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Sample records for hydrostatic mooring system

  1. Hydrostatic Mooring System. Final Technical Report: Main Report plus Appendices A, B, and C - Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jens Korsgaard

    2000-08-08

    The main conclusions from the work carried out under this contract are: An ordinary seafarer can learn by training on a simulator, to moor large tanker vessels to the Hydrostatic Mooring, safely and quickly, in all weather conditions up to storms generating waves with a significant wave height of 8 m. Complete conceptual design of the Hydrostatic Mooring buoy was carried out which proved that the buoy could be constructed entirely from commercially available standard components and materials. The design is robust, and damage resistant. The mooring tests had a 100% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being securely attached and moored to the vessel following every mooring attempt. The tests had an 80% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being adequately centered such that petroleum transfer equipment on the vessel could be attached to the corresponding equipment on the buoy. The results given in Table 3-2 of the mooring tests show a consistently improving performance from test to test by the Captain that performed the mooring operations. This is not surprising, in view of the fact that the Captain had only three days of training on the simulator prior to conducting the tests, that the maneuvering required is non-standard, and the test program itself lasted four days. One conclusion of the test performance is that the Captain was not fully trained at the initiation of the test. It may therefore be concluded that a thoroughly trained navigator would probably be able to make the mooring such that the fluid transfer equipment can be connected with reliability in excess of 90%. Considering that the typical standard buoy has enough power aboard to make eight mooring attempts, this implies that the probability that the mooring attempt should fail because of the inability to connect the fluid transfer equipment is of the order of 10{sup {minus}8}. It may therefore be concluded that the mooring operation between a Hydrostatic Mooring and a large

  2. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  3. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  4. OTEC mooring system development: recent accomplishments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.M.; Wood, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    The mooring system for a floating OTEC platform consists of a seafloor foundation, a platform foundation, and a connecting line. This paper introduces the OTEC mooring system with a brief historical overview, reviews developmental work accomplished during the past year, and then presents a new look at life cycle costs for an example mooring system. Since June 1980, a significant effort within the OTEC Program has been directed toward the further development of mooring systems. The effort has included work leading to a better understanding of anchoring capabilities and problems, refinement of an existing mooring analytical model, a review of OTEC past mooring designs, and the production of a mooring system technology development plan. A major finding of the past year was a new upward estimate of mooring system lifetime costs as a result of downward-revised estimates of wire rope service life.

  5. Selection of the mooring system for an FSO vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.M.

    1996-09-01

    Options to be selected are proposed for the mooring system deployed for a floating-storage-and-offloading (FSO) vessel. The vessel and affiliated installations form a product crude oil exporting facility. Each option is comparatively evaluated against the relevant agenda which is important from view points of facility operation and maintenance. Options for the mooring system include the turret, jacket, and buoy single-point mooring (SPM) systems as well as the spread mooring system. There is no one options which is a one-fit-all agenda for the mooring system. Other generalized conclusions are also presented.

  6. Hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the TIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Schneider, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Godoy, Javier; Farah Simon, Alejandro; Quintanilla, R.; Soto, P.; Salas, Luis; Cruz-Gonzales, Irene

    2000-08-01

    We present an active, low cost hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the Mexican Infrared Telescope which solves the suspension and motion of a 100 ton, 7.8 m telescope. Different geometries are analyzed to optimize the shoe's pressure print. These designs offer a self-adjusting action between the shoe's sliding path and the girth track. Different parameters such as pressure, temperature and proximity are measured and implemented into a control system in order to stabilize the bearing from the fluid's thermal viscosity effects. A simple method for fluid injection is discussed.

  7. Effect of mooring line arrangement on the dynamics of spread mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, M.M.; Garza-Rios, L.O.

    1995-12-31

    A design methodology is formulated to reveal the dependence of nonlinear slow motion dynamics of Spread Mooring Systems (SMS) on mooring line arrangement. For a given SMS configuration, catastrophe sets are developed in the parametric design space showing the dependence of stability boundaries and singularities of bifurcations on design variables. This approach eliminates the need for nonlinear simulations. For general SMS design, however, the designer relies on experience rather than scientific understanding of SMS nonlinear dynamics, due to the high number of design variables. Several numerical applications are used to demonstrate counter intuitive ways of improving SMS dynamics. The SMS design methodology formulated in this paper aims at providing fundamental understanding of the effects of mooring line arrangement and pretension on SMS horizontal plane dynamics. Thus, the first guidelines are developed to reduce trial and error in SMS design. The methodology is illustrated by comparing catastrophe sets for various SMS configurations with up to three mooring lines. Numerous examples for a barge and a tanker SMS which exhibit qualitatively different nonlinear dynamic behavior are provided.

  8. Impact of PIRATA Moorings in the Operational MERCATOR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F.; Benkiran, M.; Cousin, R.; Du Penhoat, Y.; Greiner, E.; Provost, C.

    2005-12-01

    We test the impact of assimilating PIRATA mooring temperature and salinity data in the new version of the operational MERCATOR model (PSY1V2 system). The ten PIRATA moorings are situated in the tropical Atlantic, between 15°N and 10°S, and data are collected in real time and provided by the CORIOLIS project. Two run experiments were performed, one assimilating altimetric data and all available in situ data (the operational system) and a second one assimilating the same data set but the PIRATA mooring data. The operational system is sensitive to assimilating PIRATA data in the tropics, on the temperature and salinity profiles as well as on the current fields. Global statistical analyses have been used to estimate the reduction of the biases between prevision model and observations. The impact of PIRATA data is positive in the equatorial band where the equatorial thermocline is better simulated (in term of position and temperature gradient). It is also positive in all layers between surface and 500 meters except in the near surface layer (0-30m) where other assimilated data are more numerous and where the impact of mooring data is probably less sensitive. Direct comparisons with ADCP current moorings are also shown. The comparison is encouraging with significant correlations, even though the time series are limited in time and space.

  9. Gravity, the hydrostatic indifference concept and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Gravity, like any acceleration, causes a hydrostatic pressure gradient in fluid-filled bodily compartments. At a force of 1G, this pressure gradient amounts to 10 kPa/m. Postural changes alter the distribution of hydrostatic pressure patterns according to the body's alignment to the acceleration field. At a certain location--referred to as hydrostatically indifferent--within any given fluid compartment, pressure remains constant during a given change of position relative to the acceleration force acting upon the body. At this specific location, there is probably little change in vessel volume, wall tension, and the balance of Starling forces after a positional manoeuvre. In terms of cardiac function, this is important because arterial and venous hydrostatic indifference locations determine postural cardiac preload and afterload changes. Baroreceptors pick up pressure signals that depend on their respective distance to hydrostatic indifference locations with any change of body position. Vascular shape, filling volume, and compliance, as well as temperature, nervous and endocrine factors, drugs, and time all influence hydrostatic indifference locations. This paper reviews the physiology of pressure gradients in the cardiovascular system that are operational in a gravitational/acceleration field, offers a broadened hydrostatic indifference concept, and discusses implications that are relevant in physiological and clinical terms.

  10. Hydrostatic levelling systems: Measuring at the system limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Edi; Geiger, Alain; Ingensand, Hilmar; Licht, Hans; Limpach, Philippe; Steiger, Andreas; Zwyssig, Roger

    2010-09-01

    Three hydrostatic displacement monitoring system applications in Switzerland are discussed; the first concerns experience gained monitoring the foundation of the Albigna dam, the second relating to the underground stability of the Swiss Light Source synchrotron and the third concerning the deformation of a bridge near the city of Lucerne. Two different principles were applied, the Hydrostatic Levelling System (HLS) using the “half-filled pipe principle” developed by the Paul Scherrer Institute and the Large Area Settlement System (LAS) using the “differential pressure principle”. With both systems ground deformations induced by tidal forces can be seen. However, high accuracy of single sensors is not sufficient. A well-designed configuration of the complete system is equally important. On the other hand there are also limits imposed by installation logistics and by the environmental conditions. An example is the bridge monitoring application, where the acceleration along the bridge due to the passage of heavy trucks limits the feasibility of using hydrostatic levelling measurements.

  11. Computing the Moore-Penrose Inverse of a Matrix with a Computer Algebra System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    In this paper "Derive" functions are provided for the computation of the Moore-Penrose inverse of a matrix, as well as for solving systems of linear equations by means of the Moore-Penrose inverse. Making it possible to compute the Moore-Penrose inverse easily with one of the most commonly used Computer Algebra Systems--and to have the blueprint…

  12. On tethered sample and mooring systems near irregular asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-10-01

    A tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is investigated in this paper. In this system the spacecraft is moored to the surface of an irregular asteroid such as 216 Kleopatra by using a rocket-propelled anchor with a cable. The rocket-propelled anchor is a kind of space penetrator, which can inject into asteroids at high speeds generated by its own rocket engine. It can be used to explore the interior structure of asteroids, and it can also be used as a sample collector. When the sampling mission is done, the sample can be pulled back to the spacecraft with the anchor. Using this method, the spacecraft can be kept in a safe region in which it cannot be trapped by the gravitational field of the asteroid. This work is concerned with the dynamics of the tethered system near irregular asteroids. First, a shape model and gravitational field model of irregular asteroids are built. Then, the configuration and the stability of the tethered system are investigated, and the quasi-periodic motion near the equilibrium point of the tethered system is analyzed. Finally, the non-uniform density distribution of the asteroids is considered. The deployment process and the oscillation of the tethered system in the uncertain asteroid gravity field are simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The feasibility of the tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is proved.

  13. Auger`s lateral mooring system: Key learnings

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Installation of the Auger TLP was completed in February 1994 with first production in April 1994. The lateral mooring system (LMS) was critical to the successful mating of the hull and deck and installation of the tendons. The LMS is currently used to position the TLP over the wells during drilling operations and to assist the tendons in holding station during storm events. This paper describes the most significant lessons learned during design, fabrication, installation and operation of the LMS. The results presented in this paper will be useful to mooring system designers, component manufacturers, installation contractors and other operators pursuing floating system options for development of deepwater fields. Specific results to be addressed include design criteria, component selection, corrosion protection systems, component manufacture, anchor performance, locked coil failures, buoy pin procedures and offshore operations. The most significant aspect of this paper will be to provide the industry with the key learnings from the Auger LMS so that deepwater mooring systems may be further improved for future applications.

  14. Hydrostatic Water Level Systems At Homestake DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetler, L. D.; Volk, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Two arrays of Fermilab-style hydrostatic water level sensors have been installed in the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, the site of the new Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Sensors were constructed at Fermilab from 8.5 cm diameter PVC pipe (housing) that was sealed on the ends and fit with a proximity sensor. The instrument have a height of 10 cm. Two ports in each sensor housing provide for connectivity, the upper port for air and the bottom port for water. Multiple instruments connected in series provide a precise water level and differences in readings between successive sensors provide for ground tilt to be resolved. Sensor resolution is 5 μm per count and has a range of approximately 1.25 cm. Data output from each sensor is relayed to a Fermilab-constructed readout card that also has temperature/relative humidity and barometric pressure sensors connected. All data are relayed out of the mine by fiber optic cable and can be recorded by Ethernet at remote locations. The current arrays have been installed on the 2000-ft level (610 m) and consist of six instruments in each array. Three sensors were placed in a N-S oriented drift and three in an E-W oriented drift. Using this orientation, it is anticipated that tilt direction may be resolved in addition to overall tilt magnitude. To date the data show passage of earth tides and frequency analysis has revealed five components to this signal, three associated with the semi-diurnal (~12.4 hr) and two with the diurnal (~24.9 hr) tides. Currently, installation methods are being analyzed between concrete pillar and rib-mounting using the existing setup on the 2000-ft level. Using these results, two additional arrays of Fermilab instruments will be installed on the 4550-ft and 4850-ft levels (1387 and 1478 m, respectively). In addition to Fermilab instruments, several high resolution Budker tiltmeters (1 μm resolution) will be installed in the mine workings in the near future, some

  15. MOORE: A prototype expert system for diagnosing spacecraft problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlin, Katherine; Weissert, Jerry; Krantz, Kerry

    1988-01-01

    MOORE is a rule-based, prototype expert system that assists in diagnosing operational Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) problems. It is intended to assist spacecraft engineers at the TDRS ground terminal in trouble shooting problems that are not readily solved with routine procedures, and without expert counsel. An additional goal of the prototype system is to develop in-house expert system and knowledge engineering skills. The prototype system diagnoses antenna pointing and earth pointing problems that may occur within the TDRS Attitude Control System (ACS). Plans include expansion to fault isolation of problems in the most critical subsystems of the TDRS spacecraft. Long term benefits are anticipated with use of an expert system during future TDRS programs with increased mission support time, reduced problem solving time, and retained expert knowledge and experience. Phase 2 of the project is intended to provide NASA the necessary expertise and capability to define requirements, evaluate proposals, and monitor the development progress of a highly competent expert system for NASA's Tracking Data Relay Satellite. Phase 2 also envisions addressing two unexplored applications for expert systems, spacecraft integration and tests (I and T) and support to launch activities. The concept, goals, domain, tools, knowledge acquisition, developmental approach, and design of the expert system. It will explain how NASA obtained the knowledge and capability to develop the system in-house without assistance from outside consultants. Future plans will also be presented.

  16. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  17. Mooring system of ocean turbulence observation based on submerged buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Da-lei; Sun, Jing-jing; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Qian-li; Wu, Bing-wei

    2013-06-01

    A comparison experiment has been taken in the Kiaochow Bay between a newly designed mooring turbulence observation instrument (MTOI) and microstructure profiler MSS60 made by Sea & Sun. The whole observing system is based on a submerged buoy, in which the turbulence observation instrument is embedded, with a streamline-shape floating body, which is made of buoyancy material of glass microsphere. For the movement of seawater and the cable shaking strongly anytime influence the behaviors of the floating body, the accelerate sensors are used for the vibration measurement in the instrument together with the shear probe sensor. Both the vibration data and the shear data are acquired by the instrument at the same time. During data processing, the vibration signals can be removed and leave the shear data which we really need. In order to prove the reliability of the new turbulence instrument MTOI, a comparison experiment was designed. The measuring conditions are the same both in time and space. By this way, the two groups of data are comparable. In this paper, the conclusion gives a good similarity of 0.93 for the two groups of shear data in dissipation rate. The processing of the data acquired by MTOI is based on the cross-spectrum analysis, and the dissipation rate of it matches the Nasmyth spectrum well.

  18. Mooring systems design based on analytical expressions of catastrophes of slow motion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, M.M.; Garza-Rios, L.O.

    1996-12-31

    Analytical expressions of the necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of mooring systems representing bifurcation boundaries, and expressions defining the morphogeneses occurring across boundaries are presented. These expressions provide means for evaluating the stability of a mooring system around an equilibrium position and constructing catastrophe sets in any parametric design space. These expressions allow the designer to select appropriate values for the mooring parameters without resorting to trial and error. A number of realistic applications are provided for barge and tanker mooring systems which exhibit qualitatively different nonlinear dynamics. The mathematical model consists of the nonlinear, third order maneuvering equations of the horizontal plane slow motion dynamics of a vessel moored to one or more terminals. Mooring lines are modeled by synthetic nylon ropes, chains, or steel cables. External excitation consists of time independent current, wind, and mean wave drift forces. The analytical expressions presented in this paper apply to nylon ropes and current excitation. Expressions for other combinations of lines and excitation can be derived.

  19. Development of optimization program for single point mooring floating production system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, H.; Kanda, M. Mikami, T.; Kamishohara, A.; Kojima, T.; Yoshizawa, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Floating Production Systems (FPS) or the Floating, Storage and Offloading Systems (FPSO) have been applied to marginal oil fields or early production systems since late `70 in view of less capital and short delivery. There are two types of floating production systems: semi-submersible based spread mooring type and tanker-based single point mooring. This paper describes the analysis method, the technical development of optimization programs and the model experiments for the Single Point Mooring (SPM) systems for FPSO, which have been carried out as a joint research project by Japan National Oil Corporation, Akishima Laboratories Inc. and MODEC Inc. The detailed analysis program is developed based on the constraint matrix method in frequency and time domains and is capable of calculating the motions and constraint forces of SPM in wind, current and random waves. Outline of calculation method is presented.

  20. Steady State Performance Analysis of Hydrostatic Transmission System using Two Motor Summation Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, K.; Kumar, N.; Kumar, R.

    2013-10-01

    Hydrostatic transmission (HST) system used in heavy earth moving machineries (HEMMs) has high power density, wide range of speed control and good overall efficiency. Hydrostatically coupled two motor summation drive is an alternative power transmission system, compared to existing closed-loop HST system with low speed high torque motor, used in HEMM. Such drive arrangement has made the possibility to design the transmission system, used in heavy vehicles, in an efficient way to cover wide range of torque-speed demand. This article studies the concept of two motor summation drive and its steady state performance. Experiments have been carried out to analyze the performance of such system. The characteristics of single and two motor drive systems are compared at different load-torque and speed levels. It is concluded that two motor hydrostatic drive systems is more effective at high load-torque and low speed compared to single motor drive system.

  1. A single mooring system with sag-extensibility and flexural rigidity applied to offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.-C.; Lee, Hsien Hua; Lee, Jun-Yen; Hsiao, S.-S.

    2013-06-01

    Floating platform system has been extensively used in ocean exploitation, particularly for a tension-leg platform (TLP) system in deep water. Most of the TLPs are multi-mooring systems, where multi-joints are connected to the tension-legs so that the platform is not allowed to twist freely and may subject to enormous force induced by large incident waves in the weak-direction of the structure. This study aims to exploit a single moored offshore platform system that may attract less force and can be operated with less effort. In our analysis, in addition to mechanical properties of the tether, two important properties are also taken into consideration for the single mooring tether with expanded cross sectional dimension and utilization of stronger material, namely, the sag-extensibility and the flexural rigidity. Finally, the dynamic structural behavior produced by the mechanical effects on the new system is investigated and compared with that of traditional design while the wave-structure interactions of large body are also accounted for. Our study finds that the neglect of sag-extensibility or the flexural rigidity of large, strong mooring cable may result in a conservative but not necessarily safe design.

  2. A comparison of the impact of 'seagrass-friendly' boat mooring systems on Posidonia australis.

    PubMed

    Demers, Marie-Claire A; Davis, Andrew R; Knott, Nathan A

    2013-02-01

    Permanent boat moorings have contributed to the decline of seagrasses worldwide, prompting the development of 'seagrass-friendly' moorings. We contrasted seagrass cover and density (predominantly Posidonia australis) in the vicinity of three mooring types and nearby reference areas lacking moorings in Jervis Bay, Australia. We examined two types of 'seagrass-friendly' mooring and a conventional 'swing' mooring. 'Swing' moorings produced significant seagrass scour, denuding patches of ~9 m radius. Seagrass-friendly 'cyclone' moorings produced extensive denuded patches (average radius of ~18 m). Seagrass-friendly 'screw' moorings, conversely, had similar seagrass cover to nearby reference areas. Our findings reinforce previous work highlighting the negative effects of 'swing' and 'cyclone' moorings. In contrast, the previously unstudied 'screw' moorings were highly effective. We conclude that regular maintenance of moorings and the monitoring of surrounding seagrass are required to ensure that 'seagrass-friendly' moorings are operating effectively. This is important, as following damage Posidonia will take many decades to recover.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Compliant-Moored System Dynamics with Applications to Marine Energy Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Tyler

    The development of a numerical model simulating the dynamic response of compliant-moored submerged systems to non-uniform fluid flow is presented. The model is meant to serve as a computational tool with applications to compliant-moored marine energy converters by time-domain representation of the mooring dynamics. The scope of the initial code is restricted to full-submerged moored tidal turbines, though the model can be readily expanded to analyze wave energy converters as well. The system is modeled in a Lagrangian frame treating tidal turbines and structural elements as rigid bodies. Mooring lines are modeled as a series of discrete elastic segments, with parameters and force contributions lumped to point-mass nodes joining each segment. Full-range of motion is achieved using the alpha-beta-gamma Euler Angle method. The governing equations of motion of the system are derived computationally through implementation of Lagrange's Equation of Motion. The techniques employed to develop the symbolic expressions for the total kinetic, potential, and damping energies of the system and the forces acting on each element of the system are discussed. The system of differential equations obtained from evaluation of Lagrange's Equation with the developed symbolic expressions is solved numerically using a built-in MATLAB ordinary differential equation solver called ODE15i.m with the user defined initial condition of the system. Several validation tests are presented and their results discussed. Finally, an explanation of future plans for development of the model and application to existing tidal energy systems are presented.

  4. Performance of an Electro-Hydrostatic Actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    1997-01-01

    An electro-hydrostatic actuator was evaluated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The primary goal of testing this actuator system was the flight demonstration of power-by-wire technology on a primary flight control surface. The electro-hydrostatic actuator uses an electric motor to drive a hydraulic pump and relies on local hydraulics for force transmission. This actuator replaced the F-18 standard left aileron actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft and was evaluated throughout the Systems Research Aircraft flight envelope. As of July 24, 1997 the electro-hydrostatic actuator had accumulated 23.5 hours of flight time. This paper presents the electro-hydrostatic actuator system configuration and component description, ground and flight test plans, ground and flight test results, and lessons learned. This actuator performs as well as the standard actuator and has more load capability than required by aileron actuator specifications of McDonnell- Douglas Aircraft, St. Louis, Missouri. The electro-hydrostatic actuator system passed all of its ground tests with the exception of one power-off test during unloaded dynamic cycling.

  5. OTEC mooring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, D.R.; Wendt, R.L.; Johnson, B.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes existing technology for mooring components which may be suitable for OTEC use. Due to the platform size, depth of water, and length of design life required for an operational OTEC plant, only large and high capacity mooring components were investigated. The report contains engineering, test, and manufacturer's data on wire rope, synthetic rope (nylon, polyester and Kevlar), anchors, deck fittings and machinery, and design concepts for tension leg platform mooring systems. A significant portion of the effort was directed to the assessment of synthetic rope technology and its application to moorings.

  6. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Fluid flow at hydrostatic pressure (P{sub h}) is relatively common through fractures in silicic and in mafic crystalline rocks where temperatures are less than about 350-370C. In contrast, pore-fluid pressure (P{sub f}) > P{sub h} has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures >370C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high P{sub f} encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of P{sub f} that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). The brittle-plastic transition for silicic rocks can occur at temperatures as high as 370-400C in tectonically active regions. In regions where high-temperature geothermal systems develop and persist, it appears that either strain rates commonly are in the range 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}13}, or that silicic rocks in the shallow crust generally behave rheologically more like wet quartz diorite than wet Westerly granite.

  7. A Hydrostatic Bearing Test System for Measuring Bearing Load Using Magnetic-Fluid Lubricants.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu; Chen, Lu-Yu

    2016-05-01

    This paper conducts a study on the design of a hydrostatic bearing test system. It involves the determination of viscous properties of magnetic-fluid lubricants. The load of a hydrostatic thrust bearing using a water-based magnetite nanofluid of varying volume flow rate is measured under an applied external induction field via the test system. Results reveal that the presence of nanoparticles in a carrier liquid would cause an enhanced bearing load. Such an effect could be further magnified by increasing the lubricant volume flow rate or the external induction field strength. PMID:27483902

  8. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  9. Dynamic analysis of turret-moored FPSO system in freak wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, You-gang; Li, Yan; Wang, Bin; Liu, Shu-xiao; Zhu, Long-huan

    2016-07-01

    Freak wave is the common wave which has significant wave height and irregular wave shape, and it is easy to damage offshore structure extremely. The FPSOs (Floating Production Storage and Offloading) suffer from the environment loads, including the freak wave. The freak waves were generated based on the improved phase modulation model, and the coupling model of FPSO-SPM (Single Point Mooring) was established by considering internal-turret FPSO and its mooring system. The dynamic response characteristics of both FPSO and SPM affected by the freak wave were analyzed in the time domain. According to the results, the freak waves generated by original phase modulation model mainly affect the 2nd-order wave loads. However, the freak waves which are generated by random frequencies phase modulation model affect both 1st-order and 2nd-order wave loads on FPSO. What is more, compared with the irregular waves, the dynamic responses of mooring system are larger in the freak waves, but its amplitude lags behind the peak of the freak wave.

  10. Transient survival analysis of a moored floating offshore platform: Wind biased

    SciTech Connect

    Falzarano, J.; Vishnubhotla, S.; Zhang, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the authors investigate the very large amplitude roll motions of the capsized MODU Ocean Ranger. They utilize the dynamical systems approach to analyze all possible motions for fixed vessel and environmental conditions. They include the effects of wind bias and an equivalent mooring system. As expected, they find the effects of wind bias to dramatically effect the system`s safe basin, a measure of the vessel`s resistance to capsizing. Somewhat surprisingly, they find the mooring system to have a limited effect on the roll due to its small size relative to the hydrostatic roll restoring moment.

  11. Oscillation Responses to an Extreme Weather Event from a Deep Moored Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Dimarco, S. F.; Stoessel, M. M.; Zhang, X.; Ingle, S.

    2011-12-01

    In June 2007 tropical Cyclone Gonu passed directly over an ocean observing system consisting of four, deep autonomous mooring stations along the 3000 m isobath in the northern Arabian Sea. Gonu was the largest cyclone known to have occurred in the Arabian Sea or to strike the Arabian Peninsula. The mooring system was designed by Lighthouse R & D Enterprises, Inc. and installed in cooperation with the Oman Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth. The instruments on the moorings continuously recorded water velocities, temperature, conductivity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and turbidity at multiple depths and at hourly intervals during the storm. Near-inertial oscillations at all moorings from thermocline to seafloor are coincident with the arrival of Gonu. Sub-inertial oscillations with periods of 2-10 days are recorded at the post-storm relaxation stage of Gonu, primarily in the thermocline. These oscillations consist of warm, saline water masses, likely originating from the Persian Gulf. Prominent 12.7-day sub-inertial waves, measured at a station ~300 km offshore, are bottom-intensified and have characteristics of baroclinic, topographically-trapped waves. Theoretical results from a topographically-trapped wave model are in a good agreement with the observed 12.7-day waves. The wavelength of the 12.7-day waves is about 590 km calculated from the dispersion relationship. Further analysis suggests that a resonant standing wave is responsible for trapping the 12.7-day wave energy inside the Sea of Oman basin. The observational results reported here are the first measurements of deepwater responses to a tropical cyclone in the Sea of Oman/Arabian Sea. Our study demonstrates the utility of sustained monitoring for studying the impact of extreme weather events on the ocean.

  12. Deep water installation -- Heavy mooring and riser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvheim, N.

    1995-12-31

    While the move into deep water has provided exciting challenges often resulting in ingenious and novel equipment it is usually the equipment or the solution itself that is remembered and discussed. Too often one overlooks just how that novel equipment was actually installed. Perhaps one of the most exciting and ingenious equipment designs of recent times is the Submerged Turret Loading (STL) system. To date the authors have had the privilege of installing each of the 3 systems so far produced. Their work is well on course for installing the fourth during the coming summer. This paper addresses the installation of two of these systems in the summer of 94 in 350m of the hostile Halten Bank waters as part of the Conoco Heidrun development. Because the Norwegian oil industry has always been at the cutting edge of technology each new development results in the usual plethora of statistics which when presented in papers Re this are accompanied with a long list of superlatives like tallest, heaviest, deepest, quickest etc. etc. Installation work at Heidrun has a similar list. Because the 2 STL systems at Heidrun (called Direct Shuttle Loading DSL) were to be installed in such deep water the sheer size of the system components are worthy of review.

  13. Diagnosis: Michael Moore--media paint filmmaker to be health care system's main problem.

    PubMed

    Kao, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The media reporting on Sicko, Michael Moore's documentary about the failures of the U.S. health care system, provides an example of how corporate media continue to twist and restrict the much-needed debate on health care reform. Aside from an occasional concession that having 46 million uninsured Americans is indeed problematic, the media's hype-filled conversation on health care avoids the issues and echoes old myths about the dangers of "government-run" and "socialized" health care. But in the face of the media demonization, universal health care is remarkably popular among the public. PMID:18341130

  14. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  15. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-05-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  16. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-09-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  18. True-slime-mould-inspired hydrostatically coupled oscillator system exhibiting versatile behaviours.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, Takuya; Idei, Ryo; Ito, Kentaro; Ishiguro, Akio

    2013-09-01

    Behavioural diversity is an indispensable attribute of living systems, which makes them intrinsically adaptive and responsive to the demands of a dynamically changing environment. In contrast, conventional engineering approaches struggle to suppress behavioural diversity in artificial systems to reach optimal performance in given environments for desired tasks. The goals of this research include understanding the essential mechanism that endows living systems with behavioural diversity and implementing the mechanism in robots to exhibit adaptive behaviours. For this purpose, we have focused on an amoeba-like unicellular organism: the plasmodium of true slime mould. Despite the absence of a central nervous system, the plasmodium exhibits versatile spatiotemporal oscillatory patterns and switches spontaneously among these patterns. By exploiting this behavioural diversity, it is able to exhibit adaptive behaviour according to the situation encountered. Inspired by this organism, we built a real physical robot using hydrostatically coupled oscillators that produce versatile oscillatory patterns and spontaneous transitions among the patterns. The experimental results show that exploiting physical hydrostatic interplay—the physical dynamics of the robot—allows simple phase oscillators to promote versatile behaviours. The results can contribute to an understanding of how a living system generates versatile and adaptive behaviours with physical interplays among body parts.

  19. Hydrostatic pressure response of an oxide-based two-dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabaleta, J.; Borisov, V. S.; Wanke, R.; Jeschke, H. O.; Parks, S. C.; Baum, B.; Teker, A.; Harada, T.; Syassen, K.; Kopp, T.; Pavlenko, N.; Valentí, R.; Mannhart, J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems with fascinating properties exist in multilayers of standard semiconductors, on helium surfaces, and in oxides. Compared to the two-dimensional (2D) electron gases of semiconductors, the 2D electron systems in oxides are typically more strongly correlated and more sensitive to the microscopic structure of the hosting lattice. This sensitivity suggests that the oxide 2D systems are highly tunable by hydrostatic pressure. Here we explore the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the well-characterized 2D electron system formed at LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interfaces [A. Ohtomo and H. Y. Hwang, Nature (London) 427, 423 (2004), 10.1038/nature02308] and measure a pronounced, unexpected response. Pressure of ˜2 GPa reversibly doubles the 2D carrier density ns at 4 K. Along with the increase of ns, the conductivity and mobility are reduced under pressure. First-principles pressure simulations reveal the same behavior of the carrier density and suggest a possible mechanism of the mobility reduction, based on the dielectric properties of both materials and their variation under external pressure.

  20. Dynamic analysis of moored tankers

    SciTech Connect

    Dercksen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A loaded 200 kDWT tanker moored, in shallow water, by means of a single bow anchor chain is subjected to wind and waves. Wind loads on the tanker were measured in a stiff mooring arrangement. The measured wind loads together with the calibrated wave train were used as input to a numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of the anchored tanker. A good correlation with the measured tanker motions and mooring loads was found. The model can be used in the design of mooring systems and anchoring equipment for arbitrary water depths. Important features which are accounted for include bottom friction, low and high frequency tanker motions and chain dynamics.

  1. A new hydrostatic leveling system developed for the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Kivioja, L. A.

    1998-09-18

    As a result of the calibration tests performed with the first prototype units using the new measurement principle, we believe that the described leveling method is stable and accurate to the micron level with a sufficiently large range for the expected elevation changes of the support girders used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Although long-term studies with this system have not been conducted, we believe that after installation this system requires little or no servicing for long periods of time. The methods described in this paper cover only the elevation changes of individual vessels. However, changes in the tilt of a girder must also be known. Therefore, a combination of tiltmeters in conjunction with this hydrostatic level system (HLS) would be most suitable for measuring the tilt and elevation changes of the APS girders.

  2. Density Measurement System for Weights of 1 kg to 20 kg Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Woo Gab; Abdurahman, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    This paper presents a density measurement system to determine density of weights from 1 kg to 20 kg using hydrostatic weighing. The system works based on Archimedes principle. The density of reference liquid is determined using this setup while determining the density of the test weight. Density sphere is used as standard density ball to determine density of the reference liquid. A new immersion pan is designed for dual purpose to carry the density sphere and the cylindrical test weight for weighing in liquid. Main parts of the setup are an electronic balance, a thermostat controlled liquid bath, reference weights designed for bottom weighing, dual purpose immersion pans and stepping motors to load and unload in weighing process. The results of density measurement will be evaluated as uncertainties for weights of 1 kg to 20 kg.

  3. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm). PMID:23742587

  4. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm).

  5. A Long-term Temperature and Depth Logger for Ocean Mooring System

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Tian, Chuan; Guo, Zhongwen; Deng, Zhiqun; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Temperature, depth and conductivity (CTD) are the most essential physical properties of sea water. CTD instrument is one of the most efficient approaches for collecting the accurate ocean information. However, traditional CTD instruments are not best suited for applications that require high resolution data by a large number of sensors because of their large size and high cost. This paper describes the design of a compact, high-accuracy, and low-cost temperature and depth (TD) logger for ocean mooring system. The noise floor of the TD logger was evaluated in lab for determining the logger measurement resolution. A specific calibration method was implemented for pressure transducer calibration to eliminate the thermal affect. The initial temperature accuracy of the TD logger is ±0.002°C and the pressure accuracy is ±0.05% of full scale. The effective resolution is 0.0001°C and 0.001% full scale for temperature and pressure measurement, respectively. A 150 days off-shore experiment was also conducted to evaluate the stability of TD logger measurement.

  6. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  7. Autonomous system for vertical profiling of the marine environment at a moored station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, A. G.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Soloviev, V. A.; Tsibulsky, A. L.; Shvoev, D. A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents new results of the research and development project on the moored profiler Aqualog aimed at multidisciplinary studies and ecological monitoring of the marine environment. The data on the profiler's operation are summarized based upon the field experiments in the northeastern Black Sea in 2011. An important scientific result obtained by using the profiler during the experiments was the discovery of the countercurrent below the Black Sea Rim Current in the layer between the 500 m and 900 m depth.

  8. Turning performance in squid and cuttlefish: unique dual-mode, muscular hydrostatic systems.

    PubMed

    Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S

    2016-05-01

    Although steady swimming has received considerable attention in prior studies, unsteady swimming movements represent a larger portion of many aquatic animals' locomotive repertoire and have not been examined extensively. Squids and cuttlefishes are cephalopods with unique muscular hydrostat-driven, dual-mode propulsive systems involving paired fins and a pulsed jet. These animals exhibit a wide range of swimming behavior, but turning performance has not been examined quantitatively. Brief squid, Lolliguncula brevis, and dwarf cuttlefish, Sepia bandensis, were filmed during turns using high-speed cameras. Kinematic features were tracked, including the length-specific radius of the turn (R/L), a measure of maneuverability, and angular velocity (ω), a measure of agility. Both L. brevis and S. bandensis demonstrated high maneuverability, with (R/L)min values of 3.4×10(-3)±5.9×10(-4) and 1.2×10(-3)±4.7×10(-4) (mean±s.e.m.), respectively, which are the lowest measures of R/L reported for any aquatic taxa. Lolliguncula brevis exhibited higher agility than S. bandensis (ωa,max=725.8 versus 485.0 deg s(-1)), and both cephalopods have intermediate agility when compared with flexible-bodied and rigid-bodied nekton of similar size, reflecting their hybrid body architecture. In L. brevis, jet flows were the principal driver of angular velocity. Asymmetric fin motions played a reduced role, and arm wrapping increased turning performance to varying degrees depending on the species. This study indicates that coordination between the jet and fins is important for turning performance, with L. brevis achieving faster turns than S. bandensis and S. bandensis achieving tighter, more controlled turns than L. brevis.

  9. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  10. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  11. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  12. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  13. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  14. Ocean Response to Tropical Storms as Observed by a Moored Ocean Observing System in the Deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oropeza, F.; Jaramillo, S.; Fan, S.

    2013-05-01

    As part of the support activities for a deepwater development in the Gulf of Mexico, a moored ocean observing system (OOS) was deployed in a water depth of approximately 2500m, 300km south of the Louisiana Coast. From June 2007 to May 2009, the system comprised seven single point Aanderaa Recording Current Meters (RCM), deployed at 450m, 700m, 1,100m, 1,500m, 2,000m, 2,400m and 2,490m below surface, and an RDI 75kHz Longranger Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), deployed between 249 and 373m below surface in upward-looking mode. Since May 2009, the OOS was upgraded to a Wavescan Buoy based moored system including meteorological sensors for: atmospheric pressure, air temperature, wind speed and direction; directional waves sensor; a Doppler Current Sensor (DCS) at 1.5 m depth for surface currents; and two downward-looking ADCP's covering the upper 1,000m of the water column. This OOS has been operating without interruptions from 2007 to the present and has registered data associated with nine tropical storms, including the direct passage of Hurricane Ike, in September of 2008, and loop current events with speeds of up to 4 knots. It has provided one of the most comprehensive set of velocity observations in the Gulf of Mexico, especially, the near surface currents, during pre-storm conditions, response, and ocean relaxation following hurricanes/tropical storms. Based on these observations the upper ocean responses to the energy input from tropical storms are characterized in terms of the associated mixing processes and momentum balances.

  15. New mooring chain designs

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, L.; Vicinay, J.; Sanz, A.; Lopez, E.

    1996-12-31

    The present work introduces the readers to the developments the high technology offshore chain industry has carried out in recent years, in an effort to offer products that meet the needs of petroleum exploration and production. In this manner the industry can continue to regard chain as a fundamental element in its moorings system, whether for projects with a 25 year life, or projects at depths of over 1,000 meters, or in such severe environments as those faced in the Sub-Arctic. Data are presented on Studless Chain and VGW or Variable Geometry and Weight chain. These will allow engineers designers to forget the needs for chains to be circumscribed to rigid guidelines of geometry or dimensions. Instead they can design mooring systems specific for the particular situations they face. No longer shall chain have to meet geometric standardization derived from the middle of the 19th century while meeting the requirements of the 2nd half of the 20th century.

  16. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  17. Ode to Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2011-01-01

    Best known for his monumental abstract sculptures of reclining figures, Henry Moore's forms are generally pierced or have a hollow space within them. Some say that these "organic undulating forms" are reminiscent of the landscape of his home in Yorkshire, England. Moore was a giant in the world of sculpture and his large cast bronzes and marble…

  18. The structure of the microbial communities in low-moor and high-moor peat bogs of Tomsk oblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Kukharenko, O. S.; Yakushev, A. V.; Semenova, T. A.; Inisheva, L. A.

    2012-03-01

    The number, structure, and physical state of the microbial communities in high-moor and low-moor peat bogs were compared. Distinct differences in these characteristics were revealed. The microbial biomass in the high-moor peat exceeded that in the low-moor peat by 2-9 times. Fungi predominated in the high-moor peat, whereas bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the low-moor peat. The micromycetal complexes of the high-moor peat were characterized by a high portion of dark-colored representatives; the complexes of the low-moor peat were dominated by fast-growing fungi. The species of the Penicillum genus were dominant in the high-moor peat; the species of Trichoderma were abundant in the low-moor peat. In the former, the bacteria were distinguished as minor components; in the latter, they predominated in the saprotrophic bacterial complex. In the high-moor peat, the microorganisms were represented by bacilli, while, in the low-moor peat, by cytophages, myxobacteria, and actinobacteria. The different physiological states of the bacteria in the studied objects reflecting the duration of the lag phase and the readiness of the metabolic system to consume different substrates were demonstrated for the first time. The relationships between the trophic characteristics of bacterial habitats and the capacity of the bacteria to consume substrates were established.

  19. Nonlinear response of floating buoys with hydro-elastic moors

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, K.; Leonard, J.W.; Yim, S.C.S.

    1996-12-31

    A time-domain model was developed to predict the response of a moored buoy subject to hydrodynamic loadings. External loadings on the buoy include hydrodynamic forces, mooring tension, wind loading and weight. A coupled analysis of the interaction of a buoy and its mooring is included and three-dimensional response is assumed. System nonlinearities include, large translational motions of the buoy and mooring line, large rotations of the mooring line and non-conservative fluid loadings. Numerical examples and experimental results are compared to contrast the validity and capability of the formulations and solution techniques.

  20. The Representation of Tropical Cyclones Within the Global William Putman Non-Hydrostatic Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5) at Cloud-Permitting Resolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-S), an earth system model developed in the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), has integrated the non-hydrostatic finite-volume dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid. The extension to a non-hydrostatic dynamical framework and the quasi-uniform cubed-sphere geometry permits the efficient exploration of global weather and climate modeling at cloud permitting resolutions of 10- to 4-km on today's high performance computing platforms. We have explored a series of incremental increases in global resolution with GEOS-S from irs standard 72-level 27-km resolution (approx.5.5 million cells covering the globe from the surface to 0.1 hPa) down to 3.5-km (approx. 3.6 billion cells).

  1. Mooring Design for the Floating Oscillating Water Column Reference Model

    SciTech Connect

    Brefort, Dorian; Bull, Diana L.

    2014-09-01

    To reduce the price of the reference Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), a study was done analyzing the effects of reducing the mooring line length, and a new mooring design was developed. It was found that the overall length of the mooring lines could be reduced by 1290 meters, allowing a significant price reduction of the system. In this paper, we will first give a description of the model and the storm environment it will be subject to. We will then give a recommendation for the new mooring system, followed by a discussion of the severe weather simulation results, and an analysis of the conservative and aggressive aspects of the design.

  2. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  3. 48 CFR 225.7007 - Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain. 225.7007 Section 225.7007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... mooring chain....

  4. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  5. Charlotte Moore Sitterly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    2010-07-01

    Charlotte Moore Sitterly was a scientist in an era when it was rare for a woman to have the opportunity to devote her life to forefront science. Following her graduation from Swarthmore College in 1920, she accepted a position at Princeton University as an assistant to Henry Norris Russell. In 1925 she started a study of the solar spectrum. She could then not know that she would devote much of her scientific career to gathering basic atomic data that are invaluable to the scientific community, even today. In 1931 she obtained a Ph.D. degree at the University of California, Berkeley, and returned to Princeton as a staff member of the Princeton University Observatory. In 1945 Moore moved to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), to supervise preparation of the widely-used tables of atomic energy levels. Following the successful launching (1946) of a V2 rocket to obtain the ultraviolet spectrum of the Sun, she started working also with Richard Tousey and his group at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Ultimately, they extended the solar spectrum down to 2200 angstroms. She continued her affiliations with both the NBS and the NRL until her death in 1990. Charlotte Moore was a rare scientist who devoted her career to obtaining accurate numbers, thus enabling the scientific community to open her tables and know that the data are reliable.

  6. Multi-layer hydrostatic equilibrium of planets and synchronous moons: theory and application to Ceres and to solar system moons

    SciTech Connect

    Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-02-20

    The hydrostatic equilibrium of multi-layer bodies lacks a satisfactory theoretical treatment despite its wide range of applicability. Here we show that by using the exact analytical potential of homogeneous ellipsoids we can obtain recursive analytical solutions and an exact numerical method for the hydrostatic equilibrium shape problem of multi-layer planets and synchronous moons. The recursive solutions rely on the series expansion of the potential in terms of the polar and equatorial shape eccentricities, while the numerical method uses the exact potential expression. These solutions can be used to infer the interior structure of planets and synchronous moons from their observed shape, rotation, and gravity. When applied to the dwarf planet Ceres, we show that it is most likely a differentiated body with an icy crust of equatorial thickness 30-90 km and a rocky core of density 2.4-3.1 g cm{sup –3}. For synchronous moons, we show that the J {sub 2}/C {sub 22} ≅ 10/3 and the (b – c)/(a – c) ≅ 1/4 ratios have significant corrections of order Ω{sup 2}/(πGρ), with important implications for how their gravitational coefficients are determined from fly-by radio science data and for how we assess their hydrostatic equilibrium state.

  7. The Convergence of Moore's/Mooers' Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael E. D.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a four-stage hypothesis of information systems development based on computational capability, storage capability, communications capability, and effective voice input. Moore's Law and Mooers' Law are explained, the interface between the system and the user is discussed, and projections for the future are suggested. (21 references)…

  8. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  9. The Hydrostatic Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alpha E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an example demonstrating the quantitative resolution of the hydrostatic paradox which is the realization that the force due to fluid pressure on the bottom of a vessel can be considerably greater or considerably less than the weight of the fluid in the vessel. (JRH)

  10. Extending the Capabilities of the Mooring Analysis Program: A Survey of Dynamic Mooring Line Theories for Integration into FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-03-01

    Techniques to model dynamic mooring lines come in various forms. The most widely used models include either a heuristic representation of the physics (such as a Lumped-Mass, LM, system), a Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) discretization of the lines (discretized in space), or a Finite-Difference (FD) model (which is discretized in both space and time). In this paper, we explore the features of the various models, weigh the advantages of each, and propose a plan for implementing one dynamic mooring line model into the open-source Mooring Analysis Program (MAP). MAP is currently used as a module for the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to model mooring systems quasi-statically, although dynamic mooring capabilities are desired. Based on the exploration in this manuscript, the lumped-mass representation is selected for implementation in MAP based on its simplicity, computational cost, and ability to provide similar physics captured by higher-order models.

  11. Preliminary investigations into mooring forces on a semisubmersible and a turret moored tanker in pack ice, current and waves

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.J.; Spencer, D.

    1996-12-01

    Physical model tests were carried out on a scale model of a semisubmersible and a monohull tanker in drifting pack ice. The tests covered a range of drift velocities, directions and ice concentrations. The models were tested in both a fully restrained and moored condition. Data from the experiments were used to develop a semi-empirical numerical model to predict maximum global loads on the mooring system. These results were compared with the maximum loads on the mooring system caused by hydrodynamic forces (waves and current) predicted from a linear numerical model for waves. Analysis results showed that the maximum mooring loads due to the pack ice on the semisubmersible were considerably higher than those caused by the hydrodynamic forces on the same vessel. Also, the maximum mooring loads due to pack ice on the tanker were close to the maximum mooring loads caused by the hydrodynamic forces. Maximum mooring loads related to pack ice forces were realized in ice concentrations of 10/10 coverage while for concentrations less than 6/10 coverage loads attributed to pack ice were negligible in comparison to the hydrodynamic forces. The paper also presents a number of recommendations, based on these findings, to improve the performance of both vessel types and to advance the general state-of-the-art for analysis procedures related to offshore vessel moored in pack ice.

  12. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of anchor and mooring chain. 252.225-7019 Section 252.225-7019 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and mooring chain. As prescribed in 225.7007-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Anchor and Mooring Chain (DEC 2009)) (a) Definition. “Component,” as used in this clause, means...

  13. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of anchor and mooring chain. 252.225-7019 Section 252.225-7019 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and mooring chain. As prescribed in 225.7007-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Anchor and Mooring Chain (DEC 2009)) (a) Definition. “Component,” as used in this clause, means...

  14. A 7-km Non-Hydrostatic Global Mesoscale Simulation with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5) for Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, W.; Suarez, M.; Gelaro, R.; daSilva, A.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Darmenov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has used the Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5) to produce a 2-year non-hydrostatic global mesoscale simulation for the period of June 2005-2007. This 7-km GEOS-5 Nature Run (7km-G5NR) product will provide synthetic observations for observing system simulation experiments (OSSE)s at NASA and NOAA through the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation and the NASA Center for Climate Simulation. While GEOS-5 is regularly applied in seasonal-to-decadal climate simulations, and medium range weather prediction and data assimilation, GEOS-5 is also readily adaptable for application as a global mesoscale model in pursuit of global cloud resolving applications. Recent computing advances have permitted experimentation with global atmospheric models at these scales, although production applications like the 7km-G5NR have remained limited. By incorporating a non-hydrostatic finite-volume dynamical core with scale aware physics parameterizations, the 7km-G5NR produces organized convective systems and robust weather systems ideal for producing observations for existing and new remote sensing instruments. In addition to standard meteorological parameters, the 7km-G5NR includes 15 aerosol tracers (including dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon), O3, CO and CO2. The 7km-G5NR is driven by prescribed sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice, daily volcanic and biomass burning emissions, as well as high-resolution inventories of anthropogenic sources. We will discuss the technical challenges of producing the 7km-G5NR including the nearly 5 petabytes of full resolution output at 30-minute intervals as required by the OSSE developers, and modifications to the standard GEOS-5 physics to permit convective organization at the 'grey-zone' resolution of 7km. Highlights of the 7km-G5NR validation will focus on the representation of clouds and organized convection including tropical cyclones

  15. Expert system support of a heat transfer model to optimize soot blowing - a case study at Delmarva`s Edge Moor Unit No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Nasal, J.R.; DesJardins, R.R.; Deaver, R.

    1996-05-01

    In response to an increasing demand for operational tools that benefit both efficiency and environmental compliance, General Physics Corporation (GP) has developed and installed a unique aid to optimize sootblowing at Delmarva Power`s Edge Moor Unit No. 5. By combining expert system techniques with a rigorous mathematical model, a robust and reliable indication of boiler section(s) cleanliness is graphically presented to the control room operators on a minute-to-minute basis. The overall approach used in the heat transfer model is based upon technology developed in the former Soviet Union while the expert system component acts as an independent {open_quotes}cross-check{close_quotes} of the values calculated in the math model. This paper presents an overview of the general engineering approach used in developing the boiler cleanliness module as an integral part of a power plant`s, performance monitoring system. It includes graphical displays of the user interface and describes the concepts behind the heat transfer model as well as typical expert system rules used to verify the accuracy of the model. The paper concludes with {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} and a comparison of empirical data versus calculated cleanliness values for the various boiler sections over a wide capacity range of the boiler.

  16. A NANO enhancement to Moore's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry; Shen, Yin-Lin; Reinhardt, Kitt; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    In the past 46 years, Intel Moore observed an exponential doubling in the number of transistors in every 18 months through the size reduction of individual transistor components since 1965. In this paper, we are exploring the nanotechnology impact upon the Law. Since we cannot break down the atomic size barrier, the fact implies a fundamental size limit at the atomic or Nanotechnology scale. This means, no more simple 18 month doubling as in Moore's Law, but other forms of transistor doubling may happen at a different slope in new directions. We are particularly interested in the Nano enhancement area. (i) 3-D: If the progress in shrinking the in-plane dimensions (2D) is to slow down, vertical integration (3D) can help increasing the areal device transistor density and keep us on the modified Moore's Law curve including the 3rd dimension. As the devices continue to shrink further into the 20 to 30 nm range, the consideration of thermal properties and transport in such nanoscale devices becomes increasingly important. (ii) Carbon Computing: Instead of traditional Transistors, the other types of transistors material are rapidly developed in Laboratories Worldwide, e.g. IBM Spintronics bandgap material and Samsung Nano-storage material, HD display Nanotechnology, which are modifying the classical Moore's Law. We shall consider the overall limitation of phonon engineering, fundamental information unit 'Qubyte' in quantum computing, Nano/Micro Electrical Mechanical System (NEMS), Carbon NanoTubes (CNTs), single layer Graphemes, single strip Nano-Ribbons, etc., and their variable degree of fabrication maturities for the computing and information processing applications.

  17. Moored offshore structures - evaluation of forces in elastic mooring lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crudu, L.; Obreja, D. C.; Marcu, O.

    2016-08-01

    In most situations, the high frequency motions of the floating structure induce important effects in the mooring lines which affect also the motions of the structure. The experience accumulated during systematic experimental tests and calculations, carried out for different moored floating structures, showed a complex influence of various parameters on the dynamic effects. Therefore, it was considered that a systematic investigation is necessary. Due to the complexity of hydrodynamics aspects of offshore structures behaviour, experimental tests are practically compulsory in order to be able to properly evaluate and then to validate their behaviour in real sea. Moreover the necessity to carry out hydrodynamic tests is often required by customers, classification societies and other regulatory bodies. Consequently, the correct simulation of physical properties of the complex scaled models becomes a very important issue. The paper is investigating such kind of problems identifying the possible simplification, generating different approaches. One of the bases of the evaluation has been found consideringtheresults of systematic experimental tests on the dynamic behaviour of a mooring chain reproduced at five different scales. Dynamic effects as well as the influences of the elasticity simulation for 5 different scales are evaluated together. The paper presents systematic diagrams and practical results for a typical moored floating structure operating as pipe layer based on motion evaluations and accelerations in waves.

  18. A diagnostic interface for the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy v2.50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Bastian; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Numerical climate and weather models have advanced to finer scales, accompanied by large amounts of output data. The model systems hit the input and output (I/O) bottleneck of modern high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We aim to apply diagnostic methods online during the model simulation instead of applying them as a post-processing step to written output data, to reduce the amount of I/O. To include diagnostic tools into the model system, we implemented a standardised, easy-to-use interface based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) into the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework. The integration of the diagnostic interface into the model system is briefly described. Furthermore, we present a prototype implementation of an advanced online diagnostic tool for the aggregation of model data onto a user-defined regular coarse grid. This diagnostic tool will be used to reduce the amount of model output in future simulations. Performance tests of the interface and of two different diagnostic tools show, that the interface itself introduces no overhead in form of additional runtime to the model system. The diagnostic tools, however, have significant impact on the model system's runtime. This overhead strongly depends on the characteristics and implementation of the diagnostic tool. A diagnostic tool with high inter-process communication introduces large overhead, whereas the additional runtime of a diagnostic tool without inter-process communication is low. We briefly describe our efforts to reduce the additional runtime from the diagnostic tools, and present a brief analysis of memory consumption. Future work will focus on optimisation of the memory footprint and the I/O operations of the diagnostic interface.

  19. Unmanned Aerial Systems, Moored Balloons, and the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Facilities in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Mark; Verlinde, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its scientific user facility, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, provides scientific infrastructure and data to the international Arctic research community via its research sites located on the North Slope of Alaska. Facilities and infrastructure to support operations of unmanned aerial systems for science missions in the Arctic and North Slope of Alaska were established at Oliktok Point Alaska in 2013. Tethered instrumented balloons will be used in the near future to make measurements of clouds in the boundary layer including mixed-phase clouds. The DOE ARM Program has operated an atmospheric measurement facility in Barrow, Alaska, since 1998. Major upgrades to this facility, including scanning radars, were added in 2010. Arctic Observing Networks are essential to meet growing policy, social, commercial, and scientific needs. Calibrated, high-quality arctic geophysical datasets that span ten years or longer are especially important for climate studies, climate model initializations and validations, and for related climate policy activities. For example, atmospheric data and derived atmospheric forcing estimates are critical for sea-ice simulations. International requirements for well-coordinated, long-term, and sustained Arctic Observing Networks and easily-accessible data sets collected by those networks have been recognized by many high-level workshops and reports (Arctic Council Meetings and workshops, National Research Council reports, NSF workshops and others). The recent Sustaining Arctic Observation Network (SAON) initiative sponsored a series of workshops to "develop a set of recommendations on how to achieve long-term Arctic-wide observing activities that provide free, open, and timely access to high-quality data that will realize pan-Arctic and global value-added services and provide societal benefits." This poster will present information on opportunities for members of the

  20. Reconsidering Moore's Transactional Distance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giossos, Yiannis; Koutsouba, Maria; Lionarakis, Antonis; Skavantzos, Kosmas

    2009-01-01

    One of the core theories of distance education is Michael Graham Moore's "Theory of Transactional Distance" that provides the broad framework of the pedagogy of distance education and allows the generation of almost infinite number of hypotheses for research. However, the review of the existing studies relating to the theory showed the use of a…

  1. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mooring lines. 401.10 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a) Mooring lines shall: (1) Be of a uniform thickness throughout their length; (2) Have a diameter not greater...

  2. Synchronous changes in the seismicity rate and ocean-bottom hydrostatic pressures along the Nankai trough: A possible slow slip event detected by the Dense Oceanfloor Network system for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Nakano, Masaru; Takahashi, Narumi; Hori, Takane; Kamiya, Shinichiro; Araki, Eiichiro; Nakata, Ryoko; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    We detected long-term hydrostatic pressure changes at ocean-bottom stations of the Dense Oceanfloor Network system for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET) along the Nankai trough, off southwestern Japan. We detected these changes after removing the contributions of ocean mass variations and sensor drift from the records. In addition, we detected a decrease in the background seismicity rate of a nearby earthquake cluster that was synchronous with the hydrostatic pressure changes. We interpreted these observed hydrostatic pressure changes to reflect vertical deformation of the ocean floor of 3-8 cm, and we consider the cause of the seafloor crustal deformation to be a slow slip event (SSE) beneath the stations. Because the pressure changes were observed at stations with distances less than 20 km to each other, we inferred that the SSE occurred in the shallow part of the sedimentary wedge, such as on a splay fault system. The synchronous observation of an SSE and a seismicity rate change suggests that both were triggered by a change in the regional stress that may be associated with stress accumulation and release processes occurring along the Nankai trough. These data show that continuous and careful monitoring of crustal activities by DONET stations provides an effective way to detect seismic and geodetic signals related to the occurrence of megathrust or other types of large earthquakes.

  3. Development of moored oceanographic spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Charles R.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Holm-Hansen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Biospherical Instruments has successfully completed a NASA sponsored SBIR (Small Business Innovational Research Program) project to develop spectroradiometers capable of being deployed in the ocean for long periods of time. The completion of this project adds a valuable tool for the calibration of future spaceborne ocean color sensors and enables oceanographers to extend remote sensing optical techniques beyond the intermittent coverage of spaceborne sensors. Highlights of the project include two moorings totalling 8 months generating extensive sets of optical, biological, and physical data sets in the ocean off La Jolla, California, and a 70 day operational deployment of the resulting commercial product by the ONR and NASA sponsored BIOWATT program. Based on experience gained in these moorings, Biospherical Instruments has developed a new line of spectroradiometers designed to support the oceanographic remote sensing missions of NASA, the Navy, and various oceanographers.

  4. Barracuda field: New records for turret moored FPSO`s

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, P.R.B.

    1995-12-01

    An early production system will introduce several innovations and set records when it comes on stream at Barracuda, the third largest of the giant oilfields offshore Brazil. The floating production unit will be a 52,000 dwt FPSO, turret type mooring and a process plant with capacity to process 30,000 bopd. It will remain on location for a minimum of five years. The tanker modifications and overhaul are underway. The FPSO will be prepared to process the oil and offload it to a tandem moored shuttle tanker. The produced gas will be both reinjected and exported to shore through a dedicated riser pipeline. This unit will comprise the world`s largest turret with capacity for 34 risers and the world`s deepest FPSO, moored in 840 meters water depth.

  5. Cabled-observatory Regional Circulation Moorings on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    In September of 2010, one of four moorings was deployed on the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada cabled-observatory network. The installation included the laying of a 7km cable from the node to the mooring site in the axial valley about 3km north of the Main Endeavour Vent Field over extraordinary bathymetry. This September, three more cables and secondary junction boxes will be deployed to support the three additional moorings that complete the regional circulation array. The cable-laying is facilitated by the Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility's ROV ROPOS and a remotely operated cable-laying system, whereas the actual deployment of the moorings is a two ship operation. The CCGS John P. Tully lowers the mooring anchor first, while the RV Thomas G. Thompson supports the ROV operations which navigate the mooring to underwater mateable cable end. Precise navigation is needed because there are few areas suitable for placement of the junction boxes. Scientifically, the moorings are designed and located to best constrain the hydrothermally driven circulation within the rift valley, the regional circulation can then be used as a proxy measurement for hydrothermal fluxes. Each mooring carries a current meter/ ctd pair at 4, 50, 125, and 200m, with an upward looking ADCP at 250m. The northern moorings are located between the Hi-Rise and Salty Dawg fields about 700m apart in the ~1km wide rift valley and the southern moorings are located south of the Mothra vent field. Here we present initial results from the four mooring array.

  6. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certified and a test certificate for each mooring line containing information on breaking strength, material....10 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a)...

  7. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certified and a test certificate for each mooring line containing information on breaking strength, material....10 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a)...

  8. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for the size of the vessel and local conditions. (b) While the vessel is moored or anchored in a port area... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL...

  9. Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev I.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

  10. Optimization and automation of the semi-submersible platforms mooring design

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, J.A. Jr.; Morooka, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    There are a few calculation programs around the world used for determining the main aspects of the Mooring Design of Semi-Submersible Platforms . These programs bold a worldwide acknowledgement and their results are actually reliable. But they require many runs to get a solution that comply with the Classification Society requirements. This paper presents some procedures in order to optimize the semi-submersible mooring design as well as to make it automatic. Regarding the optimization philosophies, the following aspects are treated: (1) the optimization of the platform heading and the mooring pattern based on the spreading of the environmental forces; (2) the searching for the optimum mooring line composition in an automatic mode. Basically, the paper`s main goal is to introduce some methods to find the lowest cost solution for the mooring system in a short time. All of these methods were computationally implemented creating the intelligent system named PROANC, which deals with the semi-submersible mooring design in a quasi-static and deterministic approach. It should be noted that the proposed system exerts a strong appeal as a design tool for feasibility studies of a given oil field and its quasi-static results can be directly applied to a mooring program capable of performing dynamic analysis. Finally some simulations are executed for different water depths and its final results, including the expended time to run, are presented in order to prove the PROANC system wide potential as a design tool.

  11. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  12. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  13. ANSYS Modeling of Hydrostatic Stress Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic pressure has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Plasticity textbooks, from the earliest to the most modem, infer that there is no hydrostatic effect on the yielding of metals, and even modem finite element programs direct the user to assume the same. The object of this study is to use the von Mises and Drucker-Prager failure theory constitutive models in the finite element program ANSYS to see how well they model conditions of varying hydrostatic pressure. Data is presented for notched round bar (NRB) and "L" shaped tensile specimens. Similar results from finite element models in ABAQUS are shown for comparison. It is shown that when dealing with geometries having a high hydrostatic stress influence, constitutive models that have a functional dependence on hydrostatic stress are more accurate in predicting material behavior than those that are independent of hydrostatic stress.

  14. MITESS: a moored in situ trace element serial sampler for deep-sea moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jory; Betts, Joe; Boyle, Edward

    2002-11-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested a trace element clean sampling device for long term deployment (6 months or longer) on deep-sea moorings. The device collects unfiltered 500 ml samples by opening and closing a bottle originally filled with dilute acid (passively replaced by denser seawater). Each sample is collected by an independent module, so failure of a single unit does not affect others. Seven years of deployments have refined the sampler into a rugged and reliable device. The device also can be hung below a wire to collect water column samples. Automated trace element sampler (ATE), a spinoff from moored in situ trace element serial sampler, is a single-module device for allowing trace metal clean near-surface samples to be collected by personnel not trained in trace element sampling. ATE/VANE, another variation, allows the same personnel to collect upper water column profiles on conventional hydrowire. The systems have been tested by comparing samples collected for lead and iron with those collected by previously proven sampling techniques.

  15. The ARGOS contribution to the successful dredging of a deep moored current meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, J.; Ollivier, B.

    Current meters moored at 1200 m from a seabed 4600 m deep in the Indian Ocean were recovered using the ARGOS system after failure of the explosive anchor-release bolts prevented recovery using acoustic methods. The position of each mooring was known to within 0.25 nautical miles, so the ARGOS system was used to position the recovery ships to within 100 m of the targets.

  16. Analysis of single point moored tanker using maneuvering hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, K.; Brinati, H.L.; Fucatu, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Single Point Mooring Systems (SPM) are widely used as a tanker terminal in Brazilian south coast by Petrobras, Brazilian oil company. Although different authors (Wichers, 1987, Obokata, 1987, and Jiang et al., 1988) had analyzed the dynamic stability of SPM system, the down time of these systems due to large oscillatory ship motion in the horizontal plane is significant until now. The main source of the instability of these systems is considered to be the use of inadequate hawser length and bad weather. This paper deals with the dynamic behavior of SPM moored vessels considering the influence of the environmental forces as well as shallow water effects. In a first step, a nonlinear mathematical model developed for the simulation of low speed ship maneuvers (Takashina, 1986) is extended to study the behavior of a tanker moored to a single buoy in comparison with the Obokata`s SPM model, 1987. A large number of tanker motion simulations were carried out both for deep and shallow water and different environmental conditions. The influence of the system parameters shown by the study is, in general, in a good agreement with those obtained by the traditional SPM system analysis.

  17. Beyond moore computing research challenge workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Mark C.; Aidun, John Bahram

    2013-10-01

    We summarize the presentations and break out session discussions from the in-house workshop that was held on 11 July 2013 to acquaint a wider group of Sandians with the Beyond Moore Computing research challenge.

  18. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  19. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  20. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  1. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  2. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  3. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... on the metal identification plate without leaking; and (6) If fitted with an internal heating coil, the heating coil passing a hydrostatic test at a pressure of 200 psig or more or 50 percent or more above the rated pressure of the coil, whichever is greater. (b) If the tank passes the hydrostatic...

  4. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... on the metal identification plate without leaking; and (6) If fitted with an internal heating coil, the heating coil passing a hydrostatic test at a pressure of 200 psig or more or 50 percent or more above the rated pressure of the coil, whichever is greater. (b) If the tank passes the hydrostatic...

  5. Moore's Law, disruptive technologies, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Newbower, Ronald S

    2002-01-01

    The advancement of technical power described by Moore's Law offers great potential for enabling more cost-effective medical devices and systems. However, progress has been slow. Many factors for this failure have been cited, including the anti-rational economic structure of healthcare and the complexity and long time scale of medical development. Christensen et al. suggest that "disruptive technologies" may circumvent some of these difficulties. "Disruptive Technologies" are defined as those that are established in one market, but then penetrate and overwhelm another market. These incursions are accelerated by economic factors, and capitalize on functionality, reliability, and advancements supported by the original market. Christensen has cited many examples from industrial and service businesses, but few examples can be found yet in healthcare. We argue that positive technology impacts in medicine occur most readily when innovators augment the skills of and collaborate with caregivers, rather than seeking to displace them. In the short term, a new approach may improve efficiency or quality. In the longer term, such approaches may obviate human tasks at lower-skill levels, and even permit task automation. One successful example has been the introduction of flexible monitoring for physiologic information. Systems for computer-aided diagnosis, which have failed to impact complex decision making, have succeeded in simpler specialty areas such as the interpretation of EKG's and mammograms, and may do the same with analysis of some pathology images. The next frontier may the operating room, and the adoption of such systemic technologies by caregivers in emergency medicine and general care may then have an even wider "disruptive" effect. Responding to time and cost pressures, and the desire to move care to the patient, other workers, such as radiologists, will drive the trend away from isolated, complex, large-scale devices, and toward integrated, modular, and simpler

  6. Josephson-coupled Moore-Read states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Gunnar; Hormozi, Layla; Slingerland, Joost; Simon, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    We study a quantum Hall bilayer system of bosons at total filling factor ν =1 , and study the phase that results from short-ranged pair tunneling combined with short-ranged interlayer interactions. We introduce two exactly solvable model Hamiltonians which both yield the coupled Moore-Read state [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 256809 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.256809] as a ground state, when projected onto fixed particle numbers in each layer. One of these Hamiltonians describes a gapped topological phase, while the other is gapless. However, on introduction of a pair-tunneling term, the second system becomes gapped and develops the same topological order as the gapped Hamiltonian. Supported by the exact solution of the full zero-energy quasihole spectrum and a conformal field-theory approach, we develop an intuitive picture of this system as two coupled composite fermion superconductors. In this language, pair tunneling provides a Josephson coupling of the superconducting phases of the two layers, and gaps out the Goldstone mode associated with particle transport between the layers. In particular, this implies that quasiparticles are confined between the layers. In the bulk, the resulting phase has the topological order of the Halperin 220 phase with U(1)2× U (1)2 topological order, but it is realized in the symmetric/antisymmetric basis of the layer index. Consequently, the edge spectrum at a fixed particle number reveals an unexpected U(1)4× U (1) structure.

  7. Technical note: GODESS - a profiling mooring in the Gotland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prien, Ralf D.; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2016-07-01

    This note describes a profiling mooring with an interdisciplinary suite of sensors taking profiles between 180 and 30 m depth. It consists of an underwater winch, moored below 180 m depth, and a profiling instrumentation platform. In its described setup it can take about 200 profiles at pre-programmed times or intervals with one set of batteries. This allows for studies over an extended period of time (e.g. two daily profiles over a time of 3 months). The Gotland Deep Environmental Sampling Station (GODESS) in the Eastern Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea is aimed at investigations of redoxcline dynamics. The described system can be readily adapted to other research foci by changing the profiling instrumentation platform and its payload.

  8. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  9. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  10. Josephson-coupled Moore-Read states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormozi, Layla; Moller, Gunnar; Slingerland, Joost; Simon, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We study a quantum Hall bilayer system of bosons at total filling fraction ν = 1, and analyze the the coupled Moore-Read state [PRL 108, 256809 (2012)] that results from the interplay between short-ranged interactions and interlayer pair-tunneling terms. Supported by the exact solution of the full zero-energy quasihole spectrum and a conformal field theory analysis, we develop an intuitive picture of this system as two coupled composite fermion superconductors. In this language, pair tunneling plays the role of Josephson coupling between the superconducting phases of the two layers, which gaps out the Goldstone mode associated with interlayer particle distribution. This coupling further implies that non-Abelian quasiparticles are confined between the layers. In the bulk, the resulting phase has the topological order of the Halperin 220 state i.e. U(1)2 x U(1)2 but the edge spectrum at a fixed particle number reveals an unexpected U(1)4 x U(1) structure. We attribute this behavior to the fact that this state is realized in a rotated basis of layer index, where the charged and neutral sectors are separated. With the charge quantum number being conserved but without any such restriction on the neutral sector we show that the edge spectrum must take the observed form.

  11. Control of hydrostatic transmission wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop

    In this study, we proposed a control strategy for a wind turbine that employed a hydrostatic transmission system for transmitting power from the wind turbine rotor via a hydraulic transmission line to a ground level generator. Wind turbine power curve tracking was achieved by controlling the hydraulic pump displacement and, at the other end of the hydraulic line, the hydraulic motor displacement was controlled so that the overall transmission loss was minimized. Steady state response, dynamic response, and system stability were assessed. The maximum transmission efficiency obtained ranged from 79% to 84% at steady state when the proposed control strategy was implemented. The leakage and friction losses of the hydraulic components were the main factors that compromised the efficiency. The simulation results showed that the system was stable and had fast and well-damped transient response. Double wind turbine system sharing hydraulic pipes, a hydraulic motor, and a generator were also studied. The hydraulic pipe diameter used in the double-turbine system increased by 27% compared to the single-turbine system in order to make the transmission coefficient comparable between both systems. The simulation results suggested that the leakage losses were so significant that the efficiency of the system was worsened compared with the single-turbine system. Future studies of other behavioral aspects and practical issues such as fluid dynamics, structure strength, materials, and costs are needed.

  12. Study on global performances and mooring-induced damping of a semi-submersible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning; Zhao, Wen-hua; Kou, Yu-feng

    2016-10-01

    The harsh environmental conditions bring strong nonlinearities to the hydrodynamic performances of the offshore floating platforms, which challenge the reliable prediction of the platform coupled with the mooring system. The present study investigates a typical semi-submersible under both the operational and the survival conditions through numerical and experimental methods. The motion responses, the mooring line tensions, and the wave loads on the longitudinal mid-section are investigated by both the fully non-linearly coupled numerical simulation and the physical experiment. Particularly, in the physical model test, the wave loads distributed on the semi-submersible's mid-section were measured by dividing the model into two parts, namely the port and the starboard parts, which were rigidly connected by three six-component force transducers. It is concluded that both the numerical and physical model can have good prediction of the semi-submersible's global responses. In addition, an improved numerical approach is proposed for the estimation of the mooring-induced damping, and is validated by both the experimental and the published results. The characteristics of the mooring-induced damping are further summarized in various sea states, including the operational and the survival environments. In order to obtain the better prediction of the system response in deep water, the mooring-induced damping of the truncated mooring lines applied in the physical experiment are compensated by comparing with those in full length. Furthermore, the upstream taut and the downstream slack mooring lines are classified and investigated to obtain the different mooring line damping performances in the comparative study.

  13. The Cole-Moore Effect: Still Unexplained?

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Toshinori; Armstrong, Clay M

    2015-10-01

    In the first issue, on the first page of the Biophysical Journal in 1960, Cole and Moore provided the first confirmation of the Hodgkin and Huxley formulation of the sodium and potassium conductances that underlie the action potential. In addition, working with the squid giant axon, Cole and Moore noted that strong hyperpolarization preceding a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse delayed the rise of the potassium conductance: once started, the time course of the rise was always the same but after significant hyperpolarization there was a long lag before the rise began. This phenomenon has come to be known as the Cole-Moore effect. Their article examines and disproves the hypothesis that the lag reflects the time required to refill the membrane with potassium ions after the ions are swept out of the membrane into the axoplasm by hyperpolarization. The work by Cole and Moore indirectly supports the idea of a membrane channel for potassium conductance. However, the mechanism of the Cole-Moore effect remains a mystery even now, buried in the structure of the potassium channel, which was completely unknown at the time.

  14. The Cole-Moore Effect: Still Unexplained?

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Toshinori; Armstrong, Clay M.

    2015-01-01

    In the first issue, on the first page of the Biophysical Journal in 1960, Cole and Moore provided the first confirmation of the Hodgkin and Huxley formulation of the sodium and potassium conductances that underlie the action potential. In addition, working with the squid giant axon, Cole and Moore noted that strong hyperpolarization preceding a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse delayed the rise of the potassium conductance: once started, the time course of the rise was always the same but after significant hyperpolarization there was a long lag before the rise began. This phenomenon has come to be known as the Cole-Moore effect. Their article examines and disproves the hypothesis that the lag reflects the time required to refill the membrane with potassium ions after the ions are swept out of the membrane into the axoplasm by hyperpolarization. The work by Cole and Moore indirectly supports the idea of a membrane channel for potassium conductance. However, the mechanism of the Cole-Moore effect remains a mystery even now, buried in the structure of the potassium channel, which was completely unknown at the time. PMID:26445430

  15. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  16. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  17. Hydrostatic pressure effects on vestibular hair cell afferents in fish and crustacea.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Peter J; Cruickshank, Stuart F; Shelmerdine, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    Following the discovery of a hydrostatic pressure sensor with no associated gas phase in the crab, and the knowledge that several systems of cells in culture show long term alterations to small changes in hydrostatic pressure, we show here that vestibular type II hair cells in a well known model system (the isolated elasmobranch labyrinth), are sensitive to hydrostatic pressure. This new finding for the vertebrate vestibular system may provide an explanation for low levels of resting activity in vertebrate hair cells and explain how fish without swim bladders sense hydrostatic cues. It could have implications for humans using their balancing systems in hypobaric or hyperbaric environments such as in aircraft or during space exploration. Although lacking the piston mechanism thought to operate in crab thread hairs which sense angular acceleration and hydrostatic pressure, the vertebrate system may use larger numbers of sensory cells with resultant improvement in signal to noise ratio. The main properties of the crab hydrostatic pressure sensing system are briefly reviewed and new experimental work on the isolated elasmobranch labyrinth is presented.

  18. Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Metal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1940s, the theory of plasticity has assumed that hydrostatic stress does not affect the yield or postyield behavior of metals. This assumption is based on the early work of Bridgman. Bridgman found that hydrostatic pressure (compressive stress) does not affect yield behavior until a substantial amount of pressure (greater than 100 ksi) is present. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hydrostatic tension on yield behavior. Two different specimen geometries were examined: an equal-arm bend specimen and a double edge notch specimen. The presence of a notch is sufficient to develop high enough hydrostatic tensile stresses to affect yield. The von Mises yield function, which does not have a hydrostatic component, and the Drucker-Prager yield function, which includes a hydrostatic component, were used in finite element analyses of the two specimen geometries. The analyses were compared to test data from IN 100 specimens. For both geometries, the analyses using the Drucker-Prager yield function more closely simulated the test data. The von Mises yield function lead to 5-10% overprediction of the force-displacement or force-strain response of the test specimens.

  19. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter ... Zerhouni, Rep. Ralph Regula (R-OH), Mary Tyler Moore, former Rep. Paul Rogers, and NLM Director Dr. ...

  20. Evolutionary Excesses: A Response to Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    The physicist Edward Teller once gave an interview to a woman from a popular science magazine. He began the interview by saying, "You have heard many bad things about the Hydrogen Bomb. Now I am going to tell you some nice things about it." In reflecting upon a response to Dr. Randy Moore, the author thought of Teller, seeing his role here in…

  1. In the Style of Henry Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by Henry Moore's sculptures. This project consists of two activities. In the first activity, students select, sand and stain a wood block that would become a base for their plaster sculpture. This activity would keep the students independently engaged (classroom management) while the…

  2. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  3. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  4. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  5. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  6. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  7. Non-hydrostatic equilibrium of the Sun and alternative physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferronsky, V.

    2009-04-01

    The proved fact that the Earth and the Moon don't stay in hydrostatic equilibrium and many other evidences bring us to conclusion that dynamics and physics of all other Solar System bodies including the Sun itself ought to be studied on non-hydrostatic basis. The only reasonable and logical alternative to that is the dynamical approach. We accepted this option and found it as a promising direction. It was found that in order to change hydrostatics by dynamical physics the outer force field of the body must be replaced by its inner volumetric force pressure. This is because the gravitational and electromagnetic forces, being inner mass forces, are volumetric in their nature. The analytical approach of that is shown in our abstract presented to GD10 of GA2009. A novel equation of state for the Sun and other stars following from the dynamical approach was obtained. The common nature of gravitational and electromagnetic energy, generated by interacted (collide and scattered) elementary particles, follows from the dynamics. New ideas related to mechanism of the Solar System creation are aroused from the approach. See more information in our works: Ferronsky V.I. and S.V. Ferronsky (2007). Dynamics of the Earth, Scientific World, Moscow; Ferronsky V.I. (2008). Non-averaged virial theorem for natural systems: http://zhurnal.ape.relarn.ru/articles/2008/066e.pdf; Ferronsky V.I., S.A. Denisik and S.V. Ferronsky (1987). Jacobi Dynamics, Riedel, Dordrecht.

  8. An investigation on low frequency fatigue damage of mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junfeng; Wang, Shuqing; Chang, Anteng; Li, Huajun

    2016-06-01

    Assessing the fatigue life of mooring systems is important for deep water structures. In this paper, a comprehensive fatigue analysis is conducted on the mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform with special focus on the low frequency (LF) fatigue damage. Several influential factors, including water depth, wave spectral parameters, and riser system, are considered. Numerical simulation of a semi-submersible platform with the mooring/riser system is executed under different conditions, and the fatigue damage of mooring lines is assessed by using the time domain analysis method as a benchmark. The effects of these factors on the mooring line tension and the fatigue damage are investigated and discussed in detail. Research results indicate that the LF fatigue damage only accounts for a very small portion of the total damage, although the LF components dominate the global motion response and the mooring line tension of the semi-submersible platform. However, it is demonstrated that the LF fatigue damage is clearly affected by the influential factors. The increase in water depth and spectral peak periods, and the existence of risers can weaken the contribution of the LF components to the mooring line fatigue damage, while the fatigue damage due to the LF components increases with the increase of significant wave height.

  9. Investigation on the dynamic responses of a truss spar platform for different mooring line groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Montasir Osman; Yenduri, Anurag; Kurian, V. J.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic responses of any floating platform are dependent on the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics of the body as well as mooring system. Therefore, it is very essential to study the effect of individual contributions to the system that can finally help to economise their cost. This paper focuses on the effect of mooring stiffness on the responses of a truss spar platform, obtained by different grouping of lines. The study is part of our present researches on mooring systems which include the effect of line pretension, diameter and azimuth angles. The platform is modelled as a rigid body with three degrees-of-freedom and its motions are analyzed in time-domain using the implicit Newmark Beta technique. The mooring lines restoring force-excursion relationship is evaluated using a quasi-static approach. It is observed that the mooring system with lines arranged in less number of groups exhibits better performance in terms of the restoring forces as well as mean position of platform. However, the dynamic motions of platform remain unaffected for different line groups.

  10. Hydraulic efficiency of a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement pump and motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, Daniel

    Pumps and motors are commonly connected hydraulically to create hydrostatic drives, also known as hydrostatic transmissions. A typical hydrostatic transmission consists of a variable displacement pump and a fixed displacement motor. Maximum efficiency is typically created for the system when the motor operates at maximum volumetric displacement. The objective of this research is to determine if a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement motor can be more efficient than one with a fixed displacement motor. A work cycle for a Caterpillar 320D excavator was created and the efficiency of the hydrostatic drive system, controlling the swing circuit, with a fixed displacement motor was compared to the efficiency with a variable displacement motor. Both multiplicative and additive uncertainty analysis were performed to determine uncertainty models that could be used to analyze the robustness of the system with feedback control applied. A PID and an H∞ controller were designed for a position control model, as well as velocity control. It was found that while it may seem obvious to achieve maximum efficiency at maximum displacement, there are some cases where maximum efficiency is achieved at a lower displacement. It was also found that for the given work cycle, a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement motor can be more efficient.

  11. Patrick Moore's millennium yearbook : the view from AD 1001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick, Chapman, Allan

    In a year that will probably be remembered almost as much for books about the millennium as for the turn of 2000 A.D itself, Patrick Moore's Millennium Yearbook celebrates.....well, the wrong millennium! This thoroughly entertaining book - which is for everyone, not just astronomers - contains articles on King Alfred's chronological work, reviews of the new Star Catalogue by the Arab Al-Sufi and the latest edition of Ptolemy's Almagast. And foreshadowing the change to metric units by 1000 years, the book uses arabic numbers instead of Roman - but there is a conversion table if you have trouble with the idea of "zero" and prefer the older system.

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion moored pipe/mobile platform design study

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, H.O.; McNatt, T.R.; Ross, J.M.; Stambaugh, K.A.; Watts, J.L.

    1982-07-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Moored Pipe/Mobile Platform (MP-Squared) Design Study was carried out to investigate an innovative approach to the moored floating OTEC plant. In the past, a number of concepts have been examined by NOAA for floating OTEC plants. These concepts have considered various configurations for platforms, cold water pipes and mooring systems. In most cases the cold water pipe (CWP) was permanently attached to the platform and the platform was permanently moored on station. Even though CWP concepts incorporating articulated joints or flexible pipes were used, the CWP stresses induced by platform motion were frequently excessive and beyond the design limits of the CWP. This was especially true in the survival (100-year storm) case. It may be feasible that the concept of a permanently moored CWP attached through a flexible transition CWP to the platform could reduce the degree of technical risk by de-coupling the CWP from the motions of the platform. In addition, if the platform is capable of disconnecting from the CWP during survival conditions, even less technical risk may be inherent in the OTEC system. The MP-Squared Design Study was an engineering evaluation of the concepts described above. The effort has been carried through to the conceptual design level, and culminated in model tests in an experimental wave basin.

  13. Moore v. Regents of the University of California.

    PubMed

    1988-07-21

    In 1976, John Moore had his spleen removed in the course of treatment for hairy cell leukemia at the UCLA Medical Center. Subsequently, a cell line was developed from Moore's tissues that offered enormous therapeutic value. Doctors applied for patents on the cell line and entered into contracts for its commercial exploitation. Moore claimed the modified tissue to be his own property and sued to recover deserved profits. The trial court dismissed Moore's case because it failed to set forth a proper claim at law. The appellate court reversed, interpreting the claim to be adequate for recovery. The court held that the removed tissue was Moore's property; that consent forms signed by Moore only applied to the removal of tissue and did not imply his consent to its commercial exploitation; and that Moore need not allege either the defendent's knowledge of the cells' value, or of the defendant's intent to exploit the cells, in order to assert his claim.

  14. Molecular computing revisited: a Moore's Law?

    PubMed

    Livstone, Michael S; van Noort, Danny; Landweber, Laura F

    2003-03-01

    Moore's Law states that the processing power of microchips doubles every one to two years. This observation might apply to the nascent field of molecular computing, in which biomolecules carry out logical operations. Incorporation of new technologies that improve sensitivity and throughput has increased the complexity of problems that can be addressed. It is an ultimate goal for molecular computers to use the full potential of massive parallelism.

  15. Frontiers of More than Moore in Bioelectronics and the Required Metrology Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; Kotanen, Christian; Wilson, A. Nolan

    2011-11-01

    Silicon's intersection with biology is a premise inherent in Moore's prediction. Distinct from biologically inspired molecular logic and storage devices (more Moore) are the integration of solid state electronic devices with the soft condensed state of the body (more than Moore). Developments in biomolecular recognition events per sq. cm parallel those of Moore's Law. However, challenges continue in the area of "More than Moore". Two grand challenge problems must be addressed—the biocompatibility of synthetic materials with the myriad of tissue types within the human body and the interfacing of solid state micro- and nano-electronic devices with the electronics of biological systems. Electroconductive hydrogels have been developed as soft, condensed, biomimetic but otherwise inherently electronically conductive materials to address the challenge of interfacing solid state devices with the electronics of the body, which is predominantly ionic. Nano-templated interfaces via the oriented immobilization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) onto metallic electrodes have engendered reagentless, direct electron transfer between biological redox enzymes and solid state electrodes. In addressing these challenges, metrology needs and opportunities are found in such widely diverse areas as single molecule counting and addressing, sustainable power requirements such as the development of implantable biofuel cells for the deployment of implantable biochips, and new manufacturing paradigms to address plura-biology needs on solid state devices.

  16. Charlotte Moore Sitterly: A Life of Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Charlotte Moore Sitterly was a scientist in an era when it was rare for a woman to have the opportunity to devote her life to forefront science. Following her graduation from Swarthmore College in 1920, she accepted a position at Princeton University as an assistant to Henry Norris Russell. In 1925 she started a study of the solar spectrum. She could then not know that she would devote much of her scientific career to gathering basic atomic data that are invaluable to the scientific community, even today. In 1931 she obtained a PhD degree at U. California, Berkeley, and returned to Princeton as a staff member of the Princeton University Observatory. In 1945 she moved to the National Bureau of Science (NBS), to supervise preparation of the widely used tables of atomic energy levels. Following the successful lunching (1946) of a V2 rocket to obtain the ultra violet spectrum of the sun, Moore started working with Richard Tousey and his group at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Ultimately, they extended the solar spectrum down to 2200 angstroms. She continued her affiliations with NBS and NRL until her death in 1990. Charlotte Moore was rare scientist who devoted her career to obtaining accurate numbers, thus enabling the scientific community to open her tables and know that the data are accurate.

  17. Static and dynamic mooring analysis - Stability of floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) risers for extreme environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Yu-Ho; Kim, Kookhyun; Jo, Chul-Hee; Kim, Do-Youb

    2013-06-01

    Floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) facilities are used at most of the offshore oil fields worldwide. FPSO usage is expected to grow as oil fields move to deeper water, thus requiring the reliability and stability of mooring wires and risers in extreme environmental conditions. Except for the case of predictable attack angles of external loadings, FPSO facilities with turret single point mooring (SPM) systems are in general use. There are two types of turret systems: permanent systems and disconnectable turret mooring systems. Extreme environment criteria for permanent moorings are usually based on a 100-year return period event. It is common to use two or three environments including the 100-year wave with associated wind and current, and the 100-year wind with associated waves and current. When fitted with a disconnectable turret mooring system, FPSOs can be used in areas where it is desirable to remove the production unit from the field temporarily to prevent exposure to extreme events such as cyclones or large icebergs. Static and dynamic mooring analyses were performed to evaluate the stability of a spider buoy after disconnection from a turret during cyclone environmental conditions

  18. Tender mooring for infill drilling operations: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Tapis-pump platform is a four-leg jacket structure located 230 ft south of the Tapis-D platform and connected to it by a walkway bridge. All crude production (360,000 B/D) from Esso Production Malaysia Inc. (EPMI) wells in the South China Sea offshore Terengganu is piped to the Tapais-pump platform for pumping to an onshore terminal. The continuous operation of this platform is essential. The Tapis-D platform is a manned production platform that also acts as a central communication center and emergency response command center for EPMI`s offshore operations in the South China Sea. A total of nine wells is planned for an infill drilling program at the Tapis-D platform. The rig selected for this infill drilling program is a self-erecting tender-assisted rig that uses an eight-point wire rope mooring system. Eleven pipelines are connected to the Tapis-pump/Tapis-D platform complex. All the pipelines were laid on the seafloor without any special external protection and were not tied down or anchored. The paper describes the planning of the mooring system for drilling.

  19. Hydrostatic liquid-bearing for precision gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sgambati, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit with 2W power increase and slightly larger overall dimensions performs as well as or better than its gas-bearing counterpart. Liquid-bearings are built by reworking serviceable gas-bearing components /sleeves, endplates, and cylinders/. Hydrostatic bearing is self-centered, requiring no magnetic suspension or centering jewel.

  20. A Load Cell for Hydrostatic Weighing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Thomas D.; Schroeder, Richard

    1978-01-01

    Although a load cell is more expensive than the autopsy scale for hydrostatic weighing, it is more accurate, easier to read, has no moving parts, is less susceptible to rust, and is less likely to be damaged by large subjects exceeding its capacity. (Author)

  1. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814... Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be conducted for the qualification... loaded or discharged under pressure or intended to contain liquids. (b) Special preparation for...

  2. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814... Testing of IBCs § 178.814 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be... contain solids that are loaded or discharged under pressure or intended to contain liquids. (b)...

  3. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must... required for inner packagings of combination packagings. For internal pressure requirements for...

  4. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must... required for inner packagings of combination packagings. For internal pressure requirements for...

  5. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be conducted for the qualification of all metal, plastic, and...

  6. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814... Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be conducted for the qualification... loaded or discharged under pressure or intended to contain liquids. (b) Special preparation for...

  7. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814... Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must be conducted for the qualification... loaded or discharged under pressure or intended to contain liquids. (b) Special preparation for...

  8. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test must... required for inner packagings of combination packagings. For internal pressure requirements for...

  9. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum allowable... all accessible parts under pressure. The thermal fluid may be used as the hydrostatic test medium....

  10. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum allowable... all accessible parts under pressure. The thermal fluid may be used as the hydrostatic test medium....

  11. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  12. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  13. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  14. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  15. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  16. Mooring Line Damping Estimation for a Floating Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  17. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  18. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design.

  19. Numerical modeling of a spherical buoy moored by a cable in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangqian; Yoo, Wan-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Floating facilities have been studied based on the static analysis of mooring cables over the past decades. To analyze the floating system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable with a higher accuracy than before, the dynamics of the cables are considered in the construction of the numerical modeling. The cable modeling is established based on a new element frame through which the hydrodynamic loads are expressed efficiently. The accuracy of the cable modeling is verified with an experiment that is conducted by a catenary chain moving in a water tank. In addition, the modeling of a spherical buoy is established with respect to a spherical coordinate in three dimensions, which can suffers the gravity, the variable buoyancy and Froude-Krylov loads. Finally, the numerical modeling for the system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable is established, and a virtual simulation is proceeded with the X- and Y-directional linear waves and the X-directional current. The comparison with the commercial simulation code ProteusDS indicates that the system is accurately analyzed by the numerical modeling. The tensions within the cable, the motions of the system, and the relationship between the motions and waves are illustrated according to the defined sea state. The dynamics of the cables should be considered in analyzing the floating system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable.

  20. 1. Photocopy of photograph, 1893 (Moore Memorial Library) CHRISTIANA BOROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph, 1893 (Moore Memorial Library) CHRISTIANA BOROUGH BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION CREW - Christiana Borough Bridge, Bridge Street over Pennsylvania Railroad, Christiana, Lancaster County, PA

  1. Study of glass hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoyun; Wang, Jintao; Li, Zhihao; Zhang, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Glass hydrometers are simple but effective instruments for measuring the density of liquids. Glass hydrometers calibration based on the Archimedes law, using silicon ring as a reference standard solid density, n-tridecane with density stability and low surface tension as the standard working liquid, based on hydrostatic weighing method designs a glass hydrometer calibration system. Glass hydrometer calibration system uses CCD image measurement system to align the scale of hydrometer and liquid surface, with positioning accuracy of 0.01 mm. Surface tension of the working liquid is measured by Whihemy plate. According to twice glass hydrometer weighing in the air and liquid can calculate the correction value of the current scale. In order to verify the validity of the principle of the hydrostatic weighing method of glass hydrometer calibration system, for measuring the density range of (770-790) kg/m3, with a resolution of 0.2 kg/m3 of hydrometer. The results of measurement compare with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt(PTB) ,verifying the validity of the calibration system.

  2. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  3. Transaction Performance vs. Moore's Law: A Trend Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Raghunath; Poess, Meikel

    Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore postulated in his famous 1965 paper that the number of components in integrated circuits had doubled every year from their invention in 1958 until 1965, and then predicted that the trend would continue for at least ten years. Later, David House, an Intel colleague, after factoring in the increase in performance of transistors, concluded that integrated circuits would double in performance every 18 months. Despite this trend in microprocessor improvements, your favored text editor continues to take the same time to start and your PC takes pretty much the same time to reboot as it took 10 years ago. Can this observation be made on systems supporting the fundamental aspects of our information based economy, namely transaction processing systems?

  4. PREFACE: E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Symposium M: More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Christian; Fompeyrine, Jean; Vallée, Christophe; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    More than Moore explores a new area of Silicon based microelectronics, which reaches beyond the boundaries of conventional semiconductor applications. Creating new functionality to semiconductor circuits, More than Moore focuses on motivating new technological possibilities. In the past decades, the main stream of microelectronics progresses was mainly powered by Moore's law, with two focused development arenas, namely, IC miniaturization down to nano scale, and SoC based system integration. While the microelectronics community continues to invent new solutions around the world to keep Moore's law alive, there is increasing momentum for the development of 'More than Moore' technologies which are based on silicon technologies but do not simply scale with Moore's law. Typical examples are RF, Power/HV, Passives, Sensor/Actuator/MEMS or Bio-chips. The More than Moore strategy is driven by the increasing social needs for high level heterogeneous system integration including non-digital functions, the necessity to speed up innovative product creation and to broaden the product portfolio of wafer fabs, and the limiting cost and time factors of advanced SoC development. It is believed that More than Moore will add value to society on top of and beyond advanced CMOS with fast increasing marketing potentials. Important key challenges for the realization of the 'More than Moore' strategy are: perspective materials for future THz devices materials systems for embedded sensors and actuators perspective materials for epitaxial approaches material systems for embedded innovative memory technologies development of new materials with customized characteristics The Hot topics covered by the symposium M (More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics) at E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, 14-18 May 2012 have been: development of functional ceramics thin films New dielectric materials for advanced microelectronics bio- and CMOS compatible

  5. On variable hydrostatic transmission for road vehicles, powered by supply of fluid at constant pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, M.; Freivald, A.; Andersson, I.; Ericsson, U.

    1981-01-01

    Various hydrostatic power transmission systems for automotive applications with power supply at constant pressure and unrestricted flow and with a Volvo Flygmotor variable displacement motor as the principal unit were investigated. Two most promising concepts were analyzed in detail and their main components optimized for minimum power loss at the EPA Urban Driving Cycle. The best fuel consumption is less than 10 lit. per 100 kM for a 1542 kG vehicle with a hydrostatic motor and a two speed gear box in series (braking power not recovered). Realistic system pressure affects the fuel consumption just slightly, but the package volume/weight drastically. Back pressure increases losses significantly. Special attention was paid to description of the behavior and modeling of the losses of variable displacement hydrostatic machines.

  6. On variable hydrostatic transmission for road vehicles, powered by supply of fluid at constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magi, M.; Freivald, A.; Andersson, I.; Ericsson, U.

    1981-05-01

    Various hydrostatic power transmission systems for automotive applications with power supply at constant pressure and unrestricted flow and with a Volvo Flygmotor variable displacement motor as the principal unit were investigated. Two most promising concepts were analyzed in detail and their main components optimized for minimum power loss at the EPA Urban Driving Cycle. The best fuel consumption is less than 10 lit. per 100 kM for a 1542 kG vehicle with a hydrostatic motor and a two speed gear box in series (braking power not recovered). Realistic system pressure affects the fuel consumption just slightly, but the package volume/weight drastically. Back pressure increases losses significantly. Special attention was paid to description of the behavior and modeling of the losses of variable displacement hydrostatic machines.

  7. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool. Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat…

  8. Work capsule for lightweight hydrostatic machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, M. S.

    1983-02-01

    The theoretical feasibility of designing a lightweight flexible capsule suitable for use as the basic actuating means in the place of the conventional piston and cylinder in a high pressure hydrostatic machine was investigated. The idea was suggested by the high strength/modulus ratio obtained with glass fiber reinforced composites. It is found that the combined effect of hoop and bend stresses in the flexible walls of a bellows type capsule imposes severe limitations on the work output of the capsule.

  9. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Tensile Failure of Rocks Subjected to Hydrostatic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangbiao; Yao, Wei; Xia, Kaiwen

    2016-10-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamic tensile failure of confined rocks in many rock engineering applications, such as underground blasting in mining projects. To simulate the in situ stress state of underground rocks, a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system is utilized to load Brazilian disc (BD) samples hydrostatically, and then exert dynamic load to the sample by impacting the striker on the incident bar. The pulse shaper technique is used to generate a slowly rising stress wave to facilitate the dynamic force balance in the tests. Five groups of Laurentian granite BD samples (with static BD tensile strength of 12.8 MPa) under the hydrostatic confinement of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MPa were tested with different loading rates. The result shows that the dynamic tensile strength increases with the hydrostatic confining pressure. It is also observed that under the same hydrostatic pressure, the dynamic tensile strength increases with the loading rate, revealing the so-called rate dependency for engineering materials. Furthermore, the increment of the tensile strength decreases with the hydrostatic confinement, which resembles the static tensile behavior of rock under confining pressure, as reported in the literature. The recovered samples are examined using X-ray micro-computed tomography method and the observed crack pattern is consistent with the experimental result.

  10. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  11. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy also eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.

  12. Hydrostatic Adjustment in Vertically Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Dean G.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrostatic adjustment due to diabatic heat in two nonisothermal atmospheres is examined. In the first case the temperature stratification is continuous; in the second case the atmosphere is composed of a warm, isothermal troposphere and a colder, isothermal semi-infinitely deep stratosphere.In both cases hydrostatic adjustment, to a good approximation, follows the pattern found in the Lamb problem (semi-infinitely deep. isothermal atmosphere): Initially we have acoustic waves with the kinetic energy increasing or decreasing at the expense of available elastic energy. After this initial period the acoustic waves evolve into acoustic-gravity waves with the kinetic, available potential and available elastic energies interacting with each other. Relaxation to hydrostatic balance occurs within a few oscillations. Stratification in an atmosphere with a continuous temperature profile affects primarily the shape and amplitude of the disturbances. In the two-layer atmosphere, a certain amount of energy is trapped in the tropospheric waveguide as disturbances reflect off the tropopause and back into the troposphere. With each internal reflection a portion of this trapped energy escapes and radiates to infinity.

  13. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  14. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  15. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  16. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  17. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  18. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  19. 75 FR 73072 - Moore, Cody; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moore, Cody; Notice of Filing November 19, 2010. Take notice that, on November 17, 2010, Cody Moore filed an application to hold an interlocking position, pursuant to...

  20. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  1. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  2. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  3. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  4. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  5. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  6. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  7. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  8. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  9. High-pressure, high-temperature bioreactor for comparing effects of hyperbaric and hydrostatic pressure on bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C M; Schuppenhauer, M R; Clark, D S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a high-pressure reactor system suitable for simultaneous hyperbaric and hydrostatic pressurization of bacterial cultures at elevated temperatures. For the deep-sea thermophile ES4, the growth rate at 500 atm (1 atm = 101.29 kPa) and 95 degrees C under hydrostatic pressure was ca. three times the growth rate under hyperbaric pressure and ca. 40% higher than the growth rate at 35 atm. PMID:1622255

  10. The Pacific and Indian Ocean Exchange: Analysis of the Imos Timor Passage and Ombai Strait Moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloyan, B.; Wijffels, S. A.; Cowley, R.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental aspect of observing, describing, understanding and modeling the global climate and particularly the Maritime Continent, is a better knowledge of the fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater in the ocean. The Indonesian seas are the only major low-latitude connection in the global oceans. This connection permits the transfer of Pacific waters into the Indian Ocean, known as the Indonesian Throughflow. The interaction of the Pacific and Indian basins and their modes of variability (El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD)), both through atmospheric teleconnections and the ocean link via the Indonesian Throughflow, is now being hotly pursued in the research community. We will present some initial findings from the 3-year time series (2011-2014) of the Timor Passage and Ombai Strait moorings. This mooring array is a component of the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), and builds on the earlier results of the INSTANT (2003-2006) observational program. The moorings comprise of velocity, temperature and salinity instruments. Observations from these moorings provide the required spatial and temporal coverage to understand ocean dynamics, the ocean's role in climate variability and change, investigate forcing of the atmosphere and ocean and assess the realism of data-assimilative ocean models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models.

  11. Henry (Hank) J. Moore (1928-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.

    Henry (Hank) J. Moore, a member of the AGU Planetary Sciences section, died of a heart attack on September 21, 1998. He was in Utah while on a family trip to visit his daughter. His 70th birthday occurred just 3 weeks before his death. Henry, who was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, took great pride in having found and visited the small town of Albuquerque in the Extremadura region of Spain, noting the geologic similarities between that part of Spain and his birthplace in America.Henry, known for his contributions to the Apollo,Viking, Magellan, and Mars Pathfinder missions, attributed his career to a chance encounter with Gene Shoemaker in 1960. Henry was completing his Ph.D. work in geology at Stanford University and Gene obviously had spotted Henry's keen analytical mind. I suspect this pivotal meeting was far from a chance encounter.

  12. Electronic structure computation and differential capacitance profile in δ-doped FET as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos-Pinedo, C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.

    2014-05-15

    In this work we present the results obtained from the calculation of the level structure of a n-type delta-doped well Field Effect Transistor when is subjected to hydrostatic pressure. We study the energy level structure as a function of hydrostatic pressure within the range of 0 to 6 kbar for different Schottky barrier height (SBH). We use an analytical expression for the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the SBH and the pressure dependence of the basic parameters of the system as the effective mass m(P) and the dielectric constant ε(P) of GaAs. We found that due to the effects of hydrostatic pressure, in addition to electronic level structure alteration, the profile of the differential capacitance per unit area C{sup −2} is affected.

  13. Double nanoplate-based NEMS under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Hosseini, S. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Presented herein is a comprehensive investigation on the nonlinear vibration behavior of nanoplate-based nano electromechanical systems (NEMS) under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations based on nonlocal elasticity and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Using nonlinear strain-displacement relations, the geometrical nonlinearity is modeled. Based on Kelvin-Voigt model, the influence of the viscoelastic coefficient is also discussed. Nonlocal plate theory and Hamilton's principle are utilized for deriving the governing equations. Furthermore, the differential quadrature method (DQM) is employed to compute the nonlinear frequency. In addition, pull-in voltage and hydrostatic pressure are considered by comparing the results obtained from nanoplates made of two different materials including aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si). Finally, the influences of important parameters including the small scale, thickness of the nanoplate, center gap and Winkler coefficient in the actuated nanoplate are thoroughly studied. The plots for the ratio of nonlinear-to-linear frequencies against thickness, maximum transverse amplitude and non-dimensional center gap of nanoplate are also presented.

  14. Arsenolite: a quasi-hydrostatic solid pressure-transmitting medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sans, J. A.; Manjón, F. J.; Popescu, C.; Muñoz, A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, P.; Jordá, J. L.; Rey, F.

    2016-11-01

    This study reports the experimental characterization of the hydrostatic properties of arsenolite (As4O6), a molecular solid which is one of the softest minerals in the absence of hydrogen bonding. The high compressibility of arsenolite and its stability up to 15 GPa have been proved by x-ray diffraction measurements, and the progressive loss of hydrostaticity with increasing pressure up to 20 GPa has been monitored by ruby photoluminescence. Arsenolite has been found to exhibit hydrostatic behavior up to 2.5 GPa and a quasi-hydrostatic behavior up to 10 GPa at room temperature. This result opens the way to explore other molecular solids as possible quasi-hydrostatic pressure-transmitting media. The validity of arsenolite as an insulating, stable, non-penetrating and quasi-hydrostatic medium is explored by the study of the x-ray diffraction of zeolite ITQ-29 at high pressure.

  15. Arsenolite: a quasi-hydrostatic solid pressure-transmitting medium.

    PubMed

    Sans, J A; Manjón, F J; Popescu, C; Muñoz, A; Rodríguez-Hernández, P; Jordá, J L; Rey, F

    2016-11-30

    This study reports the experimental characterization of the hydrostatic properties of arsenolite (As4O6), a molecular solid which is one of the softest minerals in the absence of hydrogen bonding. The high compressibility of arsenolite and its stability up to 15 GPa have been proved by x-ray diffraction measurements, and the progressive loss of hydrostaticity with increasing pressure up to 20 GPa has been monitored by ruby photoluminescence. Arsenolite has been found to exhibit hydrostatic behavior up to 2.5 GPa and a quasi-hydrostatic behavior up to 10 GPa at room temperature. This result opens the way to explore other molecular solids as possible quasi-hydrostatic pressure-transmitting media. The validity of arsenolite as an insulating, stable, non-penetrating and quasi-hydrostatic medium is explored by the study of the x-ray diffraction of zeolite ITQ-29 at high pressure. PMID:27636010

  16. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... system is filling. (b) Test medium and test temperature. (1) Water will be used for a hydrostatic leak test unless another medium is approved by the Commandant. (2) The temperature of the test medium will... greater than 90 percent of its yield strength (0.2 percent offset) at test temperature. (g)...

  17. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... system is filling. (b) Test medium and test temperature. (1) Water will be used for a hydrostatic leak test unless another medium is approved by the Commandant. (2) The temperature of the test medium will... greater than 90 percent of its yield strength (0.2 percent offset) at test temperature. (g)...

  18. Ill-Posedness of the Hydrostatic Euler and Singular Vlasov Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han-Kwan, Daniel; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we develop an abstract framework to establish ill-posedness, in the sense of Hadamard, for some nonlocal PDEs displaying unbounded unstable spectra. We apply this to prove the ill-posedness for the hydrostatic Euler equations as well as for the kinetic incompressible Euler equations and the Vlasov-Dirac-Benney system.

  19. Evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin. Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that currently inhabit the new world was certainly a topic about which zoologists could disagree. But it was in discussing the broader implications of the theory...that tempers flared and statements were made which could transform what otherwise would have been a quiet scholarly meeting into a social scandal' (Farber 1994, 22). Some resistance to the biological thesis of Darwinism sprung from the thought that it was incompatible with traditional morality and, since one of them had to go, many thought that Darwinism should be rejected. However, some people did realize that a secular ethics was possible so, even if Darwinism did undermine traditional religious beliefs, it need not have any effects on moral thought. Before I begin my discussion of evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore, I would like to make some more general remarks about its development. There are three key events during this history of evolutionary ethics. First, Charles Darwin published On the Origin of the Species (Darwin 1859). Since one did not have a fully developed theory of evolution until 1859, there exists little work on evolutionary ethics until then. Shortly thereafter, Herbert Spencer (1898) penned the first systematic theory of evolutionary ethics, which was promptly attacked by T.H. Huxley (Huxley 1894). Second, at about the turn of the century, moral philosophers entered the fray and attempted to demonstrate logical errors in Spencer's work; such errors were alluded

  20. Evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin. Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that currently inhabit the new world was certainly a topic about which zoologists could disagree. But it was in discussing the broader implications of the theory...that tempers flared and statements were made which could transform what otherwise would have been a quiet scholarly meeting into a social scandal' (Farber 1994, 22). Some resistance to the biological thesis of Darwinism sprung from the thought that it was incompatible with traditional morality and, since one of them had to go, many thought that Darwinism should be rejected. However, some people did realize that a secular ethics was possible so, even if Darwinism did undermine traditional religious beliefs, it need not have any effects on moral thought. Before I begin my discussion of evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore, I would like to make some more general remarks about its development. There are three key events during this history of evolutionary ethics. First, Charles Darwin published On the Origin of the Species (Darwin 1859). Since one did not have a fully developed theory of evolution until 1859, there exists little work on evolutionary ethics until then. Shortly thereafter, Herbert Spencer (1898) penned the first systematic theory of evolutionary ethics, which was promptly attacked by T.H. Huxley (Huxley 1894). Second, at about the turn of the century, moral philosophers entered the fray and attempted to demonstrate logical errors in Spencer's work; such errors were alluded

  1. Moore's law and the impact on trusted and radiation-hardened microelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwok Kee

    2011-12-01

    In 1965 Gordon Moore wrote an article claiming that integrated circuit density would scale exponentially. His prediction has remained valid for more than four decades. Integrated circuits have changed all aspects of everyday life. They are also the 'heart and soul' of modern systems for defense, national infrastructure, and intelligence applications. The United States government needs an assured and trusted microelectronics supply for military systems. However, migration of microelectronics design and manufacturing from the United States to other countries in recent years has placed the supply of trusted microelectronics in jeopardy. Prevailing wisdom dictates that it is necessary to use microelectronics fabricated in a state-of-the-art technology for highest performance and military system superiority. Close examination of silicon microelectronics technology evolution and Moore's Law reveals that this prevailing wisdom is not necessarily true. This presents the US government the possibility of a totally new approach to acquire trusted microelectronics.

  2. Study shows turret-moored oil production vessel capabilities in typhoons

    SciTech Connect

    Akiba, Takehiko; Komiya, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Kodan, Norihisa; Mikami, Jun

    1995-08-21

    A turret-moored, floating-type early production and testing system (EPTS) can weather the severe conditions for marginal field exploitation of East Asian offshore oil fields. These vessels are an alternative to permanent facilities such as conventional jackets that often are uneconomical for marginal fields and deepwater, harsh environments. The required production system must withstand the severe weather conditions of a typhoon. Weather downtime and the associated motion performance, weather-vaning capabilities, and mooring system requirements are main considerations in designing EPTSs for these environments. An example of the EPTS concept is the Petrojarl 1, which operates in the North Sea and was built by NKK Corp. The results of 6 years` experience with the Petrojarl 1 have proven that such vessels can operate even in the harsh environment of the North Sea. The study, summarized in this article, verified that satisfactory operational efficiency can be achieved in environments where typhoons exits.

  3. Power control for a hydrostatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Geringer, K.G.

    1988-05-24

    A power control for a hydrostatic transmission is described having a pair of hydraulic units at least one of which being of variable displacement. The variable displacement hydraulic unit has hydraulic servo means for varying the displacement. The hydrostatic transmission furthermore has a fixed displacement speed signal pump driven at a speed proportional to the input speed of the transmission and providing a hydraulic input speed signal. The power control comprises first and second valves in series flow relationship between the speed signal pump and the servo means. The first valve is a variable orifice valve spring biased toward a cloeed position and biased by the input speed signal toward an open position to establish a pressure drop having a generally linear relationship to the input speed signal. The second valve is spring biased toward a closed position relative to communicating the output of the first valve to the servo means and having first and second opposed pilots connected across the first valve so that the input speed signal induced pressure drop biases the second valve toward an open position. The second valve also has an output feedback proportional to pressure in the servo means and connected to a third pilot biasing the second valve towards the closed position.

  4. Numerical simulations and model tests of the mooring characteristic of a tension leg platform under random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jia-yang; Yang, Jian-min; Lü, Hai-ning

    2013-10-01

    Analyzing the dynamic response and calculating the tendon tension of the mooring system are necessary for the structural design of a tension leg platform (TLP). The six-degree-of-freedom dynamic coupling responses and the mooring characteristics of TLP under random waves are studied by using a self-developed program. Results are verified by the 1:40 scaling factor model test conducted in the State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering at Shanghai JiaoTong University. The mean, range, and standard deviation of the numerical simulation and model test are compared. The influences of different sea states and wave approach angles on the dynamic response and tendon tension of the mooring system are investigated. The acceleration in the center and corner of the deck is forecasted.

  5. 61. FAN HOUSE BUILT DURING LOW MOOR ERA; PEDESTALS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. FAN HOUSE BUILT DURING LOW MOOR ERA; PEDESTALS ON WHICH FAN RESTED IS IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Kaymoor Coal Mine, South side of New River, upstream of New River Gorge Bridge, Fayetteville, Fayette County, WV

  6. 26. photographer unknown 29 December 1937 FLOATING MOORING BIT INSTALLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. photographer unknown 29 December 1937 FLOATING MOORING BIT INSTALLED IN LOCK SIDEWALL. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  7. James Moores Ball: Ophthalmologist, medical historian, bibliophile.

    PubMed

    Feibel, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    James Moores Ball (1862-1929) was an ophthalmologist in St. Louis, Missouri, who excelled as a medical historian and collector of rare and historic books about the history of anatomy. During his lifetime, he was best known as the author of a comprehensive, authoritative, and popular textbook titled Modern Ophthalmology First published in 1904, there were five further editions. Ball was very interested in the history of anatomy and wrote two books on this subject, the first being a biography of Andreas Vesalius, one of the earliest in English, and the second a history of the resurrection men or grave robbers who sold corpses to professors of anatomy and surgery for teaching purposes. His legacy today is the 470 volumes of his personal library, which are now in the Archives and Rare Books department of the Becker Medical Library of the Washington University School of Medicine. These texts are one of their major collections, concentrating on the history of anatomy, beginning with a first edition of Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica and holding many important and beautiful landmark volumes of anatomical atlases. PMID:27316691

  8. Charles Bachman Moore (1920-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, William; Krehbiel, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Charles B. Moore passed away 2 March 2010 at the age of 89, following a long and varied scientific career in meteorology and the atmospheric sciences. He will be remembered best for his substantial contributions in the field of atmospheric electricity and for the students and faculty he guided as chairman of Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research and professor of physics at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He possessed a unique sense of humor and an excellent memory that served as a reservoir of scientific and historical knowledge. Like many of his generation, Charlie's career was profoundly influenced by the Second World War. Following Pearl Harbor, he interrupted his undergraduate studies in chemical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology to enlist in the Army Air Corps, where he became the chief weather equipment officer in the 10th Weather Squadron, setting up and operating remote meteorological stations behind enemy lines in the China-Burma-India theater. He served with distinction alongside Athelstan Spilhaus Sr., who had been one of Charlie's instructors in the Army meteorology program.

  9. Slow-drift motion: Practical estimation of mooring line damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bompais, X.; Boulluec, M. Le; Dekindt, F.; Marin, S.; Molin, B.

    1994-12-31

    A simple method is presented, that permits to calculate the slow-drift damping induced by mooring lines. It is based on a linearization of the catenary line equations. Comparisons are made with experimental results, and with values obtained with a fully non linear code, with a good agreement. An application case is then presented for a storage barge in the Gulf of Guinea, where it is found that mooring lines bring the dominant contribution to the low-frequency damping.

  10. External Coulomb-Friction Damping For Hydrostatic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    External friction device damps vibrations of shaft and hydrostatic ring bearing in which it turns. Does not rely on wear-prone facing surfaces. Hydrostatic bearing ring clamped in radially flexing support by side plates clamped against radial surfaces by spring-loaded bolts. Plates provide friction against radial motions of shaft.

  11. A Simple Explanation of the Classic Hydrostatic Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the…

  12. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test. The... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section...

  13. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test. The... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section...

  14. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test. The... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section...

  15. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test. The... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section...

  16. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test. The... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section...

  17. Vertical finite-element scheme for the hydrostatic primitive equations on a cubed-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. R.; Yi, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    A vertical finite-element (VFE) scheme of three-dimensional hydrostatic primitive equations is adopted for the numerical weather prediction system, which is horizontally discretized with spectral elements on a cubed-sphere. The hybrid pressure-based vertical coordinate is employed to discretize a vertical grid, in which only the full levels of the coordinate are used in the VFE. Vertical integrals and derivatives in the hydrostatic equations are derived based on Galerkin-based finite elements with b-spline functions. These basis functions and their first-order derivatives are constructed using the Cox-de Boor algorithm. The computation of vertical integrals, derivatives and advections in the hydrostatic equations are easily done in physical space by matrix multiplication with the corresponding vertical operators. The VFE discretization scheme implemented into the global three-dimensional hydrostatic model on the cubed-sphere is evaluated by performing ideal test cases including the steady-state, baroclinic wave, 3D Rossby-Haurwitz wave, and mountain-induced Rossby wave train test cases. The two types of the VFE scheme are compared to the vertical finite difference scheme.

  18. Sampling efficiency of the Moore egg collector

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Mueller, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative studies focusing on the collection of semibuoyant fish eggs, which are associated with a pelagic broadcast-spawning reproductive strategy, are often conducted to evaluate reproductive success. Many of the fishes in this reproductive guild have suffered significant reductions in range and abundance. However, the efficiency of the sampling gear used to evaluate reproduction is often unknown and renders interpretation of the data from these studies difficult. Our objective was to assess the efficiency of a modified Moore egg collector (MEC) using field and laboratory trials. Gear efficiency was assessed by releasing a known quantity of gellan beads with a specific gravity similar to that of eggs from representatives of this reproductive guild (e.g., the Arkansas River Shiner Notropis girardi) into an outdoor flume and recording recaptures. We also used field trials to determine how discharge and release location influenced gear efficiency given current methodological approaches. The flume trials indicated that gear efficiency ranged between 0.0% and 9.5% (n = 57) in a simple 1.83-m-wide channel and was positively related to discharge. Efficiency in the field trials was lower, ranging between 0.0% and 3.6%, and was negatively related to bead release distance from the MEC and discharge. The flume trials indicated that the gellan beads were not distributed uniformly across the channel, although aggregation was reduced at higher discharges. This clustering of passively drifting particles should be considered when selecting placement sites for an MEC; further, the use of multiple devices may be warranted in channels with multiple areas of concentrated flow.

  19. Obituary: Ben Hawkins Moore, 1921-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James F.

    2004-12-01

    Ben H. Moore, emeritus professor of physics, astronomy and earth sciences at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, died 7 November 2003, in South Padre Island, Texas. Ben was born 18 March 1921, in Kansas City, Missouri, to Fraser D. and Cora R. (Hawkins) Moore. Though his parents provided a strong guiding influence on Ben's development, Ben's career was impacted most clearly by his work as a student and research assistant for Allen Basset (Ben's father-in-law) at Park College. This relationship turned Ben's early interest in chemistry and biology toward a focus on physics. Ben received his undergraduate degree from Park College where he graduated Phi Delta Kappa. He received a MS in physics from Kansas State University. He also did post-masters work at the University of Kansas, the University of Colorado, the University of Washington and Temple University. In addition to his work as a research assistant, Ben taught at Park College as well as Washington Kansas High School, Wyandotte High School, and Kansas City Kansas Junior College before moving to St. Cloud State University in 1960. He retired from this teaching position in May 1982 but remained involved in activities of his department, including some teaching, through most of his years in retirement. Ben's accomplishments were mainly centered on his teaching. His development of courses and his rapport with students consistently brought praise from both his colleagues and his students. Above all, his work involved innovative development of the curriculum in the sciences at St. Cloud State. Soon after his arrival at the university, Ben took over the fledgling field geology course and continued to shape this offering into a program in earth sciences. The popularity of his classes, which attracted both general students and a growing number of majors, finally enabled the university to establish an earth sciences department in the late 1960's and Ben was the first chair of that department. In the mid-1960's Ben took

  20. Verifying the interactive convergence clock synchronization algorithm using the Boyer-Moore theorem prover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The application of formal methods to the analysis of computing systems promises to provide higher and higher levels of assurance as the sophistication of our tools and techniques increases. Improvements in tools and techniques come about as we pit the current state of the art against new and challenging problems. A promising area for the application of formal methods is in real-time and distributed computing. Some of the algorithms in this area are both subtle and important. In response to this challenge and as part of an ongoing attempt to verify an implementation of the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm (ICCSA), we decided to undertake a proof of the correctness of the algorithm using the Boyer-Moore theorem prover. This paper describes our approach to proving the ICCSA using the Boyer-Moore prover.

  1. On the Nature of Hydrostatic Equilibrium in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, V.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.; Rasia, E.; Planelles, S.; Granato, G. L.; Ragone-Figueroa, C.; Beck, A. M.; Gaspari, M.; Dolag, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the level of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) in the intracluster medium of simulated galaxy clusters, extracted from state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations performed with the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamic code GADGET-3. These simulations include several physical processes, among which are stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, and have been performed with an improved version of the code that allows for a better description of hydrodynamical instabilities and gas mixing processes. Evaluating the radial balance between the gravitational and hydrodynamical forces via the gas accelerations generated, we effectively examine the level of HE in every object of the sample and its dependence on the radial distance from the center and on the classification of the cluster in terms of either cool-coreness or dynamical state. We find an average deviation of 10%–20% out to the virial radius, with no evident distinction between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Instead, we observe a clear separation between regular and disturbed systems, with a more significant deviation from HE for the disturbed objects. The investigation of the bias between the hydrostatic estimate and the total gravitating mass indicates that, on average, this traces the deviation from HE very well, even though individual cases show a more complex picture. Typically, in the radial ranges where mass bias and deviation from HE are substantially different, the gas is characterized by a significant amount of random motions (≳ 30 % ), relative to thermal ones. As a general result, the HE-deviation and mass bias, at a given distance from the cluster center, are not very sensitive to the temperature inhomogeneities in the gas.

  2. On the Nature of Hydrostatic Equilibrium in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, V.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.; Rasia, E.; Planelles, S.; Granato, G. L.; Ragone-Figueroa, C.; Beck, A. M.; Gaspari, M.; Dolag, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the level of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) in the intracluster medium of simulated galaxy clusters, extracted from state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations performed with the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamic code GADGET-3. These simulations include several physical processes, among which are stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, and have been performed with an improved version of the code that allows for a better description of hydrodynamical instabilities and gas mixing processes. Evaluating the radial balance between the gravitational and hydrodynamical forces via the gas accelerations generated, we effectively examine the level of HE in every object of the sample and its dependence on the radial distance from the center and on the classification of the cluster in terms of either cool-coreness or dynamical state. We find an average deviation of 10%-20% out to the virial radius, with no evident distinction between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Instead, we observe a clear separation between regular and disturbed systems, with a more significant deviation from HE for the disturbed objects. The investigation of the bias between the hydrostatic estimate and the total gravitating mass indicates that, on average, this traces the deviation from HE very well, even though individual cases show a more complex picture. Typically, in the radial ranges where mass bias and deviation from HE are substantially different, the gas is characterized by a significant amount of random motions (≳ 30 % ), relative to thermal ones. As a general result, the HE-deviation and mass bias, at a given distance from the cluster center, are not very sensitive to the temperature inhomogeneities in the gas.

  3. Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

  4. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Carcinogenic Properties of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kim, Young Hak; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. The inflammation increases the permeability of blood vessels and consequently elevates pressure in the interstitial tissues. However, there have been only a few reports on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cultured cells, and the relationship between elevated hydrostatic pressure and cell properties related to malignant tumors is less well understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the cultured epithelial cells seeded on permeable filters. Surprisingly, hydrostatic pressure from basal to apical side induced epithelial stratification in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) I and Caco-2 cells, and cavities with microvilli and tight junctions around their surfaces were formed within the multi-layered epithelia. The hydrostatic pressure gradient also promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis, and increased transepithelial ion permeability. The inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) promoted epithelial stratification by the hydrostatic pressure whereas the activation of PKA led to suppressed epithelial stratification. These results indicate the role of the hydrostatic pressure gradient in the regulation of various epithelial cell functions. The findings in this study may provide clues for the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of the carcinoma. PMID:26716691

  5. The Bermuda Testbed Mooring and Emerging Technologies for Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    The Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) program provides the oceanographic community with a deep-water platform for testing new instrumentation. Scientific studies also utilize data collected from the BTM, particularly in conjunction with the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program. Additionally, the BTM has been used for groundtruthing of satellite ocean color imager (SeaWiFS) data. The mooring is located about 80 km southeast of Bermuda. Surface instruments have collected meteorological and spectral radiometric data from the buoy tower and measurements at depth have included: currents, temperature, bio-optical, chemical, and acoustical variables. The BTM captures a broad dynamic range of oceanic variability (minutes to years). Key results include: 1. Data obtained during passages of cold-core eddies have been used to estimate the role of such features on new production and carbon flux to the deep ocean. One of the observed features contained the greatest values of chlorophyll observed during the decade of observations at the site (based on BATS historical data base). The measurements provide high frequency, long-term data, which can be used for a) detailed studies of a variety of physical, chemical, bio-optical, and ecological processes on time scales from minutes to years, b) contextual information for many other observations made near the BTM/BATS sites, c) evaluation of undersampling/aliasing effects, and d) developing/testing models. 2. The dynamics of the upper ocean have been observed during transient re-stratification events and during passages of hurricanes and other intense storms. These observations are unique and the subject of ongoing modeling efforts. 3. BTM papers have provided new insights concerning bio-optical variability on short (minutes to day) time scales and have proven valuable for ocean color satellite groundtruthing. 4. During the BTM project, several new sensors and systems have been tested by U.S. and international groups

  6. Investigation of a FAST-OrcaFlex Coupling Module for Integrating Turbine and Mooring Dynamics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.

    2011-10-01

    To enable offshore floating wind turbine design, the following are required: accurate modeling of the wind turbine structural dynamics, aerodynamics, platform hydrodynamics, a mooring system, and control algorithms. Mooring and anchor design can appreciably affect the dynamic response of offshore wind platforms that are subject to environmental loads. From an engineering perspective, system behavior and line loads must be studied well to ensure the overall design is fit for the intended purpose. FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures and Turbulence) is a comprehensive simulation tool used for modeling land-based and offshore wind turbines. In the case of a floating turbine, continuous cable theory is used to emulate mooring line dynamics. Higher modeling fidelity can be gained through the use of finite element mooring theory. This can be achieved through the FASTlink coupling module, which couples FAST with OrcaFlex, a commercial simulation tool used for modeling mooring line dynamics. In this application, FAST is responsible for capturing the aerodynamic loads and flexure of the wind turbine and its tower, and OrcaFlex models the mooring line and hydrodynamic effects below the water surface. This paper investigates the accuracy and stability of the FAST/OrcaFlex coupling operation.

  7. A simple explanation of the classic hydrostatic paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-07-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the same. However, if the shape of the container is different, the amount of the liquid (and as a consequence the weight) can greatly vary. In this paper, a simple explanation of the hydrostatic paradox, specifically designed and implemented for educational purposes regarding secondary education, is provided.

  8. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows.

    PubMed

    Serrano, O; Ruhon, R; Lavery, P S; Kendrick, G A; Hickey, S; Masqué, P; Arias-Ortiz, A; Steven, A; Duarte, C M

    2016-01-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m(-2) in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m(-2) yr(-1). The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m(-2) in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation. PMID:26979407

  9. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2016-03-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m‑2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m‑2 yr‑1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m‑2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.

  10. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m−2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m−2 yr−1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m−2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation. PMID:26979407

  11. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-11-10

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10{sup 13} - 2 x 10{sup 15} h{sup -1} M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to approx5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  12. Obituary: Ben Hawkins Moore, 1921-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James F.

    2004-12-01

    Ben H. Moore, emeritus professor of physics, astronomy and earth sciences at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, died 7 November 2003, in South Padre Island, Texas. Ben was born 18 March 1921, in Kansas City, Missouri, to Fraser D. and Cora R. (Hawkins) Moore. Though his parents provided a strong guiding influence on Ben's development, Ben's career was impacted most clearly by his work as a student and research assistant for Allen Basset (Ben's father-in-law) at Park College. This relationship turned Ben's early interest in chemistry and biology toward a focus on physics. Ben received his undergraduate degree from Park College where he graduated Phi Delta Kappa. He received a MS in physics from Kansas State University. He also did post-masters work at the University of Kansas, the University of Colorado, the University of Washington and Temple University. In addition to his work as a research assistant, Ben taught at Park College as well as Washington Kansas High School, Wyandotte High School, and Kansas City Kansas Junior College before moving to St. Cloud State University in 1960. He retired from this teaching position in May 1982 but remained involved in activities of his department, including some teaching, through most of his years in retirement. Ben's accomplishments were mainly centered on his teaching. His development of courses and his rapport with students consistently brought praise from both his colleagues and his students. Above all, his work involved innovative development of the curriculum in the sciences at St. Cloud State. Soon after his arrival at the university, Ben took over the fledgling field geology course and continued to shape this offering into a program in earth sciences. The popularity of his classes, which attracted both general students and a growing number of majors, finally enabled the university to establish an earth sciences department in the late 1960's and Ben was the first chair of that department. In the mid-1960's Ben took

  13. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  14. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-10-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool.1-4 Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat so that the boat sinks, does the water level in the pool change? If so, when does the change begin (when water first begins to enter the boat or later)? 2. A boat floating in a pool carries a mass M that can either be placed on the raft or hung below the raft. (a) How does the water level in the pool compare in the two cases? (b) In which case does the raft float higher in the water? This paper describes a simple low-cost experimental setup that can be used to demonstrate the solutions to such problems in a concrete and dramatic way.

  15. A hydrostatic pressure-cycle energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Hahn, Gregory; Morgan, Eric

    2015-04-01

    There have been a number of new applications for energy harvesting with the ever-decreasing power consumption of microelectronic devices. In this paper we explore a new area of marine animal energy harvesting for use in powering tags known as bio-loggers. These devices record data about the animal or its surroundings, but have always had limited deployment times due to battery depletion. Reduced solar irradiance below the water's surface provides the impetus to explore other energy harvesting concepts beyond solar power for use on marine animals. We review existing tag technologies in relation to this application, specifically relating to energy consumption. Additionally, we propose a new idea for energy harvesting, using hydrostatic pressure changes as a source for energy production. We present initial testing results of a bench-top model and show that the daily energy harvesting potential from this technology can meet or exceed that consumed by current marine bio-logging tags. The application of this concept in the arena of bio-logging technology could substantially increase bio-logger deployment lifetimes, allowing for longitudinal studies over the course of multiple breeding and/or migration cycles.

  16. Dielectric elastomer actuators with hydrostatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-03-01

    The rapidly growing adoption of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators as a high performance EAP technology for many kinds of new applications continuously opens new technical challenges, in order to take always the most from each adopted device and actuating configuration. This paper presents a new type of DE actuators, which show attractive potentialities for specific application needs. The concept here proposed adopts an incompressible fluid to mechanically couple active and passive parts. The active parts work according to the DE actuation principle, while the passive parts represent the end effector, in contact with the load. The fluid is used to transfer actuation hydrostatically from an active to a passive part and, then, to the load. This can provide specific advantages, including improved safety and less stringent design constraints for the architecture of the actuator, especially for soft end effectors. Such a simple concept can be readily implemented according to different shapes and intended functionalities of the resulting actuators. The paper describes the structure and the performance of the first prototype devices developed so far.

  17. Effect of Superimposed Hydrostatic Pressure on Bendability of Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. X.; Wu, P. D.; Lloyd, D. J.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on fracture under three-point bending is studied numerically using the finite element method based on the Gurson damage model. It is demonstrated that superimposed hydrostatic pressure significantly increases the bendability and bending fracture strain due to the fact that a superimposed pressure delays or completely eliminates the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microvoids or microcracks. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  18. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  19. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  20. Hydrostatic and caustic mass profiles of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Ben J.; Giles, Paul A.; Rines, Kenneth J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Geller, Margaret J.; Van Der Pyl, Nina; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    We compare X-ray and caustic mass profiles for a sample of 16 massive galaxy clusters. We assume hydrostatic equilibrium in interpreting the X-ray data, and use large samples of cluster members with redshifts as a basis for applying the caustic technique. The hydrostatic and caustic masses agree to better than ≈20 per cent on average across the radial range covered by both techniques (˜[0.2-1.25]R500). The mass profiles were measured independently and do not assume a common functional form. Previous studies suggest that, at R500, the hydrostatic and caustic masses are biased low and high, respectively. We find that the ratio of hydrostatic to caustic mass at R500 is 1.20^{+0.13}_{-0.11}; thus it is larger than 0.9 at ≈3σ and the combination of under- and overestimation of the mass by these two techniques is ≈10 per cent at most. There is no indication of any dependence of the mass ratio on the X-ray morphology of the clusters, indicating that the hydrostatic masses are not strongly systematically affected by the dynamical state of the clusters. Overall, our results favour a small value of the so-called hydrostatic bias due to non-thermal pressure sources.

  1. Hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic simulations of dense waters cascading off a shelf: The East Greenland case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaldi, Marcello G.; Haine, Thomas W. N.

    2015-02-01

    The cascade of dense waters of the Southeast Greenland shelf during summer 2003 is investigated with two very high-resolution (0.5-km) simulations. The first simulation is non-hydrostatic. The second simulation is hydrostatic and about 3.75 times less expensive. Both simulations are compared to a 2-km hydrostatic run, about 31 times less expensive than the 0.5 km non-hydrostatic case. Time-averaged volume transport values for deep waters are insensitive to the changes in horizontal resolution and vertical momentum dynamics. By this metric, both lateral stirring and vertical shear instabilities associated with the cascading process are accurately parameterized by the turbulent schemes used at 2-km horizontal resolution. All runs compare well with observations and confirm that the cascade is mainly driven by cyclones which are linked to dense overflow boluses at depth. The passage of the cyclones is also associated with the generation of internal gravity waves (IGWs) near the shelf. Surface fields and kinetic energy spectra do not differ significantly between the runs for horizontal scales L > 30 km. Complex structures emerge and the spectra flatten at scales L < 30 km in the 0.5-km runs. In the non-hydrostatic case, additional energy is found in the vertical kinetic energy spectra at depth in the 2 km < L < 10 km range and with frequencies around 7 times the inertial frequency. This enhancement is missing in both hydrostatic runs and is here argued to be due to the different IGW evolution and propagation offshore. The different IGW behavior in the non-hydrostatic case has strong implications for the energetics: compared to the 2-km case, the baroclinic conversion term and vertical kinetic energy are about 1.4 and at least 34 times larger, respectively. This indicates that the energy transfer from the geostrophic eddy field to IGWs and their propagation away from the continental slope is not properly represented in the hydrostatic runs.

  2. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, K.; Rajiniganth, M. P.; Arun, A. D.; Sahoo, P.; Satya Murty, S. A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ˜4 s, respectively.

  3. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  4. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility.

    PubMed

    Praveen, K; Rajiniganth, M P; Arun, A D; Sahoo, P; Murty, S A V Satya

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ∼4 s, respectively.

  5. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  6. Maintaining Moore's law: enabling cost-friendly dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Arindam; Ryckaert, Julien; Mercha, Abdelkarim; Verkest, Diederik; Ronse, Kurt; Thean, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Moore's Law (Moore's Observation) has been driving the progress in semiconductor technology for the past 50 years. The semiconductor industry is at a juncture where significant increase in manufacturing cost is foreseen to sustain the past trend of dimensional scaling. At N10 and N7 technology nodes, the industry is struggling to find a cost-friendly solution. At a device level, technologists have come up with novel devices (finFET, Gate-All-Around), material innovations (SiGe, Ge) to boost performance and reduce power consumption. On the other hand, from the patterning side, the relative slow ramp-up of alternative lithography technologies like EUVL and DSA pushes the industry to adopt a severely multi-patterning-based solution. Both of these technological transformations have a big impact on die yield and eventually die cost. This paper is aimed to analyze the impact on manufacturing cost to keep the Moore's law alive. We have proposed and analyzed various patterning schemes that can enable cost-friendly scaling. We evaluated the impact of EUVL introduction on tackling the high cost of manufacturing. The primary objective of this paper is to maintain Moore's scaling from a patterning perspective and analyzing EUV lithography introduction at a die level.

  7. Baseline designs of moored and grazing 40-MW OTEC pilot plants. Volume B: Engineering drawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    Baseline design data are presented for two types of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) pilot plants: (1) a moored plant that uses underwater cables to transmit electric power to a shore-based utility company, and (2) a cruising plantship that uses the OTEC electric power to produce an energy-intensive product onboard, where it is stored for later transshipment to market. Engineering drawings of the hull, cold-water pipe, ship outfitting and machinery, OTEC power system, electrical system, and folded-tube heat exchangers are provided.

  8. Getting It Wrong: Comment on Moore's "Behaviorism and the Stages of Scientific Activity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, William M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on Moore's (2010) illogical attack on the matching law which was published by "The Behavior Analyst." Moore begins by attacking the psychophysical power law because he claims it is based on mentalism. One may argue about theory, but one cannot argue with data. Moore's attack on the generalized matching law is…

  9. Thomas E. Moore's "Sour Sofkee" in the Tradition of Muskogee Dialect Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petete, Timothy; Womack, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The Muskogee dialect letters provide one of the most interesting combinations of fictional viewpoints and political commentary in American Indian letters. This article features the life story of Thomas E. Moore. This article also presents the fictional literary works of Moore and compares his dialect writings to Alexander Posey. Moore is the most…

  10. Simulation of Storm Surge by a Depth-integrated Non-hydrostatic Nested-gird Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Wu, Tso-Ren; Terng, Chuen-Teyr; Cheung, Mei-Hui

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents COMCOT-SS (COrnell Multi-grid Coupled of Tsunami Model - Storm Surge) operational model, a depth integrated non-hydrostatic storm surge model developed for the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) in Taiwan. This model is based on the widely-validated COMCOT tsunami model. However, the governing equations were modified to be a depth-integrated vertical momentum equation, and the nonlinear shallow water equations including extra terms, such as the non-hydrostatic pressure, weather forcing, and tidal terms. The non-hydrostatic term enables the model to simulate relatively steep waves in the near-shore region. The conventional features in COMCOT, such as the nested-grid system, spherical and Cartesian coordinate systems, and the moving boundary scheme for inundation prediction were preserved. In this study, we carefully validated the model with analytic solutions for wind shear stress and pressure gradient terms. TWRF (Typhoon Weather Research and Forecasting) model was coupled for providing the meteorological forces generated by typhoons. Besides, parametric typhoon models such as Holland model (1980) and CWB model were also coupled with COMCOT-SS in which the drag coefficient was advised by Large and Pond (1981) and Powell (2003). Astronomical tide provided by the TPXO global tidal model was imported from the domain boundaries. As for the model performance, COMCOT-SS spends less than 30 minutes to finish a 48-hrs forecasting with a large computational domain which covers Taiwan Strait and most parts of Western Pacific Ocean and South China Sea and satisfies the requirement of early warning. In this paper, we also presented the results of nine typical typhoon routes defined by CWB in Taiwan for the model verification. The simulation results accompanied with the non-hydrostatic effect presented good agreement with observation data. Detailed results and discussion will be presented in EGU, 2015.

  11. Will Moores law be sufficient?

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2004-07-01

    It seems well understood that supercomputer simulation is an enabler for scientific discoveries, weapons, and other activities of value to society. It also seems widely believed that Moore's Law will make progressively more powerful supercomputers over time and thus enable more of these contributions. This paper seeks to add detail to these arguments, revealing them to be generally correct but not a smooth and effortless progression. This paper will review some key problems that can be solved with supercomputer simulation, showing that more powerful supercomputers will be useful up to a very high yet finite limit of around 1021 FLOPS (1 Zettaflops) . The review will also show the basic nature of these extreme problems. This paper will review work by others showing that the theoretical maximum supercomputer power is very high indeed, but will explain how a straightforward extrapolation of Moore's Law will lead to technological maturity in a few decades. The power of a supercomputer at the maturity of Moore's Law will be very high by today's standards at 1016-1019 FLOPS (100 Petaflops to 10 Exaflops), depending on architecture, but distinctly below the level required for the most ambitious applications. Having established that Moore's Law will not be that last word in supercomputing, this paper will explore the nearer term issue of what a supercomputer will look like at maturity of Moore's Law. Our approach will quantify the maximum performance as permitted by the laws of physics for extension of current technology and then find a design that approaches this limit closely. We study a 'multi-architecture' for supercomputers that combines a microprocessor with other 'advanced' concepts and find it can reach the limits as well. This approach should be quite viable in the future because the microprocessor would provide compatibility with existing codes and programming styles while the 'advanced' features would provide a boost to the limits of performance.

  12. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure mimics gravitational pressure in characean cells.

    PubMed

    Staves, M P; Wayne, R; Leopold, A C

    1992-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure applied to one end of a horizontal Chara cell induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming, thus mimicking the effect of gravity. A positive hydrostatic pressure induces a more rapid streaming away from the applied pressure and a slower streaming toward the applied pressure. In contrast, a negative pressure induces a more rapid streaming toward and a slower streaming away from the applied pressure. Both the hydrostatic pressure-induced and gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming respond identically to cell ligation, UV microbeam irradiation, external Ca2+ concentrations, osmotic pressure, neutral red, TEA Cl-, and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and LaCl3. In addition, hydrostatic pressure applied to the bottom of a vertically-oriented cell can abolish and even reverse the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. These data indicate that both gravity and hydrostatic pressure act at the same point of the signal transduction chain leading to the induction of a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming and support the hypothesis that characean cells respond to gravity by sensing a gravity-induced pressure differential between the cell ends.

  14. BE STAR DISK MODELS IN CONSISTENT VERTICAL HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sigut, T. A. A.; McGill, M. A.; Jones, C. E. E-mail: mmcgill@astro.uwo.ca

    2009-07-10

    A popular model for the circumstellar disks of Be stars is that of a geometrically thin disk with a density in the equatorial plane that drops as a power law of distance from the star. It is usually assumed that the vertical structure of such a disk (in the direction parallel to the stellar rotation axis) is governed by the hydrostatic equilibrium set by the vertical component of the star's gravitational acceleration. Previous radiative equilibrium models for such disks have usually been computed assuming a fixed density structure. This introduces an inconsistency as the gas density is not allowed to respond to temperature changes and the resultant disk model is not in vertical, hydrostatic equilibrium. In this work, we modify the BEDISK code of Sigut and Jones so that it enforces a hydrostatic equilibrium consistent with the temperature solution. We compare the disk densities, temperatures, H{alpha} line profiles, and near-IR excesses predicted by such models with those computed from models with a fixed density structure. We find that the fixed models can differ substantially from the consistent hydrostatic models when the disk density is high enough that the circumstellar disk develops a cool (T {approx}< 10, 000 K) equatorial region close to the parent star. Based on these new hydrostatic disks, we also predict an approximate relation between the (global) density-averaged disk temperature and the T{sub eff} of the central star, covering the full range of central Be star spectral types.

  15. Hydrostatic pressure mimics gravitational pressure in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure applied to one end of a horizontal Chara cell induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming, thus mimicking the effect of gravity. A positive hydrostatic pressure induces a more rapid streaming away from the applied pressure and a slower streaming toward the applied pressure. In contrast, a negative pressure induces a more rapid streaming toward and a slower streaming away from the applied pressure. Both the hydrostatic pressure-induced and gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming respond identically to cell ligation, UV microbeam irradiation, external Ca2+ concentrations, osmotic pressure, neutral red, TEA Cl-, and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and LaCl3. In addition, hydrostatic pressure applied to the bottom of a vertically-oriented cell can abolish and even reverse the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. These data indicate that both gravity and hydrostatic pressure act at the same point of the signal transduction chain leading to the induction of a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming and support the hypothesis that characean cells respond to gravity by sensing a gravity-induced pressure differential between the cell ends.

  16. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  17. Optimal dispersion with minimized Poisson equations for non-hydrostatic free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Haiyang; Pietrzak, J. D.; Stelling, G. S.

    2014-09-01

    A non-hydrostatic shallow-water model is proposed to simulate the wave propagation in situations where the ratio of the wave length to the water depth is small. It exploits the reduced-size stencil in the Poisson pressure solver to make the model less expensive in terms of memory and CPU time. We refer to this new technique as the minimized Poisson equations formulation. In the simplest case when the method applied to a two-layer model, the new model requires the same computational effort as depth-integrated non-hydrostatic models, but can provide a much better description of dispersive waves. To allow an easy implementation of the new method in depth-integrated models, the governing equations are transformed into a depth-integrated system, in which the velocity difference serves as an extra variable. The non-hydrostatic shallow-water model with minimized Poisson equations formulation produces good results in a series of numerical experiments, including a standing wave in a basin, a non-linear wave test, solitary wave propagation in a channel and a wave propagation over a submerged bar.

  18. A 3D unstructured non-hydrostatic ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Congfang; Ding, Weiye

    2016-10-01

    A 3D non-hydrostatic model is developed to compute internal waves. A novel grid arrangement is incorporated in the model. This not only ensures the homogenous Dirichlet boundary condition for the non-hydrostatic pressure can be precisely and easily imposed but also renders the model relatively simple in its discretized form. The Perot scheme is employed to discretize horizontal advection terms in the horizontal momentum equations, which is based on staggered grids and has the conservative property. Based on previous water wave models, the main works of the present paper are to (1) utilize a semi-implicit, fractional step algorithm to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE); (2) develop a second-order flux-limiter method satisfying the max-min property; (3) incorporate a density equation, which is solved by a high-resolution finite volume method ensuring mass conservation and max-min property based on a vertical boundary-fitted coordinate system; and (4) validate the developed model by using four tests including two internal seiche waves, lock-exchange flow, and internal solitary wave breaking. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solutions or experimental data or other model results show reasonably good agreement, demonstrating the model's capability to resolve internal waves relating to complex non-hydrostatic phenomena.

  19. A 3D unstructured non-hydrostatic ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Congfang; Ding, Weiye

    2016-08-01

    A 3D non-hydrostatic model is developed to compute internal waves. A novel grid arrangement is incorporated in the model. This not only ensures the homogenous Dirichlet boundary condition for the non-hydrostatic pressure can be precisely and easily imposed but also renders the model relatively simple in its discretized form. The Perot scheme is employed to discretize horizontal advection terms in the horizontal momentum equations, which is based on staggered grids and has the conservative property. Based on previous water wave models, the main works of the present paper are to (1) utilize a semi-implicit, fractional step algorithm to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE); (2) develop a second-order flux-limiter method satisfying the max-min property; (3) incorporate a density equation, which is solved by a high-resolution finite volume method ensuring mass conservation and max-min property based on a vertical boundary-fitted coordinate system; and (4) validate the developed model by using four tests including two internal seiche waves, lock-exchange flow, and internal solitary wave breaking. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solutions or experimental data or other model results show reasonably good agreement, demonstrating the model's capability to resolve internal waves relating to complex non-hydrostatic phenomena.

  20. Baseline designs of moored and grazing 40-MW OTEC pilot plants. Volume A: Detailed report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, J. F.; Richards, D.

    1980-06-01

    Baseline designs of two types of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) pilot plants are presented. Both designs feature floating concrete hull structures that house up to 40 MW sub e (net) of OTEC power systems. One plant is designed for moored operation at an island site, and use underwater cables to transmit electric power to a shore-based utility company. The other plant is self-propelled and cruises slowly through tropical waters, using the OTEC electric power to produce an energy intensive product onboard, where it is stored for later transshipment to market.

  1. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    PubMed

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  2. A hydrostatic stress-dependent anisotropic model of viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Tao, Q.; Verrilli, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrostatic stress-dependent, anisotropic model of viscoplasticity is formulated as an extension of Bodner's model. This represents a further extension of the isotropic Bodner model over that made to anisotropy by Robinson and MitiKavuma. Account is made of the inelastic deformation that can occur in metallic composites under hydrostatic stress. A procedure for determining the material parameters is identified that is virtually identical to the established characterization procedure for the original Bodner model. Characterization can be achieved using longitudinal/transverse tensile and shear tests and hydrostatic stress tests; alternatively, four off-axis tensile tests can be used. Conditions for a yield stress minimum under off-axis tension are discussed. The model is applied to a W/Cu composite; characterization is made using off-axis tensile data generated at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  3. Mooring apparatus and method of installation for deep water tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, A.F.; Zimmer.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for mooring a floating tension leg platform to a subsea anchorage utilizing a plurality of linear mooring tendons which each may be provided with an enlarged upper connector. The apparatus comprises a plurality of mooring porches attached to an external surface of the floating platform, each mooring porch including at least one load ring having an upwardly facing bearing surface and being interrupted creating a side-entry opening for receiving one of the linear mooring tendons whereby each one of the linear mooring tendons may be moved laterally through one of the side-entry openings and the enlarged upper connector received in the upwardly facing bearing surface to attach the mooring tendon to the floating platform.

  4. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  5. A model for hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Braddock, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for consolidation of transversely isotropic porous media under hydrostatic stress. The solutions are applied to model the time variation of pore pressure, volume strain and strains parallel and normal to bedding, and to obtain coefficients of consolidation and permeability, as well as other properties, and the bulk modulus resulting from hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale. It is found that the coefficients consolidation and permeability decrease and the bulk moduli increase with increasing confining pressure, reflecting the closure of voids in the rock. ?? 1991.

  6. Hip hemiarthroplasty: from Venable and Bohlman to Moore and Thompson.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Quiennec, Steffen; Guissou, Isaac

    2014-03-01

    In 1939, Frederick R. Thompson of New York and Austin T. Moore of South Carolina separately developed replacements for the entire ball of the hip. These were used to treat hip fractures and also certain arthritis cases. This type of hemiarthroplasty addressed the problem of the arthritic femoral head only. The diseased acetabulum (hip socket) was not replaced. This prosthesis consisted of a metal stem that was placed into the marrow cavity of the femur, connected in one piece with a metal ball fitted into the hip socket. Bohlman and Austin T. Moore (1939) collaborated for the fabrication and implantation of a custom made 12-inch-long vitallium (metal alloy invented by Venable) femoral head prosthesis for a patient with a recurrent giant cell tumour. This prosthesis functioned well and later on influenced the development of long stem femoral head prostheses.

  7. Genes and social justice: a Rawlsian reply to Moore.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colin

    2002-02-01

    In this article I critically examine Adam Moore's claim that the threshold for overriding intangible property rights and privacy rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. I argue that Moore fails to see how important advances in genetic research are to social justice. Once this point is emphasized one sees that the issue of how formidable overriding these rights are is open to much debate. There are strong reasons, on grounds of social justice, for thinking the importance of such rights is likely to be diminished in the interests of ensuring a more just distribution of genes essential to pursuing what John Rawls calls a person's 'rational plan of life'.

  8. The Moore-Penrose Inverse of Block Magic Rectangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakopian, Y. R.; Eloyan, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    As is known, a semi-magic square is an "n x n" matrix having the sum of entries in each row and each column equal to a constant. This note generalizes this notion and introduce a special class of block matrices called "block magic rectangles." It is proved that the Moore-Penrose inverse of a block magic rectangle is also a block magic rectangle.

  9. Geology and mineral deposits of the Minnie Moore and Bullion mineralized areas, Blaine County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Paul Karl; Worl, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    In the early 1880?s the discovery of rich ores in the Minnie Moore and Bullion mineralized areas sparked a rush to settle and develop the Wood River valley. Silver and lead discoveries in these areas spurred the boom in mining after completion of the Oregon Short Line Railroad to Hailey in 1883. In both areas the ore comprises galena, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite in a gangue of siderite, calcite, or quartz. Minor goldbearing quartz veins are also present. The ore is in fissure and replacement veins along fracture systems that formed in Late Cretaceous time, after intrusion of nearby granodiorite or quartz diorite stocks. The ore formed under mesothermal conditions and heat was supplied by the nearby plutons. In the Minnie Moore area, the mineralized veins are cut by low-angle normal faults that are of probable Eocene age. In the Minnie Moore mineralized area, the host rock is the middle part of the Devonian Milligen Formation, (the informal Lucky Coin limestone and Triumph argillite), which is the same stratigraphic level as the host ore in the rich Triumph mine northeast of Hailey. In the Bullion mineralized area, the ore is hosted by the lower member of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Dollarhide Formation. Rich ore was mined in several tunnels that reached the Mayflower vein, a northwest-striking mineralized shear zone. The deposits are thought to be mainly mesothermal veins that formed in association with Cretaceous magmatism. The syngenetic stratiform model of ore formation has often been applied to these deposits, however, no evidence of syngenetic mineralization was found in this study. Faulting has displaced most of the major orebodies and thus has made mining these deposits a challenge.

  10. Uraniferous asphaltite in Moore and Potter Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.; Granata, G.E.

    1980-06-01

    Asphaltite is present in facies of the Red Cave and Panhandle lime Formation. Drill cuttings from 30 Moore County wells and 4 cores distributed across Moore and Potter Counties were examined for asphaltite. Results show that asphaltite is widespread but seems to be most abundant over structural highs, and that there is a facies control of asphaltite occurrences. In drill cuttings sandstones contain most abundant nodules yet the nodules are generally very small. Largest nodules were commonly observed in mudstone core samples. A potential exploration program should take those observations into account. Once exploitable deposits are located and if proper in situ leaching materials were developed for extraction of uranium, only sandstones could be worked. Interchannel mudstones are too impermeable and nonporous. Subsurface mining would be forced to address potential problems derived from high concentrations of hydrocarbons in the target rocks (Red Cave Formation produces oil and gas in Moore County) as well as high levels of radon (averages 100 x 10/sup -12/ curies per liter STP) in gas produced from the Panhandle Field.

  11. Protein dynamics: Moore's law in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-01-25

    The millisecond barrier has been broken in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins. Such simulations are increasingly revealing the inner workings of biological systems by generating atomic-level descriptions of their behaviour that make testable predictions about key molecular processes.

  12. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  13. Implausibility of Hydrostatic Funnels Constituting the Sun's Upper Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Carpio, Melisa M.; Sheung, Janet

    2007-09-01

    Over the past thirty years, two bodies of literature have developed in parallel presenting mutually exclusive views of the Sun’s upper transition region. One model holds that the Sun’s upper-transition-region plasmas are confined primarily in hydrostatic funnels with a substantial backheating component. The other model holds that discrete structures, which are effectively isolated from the corona, predominate in the Sun’s upper transition region. Purveyors of the latter position have recently begun to present near-resolved observations of discrete structures. The funnel scenario, in contrast, has only been addressed by modeling unresolved upper transition region emission. To address this paradox we have constructed hydrostatic funnel models and tested them against a wider set of solar observations than previously performed. We reproduce the results of the previous analyses, yet find that the hydrostatic funnels are unable to self-consistently match the wider set of observations against which we test the models. We show that it is not possible for a class of funnels having peak temperatures in the transition region or in the corona to match the observations. We conclude that it is implausible that a class of hydrostatic funnels constitutes the dominant emitting component of the Sun’s upper-transition-region plasmas as has been suggested.

  14. [Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Jun; Xu, Jian-Xing

    2005-08-01

    Physiological characterizations of Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 11994 and Escherichia coli ATCC 80739 have deeply changed by high hydrostatic pressure. The results showed that counts of both microbial strains decreased 7 log cfu at 400MPa, 10 min. Pressure treatments also resulted in change of Intracellular pH value, lowed membrane potential, have internal potassium filtered out, and decreased ATP concentration.

  15. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G.; Gerth, Howard L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  16. Numerical construction of magneto-hydrostatic atmospheres in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, Stuart; Braun, Douglas; Barnes, Graham

    2016-05-01

    There is a general interest in constructing magneto-hydrostatic models of the solar atmosphere. These models describe large-scale, long-lived magnetic structures like sunspots, prominences, coronal loops, and the corona itself on global scales. The nonlinearity of the magneto-hydrostatic equations prohibits direct analytic solution except when idealized approximations like self-similarity are made. Numerical approaches, too, are limited in scope, and primarily focus on the two-dimensional problem --- the general three-dimensional magneto-hydrostatic problem is not treated. In this presentation we present a new numerical scheme for solving the magneto-hydrostatic equations in three dimensions. We are presently using this method to construct sunspot models for helioseismic MHD wave-propagation simulations with the goal of comparing the simulations to local-helioseismic measurements. We will present the details of the method and its application to test cases.This work is supported by NASA Heliophysics Division through grant NNX14AD42G and by the NSF Solar-Terrestrial program through grant AGS-1127327.

  17. Comparison of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure to inactivate foodborne viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) and hydrodynamic pressure (HDP), in combination with chemical treatments, was evaluated for inactivation of foodborne viruses and non-pathogenic surrogates in a pork sausage product. Sausages were immersed in water, 100 ppm EDTA, or 2 percent lactoferrin...

  18. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  19. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  20. Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick; Rees, Robin

    2011-02-01

    1. The Solar System; 2. The Sun; 3. The Moon; 4. Mercury; 5. Venus; 6. Earth; 7. Mars; 8. The asteroid belt; 9. Jupiter; 10. Saturn; 11. Uranus; 12. Neptune; 13. Beyond Neptune: the Kuiper Belt; 14. Comets; 15. Meteors; 16. Meteorites; 17. Glows and atmospheric effects; 18. The stars; 19. Stellar spectra and evolution; 20. Extrasolar planets; 21. Double stars; 22. Variable stars; 23. Stellar clusters; 24. Nebulae; 25. The Galaxy; 26. The evolution of the Universe; 27. The constellations; 28. The star catalogue; 29. Telescopes and observatories; 30. Non-optical astronomy; 31. The history of astronomy; 32. Astronomers; 33. Glossary; Index.

  1. Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick; Rees, Robin

    2014-01-01

    1. The Solar System; 2. The Sun; 3. The Moon; 4. Mercury; 5. Venus; 6. Earth; 7. Mars; 8. The asteroid belt; 9. Jupiter; 10. Saturn; 11. Uranus; 12. Neptune; 13. Beyond Neptune: the Kuiper Belt; 14. Comets; 15. Meteors; 16. Meteorites; 17. Glows and atmospheric effects; 18. The stars; 19. Stellar spectra and evolution; 20. Extrasolar planets; 21. Double stars; 22. Variable stars; 23. Stellar clusters; 24. Nebulae; 25. The Galaxy; 26. The evolution of the Universe; 27. The constellations; 28. The star catalogue; 29. Telescopes and observatories; 30. Non-optical astronomy; 31. The history of astronomy; 32. Astronomers; 33. Glossary; Index.

  2. Beyond Moore's law: towards competitive quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    A century after the invention of quantum theory and fifty years after Bell's inequality we see the first quantum devices emerge as products that aim to be competitive with the best classical computing devices. While a universal quantum computer of non-trivial size is still out of reach there exist a number commercial and experimental devices: quantum random number generators, quantum simulators and quantum annealers. In this colloquium I will present some of these devices and validation tests we performed on them. Quantum random number generators use the inherent randomness in quantum measurements to produce true random numbers, unlike classical pseudorandom number generators which are inherently deterministic. Optical lattice emulators use ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices to mimic typical models of condensed matter physics. In my talk I will focus especially on the devices built by Canadian company D-Wave systems, which are special purpose quantum simulators for solving hard classical optimization problems. I will review the controversy around the quantum nature of these devices and will compare them to state of the art classical algorithms. I will end with an outlook towards universal quantum computing and end with the question: which important problems that are intractable even for post-exa-scale classical computers could we expect to solve once we have a universal quantum computer?

  3. Numerical investigation of mooring line damping and the drag coefficients of studless chain links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengqiang; Huang, Shan

    2014-03-01

    The chain/wire rope/chain combination is a common choice for mooring offshore floating platforms. However, data of the drag coefficients of chain links are rather limited, resulting in uncertainties with the calculations of the drag force, and hence the damping of the mooring system. In this paper, the importance of the selection of the drag coefficient is first investigated. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is then used to determine the drag coefficients of a studless chain under steady flows. Numerical model validation is first completed by simulating a smooth circular cylinder under steady flows. In particular, the performance of different turbulence models is assessed through the comparisons between the calculations and the experimental results. The large eddy simulation (LES) model is finally selected for the simulation of steady flows past a chain. The effects of the Reynolds number on the drag coefficient of a stud-less chain is also studied. The results show that the calculated drag coefficients of a stud-less chain are fairly consistent with the available experimental data.

  4. Cell compressibility studies utilizing noncontact hydrostatic pressure measurements on single living cells in a microchamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. A. G.; Liu, A. Q.; Yu, Y. F.; Zhang, C.; Lim, C. S.; Ng, S. H.; Yap, P. H.; Gao, H. J.

    2008-06-01

    A micro-optical-fluidic system (MOFS), which integrates a force generating device and an optical detector, is designed to measure the bulk modulus of a single living cell in real time under a controlled hydrostatic pressure. In this design, the accuracy of the bulk modulus measurement is improved because neither the force generating device nor the optical detector needs to be in contact with the cells. The MOFS device has been used to investigate the mechanotransduction of THP-1 human acute monocytic leukemia cells and the effects of the toxin lipopolysaccharide and colchicine on various properties of these cells.

  5. Reversible Morphological Control of Tubulin-Encapsulating Giant Liposomes by Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahito; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kazayama, Yuki; Toyota, Taro; Harada, Yoshie; Takiguchi, Kingo

    2016-04-19

    Liposomes encapsulating cytoskeletons have drawn much recent attention to develop an artificial cell-like chemical-machinery; however, as far as we know, there has been no report showing isothermally reversible morphological changes of liposomes containing cytoskeletons because the sets of various regulatory factors, that is, their interacting proteins, are required to control the state of every reaction system of cytoskeletons. Here we focused on hydrostatic pressure to control the polymerization state of microtubules (MTs) within cell-sized giant liposomes (diameters ∼10 μm). MT is the cytoskeleton formed by the polymerization of tubulin, and cytoskeletal systems consisting of MTs are very dynamic and play many important roles in living cells, such as the morphogenesis of nerve cells and formation of the spindle apparatus during mitosis. Using real-time imaging with a high-pressure microscope, we examined the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the morphology of tubulin-encapsulating giant liposomes. At ambient pressure (0.1 MPa), many liposomes formed protrusions due to tubulin polymerization within them. When high pressure (60 MPa) was applied, the protrusions shrank within several tens of seconds. This process was repeatedly inducible (around three times), and after the pressure was released, the protrusions regenerated within several minutes. These deformation rates of the liposomes are close to the velocities of migrating or shape-changing living cells rather than the shortening and elongation rates of the single MTs, which have been previously measured. These results demonstrate that the elongation and shortening of protrusions of giant liposomes is repeatedly controllable by regulating the polymerization state of MTs within them by applying and releasing hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27023063

  6. The impact energy of a moored tanker under the action of regular waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Cheng Li

    1982-09-01

    The influence that factors such as mooring line conditions, fender arrangements, dolphin arrangements, degree of ship loading, waves of long period, wave direction, and wind on the impact energy of a moored tanker were studied. Based on systematic test data, a semi-empirical formula was developed to calculate the impact energy of the moored ship on the berthing facilities under the action of regular waves. It was shown by experiment that this method is suitable for calculating the impact energy of moored ships of capacities as great as 200 X 10/sup 3/ t.

  7. Intel turns to photonics to extend Moore's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitz, Breck

    2009-07-01

    Mario Paniccia settles into his chair with an air of confidence that comes from having been right all along. "We have done all the things that sceptics said we could not," he says. Paniccia, who is director of Intel's Photonics Technology Laboratory in Santa Clara, California, ticks off his group's accomplishments: silicon lasers; high-speed silicon modulators; fast, sensitive silicon photodetectors in the infrared. "We have got beyond the proof-of-principle stage," he says. "Now we're putting it all together so that Moore's law can extend for decades into the future."

  8. Refolding of endostatin from inclusion bodies using high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Chura-Chambi, Rosa Maria; Genova, Luis Antonio; Affonso, Regina; Morganti, Ligia

    2008-08-01

    High hydrostatic pressure was used for concomitant solubilization and refolding of insoluble endostatin (ES) aggregated as inclusion bodies (IBs). High hydrostatic pressure (200 MPa or 2 kbar) was applied in combination with nondenaturing concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride. High levels of correctly folded ES (90 mg/L culture) were obtained after optimization/standardization of the procedure by applying pressures of 200 MPa for 16 h in 1.5 M guanidine hydrochloride/0.5 mM oxidized glutathione and reduced glutathione. Refolded ES was purified by affinity chromatography on a heparin column and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, size exclusion HPLC, circular dichroism, and intrinsic fluorescence. We demonstrated that high pressure can successfully convert insoluble IBs of ES expressed in Escherichia coli into an ES preparation with native tertiary structure and full biological activity.

  9. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on tissue engineered bone development.

    PubMed

    Neßler, K H L; Henstock, J R; El Haj, A J; Waters, S L; Whiteley, J P; Osborne, J M

    2016-04-01

    The hydrostatic pressure stimulation of an appropriately cell-seeded porous scaffold within a bioreactor is a promising method for engineering bone tissue external to the body. We propose a mathematical model, and employ a suite of candidate constitutive laws, to qualitatively describe the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quantity of minerals deposited in such an experimental setup. By comparing data from numerical simulations with experimental observations under a number of stimulation protocols, we suggest that the response of bone cells to an applied pressure requires consideration of two components; (i) a component describing the cell memory of the applied stimulation, and (ii) a recovery component, capturing the time cells require to recover from high rates of mineralisation. PMID:26796221

  10. Hydrostatic compression of Fe(1-x)O wuestite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Sato-Sorensen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrostatic compression measurements on Fe(0.95)O wuestite up to 12 GPa yield a room temperature value for the isothermal bulk modulus of K(ot) = 157 (+ or - 10) GPa at zero pressure. This result is in accord with previous hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic measurements of K(ot) for wuestites of composition: 0.89 = Fe/O 0.95. Dynamic measurements of the bulk modulus by ultrasonic, shock-wave and neutron-scattering experiments tend to yield a larger value: K(ot) approximately 180 GPa. The discrepancy between static and dynamic values cannot be explained by the variation of K(ot) with composition, as has been proposed. This conclusion is based on high-precision compression data and on theoretical models of the effects of defects on elastic constants. Barring serious errors in the published measurements, the available data suggest that wuestite exhibits a volume relaxation under pressure.

  11. Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

    1987-07-01

    An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

  12. Steel pressure vessels for hydrostatic pressures to 50 kilobars.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, A; Whalley, E

    1978-07-01

    Cylindrical steel pressure vessels are described that can be used for hydrostatic pressures up to 50 kilobars. Monoblock vessels of 350 maraging steel can be used to 40 kilobars and compound vessels with an inner vessel of 350 maraging steel and an outer vessel of 300 maraging steel to 50 kilobars. Neither requires the cylinder to be end loaded, and so they are much easier to use than the more usual compound vessels with a tungsten carbide inner and steel outer vessel.

  13. High hydrostatic pressure treatment of finfish to inactivate Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Dong, Faye M; Cook, Allison R; Herwig, Russell P

    2003-10-01

    High hydrostatic pressure has been demonstrated to be a useful technique for treating food to reduce the number of pathogenic organisms and to extend shelf life. Most research in this area has focused on bacteria. However, a concern in the sashimi (raw fish) industry is that nematode worms such as Anisakis simplex occur naturally in cold-water marine fish. The objectives of this research were to perform a pilot study to determine the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the viability of Anisakis simplex larvae, commonly found in king salmon and arrowtooth flounder, and to evaluate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on the color and texture of the fish fillets. Pieces of fish (ca. 100 g per bag) containing 13 to 118 larvae were exposed to pressures of up to 80,000 lb/in2 (552 MPa) for up to 180 s. The times and pressures required to kill 100% of the larvae were as follows: 30 to 60 s at 60,000 lb/in2 (414 MPa), 90 to 180 s at 40,000 lb/in2 (276 MPa), and 180 s at 30,000 lb/in2 (207 MPa). For all salmon treatments that killed 100% of the larvae, a significant increase in the whiteness of the flesh was observed. Although high hydrostatic pressure was effective in killing A. simplex larvae in raw fish fillets, its significant effect on the color and overall appearance of the fillet may limit its application to the processing of fish for raw-fish markets.

  14. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Exposure on Hepatic Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Recker, Stephanie; Bukovec, Melani; Sparks, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) have the potential to regenerate healthy tissue in the setting of chronic liver disease. The goal of this study was to characterize the mechanosensitivity of HPCs to sustained hydrostatic pressure (20 mmHg) similar to that observed in liver cirrhosis. Bipotential Murine Oval Liver (BMOL) cells, an HPC-like cell line, were cultured in a hydrostatic pressure controlled chamber at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 4 days (to 90% confluency) or 12 days (superconfluency). Controls were run for each time point in a standard incubator without pressure. Nuclei were stained with DAPI and cells were viewed under a Zeiss 710 laser scanning confocal microscope with 40x objective. Nuclei were measured with Image J software (170 to 398 distinct cell nucleus area measurements per group). Two-way ANOVA was used to examine the influence of pressure and confluency on nuclear size. Cells exposed to pressure (mean nuclear area 126.7µm2, S.D. 56.9) had significantly larger nuclei than control cells (mean nuclear area 102.3µm2, S.D. 84.1), p<.001. The pressure*confluency interaction was also significant (p<.05). Results suggest that HPCs are sensitive to low-level hydrostatic pressure associated with chronic liver disease. Further experiments include analyzing cellular proliferation, morphology, and differentiation effects associated with pressure exposure.

  15. Samuel Preston Moore: Surgeon-General of the Confederacy.

    PubMed

    Purcell, P N; Hummel, R P

    1992-10-01

    Samuel Preston Moore was trained as a military surgeon in the US Army but resigned his commission and was appointed Surgeon-General of the Confederate States Army Medical Department at the beginning of the American Civil War. He reformed the mediocre medical corps by raising recruiting standards and improving treatment protocols and by placing the most capable surgeons in positions of authority. He improved the ambulance corps and directed the construction of many new hospitals for Confederate casualties. He was directly responsible for the barracks hospital design, which is still used today. He established the Confederate States Medical and Surgical Journal and directed a successful effort to develop substitutes for scarce pharmaceuticals from the indigenous flora of the South. He founded the Association of Army and Navy Surgeons of the Confederate States of America. With skill and dedication, Dr. Moore transformed the medical corps into one of the most effective departments of the Confederate military and was responsible for saving thousands of lives on the battlefield. PMID:1415944

  16. Evaluating the role of hydrostatic gradient and structural dip on subsurface dissolution of evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, E.; Konz, M.; Younes, A.; Huggenberger, P.

    2009-04-01

    Typically, four basic requirements are defined for subsurface dissolution of salt (NaCl), or gypsum (CaSO4): (1) a deposit of salt or gypsum against which, or through which water can flow, (2) a supply of water undersaturated with NaCl, or CaSO4, (3) an outlet where the resulting brine can escape, and (4) energy, such as provided by a hydrostatic head, or density gradient, which causes groundwater flow through the system. Based on an approximately 1000m long, and 150m deep 2D field scale model, which represents a setup of two aquifers connected by subvertical fault zones, a series of 2D density-coupled solute transport simulations were conducted. Hydraulic boundary conditions were assigned according to a regional 3D groundwater flow model. The maintained hydrostatic gradient in the 2D model section is a result of both a natural hydrostatic gradient and a superimposed anthropogenic large-scale groundwater withdrawal in the upper aquifer. A numerical model based on Mixed Finite Elements for the fluid flow problem and a combination of Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element and Multi-Point Flux Approximation methods for the transport turned out to be adequate for the simulation of density driven flow. Results indicate that the upconing process of saline groundwater from the deeper aquifer above the halite formation to the upper aquifer occurs under different sets of subsurface parameter constellations and hydraulic boundary conditions. Steady-state of the concentration distribution in the upper aquifer is reached in most simulations after relative short time span, and increased salinities are affecting most parts of the aquifer. The resulting salinity stratification with increase towards the bottom of the upper aquifer corresponds both to field observation data and measurements in laboratory scale flow tank experiments. Moreover, the effect of the anthropogenic groundwater withdrawal on salt dissolution rate is significantly lower than expected. Considerably more

  17. Non-Hydrostatic Modelling of Waves and Currents over Subtle Bathymetric Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, E.; Mulligan, R. P.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Localized areas with high rates of shoreline erosion on beaches, referred to as erosional hotspots, can occur near clusters of relict shore-oblique sandbars. Wave transformation and wave-driven currents over these morphological features could provide an understanding of the hydrodynamic-morphologic coupling mechanism that connects them to the occurrence of erosional hotspots. To investigate this, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model that phase-resolves the free surface and fluid motions throughout the water column, allowing for high resolution of wave propagation and breaking processes. In this study we apply a coupled system of nested models including SWAN over a large domain of the North Carolina shelf with smaller nested SWASH domains in areas of interest to determine the hydrodynamic processes occurring over shore oblique bars. In this presentation we focus on a high resolution grid (10 vertical layers, 10 m horizontal resolution) applied to the Duck region with model validation from acoustic wave and current data, and observations from the Coastal Lidar And Radar Imaging System (CLARIS). By altering the bathymetry input for each model run based on bathymetric surveys and comparing the predicted and observed wave heights and current profiles, the effects of subtle bathymetric perturbations have on wave refraction, wave breaking, surf zone currents and vorticity are investigated. The ability to predict wave breaking and hydrodynamics with a non-hydrostatic model may improve our understanding of surf zone dynamics in relation to morphologic conditions.

  18. A new generation of the regional climate model REMO: REMO non-hydrostatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Kevin; Raub, Thomas; Marien, Lennart; Buntemeyer, Lars; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    The regional climate model REMO is well established and has proofed it's value in regional climate simulations for more than a decade. However, due to the hydrostatic formulation REMO is not able to produce useful regional climate information on scales smaller than ~10 km. The demand for higher resolution data especially in the climate service sector is evident. Often climate change information on urban district or even point level is needed. A previous development of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core for REMO utilizing ideas of Miller and Pearce (1974) and Janjic (2001) has been picked up and implemented into the latest hydrostatic REMO version. One of the advantages of the Janjic formulation is that hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic computations are well separated. This offers a straightforward implementation of the non-hydrostatic calculations into an existing hydrostatic model. Other advantages are the easy quantification of the error done by the hydrostatic approximation and the lower computational costs at lower resolutions by switching of the non-hydrostatic part. We will show results from climate simulations on the EURO-CORDEX domain with and without non-hydrostatic option.

  19. Benjamin Moore, Science, and Medical Planning in Early Twentieth-Century Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Gordon S.

    2008-01-01

    Benjamin Moore (1867-1922), physiologist and biochemist, was an eminent member of the British scientific and medical community in the early twentieth century. As a founder and president of the State Medical Services Association (SMSA) from its establishment in 1912 until his untimely death in 1922, Moore was a prominent medical services activist…

  20. Welcome Home Annie: Rethinking Ellis Island and Annie Moore in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Mia

    2008-01-01

    The story of the United States and the people who have made it their home would not be complete without considering the experience of Irish immigrants--particularly the experience of Annie Moore, the first immigrant to be processed on Ellis Island. However, the story of Annie Moore, and how it has been recounted and taught to date, is inaccurate.…

  1. Using the "Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a Feminist Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jule, Allyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a teaching tool used with a group of final-year undergraduate students who gathered together last academic year (2007-8) to explore Women in Leadership, as part of a Communications course. The research focus was: How can the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (a 1970-7 American…

  2. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  3. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  4. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  5. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  6. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall lead forward from the break of the bow and one line shall lead astern from the quarter and be... astern from the break of the bow through chocks to suitable mooring bitts on deck; (2) Vessels of more... operated by the main drums of adequate power operated winches as follows: (i) One mooring line shall...

  7. 75 FR 82243 - Security Zones; Moored Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Moored Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego... a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is moored at any berth within the San Diego port area inside the sea buoys bounding the Port of San Diego. This temporary final rule is necessary to...

  8. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  9. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  10. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  11. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  12. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  13. Compression of α-cristobalite under different hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernok, Ana; Marquardt, Katharina; Bykova, Elena; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    The response of α-cristobalite to high-pressure has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies for more than two decades. The results indicated prolific polymorphism under high pressures, yet no consensus has emerged on what is the sequence of these pressure-induced transformations. In particular, the structure of the high-pressure polymorph that appears above ~10 GPa (hereafter cristobalite X-I), which is believed to be a direct link between the low-pressure (silicon in SiO4 tetrahedra) and the high-pressure (SiO6 octahedra) forms of silica remained elusive. This study examined the response of α-cristobalite when compressed at different levels of hydrostaticity, with the special focus on formation and stability of cristobalite X-I. The structural behavior of cristobalite under pressure was investigated up to ~80 GPa and at ambient temperature. We investigated behavior of single crystals and powders, in either (quasy)-hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic environment. In situ high pressure transformation path and structural behavior was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples recovered after pressure release were additionally investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Low- or α-cristobalite responds differently to high pressure depending on the degree of the hydrostaticity. The highest attainable hydrostaticity preserves the initial structure of cristobalite at least up to ~15 GPa. When the crystal experiences even slight stresses during an experiment, transformation sequence leads to cristobalite X-I - a monoclinic polymorph with silicon in octahedral coordination. This polymorph belongs to the family of the high-pressure silica phases that are comprised of distorted close-packed array of oxygen ions in which silicon atoms fully or partially occupy octahedral sites. The reflections collected on a single crystal at ~11 GPa can be indexed by a monoclinic unit cell a=6.658(9) Å, b=4

  14. Podcasting at the University of Virginia Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

    PubMed

    Ragon, Bart; Looney, Ryan P

    2007-01-01

    The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library co-sponsors a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series in the fall and spring of each year. Each lecture is produced and recorded for the benefit of the University of Virginia Heath System and members of the surrounding community. In the fall of 2005, the Library decided to begin podcasting the lectures via the Internet. This article describes the investigation process for creating access to the content via podcast, Webcast, and direct download. The article also addresses how the Library is teaching podcasting in its annual Multimedia Bootcamp and exploring additional uses for podcasting. doi:10.1300/J115v26n01_02.

  15. Moore-Gibson-Thompson equation with memory, part I: exponential decay of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasiecka, Irena; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    We are interested in the Moore-Gibson-Thompson equation with memory τ{u}_{ttt}+ α u_{tt}+c2Au+bAu_t -int_0tg(t-s)A w(s){d}s=0. This model arises in high-frequency ultrasound applications accounting for thermal flux and molecular relaxation times. According to revisited extended irreversible thermodynamics, thermal flux relaxation leads to the third-order derivative in time while molecular relaxation leads to non-local effects governed by memory terms. The resulting model is of hyperbolic type with viscous effects. We first classify the memory into three types. Then, we study how a memory term creates damping mechanism and how the memory causes energy decay even in the cases when the original memoryless system is unstable.

  16. Titan's Hydrostatic Figure and a Possible Dynamic Tidal Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Schubert, G.

    2012-12-01

    An archive of radio Doppler data from the Cassini mission can be found in NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node as a series of binary files called Orbit Data Files (ODF). We have downloaded six ODFs from the Cassini mission for six Titan gravity passes T11 (27-Feb-2006), T22 (28-Dec-2006), T33 (29-Jun-2007), T45 (31-Jul-2008), T68 (20-May-2010) and T74 (18-Feb-2011). After converting to text files with JPL space-navigation software (ODDUMP), we convert the observed Doppler shift for the Cassini spacecraft to radial velocity along the line of sight (LOS) at one-second sample interval. These data can be fit by a numerical integration of the equations of motion for the craft with respect to Titan, and a subsequent projection of the velocity so obtained along the LOS. The orbital parameters are represented by six standard Kepler elements with the plane of sky as the fundamental reference system, the system used for spectroscopic binary stars. While the systemic velocity Vs is taken as a constant for binary stars, it is represented for spacecraft by six parameters in a function developed for the Doppler detection of gravitational waves. We adopt well-determined values for the GM of Titan and Saturn and add a 13th gravity parameter C22 for an ellipsoidal hydrostatic Titan distorted by the Saturn tide and synchronous rotation (J2 = (10/3) C22). Also, we adopt the IAU definition for the pole and prime meridian of Titan in the ICRF/J2000 reference system. The interval of observation for each flyby is held to two hours, centered as closely as possible on the time of closest approach to Titan. This interval is sufficiently long for purposes of including all the detectable signal from C22, but short enough that spacecraft-generated translational forces can be neglected. By iterating on a linear least-squares system, 13 converged parameters and associated covariance matrix are found by singular-value decomposition of the least-squares design matrix for each of the six flybys. With

  17. High resolution non-hydrostatic GCM simulations of Venus polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Alexander V.; Orlov, Konstantin; Mingalev, Igor

    Non-hydrostatic general circulation model of the Venus atmosphere is capable of reproducing both superrotatoin and subsolar-antisolar circulation, providing proper parameterization of the peculiar heat balance. Using high resolution (0.7 (o) in longitude and latitude, 250 m in height) simulations from the bottom to 120 km, we explore the response of the circulation system to perturbation of heating and cooling rates in the polar regions. It is shown that diurnal tide results in off-axis displacement of the polar vortex external part at the upper cloud level, consistent with the patterns retrieved from cloud tracking observations. On the other hand, minor (3 (o) -7 (o) ) displacement of the polar vortex central part constrains the diurnal variations of the heating/cooling rates within main cloud deck. Based on the recently developed radiative transfer code, we simulate heat balance in the polar Venus atmosphere, that results in realistic circulation pattern. It is shown that Hadley cell circulation provides extra heating above the clouds, resulting in the effective damping of superrotation and development of subsolar-antisolar circulation at higher altitudes. In turin high slant opacity of the polar atmosphere within the clouds provides the effective cooling near the pole, that causes non-hydrostatic downwelling flow, manifested as a core of the observed polar vortex. The work has been supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation grant #11.G34.31.0074

  18. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  19. The Enigmatic Core L1451-mm: A First Hydrostatic Core? Or a Hidden VeLLO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Arce, Héctor G.; Schnee, Scott; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bourke, Tyler; Foster, Jonathan B.; Robitaille, Thomas; Tanner, Joel; Kauffmann, Jens; Tafalla, Mario; Caselli, Paola; Anglada, Guillem

    2011-12-01

    We present the detection of a dust continuum source at 3 mm (CARMA) and 1.3 mm (Submillimeter Array, SMA), and 12CO (2-1) emission (SMA) toward the L1451-mm dense core. These detections suggest a compact object and an outflow where no point source at mid-infrared wavelengths is detected using Spitzer. An upper limit for the dense core bolometric luminosity of 0.05 L ⊙ is obtained. By modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution and the continuum interferometric visibilities simultaneously, we confirm that a central source of heating is needed to explain the observations. This modeling also shows that the data can be well fitted by a dense core with a young stellar object (YSO) and a disk, or by a dense core with a central first hydrostatic core (FHSC). Unfortunately, we are not able to decide between these two models, which produce similar fits. We also detect 12CO (2-1) emission with redshifted and blueshifted emission suggesting the presence of a slow and poorly collimated outflow, in opposition to what is usually found toward YSOs but in agreement with prediction from simulations of an FHSC. This presents the best candidate, so far, for an FHSC, an object that has been identified in simulations of collapsing dense cores. Whatever the true nature of the central object in L1451-mm, this core presents an excellent laboratory to study the earliest phases of low-mass star formation. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope, the Submillimeter Array, and CARMA. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). The Submillimeter Array is a joint project between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics and is funded by the Smithsonian Institution and the Academia Sinica. Support for CARMA construction was derived from the states of California, Illinois, and Maryland, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Kenneth T

  20. Whose waste is it anyway? The case of John Moore.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1988-01-01

    The author reports on a July 1988 decision of a California Court of Appeals (Moore v. Regents of the University of California) that recognized a proper cause of action against a doctor who used the diseased spleen he had removed from a patient to produce a product now being tested as an AIDS treatment without the patient's consent to this use of his spleen cells. The legal concepts of ownership, abandonment, and consent are analyzed as they apply to human body parts, and it is proposed that the Patent Act should be amended to prohibit the patenting of human cells and that the Organ Transplant Act should include a prohibition on the sale of human tissue and cells for any purpose, so that human cells can no longer be the source of commercial profit.

  1. 75 FR 1839 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Moore County Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Moore County Airport, Pinehurst/Southern Pines, NC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... that the FAA is considering a request from the Moore County Airport Authority to waive the requirement that a 27.7 acre parcel of surplus property, located at the Moore County Airport, be used...

  2. 33 CFR 149.650 - What are the requirements for single point moorings and their attached hoses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 2003, by any recognized classification society as defined in 46 CFR 8.100. Helicopter Fueling... single point moorings and their attached hoses? 149.650 Section 149.650 Navigation and Navigable Waters... single point moorings and their attached hoses? Each single point mooring and its attached hose must...

  3. Parallel finite element simulation of mooring forces on floating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, S.; Abedi, J.; Zellars, B.

    2003-03-01

    The coupling between the equations governing the free-surface flows, the six degrees of freedom non-linear rigid body dynamics, the linear elasticity equations for mesh-moving and the cables has resulted in a fluid-structure interaction technology capable of simulating mooring forces on floating objects. The finite element solution strategy is based on a combination approach derived from fixed-mesh and moving-mesh techniques. Here, the free-surface flow simulations are based on the Navier-Stokes equations written for two incompressible fluids where the impact of one fluid on the other one is extremely small. An interface function with two distinct values is used to locate the position of the free-surface. The stabilized finite element formulations are written and integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian domain. This allows us to handle the motion of the time dependent geometries. Forces and momentums exerted on the floating object by both water and hawsers are calculated and used to update the position of the floating object in time. In the mesh moving scheme, we assume that the computational domain is made of elastic materials. The linear elasticity equations are solved to obtain the displacements for each computational node. The non-linear rigid body dynamics equations are coupled with the governing equations of fluid flow and are solved simultaneously to update the position of the floating object. The numerical examples includes a 3D simulation of water waves impacting on a moored floating box and a model boat and simulation of floating object under water constrained with a cable.

  4. An analysis of the 70-meter antenna hydrostatic bearing by means of computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the computer program 'A Computer Solution for Hydrostatic Bearings with Variable Film Thickness,' used to design the hydrostatic bearing of the 70-meter antennas, was modified to improve the accuracy with which the program predicts the film height profile and oil pressure distribution between the hydrostatic bearing pad and the runner. This article presents a description of the modified computer program, the theory upon which the computer program computations are based, computer simulation results, and a discussion of the computer simulation results.

  5. Evaluation of a hybrid hydrostatic bearing for cryogenic turbopump application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spica, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.; Meyer, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid hydrostatic bearing was designed to operate in liquid hydrogen at speeds to 80,000 rpm and radial loads to 440 n (100 lbf). The bearing assembly consisted of a pair of 20-mm angular-contact ball bearings encased in a journal, which was in turn supported by a fluid film of liquid hydrogen. The size and operating conditions of the bearing were selected to be compatible with the operating requirements of an advanced technology turbopump. Several test parameters were varied to characterize the bearing's steady-state operation. The rotation of the tester shaft was varied between 0 and 80,000 rpm. Bearing inlet fluid pressure was varied between 2.07 and 4.48 MPa (300 and 650 psia), while the fluid sump pressure was independently varied between 0.34 and 2.07 MPa (50 and 300 psia). The maximum radial load applied to the bearing was 440 N (110 lbf). Measured hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing stiffness was 1.5 times greater than predicted, while the fluid flow rate through the bearing was 35 to 65 percent less than predicted. Under two-phase fluid conditions, the stiffness was even greater and the flow rate was less. The optimal pressure ratio for the bearing should be between 0.2 and 0.55 depending on the balance desired between bearing efficiency and stiffness. Startup and shutdown cyclic tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing assembly to survive at least a 300-firing-duty cycle. For a typical cycle, the shaft was accelerated to 50,000 rpm in 1.8 sec. The bearing operated for 337 start-stop cycles without failure.

  6. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Mary Ann; Bingert, John F.; Bingert, Sherri A.; Thoma, Dan J.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

  7. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-09-08

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

  8. Pasteurization of food by hydrostatic high pressure: chemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Tauscher, B

    1995-01-01

    Food pasteurized by hydrostatic high pressure have already been marketed in Japan. There is great interest in this method also in Europe and USA. Temperature and pressure are the essential parameters influencing the state of substances including foods. While the influence of temperature on food has been extensively investigated, effects of pressure, also in combination with temperature, are attracting increasing scientific attention now. Processes and reactions in food governed by Le Chatelier's principle are of special interest; they include chemical reactions of both low- and macromolecular compounds. Theoretical fundamentals and examples of pressure affected reactions are presented. PMID:7732731

  9. Nonaxisymmetric incompressible hydrostatic pressure effects in radial face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat seal having an angular misalinement is analyzed, taking into account the radial variations in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, tilting moment, and leakage is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalinement. Nonaxisymmetric hydrostatic pressures due to the radial variations in the film thickness have a considerable effect on seal stability. When the high pressure is on the outer periphery of the seal, both the axial force and the tilting moment are nonrestoring. The case of high-pressure seals where cavitation is eliminated is discussed, and the possibility of dynamic instability is pointed out.

  10. Single-molecule imaging at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Hugh; Lucas Black, S.; Flors, Cristina; Lloyd, Diarmuid; Bruce Ward, F.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2013-04-01

    Direct microscopic fluorescence imaging of single molecules can provide a wealth of mechanistic information, but up to now, it has not been possible under high pressure conditions, due to limitations in microscope pressure cell design. We describe a pressure cell window design that makes it possible to image directly single molecules at high hydrostatic pressure. We demonstrate our design by imaging single molecules of Alexa Fluor 647 dye bound to DNA, at 120 and 210 bar, and following their fluorescence photodynamics. We further show that the failure pressure of this type of pressure cell window can be in excess of 1 kbar.

  11. Results from a winter 2009-2010 nearshore mooring test in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dever, E. P.; Waldorf, B. W.; Risien, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), two surface moorings will be placed in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon and Grays Harbor, Washington. These moorings are intended to acquire continuous observations over the inner-shelf, where the surface boundary layer interacts continuously with the ocean bottom boundary layer. The moorings will utilize the WHOI-developed stretch hose technology implemented at several operational moorings along the US east coast. For the purposes of mooring survival, the largest significant waves need to be considered. Analysis of the historical record indicates the 100-year return period storm would generate 14.5 m high waves. The harsh wind and wave conditions encountered over the inner-shelf have the potential to cause mooring failure either by destroying surface buoy components, or by causing subsurface mooring components to fail. For example, during a winter storm in December 2007, several NDBC moorings along the Oregon and Washington coasts broke. To test modeling of mooring performance under winter conditions we constructed a test/pilot mooring with hardware, communications and power similar to the OOI buoy design. The test focused on the survivability of components. The mooring was equipped with a load cell to examine responses under varying wave and mean flow conditions. A secondary objective of the deployment was to test Ship-to-Ship/Ship-to-Shore Wireless Access Protocol (SWAP) telemetry from the buoy to shore over a distance of 1.5 km. Load cell data as well as buoy instruments (conductivity, temperature) were telemetered. This test mooring was deployed near one of the OOI sites in 25 m of water off Newport, Oregon in late October 2009. The mooring parted in mid-March 2010, two weeks prior to planned recovery. We recovered all mooring components, and we will report on the mooring design, the test, and the science and engineering data received.

  12. Autonomous and rapid deployment of a compact taut-wire mooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Theo; van Heerwaarden, Johan; Laan, Martin; Bakker, Roel; Groenewegen, Ruud; van Haren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    The deployment time of a taut-wire mooring is reduced to the time any transportation/hoisting device needs to put a payload at the sea surface. This is a matter of minutes rather than hours needed for deployment of long deep-ocean moorings in the regular way. It is achieved by extending the basic function of mooring parts to temporarily form a Launcher for Oceanographic Equipment and Instruments (LOEI). Full preparation of the mooring is done onshore where the instruments are prepared and programmed, and spooled onto the top-buoy together with the line. At sea, no other gear is required than a device that is able to lift a load of, say, 2000 kg, even for long deep-ocean moorings. The compact mooring method realizes considerable budget savings through deployments from non-research vessels and airborne transportation-deployment. Limitations lay in size and weight of the oceanographic instruments. We present a test-design shaped as a barbell and loaded with 940 m line and 3 current meters. Unfurling speed was maximally 2.3 m s -1 and the descent speed amounted 1.2 m s -1 until landing on the seabed. These speeds are comparable to those acquired during a conventional free-falling mooring deployment.

  13. Evaluation of station keeping systems for deepwater drilling semi-submersibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, An-Ke; Sun, Li-Ping; Luo, Yong; Wang, Qiang

    2010-09-01

    This paper addresses the need for systematic evaluation of the station keeping systems of deepwater drilling semi-submersibles. Based on the selected drilling semi-submersible configuration, the mooring systems were analyzed and designed for a range of water depths using different mooring line materials. These were steel wire rope, polyester rope and HMPE (high modulus poly ethylene). The mooring analysis was carried out using the advanced fully coupled time domain analysis method in the computer software package HARP. Diffraction analysis was first applied to solve the hydrodynamic properties of the vessel and then the motion equations of the complete dynamic system including the drilling rig, the mooring lines and risers were developed and solved in the time domain. Applying the advanced analysis method, a matrix of mooring systems was developed for operating in water depths of 1 000 m, 1 500 m, and 2 000 m using various mooring materials. The development of mooring systems was conducted in accordance with the commonly adopted mooring design code, API RP 2SK and API RP 2SM. Fresh attempts were then made to comparatively evaluate the mooring system’s characteristics and global performance. Useful results have been obtained in terms of mooring materials, water depths, and key parameters of mooring configurations. The results provide in-depth insight for the design and operation of deepwater mooring systems in the South China Sea environment.

  14. Accuracy in GPS/Acoustic positioning on a moored buoy moving around far from the optimal position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imano, M.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Hino, R.

    2015-12-01

    For detecting the seafloor crustal deformation and Tsunami associated with large earthquakes in real-time, it is necessary to monitor them just above the possible source region. For this purpose, we have been dedicated in developing a real-time continuous observation system using a multi-purpose moored buoy. Sea-trials of the system have been carried out near the Nanakai trough in 2013 and 2014 (Takahashi et al., 2014). We especially focused on the GPS/Acoustic measurement (GPS/A) in the system for horizontal crustal movement. The GPS/A on a moored buoy has a critical drawback compared to the traditional ones, in which the data can be stacked over ranging points fixed at an optimal position. Accuracy in positioning with a single ranging from an arbitrary point is the subject to be improved in this study. Here, we report the positioning results in the buoy system using data in the 2014 sea-trial and demonstrate the improvement of the result. We also address the potential resolving power in the positioning using synthetic tests. The target GPS/A site consists of six seafloor transponders (PXPs) forming a small inner- and a large outer-triangles. The bottom of the moored cable is anchored nearly the center of the triangles. In the sea-trial, 11 times successive ranging was scheduled once a week, and we plotted positioning results from different buoy position. We confirmed that scatter in positioning using six PXPs simultaneously is ten times smaller than that using individual triangle separately. Next, we modified the definition of the PXP array geometry using data obtained in a campaign observation. Definition of an array geometry is insensitive as far as ranging is made in the same position, however, severely affects the positioning when ranging is made from various positions like the moored buoy. The modified PXP array is slightly smaller and 2m deeper than the original one. We found that the scatter of positioning results in the sea-trial is reduced from 4m to 1

  15. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  16. Opportunities of hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    As a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) for several fields of application, so-called 'hydrostatically coupled' DEAs (HC-DEAs) have recently been described. HC-DEAs are based on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. This paper presents ongoing developments of HC-DEAs and potential applications in the field of haptics. Three specific examples are considered. The first deals with a wearable tactile display used to provide users with tactile feedback during electronic navigation in virtual environments. The display consists of HCDEAs arranged in contact with finger tips. As a second example, an up-scaled prototype version of an 8-dots refreshable cell for dynamic Braille displays is shown. Each Braille dot consists of a miniature HC-DEA, with a diameter lower than 2 mm. The third example refers to a device for finger rehabilitation, conceived to work as a sort of active version of a rehabilitation squeezing ball. The device is designed to dynamically change its compliance according to an electric control. The three examples of applications intend to show the potential of the new technology and the prospective opportunities for haptic interfaces.

  17. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  18. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  19. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si{sub Ga} shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  20. Optimization of conical hydrostatic bearing for minimum friction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Equations for the flow rate, load capacity, and friction torque for a conical hydrostatic bearing were developed. These equations were solved by a digital computer program to determine bearing configurations for minimum friction torque. Design curves are presented that show optimal bearing dimensions for minimum friction torque as a function of dimensionless flow rate for a range of dimensionless load capacity. Results are shown for both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The results indicate that hydrostatic pocket friction is a significant portion of the total friction torque. However, the bearing dimensions for a minimum friction design are affected very little by inclusion of pocket friction in the analysis. For laminar flow the values of the outer-land radius ratio X3 and outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change significantly with increasing friction factor. For turbulent flow, the outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change with increasing friction factor; therefore the value determined for X4 in the laminar flow case is valid for all turbulent flows.

  1. Sea-Change in Ocean Observations on Moored Buoys from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Elliott, J.; Pounder, D.; Kern, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presentation will provide the technical specifications, the systems engineering processes, and preliminary results from laboratory and field tests, as the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) undertakes a fundamental and broad transformation (sea-change) of its ocean observing systems on moored buoys. This transformation is necessary to gain efficiencies in maintaining operational ocean observation networks and to increase their reliability, which will reduce maintenance costs. The presentation will also compare and contrast existing and planned systems. The Self-Contained Ocean Observations Payload (SCOOP) takes advantage of the advances in communications and small, efficient, multi-purpose sensors to reduce the size and costs of systems and expand the suite of available real-time ocean observations. The communications will allow NDBC to increase the precision and decrease the latency of the observations. The hallmark of SCOOP is the modularity of the payloads that allow NDBC to host specialized systems, for the oceanographic research community, which may include observing ocean acidification and algal blooms, and tracking marine life, alongside its standard suite of meteorological, oceanographic, and wave systems. SCOOP will include cameras, primarily to document vandalism incidents, but they can also serve to corroborate many of the automatic observations. The two-year integration project - focused on recapitalization of NDBC's network of Hurricane Weather buoys - is aided by NDBC's 40 years of experience with marine observations and its continually improving approach to testing. Testimony to the rigor of NDBC's development and test procedures is that the World Meteorological Organization and the Intergovernmental Ocean Commission have designated NDBC as the first Regional Marine Instrumentation Center (RMIC). Integral to the fielding of these new systems is a Mission Control Center (MCC) performing the real-time, specialized monitoring and analyses and

  2. Hydrostatic intrapulpal pressure and bond strength of bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Pashley, D H; Montanari, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-pulpal pressure on shear bond strength of three light-cured glass-ionomer cements (GC lining cement, Vitrabond, and Zionomer) and four dentin bonding agents [Gluma/Scotchbond, Scotchbond 2, MBL, and Clearfil Photo Bond]. Buccal dentin surfaces were prepared just below the DEJ by means of a diamond bur. Dentin treatments were made for Zionomer (Zionomer conditioner), Scotchbond 2 (Scotchprep), MBL (10-3 solution), Clearfil PB (H3PO4), GC lining cement (Polyacrylic acid), and Gluma/Scotchbond (EDTA). Resin composites were inserted into tubes, positioned on dentin, cured, tested after five min or 24 h, and compared with samples bonded and stored under an intra-pulpal pressure of 36 cm of saline. After 24 h in superficial dentin, intrapulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only in MBL, Scotchbond 2, and Zionomer. Clearfil PB bond strength was increased, while Vitrabond, GC lining cement, and Gluma/Scotchbond were unaffected by the presence of pulpal pressure. However, in deep dentin, Scotchbond 2 and Clearfil PB shear bond strengths were significantly reduced by storage in the presence of 36-cm H2O pulpal pressure. Only Vitrabond remained unaffected by pulpal pressure in deep dentin. PMID:1901813

  3. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on water penetration and rotational dynamics in phospholipid-cholesterol bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Bernsdorff, C; Wolf, A; Winter, R; Gratton, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the lipid bilayer hydration, the mean order parameter, and rotational dynamics of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) cholesterol vesicles has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy up to 1500 bar. Whereas the degree of hydration in the lipid headgroup and interfacial region was assessed from fluorescence lifetime data using the probe 1-(4-trimethylammonium-phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH), the corresponding information in the upper acyl chain region was estimated from its effect on the fluorescence lifetime of and 3-(diphenylhexatrienyl)propyl-trimethylammonium (TMAP-DPH). The lifetime data indicate a greater level of interfacial hydration for DPPC bilayers than for POPC bilayers, but there is no marked difference in interchain hydration of the two bilayer systems. The addition of cholesterol at levels from 30 to 50 mol% to DPPC has a greater effect on the increase of hydrophobicity in the interfacial region of the bilayer than the application of hydrostatic pressure of several hundred to 1000 bar. Although the same trend is observed in the corresponding system, POPC/30 mol% cholesterol, the observed effects are markedly less pronounced. Whereas the rotational correlation times of the fluorophores decrease in passing the pressure-induced liquid-crystalline to gel phase transition of DPPC, the wobbling diffusion coefficient remains essentially unchanged. The wobbling diffusion constant of the two fluorophores changes markedly upon incorporation of 30 mol% cholesterol, and increases at higher pressures, also in the case of POPC/30 mol% cholesterol. The observed effects are discussed in terms of changes in the rotational characteristics of the fluorophores and the phase-state of the lipid mixture. The results demonstrate the ability of cholesterol to adjust the structural and dynamic properties of membranes composed of

  4. Load transfer with the Austin Moore cementless hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Keaveny, T M; Bartel, D L

    1993-03-01

    More than 1,300 Austin Moore hemiarthroplasties have been reviewed in the literature, with no reports of fracture of the stem. Many patients with these hip implants had good function. The lack of stem fractures in patients with good functions has not been explained and contrasts with stem fractures that have occurred in patients with cemented prostheses of other designs during the same time. We used three-dimensional finite-element analysis and free-body diagrams to explain the lack of fractures for this device by a description of the probable load-transfer mechanisms between the prosthesis and the bone. Results from our finite-element analysis indicate that, with good calcar-collar support, the stresses in the stem are small because the stem portion of the prosthesis and the bone are uncoupled and, consequently, do not share the resultant bending moment of the head and abductor forces. If the stem is coupled to the bone so that the resultant bending moment is shared, high stresses in the stem are predicted; such stresses are inconsistent with the complete absence of fractures of these prostheses. The results of the finite-element analysis further showed that loss of calcar-collar support with proximal fixation through the fenestrations resulted in high stresses in the stem and stress shielding of the proximal medial cortex. The uncoupled prosthesis also may be modeled with a free-body diagram as a three-force member loaded at the head, stem tip, and in the proximal region. With this model, it can be shown that the reaction force of the stem tip, and thus the peak bending stress in the stem, increases as calcar-collar support is decreased. If there is no calcar-collar support, proximal support must be provided by some combination of integration of bone in the fenestrations and wedging due to the lateral-medial taper of the device. Stresses in the stem are largest when there is no wedging, but high stresses develop in the cancellous bone in the fenestrations. When

  5. The NCEP Eulerian Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Z.; Vasic, R.; Djurdjevic, V.; Black, T.; Jovic, D.

    2014-12-01

    The unified Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB) is being developed at the National Centers for Environmental Predictions. The model dynamics preserve a number of important properties of differential operators and conserve a variety of first order and quadratic quantities. The nonlinear dynamics is controlled by conserving energy and enstrophy in case of non-divergent flow. Over-specification of non-hydrostatic vertical velocity is avoided. The physical package was developed from the WRF NMM's physics, but other physics options are also available. The regional version of the NMMB is run operationally as the main deterministic North American short-range forecasting model (NAM) and in a number of other applications. The global NMMB also has been run over the last few years experimentally in order to assess its capabilities and develop it further. In terms of large scale metrics, the performance of the global NMMB in medium range weather forecasting has been generally comparable to that of other major medium range forecasting systems. Its computational efficiency satisfies and exceeds the current and projected operational requirements. Recently, the transition has started of the operational hurricane forecasting system HWRF from the WRF NMM dynamics to those of the NMMB. This system involves the use of a hierarchy of 2-way interactive telescoping moving nests. The work on developing a unified multi-scale physics package has continued. Extended range forecasts showed large sensitivity to the method for representing clouds. With the clouds represented by optical properties of their microphysics species, the results depend on the microphysics scheme used. Also, taking into account the impact of convective clouds remains a challenge with this approach. Numerous sensitivity studies of physical parameterizations and the dynamical core features have been carried out as well. Relevant results will be presented and discussed, including some results of recent idealized

  6. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as ɛ = ( AP + B) σn over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where ɛ, P and σ denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constants. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain.

  7. EDITORIAL: Moore and more progress in electronics and photonics Moore and more progress in electronics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2009-10-01

    parts. The field of optoelectronics and photonics has been benefiting from the ability to synthesize semiconducting nanowires and quantum dots. Advances in light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, nanolasers, solar cells, and field emission devices have been abundantly reported in the journal. The future of these devices depends on our ability to control the size, orientation and properties of one- and zero-dimensional materials. The forecast for electronics and photonics has vastly underestimated developments, with predictions such as 'future computers will weigh no less than 1.5 tons'. Over the past twenty years, the number of transistors on a chip has risen from just 1 million to 2 billion, and is still increasing. Now the biggest question is: what will take over from Moore's law in about a decade? This question has been driving the research agenda in electronics across the industrial and academic world. The first answer appears to be integrating other functional components with logic and memory such as miniature camera modules, GPS, accelerometers, biometric identification, health monitoring systems, etc. Such integration is actively being pursued by industry. In contrast, a lot of new research is still driven by material innovations, for example, carbon nanotube based electronics. Rudimentary devices and circuits using SWCNTs have been demonstrated to outperform silicon devices of comparable size. However, controlling the chirality and diameter of SWCNTs is still a problem, as is the manufacture of 300-400 mm wafers with over 5-10 billion transistors, and all of this assumes that continuing on the path of CMOS but using a different material is the right approach in the first place. In the meantime, silicon and germanium in the form of nanowires may make their way into electronics. Then there is molecular electronics where conducting organic molecules could now become the heart of electronic components, although the precision and controllability of electrical contact

  8. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the United States or its outlying areas, including cutting, heat treating, quality control... items containing welded shipboard anchor and mooring chain, four inches or less in diameter. (End...

  9. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  10. CDIAC data management and archival support for a high-frequency atmospheric and seawater pCO2 data set from 14 open ocean moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyr, Alex; Sutton, Adrienne; Sabine, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and climate change are increasing ocean temperatures and affecting ocean chemistry (e.g., ocean acidification). Monitoring these important changes using ships and other platforms generates large amounts of data from heterogenous sources. Since its inception in 1993, when it became a member of the DOE/NOAA Ocean Carbon Science Team engaged in the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the CDIAC Ocean Carbon Data Management Project has been organizing, quality assuring, documenting, archiving and distributing ocean carbon-related data collected via a number of U.S. and international ocean-observing programs. CDIAC's ocean carbon data collection includes discrete and underway measurements from a variety of platforms (e.g., research ships, commercial ships, buoys) in all oceans from the surface to seafloor. One important project at CDIAC is the data management support for the Global CO2 Time-series and Moorings Project. This poster will describe the collaboration between NOAA/PMEL Mooring group and CDIAC in the data management and archival of a high-frequency atmospheric and seawater pCO2 data from 14 open ocean sites using moored autonomous systems.. Advancements in the ocean carbon observation network over the last decade, such as the development and deployment of Moored Autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) systems, have dramatically improved our ability to characterize ocean climate, sea-air gas exchange, and biogeochemical processes. The Moored Autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system provides high-resolution surface seawater and atmospheric CO2 data that can help us understand inter-annual, seasonal, and sub-seasonal dynamics and provide constrains on the impact of short-term biogeochemical variability on CO2 fluxes. CDIAC NDP-092 provides a description of the data as well as the methods and data quality control involved in developing an open-ocean MAPCO2 data set including over 100,000 individual atmospheric and seawater pCO2 measurements

  11. [Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on energy metabolism of Lactobacillus plantarum].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-long; Ju, Xing-rong; Jiang, Han-hu

    2006-02-01

    Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on energy metabolism were investigated with Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC8014 as the test microorganism in this work. An INT colorimetric method of oxidation-reduction was established to measure INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of L. plantarum ATCC8014 cells. The utilization of glucose and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of the cells after HPP treatment were determined using colorimetric methods. The experimental results showed that survival counts of ATCC8014 cells on MRS agar medium and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization decreased significantly, and little changes of utilization of glucose took place with increasing pressure ranging from 150 to 250 MPa for 15 min. Utilization of glucose also reduced evidently at high pressure ( > 300 MPa) for 15 min. Whereas survival cell counts on MRS agar medium were below the detection limit and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of ATCC8014 was 0% after a 15-min pressure holding time at 400MPa, utilization of glucose of the cells retained 56.1% compared with that of untreated cells. In summary, it can be concluded that enzymes absorbing and transporting glucose in cellular membrane appear to have a high resistance to pressure, enzymes and biological regulating systems involved in glycolysis are more resistant to pressure than those in TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) system, TCA of ATCC8014 is more sensitive to pressure than glycolysis, and the decrease of INT metabolic activity of deoxidization is highly related to cell reduction during HHP, which provide some theoretical evidences for mechanisms of HHP sterilization. Inhibition of TCA metabolism is a very important cause of ATCC8014 inactivation by HHP. High hydrostatic pressure can be used as an effective tool to explore pathways of biological metabolism.

  12. Evolution and formation of North Atlantic Eighteen Degree Water in the Sargasso Sea from moored data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Xujing Jia; Straneo, Fiammetta; Kwon, Young-Oh; Kelly, Kathryn A.; Toole, John M.

    2013-07-01

    Two profiling subsurface moorings were deployed as part of the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE) to study the formation and evolution of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) from November 2006 to November 2007. Both moorings were deployed south of the Gulf Stream in the EDW outcrop region, the northwestern part of the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic. The two moorings captured the seasonal evolution of EDW characterized by gradual mixed layer deepening and wintertime outcrop, rapid restratification from May to June and slower dissipation during the rest of the year. Superimposed on this seasonal cycle, the moored records are characterized by high frequency passing of eddies with a characteristic time scale of ˜10 days, i.e. it took about 10 days for eddies to pass the mooring sites. The net impact of these eddy fluxes is evaluated by analyzing one-dimensional heat and salt budgets of the upper ocean at the moorings and comparing them to the local air-sea fluxes. It is shown that oceanic lateral fluxes converge heat and salt into the formation region during winter thus offsetting the heat loss to the atmosphere and influencing the formation of EDW. A comparison with results from a one-dimensional model shows that without the lateral fluxes EDW would outcrop earlier and it would be colder and fresher. The warm, salty waters transported into the region originate from the Gulf Stream and this suggests that frontal processes likely play a fundamental role in EDW formation and its evolution.

  13. Ultrahigh hydrostatic pressure extraction of flavonoids from Epimedium koreanum Nakai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lili; Zhang, Shouqin; Dou, Jianpeng; Zhu, Junjie; Liang, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Herba Epimedii is one of the most famous Chinese herbal medicines listed in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, as one of the representatives of traditional Chinese herb, it has been widely applied in the field of invigorate the kidney and strengthen 'Yang'. The attention to Epimedium extract has more and more increased in recent years. In this work, a novel extraction technique, ultra-high hydrostatic pressure extraction (UPE) technology was applied to extract the total flavonoids of E. koreanum. Three factors (pressure, ethanol concentration and extraction time) were chosen as the variables of extraction experiments, and the optimum UPE conditions were pressure 350 MPa; ethanol concentration 50% (v/v); extraction time 5 min. Compared with Supercritical CO2 extraction, Reflux extraction and Ultrasonic-assisted extraction, UPE has excellent advantages (shorter extraction time, higher yield, better antioxidant activity, lower energy consumption and eco-friendly).

  14. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  15. Cell Membranes Under Hydrostatic Pressure Subjected to Micro-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilev, Vassil M.; Kostadinov, Kostadin G.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.; Shulev, Assen A.; Stoilov, Georgi I.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2011-04-01

    The work is concerned with the determination of the mechanical behaviour of cell membranes under uniform hydrostatic pressure subject to micro-injections. For that purpose, assuming that the shape of the deformed cell membrane is axisymmetric a variational statement of the problem is developed on the ground of the so-called spontaneous curvature model. In this setting, the cell membrane is regarded as an axisymmetric surface in the three-dimensional Euclidean space providing a stationary value of the shape energy functional under the constraint of fixed total area and fixed enclosed volume. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and natural boundary conditions are derived, analyzed and used to express the forces and moments in the membrane. Several examples of such surfaces representing possible shapes of cell membranes under pressure subjected to micro injection are determined numerically.

  16. Hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighing with automated liquid surface positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jesus; Wright, John D.; Bean, Vern E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an automated apparatus for calibrating hydrometers by hydrostatic weighing (Cuckow's method) in tridecane, a liquid of known, stable density, and with a relatively low surface tension and contact angle against glass. The apparatus uses a laser light sheet and a laser power meter to position the tridecane surface at the hydrometer scale mark to be calibrated with an uncertainty of 0.08 mm. The calibration results have an expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor of 2) of 100 parts in 106 or less of the liquid density. We validated the apparatus by comparisons using water, toluene, tridecane and trichloroethylene, and found agreement within 40 parts in 106 or less. The new calibration method is consistent with earlier, manual calibrations performed by NIST. When customers use calibrated hydrometers, they may encounter uncertainties of 370 parts in 106 or larger due to surface tension, contact angle and temperature effects.

  17. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on ligand binding to hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Carey, F G; Knowles, F; Gibson, Q H

    1977-06-25

    Increase in hydrostatic pressure to 1000 atm increased the affinity of human and menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) hemoglobins for oxygen. With necessary assumptions about the form of the equilibrium curve, and after correction for changes in pH and volume due to pressure, the increase in affinity is about 2-fold for both hemoglobins. At pH 6.5, Hill's n for menhaden hemoglobin is near 1, and it is believed to remain in the T state, whereas human hemoglobin undergoes a T to R transition. This suggests that the R-T equilibrium is not disturbed by pressure. In direct experiments the binding of a fluorescent effector (8 hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene (trisulfonic acid) to deoxyhemoglobin was not changed by pressure. The binding of n-butylisocyanide to hemoglobin and to myoglobin is also greater at high pressures, similarly suggesting that the R-T transition is not involved in the pressure effect. PMID:16924

  18. Melting of icosahedral nickel clusters under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bing; Chen, Li; Wang, Feifei; Xie, Yiqun; Ye, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stabilities and melting behavior of icosahedral nickel clusters under hydrostatic pressure have been studied by constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation. The potential energy and Lindemann index are calculated. The overall melting temperature exhibits a strong dependence on pressure. The Lindemann index of solid structure before melting varies slowly and is almost independent of pressure. However, after the clusters melt completely, the Lindemann index at the overall melting point strongly depends on pressure. The overall melting temperature is found to be increasing nonlinearly with increasing pressure, while the volume change during melting decreases linearly with increasing pressure. Under a high pressure and temperature environment, similar angular distributions were found between liquid and solid structures, indicating the existence of a converging local structure.

  19. Solid-Supported Lipid Multilayers under High Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Benedikt; Paulus, Michael; Nase, Julia; Salmen, Paul; Degen, Patrick; Wirkert, Florian J; Honkimäki, Veijo; Tolan, Metin

    2016-03-22

    In this work, the structure of solid-supported lipid multilayers exposed to increased hydrostatic pressure was studied in situ by X-ray reflectometry at the solid-liquid interface between silicon and an aqueous buffer solution. The layers' vertical structure was analyzed up to a maximum pressure of 4500 bar. The multilayers showed phase transitions from the fluid into different gel phases. With increasing pressure, a gradual filling of the sublayers between the hydrophilic head groups with water was observed. This process was inverted when the pressure was decreased, yielding finally smaller water layers than those in the initial state. As is commonly known, water has an abrasive effect on lipid multilayers by the formation of vesicles. We show that increasing pressure can reverse this process so that a controlled switching between multi- and bilayers is possible. PMID:26927365

  20. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  1. Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

  2. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver Deployment and Mooring Techniques for Use in Large Rivers and Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Titzler, P. Scott; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carter, Jessica A.

    2010-08-01

    Autonomous acoustic receivers are often deployed across a range of aquatic habitats to study aquatic species. The Juvenile Salmon Telemetry System autonomous acoustic receiver packages we deployed in the Columbia River and its estuary were comprised of an acoustic receiver, acoustic release, and mooring line sections and were deployed directly on the river bottom. Detection ranges and reception data from past optimization deployments helped determine acoustic receiver spacing in order to achieve acceptable detection probabilities for juvenile salmon survival estimation. Methods used in 2005, which resulted in a high equipment loss rate, were modified and used between 2006 and 2008 to increase crew safety and optimize receiver deployment and recovery operations in a large river system. By eliminating surface buoys and taglines (for anchor recovery), we experienced a recovery success rate greater than previous acoustic receiver deployment techniques used in the Columbia River and elsewhere. This autonomous acoustic receiver system has optimized deployment, recovery, and servicing efficiency to successfully detect acoustic-tagged salmonids in a variety of river environments.

  3. Processes Influencing Regolith Development on Bodmin Moor, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggins, S. G.; Tye, A. M.; Anderson, S. P.; Smith, B.

    2007-12-01

    Regolith is disaggregated, transportable material above bedrock created by physical processes such as fracture generation, frost cracking, tree throw, and animal burrowing and chemical processes such as dissolution and mineral transformation. Models typically parameterize the rate of regolith generation as a function of its thickness, without specifying the physical and chemical processes involved. This study examines a non-glaciated, granitic hillslope on Bodmin Moor, southwest England, UK, to identify processes creating regolith. The site has a temperate climate with relatively high mean annual temperature (MAT,~10°C) and rainfall (1381- 2580mm). We dug five soil pits ~80cm deep along a 120 m transect to examine the saprolite-regolith interface and extract solid phase and soil pore water samples. We find no evidence of physical processes such as frost cracking or bioturbation creating regolith. The site is treeless with vegetation dominated by grass. Although the site experiences ground frost and has sufficient water content to support frost cracking, a model of freezing front penetration indicates that the saprolite-regolith boundary does not fall within the frost cracking window of -3 to -10°C. A decrease in MAT of ~3°C would lower the depth of frost penetration to the current saprolite-regolith boundary (80cm). We speculate that frost cracking may have operated during the periglacial conditions of the Quaternary and would have pre-conditioned the bedrock for chemical processes currently operating. We use soil pore water and solid phase chemistry to determine the chemical processes at work. Pore water concentrations of K (4.5 mg/L), Na (14.2 mg/L), SO42- (24.9 mg/L), Mg (1.7 mg/L), and Ca (1.7 mg/L) are highest in O-horizons and decrease as a function of distance from the surface, indicating that biological processes have a strong effect on geochemical cycling in the upper part of the soil. Soil water at greater depths within the regolith are likely under

  4. NIOZ high-resolution moored temperature observations: benefits and new challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea; Gostiaux, Louis; Cyr, Frederic; van Haren, Hans

    2016-04-01

    The Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research has been developing for several years a family of temperature sensors (NIOZ1 to NIOZ5). In the latest iterations of this project, these instruments are precise (10‑3 K or better), have a very low noise level (below 10‑3 K), are relatively fast (sampling rate of 1Hz) and can measure for extended periods of time (several months). Being also compact and lightweight, several thermistors can be attached on a single line at a fine vertical spacing (20cm or more). When mounted on a cable, the instruments are all synchronised to a single clock, thus providing simultaneous measurements throughout the depth range of the mooring (usually in the order of 100m). Recently, the instruments have also been deployed in a group of 5 lines approximately 5m apart from each other, providing a unique view on the three-dimensional temperature field. After almost 10 years of successful deployments at sea, we try to draw some conclusions from this effort, from the scientific and technical point of view. This observational system provides temperature measurements with vertical spatial resolution comparable to that of microstructure profilers, but in comparison to ship-borne systems it offers some distinctive features: providing instantaneous measurements throughout the mooring, observations of waves and overturning structures are not influenced by the time delay between measurements at different depths; the very low noise level and high precision enables the study of the deep, weakly stratified ocean; by using a heavy ballast at the bottom and a high net buoyancy at the top of the mooring, Eulerian measurements are effectively obtained; continuous, high sampling rate Eulerian measurements enable to assess the intermittent, sporadic nature of turbulence and wave activity in the ocean; the large range of time scales included in the observations (100 ‑ 106 s) allows to study a large portion of the turbulence inertial range, the full

  5. NIOZ high-resolution moored temperature observations: benefits and new challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea; Gostiaux, Louis; Cyr, Frederic; van Haren, Hans

    2016-04-01

    The Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research has been developing for several years a family of temperature sensors (NIOZ1 to NIOZ5). In the latest iterations of this project, these instruments are precise (10-3 K or better), have a very low noise level (below 10-3 K), are relatively fast (sampling rate of 1Hz) and can measure for extended periods of time (several months). Being also compact and lightweight, several thermistors can be attached on a single line at a fine vertical spacing (20cm or more). When mounted on a cable, the instruments are all synchronised to a single clock, thus providing simultaneous measurements throughout the depth range of the mooring (usually in the order of 100m). Recently, the instruments have also been deployed in a group of 5 lines approximately 5m apart from each other, providing a unique view on the three-dimensional temperature field. After almost 10 years of successful deployments at sea, we try to draw some conclusions from this effort, from the scientific and technical point of view. This observational system provides temperature measurements with vertical spatial resolution comparable to that of microstructure profilers, but in comparison to ship-borne systems it offers some distinctive features: providing instantaneous measurements throughout the mooring, observations of waves and overturning structures are not influenced by the time delay between measurements at different depths; the very low noise level and high precision enables the study of the deep, weakly stratified ocean; by using a heavy ballast at the bottom and a high net buoyancy at the top of the mooring, Eulerian measurements are effectively obtained; continuous, high sampling rate Eulerian measurements enable to assess the intermittent, sporadic nature of turbulence and wave activity in the ocean; the large range of time scales included in the observations (100 - 106 s) allows to study a large portion of the turbulence inertial range, the full internal wave

  6. Recent development of a hydrostatic dynamical cores using the spectral element and the discontinuous Galerkin method at KIAPS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Giraldo, F. X.; Park, J.; Jun, S.; Yi, T.; Kang, S.; Oh, T.

    2013-12-01

    Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) was founded in 2011 by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) as a non-profit foundation to develop Korea's own global NWP system including it's framework, data assimilation, coupler and so on. The final goal of KIAPS is to develop a global non-hydrostatic NWP system by 2019 for operational use at KMA. In the first stage (2011-2013), we have developed a dynamical core for the Eulerian hydrostatic primitive equation as a initial effort. At the meeting, the progress and status of the core will be presented. The core is based on spectral element (SE; or continuous Galerkin method) and discontinuous Galerkin methods (DG). It is expected to take the advantages that the horizontal operators can be approximated by local high-order elements while scaling efficiently on multiprocessor computers with such high processor counts, since the properties of the methods are local in nature and have a small communication footprint. In order to overcome polar singularities and retain flexibility of the grid, we consider the hydrostatic primitive equations in 3D Cartesian space. This approach is used in Giraldo and Rosmond (MWR 2004). For the horizontal discretization, the cubed sphere grid is used for the sake of isotropy and due to the simplicity with which to use quadrilateral elements. For the vertical discretization, a Lorenz staggered grid is implemented with the terrain following σ-p coordinate. Currently, explicit time integrators, such as strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta (SSPRK) are implemented. In order to validate the developed core, some results are presented for test cases such as the Rossby-Haurwitz wavenumber 4 and the Jablonowski-Williamson balanced initial state and baroclinic instability test.

  7. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the uptake and respiration of amino acids by a facultatively psychrophilic marine bacterium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, K. L.; Morita, R. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Studies of pressure and temperature effects on glutamic acid transport and utilization indicated that hydrostatic pressure and low temperature inhibit glutamate transport more than glutamate respiration. The effects of pressure on transport were reduced at temperatures near the optimum. Similar results were obtained for glycine, phenylalanine, and proline. Pressure effects on the transport systems of all four amino acids were reversible to some degree. Both proline and glutamic acid were able to protect their transport proteins against pressure damage. The data presented indicate that the uptake of amino acids by cells under pressure is inhibited, which is the cause of their inability to grow under pressure.

  8. Experimental Comparison of Dynamic Responses of a Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine Platform with and without Spring Dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C.; O'Sullivan, K.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The offshore wind industry is rapidly maturing and is now expanding to more extreme environments in deeper water and farther from shore. To date fixed foundation types (i.e. monopoles, jackets) have been primarily used but become uneconomical in water depths greater than 50m. Floating foundations have more complex dynamics but at the moment no design has reached commercialization, although a number of devices are being tested at prototype stage. The development of concepts is carried out through physical model testing of scaled devices such that to better understand the dynamics of the system and validate numerical models. This paper investigates the testing of a scale model of a tension moored wind turbine at two different scales and in the presence and absence of a spring damper controlling its dynamic response. The models were tested under combined wave and wind thrust loading conditions. The analysis compares the motions of the platform at different scales and structural conditions through RAO, testing a mooring spring damper for load reductions.

  9. Building oceanographic moorings in a non-lab introductory ocean science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    A methodology for building low-cost ocean moorings in an introductory ocean sciences course, using HOBO temperature and light pendants, is presented. The moorings, which collect water temperature and light intensity data at high temporal frequency and at multiple depths, are relatively inexpensive, with a total cost of approximately 15 to 30 per student, depending on the configuration. Deployments of multiple months, or even longer, are possible, but in this presentation two ~3-week long deployments are described. Students in an Introduction to Oceanography course at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Washington (USA) designed and constructed moorings for deployment in an enclosed harbor at depths of ~8 meters. The HOBO pendants integrated into the moorings were set to log observations at one hour intervals. After mooring recovery students downloaded data, which were both incorporated into class lessons where feasible, but were also utilized in a fully inquiry-based research paper. The exercise was often cited in students' evaluations as a highlight, and served to both teach and reinforce oceanographic concepts, introduce students to professional options within ocean science and engineering fields, and provide skills training (by requiring students to work in Excel for data manipulation, for example).

  10. Near-surface salinity and stratification in the north Bay of Bengal from moored observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Debasis; Bharath Raj, G. N.; Ravichandran, M.; Sree Lekha, J.; Papa, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    A thin layer of fresh water from summer monsoon rain and river runoff in the Bay of Bengal (BoB) has profound influence on air-sea interaction across the south Asian region, but the mechanisms that sustain the low-salinity layer are as yet unknown. Using the first long time series of high-frequency observations from a mooring in the north BoB and satellite salinity data, we show that fresh water from major rivers is transported by large-scale flow and eddies, and shallow salinity stratification persists from summer through the following winter. The moored observations show frequent 0.2-1.2 psu salinity jumps with time scales of 10 min to days, due to O(1-10) km submesoscale salinity fronts moving past the mooring. In winter, satellite sea surface temperature shows 10 km wide filaments of cool water, in line with moored data. Rapid salinity and temperature changes at the mooring are highly coherent, suggesting slumping of salinity-dominated fronts. Based on these observations, we propose that submesoscale fronts may be one of the important drivers for the persistent fresh layer in the north BoB.

  11. Dynamics of the interaction of mooring line with the sea bed

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Y.; Surendran, S.

    1994-12-31

    Lumped Mass method is a proven numerical approach to analyze the problems of mooring lines. The two-dimensional method was originally developed by Walton and Polachek (1959) for various conditions of frequency and amplitude. Nakajima et al (1982) carried out investigation on the dynamics of mooring lines. In this paper, the interaction of mooring line with the ocean bottom is highlighted and the resulted reduction in dynamic tension is discussed. The line is divided into finite number of lumped masses and linear springs without mass. The damping, associated with the interaction of vibrating chain with the sea bed which is considered to be elastic, is incorporated in the computations. In normal case some part of mooring line will be on the surface of sea floor. Modification to the lumped mass method is done in view of the changed external forces with the change of mode of velocity amplitude along the length of the chain embedded in the sea bottom media. The validation of the modified Lumped Mass method is confirmed by comparing the dynamics of chain on elastic foundation by N.C. Perkins (1990). The sea floor conditions can be found varied for different locations of anchoring and the properties of the sea bottom media influences energy dissipation when the mooring line is interacting with it. The dynamic behavior of chain will be different depending upon the change in sea bottom conditions.

  12. RAMA: Research Moored Array for African - Asian - Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Indian Ocean is unique among the three tropical oceans in that it is blocked at 25N by the Asian land mass. Seasonal heating and cooling over this land mass sets the stage for dramatic monsoon wind reversals and intense summer rains over areas surrounding the basin. These climate variations have significant societal and economic impacts that affect half the world's population. Despite the importance of the Indian Ocean for both the regional and global climate though, it is the most poorly observed and least well understood of the three tropical oceans. This presentation describes the Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA), which has been designed to provide sustained, basin scale time series data in the Indian Ocean for climate research and forecasting. RAMA is intended to complement other satellite and in situ components of the Indian Ocean Observing System and it is being implemented through a coordinated multi- national effort involving institutions in several countries. We will review the scientific rationale, design criteria, and implementation status of RAMA. We will also illustrate some of the important intraseasonal to interannual time scale phenomena in the region observed with new RAMA time series data. Potential applications of the data for forecasting purposes will also be discussed.

  13. RAMA: Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Indian Ocean is unique among the three tropical ocean basins in that it is blocked at 25°N by the Asian land mass. Seasonal heating and cooling over this land mass sets the stage for dramatic monsoon wind reversals and intense rains over areas surrounding the basin. These climate variations have significant societal and economic impacts that affect half the world's population. Despite the importance of the Indian Ocean for both the regional and global climate though, it is the most poorly observed and least well understood of the three tropical oceans. This presentation describes the Research Moored Array for African-Asian- Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA), which has been designed to provide sustained, basin scale time series data in the Indian Ocean for climate research and forecasting. RAMA is intended to complement other satellite and in situ components of the Indian Ocean Observing System and it is being implemented through a coordinated multi-national effort involving institutions in several countries. We will review the scientific rationale, design criteria, and implementation status of RAMA. We will also illustrate some of the important intraseasonal to interannual time scale phenomena in the region observed with new RAMA time series data. Potential applications of the data for forecasting purposes will also be discussed.

  14. High-pressure resistivity technique for quasi-hydrostatic compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundu, C. R.; Ćuk, T.; Greene, R. L.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hemley, Russell J.; Struzhkin, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    Diamond anvil cell techniques are now well established and powerful methods for measuring materials properties to very high pressure. However, high pressure resistivity measurements are challenging because the electrical contacts attached to the sample have to survive to extreme stress conditions. Until recently, experiments in a diamond anvil cell were mostly limited to non-hydrostatic or quasi-hydrostatic pressure media other than inert gases. We present here a solution to the problem by using focused ion beam ultrathin lithography for a diamond anvil cell loaded with inert gas (Ne) and show typical resistivity data. These ultrathin leads are deposited on the culet of the diamond and are attaching the sample to the anvil mechanically, therefore allowing for measurements in hydrostatic or nearly hydrostatic conditions of pressure using noble gases like Ne or He as pressure transmitting media.

  15. String and Sticky Tape Experiments: Light Pipes, Hydrostatics, Surface Tension and a Milk Carton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of light pipes using low-cost materials, relating it to fiber optics communication. Also provides several experiments in hydrostatics and hydrodynamics using the materials for light pipe. (JM)

  16. O'Sullivan's hydrostatic reduction of an inverted uterus: sonar sequence recorded.

    PubMed

    Ward, H R

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute uterine inversion which was successfully managed with hydrostatic reduction is reported. A sequence of sonograms demonstrating this is presented, as far as we are aware, for the first time.

  17. Intraband optical absorption in a single quantum ring: Hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    The intraband optical absorption in GaAs/Ga0.7Al0.3As two-dimensional single quantum ring is investigated. Considering the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field the energy of the ground and few excited states has been found using the effective mass approximation and exact diagonalization technique. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the intraband optical transitions are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure for the different values of the laser field parameter. We also investigated the dependencies of the intraband optical absorption coefficient as a function of incident photon energy for different values of hydrostatic pressure and laser field parameter. It is found that the effects of hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field lead to redshift and blueshift of the intraband optical spectrum respectively.

  18. High hydrostatic pressure and biology: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Demazeau, Gérard; Rivalain, Nolwennig

    2011-03-01

    Pressure as a thermodynamical parameter was successively introduced in physics, hydrometallurgy, geochemistry, and biology. In all cases, the main objective was to recreate a natural phenomenon (gas or liquid compressibility, synthesis or crystal growth of minerals, survival of deep sea microorganisms…). The introduction of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in Biology was an important scientific feature over the last hundred years. This paper describes the different steps that have led to the spreading of pressure in biology and the opening of new frontiers either in basic and applied researches due to the specific characteristics of the pressure parameter. Because of the low energy conveyed by this parameter, leading to the preservation of most organoleptic properties of foods, and its ability to inactivate many pathogens, the use of HHP began to spread at the end of the twentieth century into the food industry, in particular for the development of pathogen inactivation processes. Today, even if this field is still the first application domain for HHP, more and more research works have shown that this parameter could be of great interest in health and medicine sciences.

  19. Recent Advances in Food Processing Using High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hsiao-Wen; Hsu, Chiao-Ping; Yang, Binghuei Barry

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is an emerging non-thermal technology that can achieve the same standards of food safety as those of heat pasteurization and meet consumer requirements for fresher tasting, minimally processed foods. Applying high-pressure processing can inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and enzymes, as well as modify structures with little or no effects on the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have approved the use of high-pressure processing (HPP), which is a reliable technological alternative to conventional heat pasteurization in food-processing procedures. This paper presents the current applications of HPP in processing fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, dairy, and egg products; such applications include the combination of pressure and biopreservation to generate specific characteristics in certain products. In addition, this paper describes recent findings on the microbiological, chemical, and molecular aspects of HPP technology used in commercial and research applications.

  20. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation.

  1. Scaling of the hydrostatic skeleton in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Jessica A; Kier, William M

    2014-06-01

    The structural and functional consequences of changes in size or scale have been well studied in animals with rigid skeletons, but relatively little is known about scale effects in animals with hydrostatic skeletons. We used glycol methacrylate histology and microscopy to examine the scaling of mechanically important morphological features of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris over an ontogenetic size range from 0.03 to 12.89 g. We found that L. terrestris becomes disproportionately longer and thinner as it grows. This increase in the length to diameter ratio with size means that, when normalized for mass, adult worms gain ~117% mechanical advantage during radial expansion, compared with hatchling worms. We also found that the cross-sectional area of the longitudinal musculature scales as body mass to the ~0.6 power across segments, which is significantly lower than the 0.66 power predicted by isometry. The cross-sectional area of the circular musculature, however, scales as body mass to the ~0.8 power across segments, which is significantly higher than predicted by isometry. By modeling the interaction of muscle cross-sectional area and mechanical advantage, we calculate that the force output generated during both circular and longitudinal muscle contraction scales near isometry. We hypothesize that the allometric scaling of earthworms may reflect changes in soil properties and burrowing mechanics with size. PMID:24871920

  2. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  3. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M.; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation. PMID:27536290

  4. Quantitative assessment of meteorological and tropospheric Zenith Hydrostatic Delay models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Guo, Jiming; Chen, Ming; Shi, Junbo; Zhou, Lv

    2016-09-01

    Tropospheric delay has always been an important issue in GNSS/DORIS/VLBI/InSAR processing. Most commonly used empirical models for the determination of tropospheric Zenith Hydrostatic Delay (ZHD), including three meteorological models and two empirical ZHD models, are carefully analyzed in this paper. Meteorological models refer to UNB3m, GPT2 and GPT2w, while ZHD models include Hopfield and Saastamoinen. By reference to in-situ meteorological measurements and ray-traced ZHD values of 91 globally distributed radiosonde sites, over a four-years period from 2010 to 2013, it is found that there is strong correlation between errors of model-derived values and latitudes. Specifically, the Saastamoinen model shows a systematic error of about -3 mm. Therefore a modified Saastamoinen model is developed based on the "best average" refractivity constant, and is validated by radiosonde data. Among different models, the GPT2w and the modified Saastamoinen model perform the best. ZHD values derived from their combination have a mean bias of -0.1 mm and a mean RMS of 13.9 mm. Limitations of the present models are discussed and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  5. A CANDIDATE DETECTION OF THE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Harvey, Paul; Dunham, Michael M.; Schnee, Scott

    2010-10-10

    The first hydrostatic core (FHSC) represents a very early phase in the low-mass star formation process, after collapse of the parent core has begun but before a true protostar has formed. This large (few AU), cool (100 K), pressure-supported core of molecular hydrogen is expected from theory, but has yet to be observationally verified. Here, we present observations of an excellent candidate for the FHSC phase: Per-Bolo 58, a dense core in Perseus that was previously believed to be starless. The 70 {mu}m flux of 65 mJy, from new deep Spitzer MIPS observations, is consistent with that expected for the FHSC. A low signal-to-noise detection at 24 {mu}m leaves open the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 could be a very low luminosity protostar, however. We utilize radiative transfer models to determine the best-fitting FHSC and protostar models to the spectral energy distribution and 2.9 mm visibilities of Per-Bolo 58. The source is consistent with an FHSC with some source of lower opacity through the envelope allowing 24 {mu}m emission to escape; a small outflow cavity and a cavity in the envelope are both possible. While we are unable to rule out the presence of a protostar, if present it would be one of the lowest luminosity protostellar objects yet observed, with an internal luminosity of {approx}0.01 L {sub sun}.

  6. Ordered states of URu2Si2 under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, J. R.; Butch, N. P.; Paglione, J.; Maple, M. B.

    2006-03-01

    Oriented single crystalline samples of URu2Si2 have been synthesized and investigated under nearly hydrostatic pressure via electrical resistivity and ac susceptibility measurements. The heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 exhibits three distinct ordered states as a function of temperature and pressure: ``hidden order'' (HO), in which the order parameter has yet to be determined; antiferromagnetism (AFM), which seemingly develops out of the HO state at P <=15 kbar; and superconductivity (SC), which exists at ambient pressure. Careful measurements of the HO transition, occurring at THO˜16.5 K at ambient pressure, have been performed at several different pressures, yielding a P-T phase diagram for the HO state as a function of pressure. In addition, measurements of the superconducting critical temperature, Tc˜1.4 K at ambient pressure, and the upper critical field Hc2 have been performed at low temperatures using a ^3He-^4He dilution refrigerator, revealing the superconducting H-T-P phase diagram. Possible correlations between the HO, AFM, and SC states will be discussed. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-03NA00068.

  7. II-VI wide band gap semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baquero, R.; Decoss, R.; Olguin, D.

    1993-08-01

    We set an analytical expression for the gap as a function of hydrostatic deformation, E(sub g)(epsilon), by diagonalizing in Gamma the corresponding empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian (ETBH). In the ETBH we use the well known d(exp -2) Harrison scaling law (HSL) to adjust the TB parameter (TBP) to the changes in interatomic distances. We do not consider cation-anion charge transfer. We calculate E(sub g)(epsilon) for wide band gap II-VI semiconductors with zincblende crystal structure for deformations under pressure up to -5 percent. Results are in good agreement with experiment for the compounds of lower ionicity but deviate as the ionicity of the compound increases. This is due to the neglect of charge transfer which should be included self-consistently. Within the approximation we always find a positive second derivative of E(sub g)(epsilon) with respect to epsilon, independent of the material. Furthermore, the inclusion of deviations from HSL appear to be unimportant to this problem.

  8. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation. PMID:27536290

  9. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on overall quality parameters of watermelon juice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhao, X Y; Zou, L; Hu, X S

    2013-06-01

    High hydrostatic pressure as a kind of non-thermal processing might maintain the quality of thermo-sensitive watermelon juice. So, the effect of high hydrostatic pressure treatment on enzymes and quality of watermelon juice was investigated. After high hydrostatic pressure treatment, the activities of polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, and pectin methylesterase of juice decreased significantly with the pressure (P < 0.05). Inactivation of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase could be fitted by two-fraction model and that of pectin methylesterase could be described by first-order reaction model. Titratable acidity, pH, and total soluble solid of juice did not change significantly (P > 0.05). No significant difference was observed in lycopene and total phenolics after high hydrostatic pressure treatment when compared to the control (P > 0.05). Cloudiness and viscosity increased with pressure (P < 0.05) but did not change significantly with treatment time (P > 0.05). a*- and b*-value both unchanged after high hydrostatic pressure treatment (P > 0.05) while L*-value increased but the values had no significant difference among treated juices. Browning degree after high hydrostatic pressure treatment decreased with increase in pressure and treatment time (P < 0.05). Through the comparison of total color difference values, high hydrostatic pressure had little effect on color of juice. The results of this study demonstrated the efficacy of high hydrostatic pressure in inactivating enzymes and maintaining the quality of watermelon juice.

  10. On the pole of non-square transfer function matrix Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ou, Linlin; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    An essential step in many controller design approaches is computing the inverse of the plant. For a square plant, its inverse is stable if the plant is minimum phase (MP). Nevertheless, this conclusion does not hold for a non-square plant. In this paper, the pole feature of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix is analysed. Instead of complicated advanced mathematical tools, only basic results of polynomial theory and the Binet-Cauchy theorem are used in the analysing procedure. The condition for testing the stability of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of an MP non-square transfer function matrix is given. This condition implies that the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix cannot be directly used as the optimal controller. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the correctness of the condition.

  11. Day-night variations in malate concentration, osmotic pressure, and hydrostatic pressure in Cereus validus

    SciTech Connect

    Luettge, U.; Nobel, P.S.

    1984-07-01

    Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Juelich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants. 13 references, 4 figures.

  12. Combined use of infrared and Raman spectra in the characterization of orthoclase under various hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Na; Cao, Miao-Cong

    2014-02-01

    Colorless and pink orthoclase from Balikun granite body, East Zhunger in Xinjiang, served as the samples for the research on hydrostatic pressure experiment. The in-situ hydrostatic pressure test for orthoclases was conducted at the room temperature and pressures from 100 to 600 MPa using cubic zirconia anvil cell, with quartz as pressure gauge. The water located in the orthoclases for the conditions of different hydrostatic pressures was characterized through the methods of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra. The results showed that there was a linear correlation between the shifting of Raman bands and hydrostatic pressure applied to the feldspar. All of vibration peaks of M-O structural groups in orthoclases, the bending vibration peaks of Si(Al(IV))-O-Si bond and tetrahedron groups of [SiO4] in Raman spectra shifted toward the higher frequency regularly, the drift distance is 2, 2.19 and less than 2 cm(-1) respectively. The spectra of FTIR suggested that there was more water in colorless orthoclases than the pink one under certain conditions of hydrostatic pressure. The intensity and integral area centered at 3420 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra increased with the rising of hydrostatic pressure. The integral area for colorless and pink feldspar in FTIR spectra rose from 120, 1383 cm(-1) under normal pressure to 1570, 2001 cm(-1) at 600 MPa respectively. The experimental results might indicate that the water in the earth crust could enter the orthoclases in certain condition of the aqueous confining pressure.

  13. Modulating optical rectification, second and third harmonic generation of doped quantum dots: Interplay between hydrostatic pressure, temperature and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-10-01

    We examine the profiles of optical rectification (OR), second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) of impurity doped QDs under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In order to study the above nonlinear optical (NLO) properties the doped dot has been subjected to a polarized monochromatic electromagnetic field. Effect of application of noise is nicely reflected through alteration of peak shift (blue/red) and variation of peak height (increase/decrease) of above NLO properties as temperature and pressure are varied. All such changes again sensitively depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The remarkable influence of interplay between noise strength and its mode of application on the said profiles has also been addressed. The findings illuminate fascinating role played by noise in tuning above NLO properties of doped QD system under the active presence of both hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  14. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  15. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure (Pf) > Ph has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures > 370??C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high Pf encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of Pf that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). -from Author

  16. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must objects protruding from... objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? (a) Each object protruding from the water that is within 100 yards of a platform or single point mooring...

  17. Dissociation of F-actin induced by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C R; Amaral Júnior, J A; Abrahamsohn, P; Verjovski-Almeida, S

    1992-11-01

    F-actin purified from rabbit skeletal muscle undergoes reversible dissociation when subjected to hydrostatic pressures up to 240 MPa. Dissociation and reversibility were detected by the following procedures: fluorescence spectral changes observed under pressure, when either intrinsic tryptophan or pyrenyl emission of N-(1-pyrenyl)iodoacetamide-labeled actin were monitored; electron microscopy of samples fixed under pressure; size-exclusion HPLC of pressurized actin. The effect of pressure upon F-actin that had been polymerized in the presence of either Mg2+, Ca2+ or K+ was studied. The standard volume changes for the association of actin subunits, calculated from pressure/dissociation curves were 74 +/- 14 ml/mol for Mg-F-actin, 79 +/- 12 ml/mol for Ca-F-actin and 328 +/- 63 ml/mol for K-F-actin, indicating that actin subunits are packed differently in the polymer depending on which cation is present. All pressure/dissociation data could be fitted by a model for dissociation of a dimer, which suggests that in the F-actin filament there is a predominant intersubunit interaction interface, most likely the head-to-tail intrastrand interaction between two subunits which repeats itself along the polymer. A tenfold change in total protein concentration from 20 micrograms to 200 micrograms/ml Mg-F-actin did not cause a change in the pressure required for half-maximal dissociation. This indicates a heterogeneity of free energy of association among actin monomers in the Mg-F-actin polymer, suggesting that, in addition to the predominant intersubunit interaction, the disordered interactions in the filament significantly contribute to the heterogeneity of microenvironments in the interface between the subunits. PMID:1425683

  18. Energetics of Streptococcal Growth Inhibition by Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Philip; Marquis, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus faecalis in complex media with various fuel sources appeared to be limited by the rate of supply of adenosine-5′ -triphosphate (ATP) at 1 atm and also under 408 atm of hydrostatic pressure. Growth under pressure was energetically inefficient, as indicated by an average cell yield for exponentially growing cultures of only 10.7 g (dry weight) per mol of ATP produced compared with a 1-atm value of 15.6. Use of ATP for pressure-volume work or for turnover of protein, peptidoglycan, or stable ribonucleic acid (RNA) did not appear to be significant causes of growth inefficiency under pressure. In addition, there did not seem to be an increased ATP requirement for ion uptake because cells growing at 408 atm had significantly lower internal K+ levels than did those growing at 1 atm. Pressure did stimulate the membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) or S. faecalis at ATP concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. Intracellular ATP levels were found to vary during the culture cycle from about 2.5 μmol/ml of cytoplasmic water for lag-phase or stationary-phase cells to maxima for exponentially growing cells of about 7.5 μmol/ml at 1 atm and 5.5 μmol/ml at 408 atm. N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide at a 10 μM concentration improved growth efficiency under pressure, as did Mg2+ or Ca2+ ions at 50 mM concentration. These agents also enhanced ATP pooling, and it seemed that at least part of the growth inefficiency under pressure was due to increased ATPase activity. In all, it appeared that S. faecalis growing under pressure has somewhat reduced ATP supply but significantly increased demand and that the inhibitory effects of pressure can be interpreted largely in terms of ATP supply and demand. PMID:405925

  19. Synthetic photometry for M and K giants and stellar evolution: hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aringer, B.; Girardi, L.; Nowotny, W.; Marigo, P.; Bressan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on a grid of hydrostatic spherical COMARCS models for cool stars, we have calculated observable properties of these objects, which will be mainly used in combination with stellar evolution tracks and population synthesis tools. The high-resolution opacity sampling and low-resolution convolved spectra as well as bolometric corrections for a large number of filter systems are made electronically available. We exploit those data to study the effect of mass, C/O ratio and nitrogen abundance on the photometry of K and M giants. Depending on effective temperature, surface gravity and the chosen wavelength ranges, variations of the investigated parameters cause very weak to moderate and, in the case of C/O values close to 1, even strong shifts of the colours. For the usage with stellar evolution calculations, they will be treated as correction factors applied to the results of an interpolation in the main quantities. When we compare the synthetic photometry to observed relations and to data from the Galactic bulge, we find in general a good agreement. Deviations appear for the coolest giants showing pulsations, mass-loss and dust shells, which cannot be described by hydrostatic models.

  20. A non-hydrostatic algorithm for free-surface ocean modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auclair, Francis; Estournel, Claude; Floor, Jochem W.; Herrmann, Marine; Nguyen, Cyril; Marsaleix, Patrick

    An original implementation of a non-hydrostatic, free-surface algorithm based on a pressure correction method is proposed for ocean modelling. The free surface is implemented through an explicit scheme combined with a mode-spitting method but the depth-averaged velocity and the position of the free surface are updated at each non-hydrostatic iteration. The vertical momentum equation is also integrated up to the surface enabling a natural and accurate treatment of the surface layer. The consistent specification of the numerical schemes provides balanced transfers of potential and kinetic energy. This algorithm is well-suited for implementation as a non-hydrostatic kernel on originally hydrostatic free-surface ocean models such as Symphonie ( http://poc.obs-mip.fr/pages/research_topics/modelling/symphonie/symphonie.htm) for which it has originally been developed. Energy balances associated with the propagation of short surface waves and solitary waves are presented for two dedicated well-documented configurations over closed domains. The buoyancy flux, the work rate of the pressure force together with the power of the advective terms are evaluated and discussed for the generation and the propagation of these two types of waves. The dissipation rate is in particular shown to be several orders of magnitude smaller than the work rates of the hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure forces confirming the necessity for the exchanges of energy to be numerically balanced. The algorithm is subsequently applied to the complex generation of non-linear solitary internal waves by surface tides over Georges Bank, in the Gulf of Maine. The generation and the propagation of the observed non-linear and non-hydrostatic features in this region are correctly reproduced.

  1. Propagation of coastally trapped waves in the Northern Benguela studied with hydrographic moorings and a regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegfried, Lydia; Junker, Tim; Mohrholz, Volker; Schmidt, Martin; van der Plas, Anja

    2015-04-01

    Upwelling in the Northern Benguela is mainly driven by local winds but nutrient and oxygen conditions on the shelf are largely determined by the intrusion of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) through the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). The poleward spreading of tropical waters is related to the propagation of Kelvin and continental shelf waves originating from the Equatorial Atlantic and bending poleward at the African coast. The strength of this remote forcing is thought to be especially relevant to the interannual variability of the upwelling system. We test the hypothesis that the poleward spreading of tropical water is driven by the combined action of both I) coastally trapped waves of equatorial origin bringing tropical water to the ABF zone and II) locally forced waves generating the undercurrent which advects SACW onto the shelf. Signals of poleward propagating waves were found in satellite altimeter data up to 12°S. To detect the propagation of coastally trapped waves further south in-situ measurements have been conducted. Three hydrographic moorings equipped inter alia with ADCPs have been deployed and maintained within the framework of the projects GENUS, SACUS and PREFACE. For the first time, simultaneous current measurements on the Namibian shelf have been realized at three different positions. The moorings are located in the Cunene cell, the Northern Namibian cell and the Central Namibian cell. By means of a regional circulation model based on MOM the propagation of coastally trapped waves are investigated with high spatial and temporal resolution (about 8km along the Namibian coast, 2-hour averages). It has been demonstrated that modelled meridional transports correspond well with long term measurements obtained by a mooring off Walvis Bay. The power spectral density shows sharp peaks for the tidal and inertial frequencies. A large proportion of kinetic energy accounts for the sub-inertial frequency range. Meridional transport signals were found to

  2. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dolphin located at approximately 32 05.01′ North, 080 59.38′ West, to the southeastern most mooring dolphin located at approximately 32 04.79′ North, 080 59.35′ West, and continues west along the North...

  3. ANATOMY, LIFE HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE PARASITIC LEECH OLIGOBDELLA BIANNULATA (MOORE, 1900) (EUHIRUDINEA: GLOSSIPHONIIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligobdella biannulata (Moore, 1900) is a rare, endemic species originally described from a mountain stream near Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Specimens of this species were collected seasonally from fall 1999 to winter 2001 with four new county records in North Carolina (Avery,...

  4. 75 FR 38019 - Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, Oahu, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, Oahu, HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: Due to...

  5. The Impact of a Modified Moore Method on Efficacy and Performance in Precalculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Thomas E.; Bailey, Brad; Briggs, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one section of undergraduate Precalculus was taught using a modified Moore method, a student centered inquiry-based approach, and two control sections were taught in a traditional lecture format. A survey of attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy toward mathematics and Precalculus was administered at the beginning and end of the semester…

  6. Mathematical Understanding and Proving Abilities: Experiment with Undergraduate Student by Using Modified Moore Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maya, Rippi; Sumarmo, Utari

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a post test experimental control group design conducted to investigate the role of modified Moore learning approach on improving students' mathematical understanding and proving abilities. Subjects of study were 56 undergraduate students of one state university in Bandung, who took advanced abstract algebra course.…

  7. LIFE HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE LEECH OLIGOBDELLA BIANNULATA (MOORE, 1900) (EUHIRUDINEA: GLOSSIPHONNIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligobdella biannulata (Moore, 1900) is a rare, endemic leech species originally described from a mountain stream near Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Specimens of O. biannulata were collected seasonally from Fall 1999, to Summer 2002, with new county records in North Carolina and ...

  8. Most-Perfect Pandiagonal Magic Squares and Their Moore-Penrose Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Dietrich; Trenkler, Gotz

    2004-01-01

    In this note 4 x 4 most-perfect pandiagonal magic squares are considered in which rows, columns and the two main, along with the broken, diagonals add up to the same sum. It is shown that the Moore-Penrose inverse of these squares has the same magic property.

  9. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall lead forward and one shall lead astern from the break of the bow and one lead astern from the quarter. (ii) One synthetic hawser shall be hand held and lead astern from the break of the bow through... four mooring lines—wires, independently power operated by the main drums of adequate power...

  10. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall lead forward and one shall lead astern from the break of the bow and one lead astern from the quarter. (ii) One synthetic hawser shall be hand held and lead astern from the break of the bow through... four mooring lines—wires, independently power operated by the main drums of adequate power...

  11. Bessie the Builder, Queen Bessie: Profile of Bessie Boehm Moore, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David; Reed, Stan

    Dr. Bessie Boehm Moore has been a major contributor to library advancement and economics education in Arkansas and throughout the United States. She began her career as a first grade teacher at the age of 14. As one of the first county supervisors in Arkansas, she became alarmed at the paucity of library materials available for student use and…

  12. Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring cleat on the top edge of the curb at the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Ramps - World War II Type, Southwest and west shore of Ford Island, near Wasp Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Inquiry Based Learning: A Modified Moore Method Approach To Encourage Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoughlin, M. Padraig M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The author of this paper submits that a mathematics student needs to learn to conjecture and prove or disprove said conjecture. Ergo, the purpose of the paper is to submit the thesis that learning requires doing; only through inquiry is learning achieved, and hence this paper proposes a programme of use of a modified Moore method (MMM) across the…

  14. Use of multi-disciplinary mooring data to extend intermittent OA observations from ship surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, U.; Ohman, M. D.; Martz, T. R.; Dickson, A. G.; Feely, R. A.; Demer, D.; Washburn, L.

    2012-12-01

    Ship surveys along the US West Coast have provided valuable insight into the conditions and changes in the water column that affect the ocean acidification state. Examples are the decades of CalCOFI sampling off southern California, and the West Coast ship survey published in Feely et al 2008. What is lacking in these observations is a description of the temporal variability of the conditions observed, and of the processes at work that lead to observed conditions or changes. Multi-disciplinary moorings are ideally suited for adding this dimension to the available observations which is critical for an understanding of the OA mechanisms. One example is the occurrence of corrosive water near the seafloor on the continental shelf, which was found in the Feely et al survey. Time series data from a mooring off Del Mar, California, with oxygen and pH sensors near the bottom in 100m depth show the frequency and intensity of corrosive and hypoxic conditions there, and how they relate to physical processes (cross-shelf and along-shelf flow), biological conditions, and climate processes (here La Nina). In the upwelling and open-ocean regimes off Pt. Conception two moorings (CCE1, CCE2) have been collecting data since early 2009 and 2010, respectively, co-located with CalCOFI stations and CCE LTER cardinal sites for ship observations. A glider also routinely passes by these moorings (along CalCOFI line 80). The moorings carry physical, oxygen, pH, pCO2, nutrient, and ecosystem sensors (chlorophyll fluorescence, water column irradiance absorption, acoustic backscatter) and telemeter most data in real-time. The mooring time series show the variability of OA parameters on daily, weekly, seasonal, and interannual time scales, and in the context of the spatial and historical sampling from ships. The multi-disciplinary sensor suite allows to study the forcing of the OA variability on those various time scales, and the impact on the ecosystem. Combined with the spatial information

  15. A deep non-hydrostatic compressible atmospheric model on a Yin-Yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T.; Zerroukat, M.

    2016-08-01

    The singularity in the traditional spherical polar coordinate system at the poles is a major factor in the lack of scalability of atmospheric models on massively parallel machines. Overset grids such as the Yin-Yang grid introduced by Kageyama and Sato [1] offer a potential solution to this problem. In this paper a three-dimensional, compressible, non-hydrostatic atmospheric model is developed and tested on the Yin-Yang grid building on ideas previously developed by the authors on the solution of Elliptic boundary value problems and conservation on overset grids. Using several tests from the literature, it is shown that this model is highly stable (even with little off-centering), accurate, and highly efficient in terms of computational cost. The model also incorporates highly efficient and accurate approaches to achieve positivity, monotonicity and conservative transport, which are paramount requirements for any atmospheric model. The parallel scalability of this model, using in excess of 212 million unknowns and more than 6000 processors, is also discussed and shown to compare favourably with a highly optimised latitude-longitude model in terms of scalability and actual run times.

  16. High hydrostatic pressure effects on the texture of meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang Dong; Holley, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can influence meat protein conformation and induce protein denaturation, aggregation, or gelation. The means whereby HHP treatment exerts effects on meat protein structure change are due to the rupture of noncovalent interactions within protein molecules, and to the subsequent re-formation of intra- and inter-molecular bonds within or among protein molecules. Depending upon the meat protein system, the pressure, the temperature, and the duration of the pressure treatment, meat can be either tenderized or toughened. Muscle texture variation induced by heat treatment is due to breakage of hydrogen bonds, whereas changes from high pressure treatment are due to the rupture of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Pressure treatment has little effect on the toughness of connective tissue. Juiciness, springiness, and chewiness are increased upon HHP treatment. Prerigor HHP treatment tenderizes meat, whereas tenderizing effects of postrigor HHP treatment are only measureable if pressure and heat treatment are combined. The limitations and future applications of high pressure technology are also discussed.

  17. Enzymatic production of γ-aminobutyric acid in soybeans using high hydrostatic pressure and precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Shigeaki; Katayama, Takumi; Watanabe, Takae; Nakajima, Kanako; Hayashi, Mayumi; Shigematsu, Toru; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The effects were investigated of the glutamic acid (Glu) substrate concentration on the generation and kinetics of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in soybeans treated under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP; 200 MPa for 10 min at 25 °C). The conversion of Glu to GABA decreased with increasing initial Glu concentration in the soybeans. The crude glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) obtained from the HHP-treated soybeans showed substrate inhibition. The GABA production rate in the HHP-treated soybeans fitted the following substrate inhibition kinetic equation: v0=(VmaxS0)/(Km+S0+(S0)2/Ki). The Km value for the HHP-treated soybeans was significantly higher than that of the untreated soybeans. The Km values in this study show the affinity between Glu and GAD, and indicate that the HHP-treated soybeans had lower affinity between Glu and GAD than the untreated soybeans. GAD extracted from the HHP-treated soybeans showed a similar value to that in the HHP-treated soybeans. The intact biochemical system was so damaged in the HHP-treated soybeans that it showed substrate inhibition kinetics similar to that of the extracted GAD. The combination of HHP and precursor feeding proved to be a novel tool that can be used to increase the concentration of a target component.

  18. High hydrostatic pressure effects on the texture of meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang Dong; Holley, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can influence meat protein conformation and induce protein denaturation, aggregation, or gelation. The means whereby HHP treatment exerts effects on meat protein structure change are due to the rupture of noncovalent interactions within protein molecules, and to the subsequent re-formation of intra- and inter-molecular bonds within or among protein molecules. Depending upon the meat protein system, the pressure, the temperature, and the duration of the pressure treatment, meat can be either tenderized or toughened. Muscle texture variation induced by heat treatment is due to breakage of hydrogen bonds, whereas changes from high pressure treatment are due to the rupture of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Pressure treatment has little effect on the toughness of connective tissue. Juiciness, springiness, and chewiness are increased upon HHP treatment. Prerigor HHP treatment tenderizes meat, whereas tenderizing effects of postrigor HHP treatment are only measureable if pressure and heat treatment are combined. The limitations and future applications of high pressure technology are also discussed. PMID:20492191

  19. Pulmonary edema: an MR study of permeability and hydrostatic types in animals.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H C; Tsay, D G; Higgins, C B

    1986-02-01

    Permeability pulmonary edema was induced in ten rats by intravenous injection of oleic acid. Hydrostatic pulmonary edema was induced in another ten rats by continuous infusion of saline. Permeability pulmonary edema was detected as increased signal intensity in all animals on images obtained with repetition times (TR) of 2.0 sec and echo times (TE) of 28 and 56 msec. Hydrostatic pulmonary edema was perceivable only in seven of ten rats. It was best seen on spin-echo TR = 2.0 sec, TE = 28 msec images as increased intensity either throughout the whole lung or in a predominant central distribution. The slopes of the relationships between the mean signal intensity and water content of both lungs were lower for hydrostatic pulmonary edema than for permeability pulmonary edema. Hydrostatic pulmonary edema demonstrated similar T1 but markedly shorter T2 relaxation times than permeability edema. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to estimate severity of hydrostatic and permeability pulmonary edemas. PMID:3941856

  20. Measurement method of compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients for density standard liquid at 2329 kg/m3 based on hydrostatic suspension principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jintao; Liu, Ziyong; Xu, Changhong; Li, Zhanhong

    2014-07-01

    The accurate measurement on the compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients of density standard liquid at 2329kg/m3 (DSL-2329) plays an important role in the quality control for silicon single crystal manufacturing. A new method is developed based on hydrostatic suspension principle in order to determine the two coefficients with high measurement accuracy. Two silicon single crystal samples with known density are immersed into a sealed vessel full of DSL-2329. The density of liquid is adjusted with varying liquid temperature and static pressure, so that the hydrostatic suspension of two silicon single crystal samples is achieved. The compression and thermal expansion coefficients are then calculated by using the data of temperature and static pressure at the suspension state. One silicon single crystal sample can be suspended at different state, as long as the liquid temperature and static pressure function linearly according to a certain mathematical relationship. A hydrostatic suspension experimental system is devised with the maximal temperature control error ±50 μK; Silicon single crystal samples can be suspended by adapting the pressure following the PID method. By using the method based on hydrostatic suspension principle, the two key coefficients can be measured at the same time, and measurement precision can be improved due to avoiding the influence of liquid surface tension. This method was further validated experimentally, where the mixture of 1, 2, 3-tribromopropane and 1,2-dibromoethane is used as DSL-2329. The compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients were measured, as 8.5×10-4 K-1 and 5.4×1010 Pa-1, respectively.

  1. Hydrostatic Pressure Investigation on the Magnetic and Structural Properties of the Quantum-Spin-Chain CuAs2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caslin, Kevin; Kremer, Reinhard; Syassen, Karl; Razavi, Fereidoon; Hanfland, Michael; Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Mike

    2015-03-01

    CuAs2O4 (Trippkeite) is a S = 1/2 quantum-spin-chain system with competing ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor (NN) and antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) spin-exchange interactions which undergoes long-range ferromagnetic ordering below 7.4 K. We have investigated the pressure dependence of the magnetic and structural properties of the CuAs2O4 by single-crystal synchrotron x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry under hydrostatic pressure. Precise structural parameters gained from the single crystal x-ray structure determination under hydrostatic pressure have been used for detailed density functional calculations of the spin-exchange interactions. Furthermore, we have correlated the spin-exchange constants to the magnetic properties measured under hydrostatic pressure. Up to approximately 9 GPa we observe a significant reduction of the Jahn-Teller elongations of the distorted CuO6 octahedra. Above approximately 9 GPa a structural phase transition occurs which leads to modifications of the crystals structure driving both NN and NNN spin-exchange constants to the ferromagnetic regime, thus, removing the magnetic frustration.

  2. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in quantum ring: effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Barseghyan, Manuk G; Restrepo, Ricardo L; Mora-Ramos, Miguel E; Kirakosyan, Albert A; Duque, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    : The linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in GaAs three-dimensional single quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field, applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure, the energies of the ground and first excited states of a donor impurity have been found using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states are examined as functions of the dimensions of the structure, electric field, and hydrostatic pressure. We have also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as a function of incident photon energy for several configurations of the system. It is found that the variation of distinct sizes of the structure leads to either a redshift and/or a blueshift of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. In addition, we have found that the application of an electric field leads to a redshift, whereas the influence of hydrostatic pressure leads to a blueshift (in the case of on-ring-center donor impurity position) of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. PMID:23021497

  3. The NCEP Eulerian Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Vasic, Ratko; Jovic, Dusan; Black, Tom

    2014-05-01

    The development of the unified Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB) has continued at NCEP. The model dynamics preserve a number of important properties of differential operators and conserve a variety of first order and quadratic quantities. The nonlinear dynamics is controlled by conserving energy and enstrophy in case of non-divergent flow. Over-specification of vertical velocity is avoided. The physical package was developed from the WRF NMM's physics, but other physics options are also available. The regional version of the NMMB is run operationally as the main deterministic North American short-range forecasting model (NAM) and in a number of other applications. The global NMMB also has been run over the last few years experimentally in order to assess its capabilities and develop it further. In terms of large scale metrics, the performance of the global NMMB in medium range weather forecasting has been generally comparable to that of other major medium range forecasting systems. Its computational efficiency satisfies and exceeds the current and projected operational requirements. Recently, the transition has started of the operational hurricane forecasting system HWRF from the WRF NMM dynamics to those of the NMMB. This system involves the use of a hierarchy of 2-way interactive telescoping moving nests. The work on the interaction between clouds and radiation has continued. Extended range forecasts showed large sensitivity to the method for representing clouds. With the clouds represented by optical properties of their microphysics species, the results depend on the microphysics scheme used. Taking into account the impact of convective clouds remains a challenge with this approach. Development of an indigenous data assimilation system for the global NMMB has commenced. The system is based on the hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/3DVAR technique. It is believed that the potential of the NMMB can be better assessed using its own dedicated data assimilation

  4. Practical applications of hydrostatic pressure to refold proteins from inclusion bodies for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Torikai, Shinnosuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the hydrostatic pressure refolding method was reported as a practical tool for solubilizing and refolding proteins from inclusion bodies; however, there have been only a few applications for protein structural studies. Here, we report the successful applications of the hydrostatic pressure refolding method to refold proteins, including the MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger, the p62 PB1 domain, the GCN2 RWD domain, and the mTOR FRB domain. Moreover, the absence of aggregation and the correct folding of solubilized protein samples were evaluated with size exclusion chromatography and NMR experiments. The analyses of NMR spectra for MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger and GCN2 RWD further led to the determination of tertiary structures, which are consistent with those from soluble fractions. Overall, our results indicate that the hydrostatic pressure method is effective for preparing samples for NMR structural studies.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROSTATIC JOURNAL BEARING WITH SLIT-STEP COMPENSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Donaldson, R R; Castro, C; Chung, C A; Hopkins, D J

    2006-07-28

    This paper describes the mathematical modeling and initial testing of an oil-hydrostatic bearing that derives compensation from both a central radial slit where fluid enters and stepped clearances near each end. Bearings using either a radial slit or stepped clearances for compensation were well studied over forty years ago by Donaldson. These bearings have smooth bores uninterrupted with multiple recesses around the circumference. The present slit-step bearing achieves the best of both types with somewhat higher hydrostatic stiffness than the slit bearing and fluid shear drag lower than the step bearing. This is apparent in TABLE 1, which compares calculated values of initial (i.e., centered) hydrostatic stiffness for each type. The slit-step bearing is one of several types being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for possible use on the Precision Optical Grinder and Lathe (POGAL).

  6. Microstructure and properties of ultrafine grain nickel 200 after hydrostatic extrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, R.; Krajewski, C.; Kamiński, J.; Spychalski, M.; Garbacz, H.; Pachla, W.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the studies of the structure and properties of ultrafine grained nickel 200 obtained by hydrostatic extrusion processes. Microstructure was characterized by means of optical microscopy and electron transmission microscopy. Corrosion resistance was studied by impedance and potentiodynamic methods using an AutoLab PGSTAT 100 potentiostat in 0.1 M Na2SO4 solution and in acidified (by addition of H2SO4) 0.1 M NaCl solution at pH = 4.2 at room temperature. Microhardness tests were also performed. The results showed that hydrostatic extrusion produces a heterogeneous, ultrafine-grained microstructure in nickel 200. The corrosive resistance tests showed that the grain refinement by hydrostatic extrusion is accompanied by a decreased corrosive resistance of nickel 200.

  7. Combined use of infrared and Raman spectra in the characterization of orthoclase under various hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Na; Cao, Miao-Cong

    2014-02-01

    Colorless and pink orthoclase from Balikun granite body, East Zhunger in Xinjiang, served as the samples for the research on hydrostatic pressure experiment. The in-situ hydrostatic pressure test for orthoclases was conducted at the room temperature and pressures from 100 to 600 MPa using cubic zirconia anvil cell, with quartz as pressure gauge. The water located in the orthoclases for the conditions of different hydrostatic pressures was characterized through the methods of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra. The results showed that there was a linear correlation between the shifting of Raman bands and hydrostatic pressure applied to the feldspar. All of vibration peaks of M-O structural groups in orthoclases, the bending vibration peaks of Si(Al(IV))-O-Si bond and tetrahedron groups of [SiO4] in Raman spectra shifted toward the higher frequency regularly, the drift distance is 2, 2.19 and less than 2 cm(-1) respectively. The spectra of FTIR suggested that there was more water in colorless orthoclases than the pink one under certain conditions of hydrostatic pressure. The intensity and integral area centered at 3420 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra increased with the rising of hydrostatic pressure. The integral area for colorless and pink feldspar in FTIR spectra rose from 120, 1383 cm(-1) under normal pressure to 1570, 2001 cm(-1) at 600 MPa respectively. The experimental results might indicate that the water in the earth crust could enter the orthoclases in certain condition of the aqueous confining pressure. PMID:24822414

  8. Constraints on Enceladus' Internal Structure from Cassini Gravity: Beyond Hydrostatic Cores and Uniformly Compensated Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Bland, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini has determined three important gravitational coefficients for Enceladus, J2, C22 and J3 (Iess et al., Science 344, 78). The gravity field is non-hydrostatic to 3σ (J2/C22 = 3.38-3.63, as opposed to 10/3). Iess et al. interpret these in terms of a hydrostatic interior (core) and isostatic (not hydrostatic) floating ice shell. The hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic contributions are separated by assuming the isostatic compensation depth is the same for each gravity term, although this can't be strictly true in the case of a regional south polar sea. The inferred normalized moment-of-inertia (0.335) implies a core density of 2340-2400 kg/m3, consistent with a highly hydrated and oxidized (sulfate-rich) core, or more plausibly (in a cosmochemical sense), a porous, water-saturated core. The long-term stability of such porosity is questionable, however. Modest topography on a more indurated core could significantly contribute to the gravity signal. For example, if Enceladus' core density were 3000 kg/m3, excess topography of only 1 km amplitude could provide the same "hydrostatic" J2 component as modeled in Iess et al. (and requires only 0.1 MPa of stress support). There is also the question of compensation depth of the ice shell. Different formalisms for spherical shells exist in the literature (e.g., Lambeck vs. Turcotte); Iess et al. follow the former and derive a 30-to-40-km thick shell at the south pole, whereas the Turcotte formalism gives a shell only 18-25-km thick. We pay particular attention to this issue, and note a thinner shell would be more mechanically compatible with the spacing of the "tiger stripes," if the fissures are indeed crevasses open to the ocean below.

  9. Enema reduction of intussusception: the success rate of hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Singhavejsakul, Jesda; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Wakhanrittee, Junsujee; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intussusception is a common surgical emergency in infants and children. The incidence of intussusception is from one to four per 2,000 infants and children. If there is no peritonitis, perforation sign on abdominal radiographic studies, and nonresponsive shock, nonoperative reduction by pneumatic or hydrostatic enema can be performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the success rates of both the methods. Methods Two institutional retrospective cohort studies were performed. All intussusception patients (ICD-10 code K56.1) who had visited Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital from January 2006 to December 2012 were included in the study. The data were obtained by chart reviews and electronic databases, which included demographic data, symptoms, signs, and investigations. The patients were grouped according to the method of reduction followed into pneumatic reduction and hydrostatic reduction groups with the outcome being the success of the reduction technique. Results One hundred and seventy episodes of intussusception occurring in the patients of Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital were included in this study. The success rate of pneumatic reduction was 61% and that of hydrostatic reduction was 44% (P=0.036). Multivariable analysis and adjusting of the factors by propensity scores were performed; the success rate of pneumatic reduction was 1.48 times more than that of hydrostatic reduction (P=0.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.03–2.13). Conclusion Both pneumatic and hydrostatic reduction can be performed safely according to the experience of the radiologist or pediatric surgeon and hospital setting. This study showed that pneumatic reduction had a higher success rate than hydrostatic reduction. PMID:26719697

  10. Numerical Simulation of Damage during Forging with Superimposed Hydrostatic Pressure by Active Media

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, B.-A.; Hagen, T.; Roehr, S.; Sidhu, K. B.

    2007-05-17

    The effective reduction of energy consumption and a reasonable treatment of resources can be achieved by minimizing a component's weight using lightweight metals. In this context, aluminum alloys play a major role. Due to their material-sided restricted formability, the mentioned aluminum materials are difficult to form. The plasticity of a material is ascertained by its maximum forming limit. It is attained, when the deformation causes mechanical damage within the material. Damage of that sort is reached more rapidly, the greater the tensile strength rate in relation to total tension rate. A promising approach of handling these low ductile, high-strength aluminum alloys within a forming process, is forming with a synchronized superposition of comprehensive stress by active media such as by controlling oil pressure. The influence of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on the flow stress was analyzed as well as the formability for different procedures at different hydrostatic pressures and temperature levels. It was observed that flow stress is independent of superimposed hydrostatic pressure. Neither the superimposed pressure has an influence on the plastic deformation, nor does a pressure dependent material hardening due to increasing hydrostatic pressure take place. The formability increases with rising hydrostatic pressure. The relative gain at room temperature and increase of the superimposed pressure from 0 to 600 bar for tested materials was at least 140 % and max. 220 %. Therefore in this paper, based on these experimental observations, it is the intended to develop a numerical simulation in order to predict ductile damage that occurs in the bulk forging process with superimposed hydrostatic pressure based Lemaitre's damage model.

  11. Nonlinear Control of Wind Turbines with Hydrostatic Transmission Based on Takagi-Sugeno Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Horst; Georg, Soren

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear model-based control concept for wind turbines with hydrostatic transmission is proposed. The complete mathematical model of a wind turbine drive train with variable displacement pump and variable displacement motor is presented. The controller design takes into consideration the nonlinearity of the aerodynamic maps and hydrostatic drive train by an convex combination of state space controller with measurable generator speed and hydraulic motor displacement as scheduling parameters. The objectives are the set point control of generator speed and tracking control of the rotor speed to reach the maximum power according to the power curve in the partial-load region.

  12. Hydrostatic pressure sensor based on micro-cavities developed by the catastrophic fuse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, M. F.; Paixão, T.; Mesquita, E.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Varum, H.; André, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an optical fiber hydrostatic pressure sensor based in Fabry-Perot micro-cavities is presented. These micro structures were generated by the recycling of optical fiber previously damaged by the fiber fuse effect, resulting in a cost effective solution when compared with the traditional methods used to produce similar micro-cavities. The developed sensor was tested for pressures ranging from 20.0 to 190.0 cmH2O and a sensitivity of 53.7 +/- 2.6 pm/cmH2O for hydrostatic pressures below to 100 cmH2O was achieved.

  13. Optimizing observational networks combining gliders, moored buoys and FerryBox in the Bay of Biscay and English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charria, Guillaume; Lamouroux, Julien; De Mey, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Designing optimal observation networks in coastal oceans remains one of the major challenges towards the implementation of future efficient Integrated Ocean Observing Systems to monitor the coastal environment. In the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel, the diversity of involved processes (e.g. tidally-driven circulation, plume dynamics) requires to adapt observing systems to the specific targeted environments. Also important is the requirement for those systems to sustain coastal applications. Two observational network design experiments have been implemented for the spring season in two regions: the Loire River plume (northern part of the Bay of Biscay) and the Western English Channel. The method used to perform these experiments is based on the ArM (Array Modes) formalism using an ensemble-based approach without data assimilation. The first experiment in the Loire River plume aims to explore different possible glider endurance lines combined with a fixed mooring to monitor temperature and salinity. Main results show an expected improvement when combining glider and mooring observations. The experiment also highlights that the chosen transect (along-shore and North-South, cross-shore) does not significantly impact the efficiency of the network. Nevertheless, the classification from the method results in slightly better performances for along-shore and North-South sections. In the Western English Channel, a tidally-driven circulation system, added value of using a glider below FerryBox temperature and salinity measurements has been assessed. FerryBox systems are characterised by a high frequency sampling rate crossing the region 2 to 3 times a day. This efficient sampling, as well as the specific vertical hydrological structure (which is homogeneous in many sub-regions of the domain), explains the fact that the added value of an associated glider transect is not significant. These experiments combining existing and future observing systems, as well as numerical

  14. Hydrostatic Pressure Studies Distinguish Global from Local Protein Motions in C-H Activation by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenshen; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; Munos, Jeffrey W; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-08-01

    The proposed contributions of distinct classes of local versus global protein motions during enzymatic bond making/breaking processes has been difficult to verify. We employed soybean lipoxygenase-1 as a model system to investigate the impact of high pressure at variable temperatures on the hydrogen-tunneling properties of the wild-type protein and three single-site mutants. For all variants, pressure dramatically elevates the enthalpies of activation for the C-H activation. In contrast, the primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for C-H activation and their corresponding temperature dependencies remain unchanged up to ca. 700 bar. The differential impact of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the temperature dependencies of rate constants versus substrate KIEs provides direct evidence for two distinct classes of protein motions: local, isotope-dependent donor-acceptor distance-sampling modes, and a more global, isotope-independent search for productive protein conformational sub-states. PMID:27348724

  15. The use of Tecnomatix software to simulate the manufacturing flows in an industrial enterprise producing hydrostatic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrila, S.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis performed on manufacturing flows within industrial enterprises producing hydrostatic components twos made on a number of factors that influence smooth running of production such: distance between pieces, waiting time from one surgery to another; time achievement of setups on CNC machines; tool changing in case of a large number of operators and manufacturing complexity of large files [2]. To optimize the manufacturing flow it was used the software Tecnomatix. This software represents a complete portfolio of manufacturing solutions digital manufactured by Siemens. It provides innovation by linking all production methods of a product from process design, process simulation, validation and ending the manufacturing process. Among its many capabilities to create a wide range of simulations, the program offers various demonstrations regarding the behavior manufacturing cycles. This program allows the simulation and optimization of production systems and processes in several areas such as: car suppliers, production of industrial equipment; electronics manufacturing, design and production of aerospace and defense parts.

  16. The 3D Moore-Rayleigh test for the quantitative groupwise comparison of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Alize E H; Muskulus, Michael; Staring, Marius; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J V; Lunel, Sjoerd Verduyn; Reiber, J Hans C; van der Weerd, Louise; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2009-01-01

    Non-rigid registration of MR images to a common reference image results in deformation fields, from which anatomical differences can be statistically assessed, within and between populations. Without further assumptions, nonparametric tests are required and currently the analysis of deformation fields is performed by permutation tests. For deformation fields, often the vector magnitude is chosen as test statistic, resulting in a loss of information. In this paper, we consider the three dimensional Moore-Rayleigh test as an alternative for permutation tests. This nonparametric test offers two novel features: first, it incorporates both the directions and magnitude of the deformation vectors. Second, as its distribution function is available in closed form, this test statistic can be used in a clinical setting. Using synthetic data that represents variations as commonly encountered in clinical data, we show that the Moore-Rayleigh test outperforms the classical permutation test. PMID:19694294

  17. Demonstration of a mid-water mooring for tidal turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Talbert, J.; deKlerk, A.; Richmond, M. C.; Durgesh, V.; Polagye, B. L.; Kilcher, L. F.; Nelson, E.

    2012-12-01

    An approach to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a short demonstration deployment. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspending Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion correction (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are investigated.

  18. Weathering in the cold: Granite hillslopes in Osborn Mountain, WY and Bodmin Moor, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggins, S. G.; Anderson, S. P.; Anderson, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Low temperatures generally limit rates of chemical weathering, and hence might be expected to limit development and evolution of mobile regolith in cold climates. Chemical and physical processes operate to release material from bedrock into the mobile regolith. Rock is weakened by chemical weathering, while physical breakdown produces particles susceptible to transport. We examine two hillslopes mantled with mobile regolith in granitic terrains that formed in cold climates where the rates of chemical processes are expected to be low, while at least some physical processes are expected to be enhanced. These end-member environments provide insight into mobile regolith development. Our study sites are gentle parabolic hillslopes at Osborn Mtn, WY, USA (elevation: 3600 m, MAT: -5°C) and Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, UK (elevation: 370 m, MAT: 9°C) developed on granitic bedrock. Neither site experienced direct glaciation during the LGM, but both were in periglacial zones. At present, the sites are populated by neither trees nor burrowing mammals. Biotite, which might spawn rock breakdown by hydration/oxidation cracking, is rare. Although there is evidence that trees have grown in Bodmin Moor in the past, frost cracking rather than tree throw has likely been the dominant mechanism releasing intact material into the mobile soil column at both field sites over the Quaternary. Present day ground surface temperatures at Osborn Mtn are below 0°C for ~9 months of the year, as measured by temperature sensors, leaving only 3 months for chemical processes to operate. During winter, temperatures are cold enough for frost cracking to occur down to significant depths. In contrast, we calculate from a numerical model of the annual thermal cycle that the immediate sub-surface of the Bodmin Moor hillslope is not currently cold enough for frost cracking at any time of the year, meaning that chemical processes can operate continuously. However, given temperature drops of order 5-10°C during

  19. Carbon isotopes and lignin composition of POC in a small river in Bekanbeushi Moor, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Seki, Osamu; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    Carbon isotope and lignin phenol compositions were investigated to assess particulate organic carbon (POC) in a small river from the Bekanbeushi Moor in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan. Suspended solids were collected 5 times at a fixed station during July 2004-April 2008. The δ 13C values of the riverine POC are almost constant: -29.1‰ to -28.7‰. In contrast, the POC shows wide variations in Δ 14C values from -103‰ during the snowmelt event to +9 ± 16‰ during summer and winter. The cinnamyl over vanillyl phenol ( C/ V) ratios indicate a predominance of nonwoody materials and no seasonal variation, suggesting that the wetland river transports older POC from the riverbank during the spring snowmelt. The river also transports newly produced and stored soil organic matter as riverine POC from the low moor in times of low flow conditions.

  20. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  1. Objective measures of laryngeal imaging: what have we learned since Dr. Paul Moore.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peak

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Paul Moore pioneered the use of high-speed cinematography for observation of normal and abnormal vocal fold vibrations during phonation. His analysis of the glottal area waveform, opening and closing speed index, and open quotient from the high-speed films were labor intensive but relevant today. With advances in digital image capture and automated image extraction techniques, stroboscopy and high-speed images of vocal fold vibration may be analyzed with objective measures. Digital high-speed image capture in color is now clinically practical at high resolution. Digital kymography now allows analysis of the vibratory waveform from each vocal fold. Serial capture and comparison can document changes in vibratory function with treatment. Quantification of vocal fold vibration using such techniques is now practical. This is a review of vocal fold vibration capture and analysis techniques since Dr. Moore. PMID:24094798

  2. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial alteration of sinking fecal pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Christian; Goutx, Madeleine; Guigue, Catherine; Garel, Marc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Charrière, Bruno; Sempéré, Richard; Pepa, Stéphane; Peterson, Michael L.; Wakeham, Stuart; Lee, Cindy

    2009-08-01

    We used a new experimental device called PASS (PArticle Sinking Simulator) during MedFlux to simulate changes in in situ hydrostatic pressure that particles experience sinking from mesopelagic to bathypelagic depths. Particles, largely fecal pellets, were collected at 200 m using a settling velocity NetTrap (SV NetTrap) in Ligurian Sea in April 2006 and incubated in high-pressure bottles (HPBs) of the PASS system under both atmospheric and continuously increasing pressure conditions, simulating the pressure change experienced at a sinking rate of 200 m d -1. Chemical changes over time were evaluated by measuring particulate organic carbon (POC), carbohydrates, transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), amino acids, lipids, and chloropigments, as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved carbohydrates. Microbial changes were evaluated microscopically, using diamidinophenylindole (DAPI) stain for total cell counts and catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) for phylogenetic distinctions. Concentrations (normalized to POC) of particulate chloropigments, carbohydrates and TEP decreased under both sets of incubation conditions, although less under the increasing pressure regime than under atmospheric conditions. By contrast, dissolved carbohydrates (normalized to DOC) were higher after incubation and significantly higher under atmospheric conditions, suggesting they were produced at the expense of the particulate fraction. POC-normalized particulate wax/steryl esters increased only under pressure, suggesting biochemical responses of prokaryotes to the increasing pressure regime. The prokaryotic community initially consisted of 43% Bacteria, 12% Crenarchaea and 11% Euryarchaea. After incubation, Bacteria dominated (˜90%) the prokaryote community in all cases, with γ- Proteobacteria comprising the greatest fraction, followed by the Cytophaga-Flavobacter cluster and α -Proteobacteria group. Using the PASS system, we obtained

  3. Porosity-Permeability Relationships Around the Percolation Threshold in a Near-Perfect Crystalline Rock Under Hydrostatic and Deviatoric Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clint, O. C.; Meredith, P. G.; Main, I. G.

    2001-12-01

    We are investigating the scaling properties of crack populations near the percolation thresholds for fracture and fluid flow. Here we report measurements of changes in fluid permeability and porosity during hydrostatic and deviatoric stressing on samples of Ailsa Craig Microgranite (ACM) with increasing levels of damage. We show virgin ACM to be almost perfectly isotropic with P & S wave velocity anisotropy coefficients of 0.05% and 0.08% respectively. The fluid permeability of the undeformed rock is 1.5 x 10-23 m2 determined at an effective pressure of 10MPa and it has a porosity <<1%. These properties show that ACM is a near-ideal material to investigate the percolation threshold. We have used thermal stressing to different elevated temperatures up to 900° C to induce crack damage in samples of ACM. For hydrostatic experiments; P and S wave velocities and the fluid permeability are then measured on each sample after the heat treatment process. Connected porosity is calculated using a novel ferrofluid saturation technique and the permeability is measured over a range of effective pressures up to 100MPa with a mean pore pressure of 10MPa. For the triaxial deformation experiments; a confining pressure of 40MPa, mean pore fluid pressure of 10MPa and a strain rates of 1.5 x 10-5 s-1 was employed. Permeability and porosity is calculated continuously during deformation from the steady-state flow rate, controlled by a servo-controlled double acting permeameter system. P and S wave velocities reduce by 48% and 32% respectively for thermal stressing up to 800° C, indicating the high level of cracking induced in the sample, while damage is found to remain isotropic over the temperature range, confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements. The fluid permeability increases by 7 orders of magnitude and connected crack porosity is increased by 4 orders of magnitude over this temperature range as induced cracks create more pathways available for fluid flow. This resulting

  4. Development of the Non-Hydrostatic Jupiter Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (J-GITM): Status and Current Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, Stephen; Ridley, Aaron; Majeed, Tariq; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, Randy; Bell, Jared

    2016-07-01

    The primary objectives for development and validation of a new 3-D non-hydrostatic model of Jupiter's upper atmosphere is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's thermosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system and to provide a global context within which to analyze the data retrieved from the new JUNO mission. The new J-GITM model presently incorporates the progress made on the previous Jupiter-TGCM code (i.e. key parameterizations, ion-neutral chemistry, IR cooling) while also employing the non-hydrostatic numerical core of the Earth Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM). The GITM numerical framework has been successfully applied to Earth, Mars, and Titan (see Ridley et al. [2006], Bougher et al. [2015], Bell [2008, 2010]). Moreover, it has been shown to simulate the effects of strong, localized heat sources (such as joule heating and auroral heating) more accurately than strictly hydrostatic GCMs (Deng et al. [2007, 2008]). Thus far, in the J-GITM model development and testing, model capability has been progressively augmented to capture the neutral composition (e.g. H, H2, He major species), 3-component neutral winds, and thermal structure, as well as the ion composition (H3+, H2+, and H+ among others) above 250 km. Presently, J-GITM: (a) provides an interactive calculation for auroral particle precipitation (i.e. heating, ionization), an improvement over the static formulation used previously in the J-TGCM (Bougher et al., 2005; Majeed et al., 2005, 2009, 2015); (b) self-consistently calculates an ionosphere using updated ion-neutral chemistry, ion dynamics, and electron transport; (c) simulates the chemistry that forms key hydrocarbons at the base of the thermosphere, focusing on CH4, C2H2, and C2H6; (d) allows the production of H3+, CH4, C2H2, and C2H6 to modify the global thermal balance of Jupiter through their non-LTE radiative cooling; (e) provides a calculation of H2 vibrational chemistry to regulate H+ densities; and (f) uses the improved

  5. Phytoplankton production in the Sargasso Sea as determined using optical mooring data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, K. J.; Smith, R. C.; Marra, J.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements from an untended mooring provide high-frequency observations of in-water optical properties and permit the estimation of important biological parameters continuously as a function of time. A 9-month time series, composed of three separate deployments, of optical data from the BIOWATT 1987 deep-sea mooring located in the oligotrophic waters of the Sargasso Sea at 34 deg N, 70 deg W are presented. These data have been tested using several bio-optical models for the purpose of providing a continuous estimate of phytoplankton productivity. The data are discussed in the context of contemporaneous shipboard observations and for future ocean color satellite observations. We present a continuous estimation of phytoplankton productivity for the 9-month time series. Results from the first 70-day deployment are emphasized to demonstrate the utility of optical observations as proxy measures of biological parameters, to present preliminary analysis, and to compare our bio-optical observations with concurrent physical observations. The bio-optical features show variation in response to physical forcings including diel variations of incident solar irradiance, episodic changes corresponding to wind forcing, variability caused by advective mesoscale eddy events in the vicinity of the mooring, and seasonal variability corresponding to changes in solar radiation, shoaling of the mixed layer depth, and succession of phytoplankton populations.

  6. An in vitro study of the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yin-Ru; Li, Ann; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Yin-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Indigo naturalis is effective in treating nail psoriasis coexisting with microorganism infections. This study examines the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. Eight bacterial and seven fungal strains were assayed using the agar diffusion method to examine the effects of indigo naturalis and its bioactive compounds. The bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis were purified sequentially using GFC, TLC, and HPLC. Their structures were identified using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. UPLC-MS/MS was applied to compare the metabolome profiles of indigo naturalis ethyl-acetate (EA) extract and its source plant, Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. The results of in vitro antimicrobial assays showed that indigo naturalis EA-extract significantly (≥1 mg/disc) inhibits Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermis and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and mildly inhibits non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens (Aspergillus fumigates and Candida albicans), but has little effect on dermatophyes. Isatin and tryptanthrin were identified as the bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis using S. aureus and S. epidermis as the bioassay model. Both bioactive ingredients had no effect on all tested fungi. In summary, indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore exhibits antimicrobial effects on Staphylococcus and non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens. Tryptanthrin and isatin may be its major bioactive ingredients against Staphylococcus and the inhibitory effect on MRSA may be due to other unidentified ingredients. PMID:24284490

  7. Combined string searching algorithm based on knuth-morris- pratt and boyer-moore algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarev, R. Yu; Chernigovskiy, A. S.; Tsareva, E. A.; Brezitskaya, V. V.; Nikiforov, A. Yu; Smirnov, N. A.

    2016-04-01

    The string searching task can be classified as a classic information processing task. Users either encounter the solution of this task while working with text processors or browsers, employing standard built-in tools, or this task is solved unseen by the users, while they are working with various computer programmes. Nowadays there are many algorithms for solving the string searching problem. The main criterion of these algorithms’ effectiveness is searching speed. The larger the shift of the pattern relative to the string in case of pattern and string characters’ mismatch is, the higher is the algorithm running speed. This article offers a combined algorithm, which has been developed on the basis of well-known Knuth-Morris-Pratt and Boyer-Moore string searching algorithms. These algorithms are based on two different basic principles of pattern matching. Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm is based upon forward pattern matching and Boyer-Moore is based upon backward pattern matching. Having united these two algorithms, the combined algorithm allows acquiring the larger shift in case of pattern and string characters’ mismatch. The article provides an example, which illustrates the results of Boyer-Moore and Knuth-Morris- Pratt algorithms and combined algorithm’s work and shows advantage of the latter in solving string searching problem.

  8. What is Radical Behaviorism? A Review of Jay Moore's Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2011-01-01

    B. F. Skinner founded both radical behaviorism and behavior analysis. His founding innovations included: a versatile preparation for studying behavior; explicating the generic nature of stimulus and response; a pragmatic criterion for defining behavioral units; response rate as a datum; the concept of stimulus control; the concept of verbal behavior; and explicating the explanatory power of contingencies. Besides these achievements, however, Skinner also made some mistakes. Subsequent developments in radical behaviorist thought have attempted to remedy these mistakes. Moore's book presents a “party line” version of radical behaviorism. It focuses narrowly on a few of Skinner's concepts (mostly mentalism and verbal behavior) and contains no criticism of his mistakes. In fact, Moore adds a few mistakes of his own manufacture; for example, he insists that the mental realm does not exist—an unprovable and distracting assertion. The book's portrayal of behavior analysis would have been current around 1960; it mentions almost none of the developments since then. It also includes almost no developments in radical behaviorism since Skinner. Moore's book would give an unwary reader a highly distorted picture of contemporary behavior analysis and radical behaviorism.

  9. Mooring apparatus and method of installation for deep water tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, A.F.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of mooring an offshore platform in a body of water having a surface and a floor comprising the steps of: locating anchoring means on the floor of the body of water, the anchoring means adapted for receipt of mooring tendons through a side entry opening therein; stationing a semi-submersible floating structure on the surface of the body of water above the anchoring means. The floating structure consists of external tendon receptacles adapted for side entry receipt of the plurality of mooring tendons, the tendon receptacles being located at an initial distance above the anchoring means; providing one piece, substantially rigid tendons disposed substantially horizontally near the surface and adjacent the floating structure, the tendons having enlarged top and bottom end connectors and an actual length which is greater than the initial distance; swinging the enlarged bottom end connector of one of the tendons downwardly into a position adjacent one of the plurality of anchoring means; pulling the enlarged bottom end connector of one of the tendons through the side opening in one of the anchoring means.

  10. Analysis of ecological factors limiting the destruction of high-moor peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    This review presents an analysis of literature data and original studies by the authors aimed at revealing the factors inhibiting the destruction of high-moor (oligotrophic) peat. Each of the ecological factors that prevent the decomposition of the high-moor peat by different groups of microorganisms is considered. The acid reaction, low temperatures, and lack of nutrients were found not to be the primary factors inhibiting the destruction of the peat. The limited content of oxygen in the peatbogs leads to a drastic decrease in the number of mycelial microorganisms and a reduction of the activity of hydrolytic and oxidizing enzymes. The main factor inhibiting the decomposition of sphagnum is its mechanical and chemical stability, since animals crushing sphagnum are absent in the soil, and this moss has polysaccharides of special composition. The toxicity of phenol compounds, which is manifested under the aerobic conditions, prevents the activity of all the hydrolytic enzymes. This is the main reason for the slow decomposition of sphagnum peat and the long-term preservation of the residues of bodies and food in high-moor peatlands.

  11. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing on in vitro digestion of milk proteins and fats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) is increasing in popularity in the food industry. Its ability to modify milk proteins and fats suggests that it may be useful in creating foods that suppress appetite; however, its effect on the digestibility of proteins and fats is unclear. The...

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-3, Hydrostatic Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This third in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes the principles and practices associated with hydrostatic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student,…

  13. Deciphering the adaptation strategies of Desulfovibrio piezophilus to hydrostatic pressure through metabolic and transcriptional analyses.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Amira; van Helden, Jacques; Bergon, Aurélie; Aouane, Aicha; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Tamburini, Christian; Loriod, Béatrice; Imbert, Jean; Ollivier, Bernard; Pradel, Nathalie; Dolla, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Desulfovibrio piezophilus strain C1TLV30(T) is a mesophilic piezophilic sulfate-reducer isolated from Wood Falls at 1700 m depth in the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we analysed the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on this deep-sea living bacterium at the physiologic and transcriptomic levels. Our results showed that lactate oxidation and energy metabolism were affected by the hydrostatic pressure. Especially, acetyl-CoA oxidation pathway and energy conservation through hydrogen and formate recycling would be more important when the hydrostatic pressure is above (26 MPa) than below (0.1 MPa) the optimal one (10 MPa). This work underlines also the role of the amino acid glutamate as a piezolyte for the Desulfovibrio genus. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 146 differentially expressed genes emphasizing energy production and conversion, amino acid transport and metabolism and cell motility and signal transduction mechanisms as hydrostatic pressure responding processes. This dataset allowed us to identify a sequence motif upstream of a subset of differentially expressed genes as putative pressure-dependent regulatory element. PMID:27264199

  14. Prolonged Exercise and Changes in Percent Fat Determinations by Hydrostatic Weighing and Scintillation Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Tom R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This study, designed to determine the effect of a prolonged running bout on the measurement of percent fat, produced erroneously low readings. It is suggested that previous exercise and state of hydration of subjects should be controlled prior to percent fat determination by hydrostatic weighing or scintillation counting. (MJB)

  15. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Torikachvili, M S; Kim, S K; Colombier, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C

    2015-12-01

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60,000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe(1-x)Ru(x))2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperature resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. This pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic. PMID:26724044

  16. Hydrostatic Pressure Project: Linked-Class Problem-Based Learning in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Freddie J.; Lockwood-Cooke, Pamela; Hunt, Emily M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few years, WTAMU Mathematics, Engineering and Science faculty has used interdisciplinary projects as the basis for implementation of a linked-class approach to Problem-Based Learning (PBL). A project that has significant relevance to engineering statics, fluid mechanics, and calculus is the Hydrostatic Pressure Project. This project…

  17. A class-A GPCR solubilized under high hydrostatic pressure retains its ligand binding ability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the solubilization of a class-A G protein-coupled receptor, the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR), was investigated. PBANR was expressed in expresSF+ insect cells as a C-terminal fusion protein with EGFP. The mem...

  18. Transcriptomics Reveal Several Gene Expression Patterns in the Piezophile Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis in Response to Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Amrani, Amira; Bergon, Aurélie; Holota, Hélène; Tamburini, Christian; Garel, Marc; Ollivier, Bernard; Imbert, Jean; Dolla, Alain; Pradel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq was used to study the response of Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney on the East-Pacific Rise at a depth of 2,600 m, to various hydrostatic pressure growth conditions. The transcriptomic datasets obtained after growth at 26, 10 and 0.1 MPa identified only 65 differentially expressed genes that were distributed among four main categories: aromatic amino acid and glutamate metabolisms, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and unknown function. The gene expression patterns suggest that D. hydrothermalis uses at least three different adaptation mechanisms, according to a hydrostatic pressure threshold (HPt) that was estimated to be above 10 MPa. Both glutamate and energy metabolism were found to play crucial roles in these mechanisms. Quantitation of the glutamate levels in cells revealed its accumulation at high hydrostatic pressure, suggesting its role as a piezolyte. ATP measurements showed that the energy metabolism of this bacterium is optimized for deep-sea life conditions. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms linked to hydrostatic pressure adaptation in sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:25215865

  19. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Torikachvili, M. S.; Kim, S. K.; Colombier, E.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-12-16

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60,000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe1–xRux)2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperature resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. As a result, this pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic.

  20. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Torikachvili, M. S.; Kim, S. K.; Colombier, E.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-12-16

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60,000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe1–xRux)2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperaturemore » resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. As a result, this pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic.« less

  1. Deciphering the adaptation strategies of Desulfovibrio piezophilus to hydrostatic pressure through metabolic and transcriptional analyses.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Amira; van Helden, Jacques; Bergon, Aurélie; Aouane, Aicha; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Tamburini, Christian; Loriod, Béatrice; Imbert, Jean; Ollivier, Bernard; Pradel, Nathalie; Dolla, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Desulfovibrio piezophilus strain C1TLV30(T) is a mesophilic piezophilic sulfate-reducer isolated from Wood Falls at 1700 m depth in the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we analysed the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on this deep-sea living bacterium at the physiologic and transcriptomic levels. Our results showed that lactate oxidation and energy metabolism were affected by the hydrostatic pressure. Especially, acetyl-CoA oxidation pathway and energy conservation through hydrogen and formate recycling would be more important when the hydrostatic pressure is above (26 MPa) than below (0.1 MPa) the optimal one (10 MPa). This work underlines also the role of the amino acid glutamate as a piezolyte for the Desulfovibrio genus. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 146 differentially expressed genes emphasizing energy production and conversion, amino acid transport and metabolism and cell motility and signal transduction mechanisms as hydrostatic pressure responding processes. This dataset allowed us to identify a sequence motif upstream of a subset of differentially expressed genes as putative pressure-dependent regulatory element.

  2. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Examination for leakage after application of pressure. Following the application of the hydrostatic test pressure for a minimum of 10 minutes (see § 56.97-30(g)), examination for leakage must be made of all... of 10 minutes and for such additional time as may be necessary to conduct the examination for...

  3. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikachvili, M. S.; Kim, S. K.; Colombier, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60 000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe1-xRux)2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperature resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. This pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic.

  4. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  5. Thermal fluid-solid interaction model and experimental validation for hydrostatic mechanical face seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weifeng; Liao, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiangfeng; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  6. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  7. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  8. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  9. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  10. Effect of Pulsed Ultraviolet Light and High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Antigenicity of Almond Protein Extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on reducing the IgE binding to the almond extracts, was studied using SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA probed with human plasma containing IgE antibodies to almond allergens, and a polyclonal antibody against almond ...

  11. Inactivation of human norovirus in contaminated oysters and clams by high-hydrostatic pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (NoV) is the most frequent causative agent of foodborne disease associated with shellfish consumption. In this study, the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on inactivation of NoV was determined. Genogroup I.1 (GI.1) or Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) NoV were inoculated into oyster ho...

  12. Observations from moored current meters in San Francisco Bay, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1981-01-01

    Current-meter data collected at eight stations in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system between August 1978 and December 1978 are compiled in this report. The measurements include current speed and direction, and water temperature and salinity (computed from conductivity and temperature). Data are presented in graphical format with each parameter plotted separately.

  13. Strength Differential Measured in Inconel 718: Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Wesseling, Paul; Prabhu, Nishad S.; Larose, Joel; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2003-01-01

    Aeropropulsion components, such as disks, blades, and shafts, are commonly subjected to multiaxial stress states at elevated temperatures. Experimental results from loadings as complex as those experienced in service are needed to help guide the development of accurate viscoplastic, multiaxial deformation models that can be used to improve the design of these components. During a recent study on multiaxial deformation (ref. 1) on a common aerospace material, Inconel 718, it was shown that the material in the aged state exhibits a strength differential effect (SDE), whereby the uniaxial compressive yield and subsequent flow behavior are significantly higher than those in uniaxial tension. Thus, this material cannot be described by a standard von Mises yield formulation. There have been other formulations postulated (ref. 2) that involve other combinations of the stress invariants, including the effect of hydrostatic stress. The question remained as to which invariants are necessary in the flow model. To capture the physical mechanisms occurring during deformation and reflect them in the plasticity formulation, researchers examined the flow of Inconel 718 under various amounts of hydrostatic stress to determine whether or not hydrostatic stress is needed in the formulation. Under NASA Grant NCC3-464, monitored by the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of tensile tests were conducted at Case Western Reserve University on aged (precipitation hardened) Inconel 718 at 650 C and with superimposed hydrostatic pressure. Dogbone shaped tensile specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 16-mm gauge length) and cylindrical compression specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 6-mm gauge length) were strain gauged and loaded in a high-pressure testing apparatus. Hydrostatic pressures were obtained with argon and ranged from 210 to 630 MPa. The aged Inconel 718 showed a pronounced difference in the tension and compression yield strength (i.e., an SDE), as previously observed. Also, there were

  14. Mooring-based long-term observation of oceanographic condition in the Chukchi Ses and Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Itoh, Motoyo; Nishino, Shigeto; Watanabe, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    Changes of the Arctic Ocean environment are well known as one of the most remarkable evidences of global warming, attracting social and public attentions as well as scientists'. However, to illustrate on-going changes and predict future condition of the Arctic marine environment, we still do not have enough knowledge of Arctic sea ice and marine environment. In particular, lack of observation data in winter, e.g., under sea ice, still remains a key issue for precise understanding of seasonal cycle on oceanographic condition in the Arctic Ocean. Mooring-based observation is one of the most useful methods to collect year-long data in the Arctic Ocean. We have been conducting long-term monitoring using mooring system in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean. Volume, heat, and freshwater fluxes through Barrow Canyon where is a major conduit of Pacific-origin water-masses into the Canada Basin have been observed since 2000. We show from an analysis of the mooring results that volume flux through Barrow Canyon was about 60 % of Bering Strait volume flux. Averaged heat flux ranges from 0.9 to 3.07 TW, which could melt 88,000 to 300,000 km2 of 1m thick ice in the Canada Basin, which likely contributed to sea ice retreat in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean. In winter, we found inter-annual variability in salinity related to coastal polynya activity in the Chukchi Sea. In collaboration with Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) project, which is one of the tasks of Sustaining Arctic Observing Network (SAON), we also initiated year-long mooring observation in the Hope Valley of the southern Chukchi Sea since 2012. Interestingly, winter oceanographic conditions in the Hope Valley are greatly different between in 2012-2013 and in 2013-2014. We speculate that differences of sea ice freeze-up and coastal polynya activity in the southern Chukchi Sea cause significant difference of winter oceanographic condition. It suggests that recent sea ice reduction in the Pacific

  15. Structure-relaxation mechanism for the response of T4 lysozyme cavity mutants to hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Michael T.; López, Carlos J.; Yang, Zhongyu; Kreitman, Margaux J.; Horwitz, Joseph; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2015-01-01

    Application of hydrostatic pressure shifts protein conformational equilibria in a direction to reduce the volume of the system. A current view is that the volume reduction is dominated by elimination of voids or cavities in the protein interior via cavity hydration, although an alternative mechanism wherein cavities are filled with protein side chains resulting from a structure relaxation has been suggested [López CJ, Yang Z, Altenbach C, Hubbell WL (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(46):E4306–E4315]. In the present study, mechanisms for elimination of cavities under high pressure are investigated in the L99A cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme and derivatives thereof using site-directed spin labeling, pressure-resolved double electron–electron resonance, and high-pressure circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the L99A mutant, the ground state is in equilibrium with an excited state of only ∼3% of the population in which the cavity is filled by a protein side chain [Bouvignies et al. (2011) Nature 477(7362):111–114]. The results of the present study show that in L99A the native ground state is the dominant conformation to pressures of 3 kbar, with cavity hydration apparently taking place in the range of 2–3 kbar. However, in the presence of additional mutations that lower the free energy of the excited state, pressure strongly populates the excited state, thereby eliminating the cavity with a native side chain rather than solvent. Thus, both cavity hydration and structure relaxation are mechanisms for cavity elimination under pressure, and which is dominant is determined by details of the energy landscape. PMID:25918400

  16. The influence of high hydrostatic pressure on bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Daniel, Isabelle

    2012-07-01

    The impact of deep-subsurface pressure conditions on microbial activity is still poorly constrained. In particular it is unknown how pressure of deep environments affects microbial transformations of iron. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the rate and the extent of bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR). We employed a novel experimental setup that enables in situ monitoring of Fe oxidation state and speciation in bacterial cultures in an optimized HHP incubation system using X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was incubated at 30 °C with Fe(III) citrate and tryptone at pressures between 0.1 and 100 MPa. For pressures up to 70 MPa strain MR-1 (108 cells ml-1) was able to reduce all 5 mM Fe(III) provided. Above 70 MPa, the final amount of Fe(III) that MR-1 could reduce decreased linearly and DIR was estimated to stop at 109 ± 7 MPa. The decrease in the reduction yield was correlated with the dramatic decrease in survival (as determined by CFU counts) above 70 MPa. The initial rate of DIR increased with pressure up to 40 MPa, then decreased to reach zero at about 110 MPa. Increased rates of DIR activity and relatively high growth rates for pressures below 40 MPa would potentially ensure the maintenance of MR-1 in most of deep subsurface environments where moderate pressures occur, i.e. deep-sea environments. This study not only provides the first in situ quantitative results for microbial iron metabolism under HHP conditions but also sets the stage for future investigations of deep-sea pressure-adapted iron reducers. Moreover it demonstrates for the first time that XANES at the Fe K-edge is a powerful probe for in vivo monitoring of iron transformations in living microbial cultures.

  17. Effect of working position on vertical motion straightness of open hydrostatic guideways in grinding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Xue, Fei; Chen, Yaolong

    2016-08-01

    Hydrostatic guideways have various applications in precision machine tools due to their high motion accuracy. The analysis of motion straightness in hydrostatic guideways is generally ignoring the external load on the slider. A variation force also exists, caused by the different working positions, together with the dead load of the slider and that of other auxiliary devices. The effect of working position on vertical motion straightness is investigated based on the equivalent static model, considering the error averaging effort of pressured oil film in open hydrostatic guideways. Open hydrostatic guideways in LGF1000 are analyzed with this approach. The theoretical results show that the slider has maximum vertical motion straightness when the working position is closer the guiderail of Y axis. The vertical motion straightness reaches a minimum value as the working position is located at the center of the two guiderails on the Y axis. The difference between the maximum and minimum vertical motion straightness is 34.7%. The smaller vertical motion straightness is attributed to the smaller spacing of the two pads centers, along the Y direction. The experimental results show that the vertical motion straightness is 4.15 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is located in the middle of the X beam, and 5.08 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is approaching the Y guiderails, denoting an increase of 18.3%. The changing trends of the measured results validate the correctness of the theoretical model. The research work can be used to reveal the variation law of accuracy of the open hydrostatic guideways, under different working positions, to predict the machining precision, and provides the basis for an error compensation strategy for gantry type grinding machines.

  18. Development And Application Of Non-Hydrostatic Model To The Coastal Engineering Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maderych, V.; Brovchenko, I.; Fenical, S.; Nikishov, V.; Terletska, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 3D non-hydrostatic free surface model developed by Kanarska and Maderich (2003) for stratified flows was further improved and has been used to simulate coastal processes. In the model the surface elevation, hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic components of pressure and velocity are calculated at sequential stages. Unlike most non-hydrostatic models, the 2-D depth-averaged momentum and continuity equations were integrated explicitly, whereas the 3-D equations were solved semi-implicitly at subsequent stages. The RANS and subgrid- scale eddy viscosity and diffusivity parameterization were implemented in the model to parameterize small-scale mixing. The model was applied to three coastal engineering problems. First, we used the model coupled with a 3D Lagrangian sediment transport model to predict scour caused by propeller jets of slowly maneuvering ships. The results of the simulations show good agreement with laboratory experiments and field ADCP measurements with tug boats. Second, the model was applied, while nested into the hydrostatic far-field counterpart model, for near-field simulation of cooling water discharge through submerged outfalls. Third, laboratory experiments and simulations were performed to estimate effects of large-amplitude internal solitary waves (ISW) on submerged structures and coastal bottom sediments. In the first series of experiments and simulations, the interaction of ISW-depressions with a rectangular bottom obstacle was investigated. In the second series, the ISW-depression was studied passing through a smooth local lateral constriction. The third series of laboratory experiments and simulations was conducted to investigate the dynamics of ISW of depressions reflecting from a steep slope. Contribution of V. Maderych in this work was supported by Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Research Fund of 2007.

  19. Seamless atmospheric modeling across the hydrostatic-nonhydrostatic scales - preliminary results using an unstructured-Voronoi mesh for weather prediction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skamarock, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major problems in atmospheric model applications is the representation of deep convection within the models; explicit simulation of deep convection on fine meshes performs much better than sub-grid parameterized deep convection on coarse meshes. Unfortunately, the high cost of explicit convective simulation has meant it has only been used to down-scale global simulations in weather prediction and regional climate applications, typically using traditional one-way interactive nesting technology. We have been performing real-time weather forecast tests using a global non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (the Model for Prediction Across Scales, MPAS) that employs a variable-resolution unstructured Voronoi horizontal mesh (nominally hexagons) to span hydrostatic to nonhydrostatic scales. The smoothly varying Voronoi mesh eliminates many downscaling problems encountered using traditional one- or two-way grid nesting. Our test weather forecasts cover two periods - the 2015 Spring Forecast Experiment conducted at the NOAA Storm Prediction Center during the month of May in which we used a 50-3 km mesh, and the PECAN field program examining nocturnal convection over the US during the months of June and July in which we used a 15-3 km mesh. An important aspect of this modeling system is that the model physics be scale-aware, particularly the deep convection parameterization. These MPAS simulations employ the Grell-Freitas scale-aware convection scheme. Our test forecasts show that the scheme produces a gradual transition in the deep convection, from the deep unstable convection being handled entirely by the convection scheme on the coarse mesh regions (dx > 15 km), to the deep convection being almost entirely explicit on the 3 km NA region of the meshes. We will present results illustrating the performance of critical aspects of the MPAS model in these tests.

  20. The role of ontogeny in physiological tolerance: decreasing hydrostatic pressure tolerance with development in the northern stone crab Lithodes maja.

    PubMed

    Munro, Catriona; Morris, James P; Brown, Alastair; Hauton, Chris; Thatje, Sven

    2015-06-22

    Extant deep-sea invertebrate fauna represent both ancient and recent invasions from shallow-water habitats. Hydrostatic pressure may present a significant physiological challenge to organisms seeking to colonize deeper waters or migrate ontogenetically. Pressure may be a key factor contributing to bottlenecks in the radiation of taxa and potentially drive speciation. Here, we assess shifts in the tolerance of hydrostatic pressure through early ontogeny of the northern stone crab Lithodes maja, which occupies a depth range of 4-790 m in the North Atlantic. The zoea I, megalopa and crab I stages were exposed to hydrostatic pressures up to 30.0 MPa (equivalent of 3000 m depth), and the relative fold change of genes putatively coding for the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-regulated protein 1 (narg gene), two heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) isoforms and mitochondrial Citrate Synthase (CS gene) were measured. This study finds a significant increase in the relative expression of the CS and hsp70a genes with increased hydrostatic pressure in the zoea I stage, and an increase in the relative expression of all genes with increased hydrostatic pressure in the megalopa and crab I stages. Transcriptional responses are corroborated by patterns in respiratory rates in response to hydrostatic pressure in all stages. These results suggest a decrease in the acute high-pressure tolerance limit as ontogeny advances, as reflected by a shift in the hydrostatic pressure at which significant differences are observed.

  1. The role of ontogeny in physiological tolerance: decreasing hydrostatic pressure tolerance with development in the northern stone crab Lithodes maja

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Catriona; Morris, James P.; Brown, Alastair; Hauton, Chris; Thatje, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Extant deep-sea invertebrate fauna represent both ancient and recent invasions from shallow-water habitats. Hydrostatic pressure may present a significant physiological challenge to organisms seeking to colonize deeper waters or migrate ontogenetically. Pressure may be a key factor contributing to bottlenecks in the radiation of taxa and potentially drive speciation. Here, we assess shifts in the tolerance of hydrostatic pressure through early ontogeny of the northern stone crab Lithodes maja, which occupies a depth range of 4–790 m in the North Atlantic. The zoea I, megalopa and crab I stages were exposed to hydrostatic pressures up to 30.0 MPa (equivalent of 3000 m depth), and the relative fold change of genes putatively coding for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-regulated protein 1 (narg gene), two heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) isoforms and mitochondrial Citrate Synthase (CS gene) were measured. This study finds a significant increase in the relative expression of the CS and hsp70a genes with increased hydrostatic pressure in the zoea I stage, and an increase in the relative expression of all genes with increased hydrostatic pressure in the megalopa and crab I stages. Transcriptional responses are corroborated by patterns in respiratory rates in response to hydrostatic pressure in all stages. These results suggest a decrease in the acute high-pressure tolerance limit as ontogeny advances, as reflected by a shift in the hydrostatic pressure at which significant differences are observed. PMID:26041343

  2. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  3. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  4. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment.

  5. HYDROSTATIC GAS CONSTRAINTS ON SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMICAL MODELING IN A SAMPLE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Philip J.; Buote, David A.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Gebhardt, Karl; Mathews, William G.

    2009-10-01

    We present new mass measurements for the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of three early-type galaxies. The gas pressure in the surrounding, hot interstellar medium (ISM) is measured through spatially resolved spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, allowing the SMBH mass (M {sub BH}) to be inferred directly under the hydrostatic approximation. This technique does not require calibration against other SMBH measurement methods and its accuracy depends only on the ISM being close to hydrostatic, which is supported by the smooth X-ray isophotes of the galaxies. Combined with results from our recent study of the elliptical galaxy NGC 4649, this brings the number of galaxies with SMBHs measured in this way to four. Of these, three already have mass determinations from the kinematics of either the stars or a central gas disk, and hence join only a handful of galaxies with M {sub BH} measured by more than one technique. We find good agreement between the different methods, providing support for the assumptions implicit in both the hydrostatic and the dynamical models. The stellar mass-to-light ratios for each galaxy inferred by our technique are in agreement with the predictions of stellar population synthesis models assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). This concurrence implies that no more than {approx}10%-20% of the ISM pressure is nonthermal, unless there is a conspiracy between the shape of the IMF and nonthermal pressure. Finally, we compute Bondi accretion rates (M-dot{sub bondi}), finding that the two galaxies with the highest M-dot{sub bondi} exhibit little evidence of X-ray cavities, suggesting that the correlation with the active galactic nuclei jet power takes time to be established.

  6. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of RT4Al8 (R = Sc, Y, La, Lu; T = Fe, Mn, Cr) compounds. Hydrostatic pressure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I. P.; Grechnev, G. E.; Panfilov, A. S.; Lyogenkaya, A. A.; Kotlyar, O. V.; Fedorchenko, A. V.; Feher, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of theoretical and experimental studies of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of RFe4Al8, RMn4Al8, and RCr4Al8 compounds with nonmagnetic elements R = Sc, Y, La, and Lu. The electron spectrum and field induced magnetic moment, as well as their dependences on the unit cell volume, are calculated for the paramagnetic phase of the RT4Al8 systems. The calculations are supplemented by measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of representative RT4Al8 compounds as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure.

  7. Complete elastic characterization of viscoelastic materials by dynamic measurements of the complex bulk and Young's moduli as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, François M.; Trivett, D. H.

    2011-07-01

    Two independent systems to measure the dynamic complex Young's and bulk moduli of viscoelastic materials as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure are described. In the Young's modulus system, a bar-shaped sample is adhered to a piezoelectric shaker and mounted vertically inside an air-filled pressure vessel. Data are obtained using both the traditional resonant approach and a wave-speed technique. In the bulk modulus system, the compressibility of a sample of arbitrary shape immersed in Castor oil and placed inside a pressure chamber is measured. Data can be obtained at frequencies typically ranging from 50 Hz to 5 kHz, at temperatures comprised between -2 and 50 °C and under hydrostatic pressures ranging from 0 to 2 MPa (Young's), or 6.5 MPa (bulk). Typical data obtained with both systems are presented, and it is shown how these data can be combined to completely characterize the elasticity of the material under investigation. In particular, they can be used to obtain experimental values of the complex Poisson's ratio, whose accurate measurement is otherwise quite challenging to perform directly. As an example, the magnitude and loss tangent of Poisson's ratio are presented for a nearly incompressible rubber.

  8. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Mooring Masts for Remotely Controlled Indoor and Outdoor Airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleelullah, Syed; Bhardwaj, Utsav; Pant, Rajkumar Sureshchandra

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and structural details of two mooring masts, one for remotely controlled outdoor airships and another one for remotely controlled indoor airships. In a previous study, a mast for outdoor remotely controlled airship was designed to meet several user-specified operating requirements, and a simplified version of the same was fabricated. A spring loaded device was incorporated that sounds an alarm when the wind-loads exceed a threshold value, so that the airship can be taken indoors. The present study started with a critical analysis of that mast, and a new mast was designed and fabricated to remove several of its shortcomings. This mast consists of power screw operated telescopic module made of aluminium, mounted on a five legged base with castor wheels, for ease in mobility. Components of the existing mast were used to the possible extent, and the design was simplified to meet the assembly and transportation requirements. The spring mechanism used in alarming device was also modified to ensure higher sensitivity in the range of maximum expected wind-loads acting on the airship. A lightweight mooring mast for indoor remotely controlled airships was also designed and fabricated, which can accommodate non-rigid indoor airships of length up to 5 m. The mast consists of an elevating bolt operated telescopic module mounted on a tripod adapter base, with lockable castor wheels, and has a specially designed mooring-clamp at the top. The various modules and components of the mast were designed to enable quick assembly and transportation.

  9. Design and performance of a horizontal mooring for upper-ocean research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosenbaugh, Mark; Anderson, Steven; Trask, Richard; Gobat, Jason; Paul, Walter; Butman, Bradford; Weller, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a two-dimensional moored array for sampling horizontal variability in the upper ocean. The mooring was deployed in Massachusetts Bay in a water depth of 84 m for the purpose of measuring the horizontal structure of internal waves. The mooring was instrumented with three acoustic current meters (ACMs) spaced along a 170-m horizontal cable that was stretched between two subsurface buoys 20 m below the sea surface. Five 25-m-long vertical instrument strings were suspended from the horizontal cable. A bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was deployed nearby to measure the current velocity throughout the water column. Pressure sensors mounted on the subsurface buoys and the vertical instrument strings were used to measure the vertical displacements of the array in response to the currents. Measurements from the ACMs and the ADCP were used to construct time-dependent, two-dimensional current fields. The current fields were used as input to a numerical model that calculated the deformation of the array with respect to the nominal zero-current configuration. Comparison of the calculated vertical offsets of the downstream subsurface buoy and downstream vertical instrument string with the pressure measurements were used to verify the numerical code. These results were then used to estimate total deformation of the array due to the passage of the internal waves. Based on the analysis of the three internal wave events with the highest measured vertical offsets, it is concluded that the geometry of the main structure (horizontal cable and anchor legs) was kept to within ±2.0 m, and the geometry of the vertical instrument strings was kept to within ±4.0 m except for one instance when the current velocity reached 0.88 m s−1.

  10. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    PubMed Central

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins. PMID:27250364

  11. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  12. Distributed measurement of hydrostatic pressure based on Brillouin dynamic grating in polarization maintaining fibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Hong; Kim, Jeongjun; Song, Kwang Yong

    2016-09-19

    High-sensitivity distributed measurement of hydrostatic pressure is experimentally demonstrated by optical time-domain analysis of Brillouin dynamic grating (BDG) in polarization maintaining fibers (PMF's). The spectral shift of the BDG in four different types of PMF's are investigated under hydrostatic pressure variation from 14.5 psi (1 bar) to 884.7 psi (61 bar) with less than 2 m spatial resolution. The pressure sensitivity of BDG frequency is measured to be ‒1.69, + 0.65, + 0.78, and + 0.85 MHz/psi for a PM photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF), two Bow-tie fibers, and a PANDA fiber, respectively, which is about 65 to 169 times larger than that of Brillouin frequency-based pressure sensing. PMID:27661881

  13. Investigation of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a large steerable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbarger, J.; Castelli, V.; Rippel, H.

    1972-01-01

    The problems inherent in the design and construction of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a tracking antenna of very large size were studied. For a load of 48,000,000 lbs., it is concluded that the hydrostatic bearing concept is feasible, provided that a particular multiple pad arrangement, high oil viscosity, and a particular load spreading arrangement are used. Presently available computer programs and techniques are deemed to be adequate for a good portion of the design job but new integrated programs will have to be developed in the area of the computation of the deflections of the supporting bearing structure. Experimental studies might also be indicated to ascertain the life characteristics of grouting under cyclic loading, and the optimization of hydraulic circuits and pipe sizes to insure the long life operation of pumps with high viscosity oil while avoiding cavitation.

  14. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment on plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, Adrian; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Hazael, Rachael; McMillan, Paul; Hazell, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds have both been previously investigated (primarily driven by an interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia respectively). However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods of applying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in such data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder set-up and shock compression via employment of a 50-mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer-plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set.

  15. Highly birefringent polymer side-hole fiber for hydrostatic pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Martynkien, Tadeusz; Wojcik, Grzegorz; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2015-07-01

    We report on the fabrication of a birefringent side-hole polymer optical fiber with an elliptical core made of polymethyl metacrylate-polystyrene (PMMA/PS) copolymer and pure PMMA cladding. The fiber core is located in a narrow PMMA bridge separating the holes. Two fibers with different bridge thickness were fabricated and characterized. We demonstrate, experimentally and numerically, that, by narrowing the bridge between the holes, one can increase simultaneously the fiber birefringence and the polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure. In the fiber with the bridge as narrow as 5 μm, we achieved a record-high polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure ranging between 175 and 140 rad/MPa/m in the spectral range of 600-830 nm. The phase modal birefringence in this fiber is also high and exceeds 3×10(-5) at 600 nm, which results in small polarization cross talk. PMID:26125360

  16. Quantifying hydrostatic pressure in plant cells by using indentation with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Beauzamy, Léna; Derr, Julien; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2015-05-19

    Plant cell growth depends on a delicate balance between an inner drive-the hydrostatic pressure known as turgor-and an outer restraint-the polymeric wall that surrounds a cell. The classical technique to measure turgor in a single cell, the pressure probe, is intrusive and cannot be applied to small cells. In order to overcome these limitations, we developed a method that combines quantification of topography, nanoindentation force measurements, and an interpretation using a published mechanical model for the pointlike loading of thin elastic shells. We used atomic force microscopy to estimate the elastic properties of the cell wall and turgor pressure from a single force-depth curve. We applied this method to onion epidermal peels and quantified the response to changes in osmolality of the bathing solution. Overall our approach is accessible and enables a straightforward estimation of the hydrostatic pressure inside a walled cell.

  17. Partial alignment and measurement of residual dipolar couplings of proteins under high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yinan; Wand, A. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a complementary approach for investigating various structural and thermodynamic properties of macromolecules. Noticeably absent from the array of experimental restraints that have been employed to characterize protein structures at high hydrostatic pressure is the residual dipolar coupling, which requires the partial alignment of the macromolecule of interest. Here we examine five alignment media that are commonly used at ambient pressure for this purpose. We find that the spontaneous alignment of Pf1 phage, d(GpG) and a C12E5/n-hexnanol mixture in a magnetic field is preserved under high hydrostatic pressure. However, DMPC/ DHPC bicelles and collagen gel are found to be unsuitable. Evidence is presented to demonstrate that pressure-induced structural changes can be identified using the residual dipolar coupling. PMID:23807390

  18. Equity and health policy in Africa: Using concept mapping in Moore (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Ridde, Valéry

    2008-01-01

    Background This methodological article is based on a health policy research project conducted in Burkina Faso (West Africa). Concept mapping (CM) was used as a research method to understand the local views of equity among stakeholders, who were concerned by the health policy under consideration. While this technique has been used in North America and elsewhere, to our knowledge it has not yet been applied in Africa in any vernacular language. Its application raises many issues and certain methodological limitations. Our objective in this article is to present its use in this particular context, and to share a number of methodological observations on the subject. Methods Two CMs were done among two different groups of local stakeholders following four steps: generating ideas, structuring the ideas, computing maps using multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis methods, and interpreting maps. Fifteen nurses were invited to take part in the study, all of whom had undergone training on health policies. Of these, nine nurses (60%) ultimately attended the two-day meeting, conducted in French. Of 45 members of village health committees who attended training on health policies, only eight were literate in the local language (Moore). Seven of these (88%) came to the meeting. Results The local perception of equity seems close to the egalitarian model. The actors are not ready to compromise social stability and peace for the benefit of the worst-off. The discussion on the methodological limitations of CM raises the limitations of asking a single question in Moore and the challenge of translating a concept as complex as equity. While the translation of equity into Moore undoubtedly oriented the discussions toward social relations, we believe that, in the context of this study, the open-ended question concerning social justice has a threefold relevance. At the same time, those limitations were transformed into strengths. We understand that it was essential to resort to the

  19. Complications of Austin Moore arthroplasty. Their incidence and relationship to potential predisposing factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, D M; Oliver, C H; Ryder, C T; Stinchfield, F E

    1975-01-01

    In a retrospective computerized study of 451 Austin Moore arthroplasties (211 for acute hip fractures and 240 for hip reconstruction), the operative and general complications were correlated with the historical, preoperative, operative, and early and late postoperative factors usually thought to influence the results. Wound complications were significantly associated with diabetes and fracture, obesity and fracture, and procedures lasting two hours or more. General complications showing significant associations were: death or pneumonia with fractures, phlebitis with obesity, and myocardial infarction with fracture. Factors not significantly associated with complications included age, previous hip surgery, time of day of the operation, surgical approach, wound irrigation, use of drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and reaming of the acetabulum.

  20. [Number, viability, and diversity of the filterable forms of prokaryotes in sphagnous high-moor peat].

    PubMed

    Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Kadulin, M S; Konova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The number, potential viability, and taxonomic diversity (at the level of phylum) of the filterable forms of prokaryotes (FFP) are estimated in the main genetic horizons of high-moor peat. It was shown that the number of FFP reached 500 million cells in 1 g, i.e., up to 5% of the general size bacteria. The portion of viable cells among FFP (93-98%) was higher than that for the general size bacteria (60-68%). FISH-analysis (fluorescence in situ hybridization) showed that FFP contained the same phylogenetic groups as the population of general size bacteria (domain Archea and phylum Actinobacteria, Cytophaga, and Proteobacteria of the domain Bacteria).