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Sample records for hydrothermal quartz veins

  1. Trace elements in hydrothermal quartz: Relationships to cathodoluminescent textures and insights into vein formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusk, B.G.; Lowers, H.A.; Reed, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution electron microprobe maps show the distribution of Ti, Al, Ca, K, and Fe among quartz growth zones revealed by scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) from 12 hydrothermal ore deposits formed between ???100 and e1750 ??C. The maps clearly show the relationships between trace elements and CL intensity in quartz. Among all samples, no single trace element consistently correlates with variations in CL intensity. However in vein quartz from five porphyry-Cu (Mo-Au) deposits, CL intensity always correlates positively with Ti concentrations, suggesting that Ti is a CL activator in quartz formed at >400 ??C. Ti concentrations in most rutile-bearing vein quartz from porphyry copper deposits indicate reasonable formation temperatures of 2000 ppm, but in high-temperature quartz, Al concentrations are consistently in the range of several hundred ppm. Aluminum concentrations in quartz refl ect the Al solubility in hydrothermal fluids, which is strongly dependent on pH. Aluminum concentrations in quartz therefore reflect fluctuations in pH that may drive metal-sulfide precipitation in hydrothermal systems. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  2. Pre-biotic organic molecules in hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn province, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dyker, Gerald; Kirnbauer, Thomas; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinfried; Tubbesing, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    According to a model recently published by Schreiber et al. (OLEB 2012), pre-biotic organic molecules as earliest markers for a chemical evolution have been formed in tectonic faults of the first Archaean cratons. These faults are often documented by quartz- and other hydrothermal vein mineralization. During the growth of these quartzes, small portions of hydrothermal fluids are enclosed which conserve the chemical composition of the given fluid medium. According to our model, the preconditions for the geochemical formation of organic molecules are a suitable carbon source (e.g. carbon dioxide), varying P/T conditions, and catalysts. This given, rising hydrothermal fluids such as mineral-rich water and supercritical carbon dioxide in deep faults with contacts to the upper earth mantle offer conditions which allow for reactions similar to the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. So far, the inclusions which possibly have conserved the products of these reactions have not been analyzed for possible organic constituents. First analytical results of a Mesozoic hydrothermal quartz vein from central Germany (Taunus) reveal that several organic compounds are found in fluid inclusions. However, the true origin of these compounds is unclear due to possible contamination by adjacent Corg-rich metasediments. Therefore, we have extended the study to hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn craton, to impact-generated quartz veins of the Shoemaker-Crater as well as to hydrothermal quartz boulders from a 2.7 to 3 billion years old conglomerate near Murchison (Western Australia). In one of the samples from the conglomerate, a wide spectrum of organic compounds such as bromomethane, butane, isoprene, benzene, and toluene have been detected. The time interval between the quartz formation, its erosion and its sedimentation is unknown. Possibly, the analyzed quartz sample was formed in a hydrothermal vein long before any living cells have existed on earth. In this case, the given

  3. VOC and VOX in fluid inclusions of quartz: New chemical insights into hydrothermal vein mineralization by GC-MS and GC-IRMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Tobias; Kirnbauer, Thomas; Keppler, Frank; Greule, Markus; Fischer, Jan; Spiekermann, Patrik; Schreiber, Ulrich; Mulder, Ines; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich

    2015-04-01

    Fluid inclusions (FIs) in minerals are known to contain a variety of different liquids, gases, and solids. The fluids get trapped during mineral growth and can preserve the original mineral-forming fluid or fluids of later events. A new analytical technique developed by Mulder et al. (2013) [1] allows to measure trace gases in FIs. For the measurements, grains of 3-5 mm diameter are ground in an airtight grinding device, releasing the volatiles from FIs into the gas phase, where they can be measured by GC-MS, GC-FID and GC-IRMS. The Taunus covers the southeastern part of the thrust-and-fold-belt of the Rhenish Massif (Germany). The Variscan rock sequences comprise sedimentary and volcanic units ranging from Ordovician to Lower Carboniferous. Several types of hydrothermal mineralization can be distinguished, which are - in regard to the Variscan orogeny - pre-orogenic, orogenic, late-orogenic, post-orogenic and recent in age [2]. They include SEDEX, vein, Alpine fissure, disseminated and stockwerk mineralizations. Thus, the Taunus mineralizations enable investigations of different hydrothermal systems at different age in one region. For most of them extensive studies of stable and radiogenic isotopes exist. Quartz crystals of post-orogenic quartz veins and Pb-Zn-Cu bearing veins [3] were selected for our FI investigation. Sulphur containing compounds like COS and CS2 dominate the FIs but there are also volatile hydrocarbons (VOC) like different butenes, benzene, toluene and cyclopentene that were found very often. In some samples volatile halogenated organic carbons (VOX) like chloro- and bromomethane were found. Some FIs even contain iodomethane, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride and -bromide. The non-fossil-fuel subsurface chemistry of VOC and VOX is not fully understood. There are a lot of unknown geogenic sources [4][5]. For a better understanding δ13C- and δ2H-values of CH4 were measured by GC-IRMS to examine if the detected organic compounds are formed biotic

  4. Biogenic Iron-Rich Filaments in the Quartz Veins in the Uppermost Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation, Aksu Area, Northwestern Tarim Basin, China: Implications for Iron Oxidizers in Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiqiang; Chen, Daizhao; Tang, Dongjie; Dong, Shaofeng; Guo, Chuan; Guo, Zenghui; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide-encrusted filamentous microstructures produced by microorganisms have been widely reported in various modern and ancient extreme environments; however, the iron-dependent microorganisms preserved in hydrothermal quartz veins have not been explored in detail because of limited materials available. In this study, abundant well-preserved filamentous microstructures were observed in the hydrothermal quartz veins of the uppermost dolostones of the terminal-Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation in the Aksu area, northwestern Tarim Basin, China. These filamentous microstructures were permineralized by goethite and hematite as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and completely entombed in chalcedony and quartz cements. Microscopically, they are characterized by biogenic filamentous morphologies (commonly 20-200 μm in length and 1-5 μm in diameter) and structures (curved, tubular sheath-like, segmented, and mat-like filaments), similar to the Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) living in modern and ancient hydrothermal vent fields. A previous study revealed that quartz-barite vein swarms were subseafloor channels of low-temperature, silica-rich, diffusive hydrothermal vents in the earliest Cambrian, which contributed silica to the deposition of the overlying bedded chert of the Yurtus Formation. In this context, this study suggests that the putative filamentous FeOB preserved in the quartz veins might have thrived in the low-temperature, silica- and Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal vent channels in subseafloor mixing zones and were rapidly fossilized by subsequent higher-temperature, silica-rich hydrothermal fluids in response to waning and waxing fluctuations of diffuse hydrothermal venting. In view of the occurrence in a relatively stable passive continental margin shelf environment in Tarim Block, the silica-rich submarine hydrothermal vent system may represent a new and important geological niche favorable for FeOB colonization, which is different from their traditional

  5. Biogenic Iron-Rich Filaments in the Quartz Veins in the Uppermost Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation, Aksu Area, Northwestern Tarim Basin, China: Implications for Iron Oxidizers in Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiqiang; Chen, Daizhao; Tang, Dongjie; Dong, Shaofeng; Guo, Chuan; Guo, Zenghui; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide-encrusted filamentous microstructures produced by microorganisms have been widely reported in various modern and ancient extreme environments; however, the iron-dependent microorganisms preserved in hydrothermal quartz veins have not been explored in detail because of limited materials available. In this study, abundant well-preserved filamentous microstructures were observed in the hydrothermal quartz veins of the uppermost dolostones of the terminal-Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation in the Aksu area, northwestern Tarim Basin, China. These filamentous microstructures were permineralized by goethite and hematite as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and completely entombed in chalcedony and quartz cements. Microscopically, they are characterized by biogenic filamentous morphologies (commonly 20-200 μm in length and 1-5 μm in diameter) and structures (curved, tubular sheath-like, segmented, and mat-like filaments), similar to the Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) living in modern and ancient hydrothermal vent fields. A previous study revealed that quartz-barite vein swarms were subseafloor channels of low-temperature, silica-rich, diffusive hydrothermal vents in the earliest Cambrian, which contributed silica to the deposition of the overlying bedded chert of the Yurtus Formation. In this context, this study suggests that the putative filamentous FeOB preserved in the quartz veins might have thrived in the low-temperature, silica- and Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal vent channels in subseafloor mixing zones and were rapidly fossilized by subsequent higher-temperature, silica-rich hydrothermal fluids in response to waning and waxing fluctuations of diffuse hydrothermal venting. In view of the occurrence in a relatively stable passive continental margin shelf environment in Tarim Block, the silica-rich submarine hydrothermal vent system may represent a new and important geological niche favorable for FeOB colonization, which is different from their traditional

  6. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  7. Quartz-molybdenite veins in the Priestly Lake granodiorite, north-central Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Shank, Stephen G.

    1983-01-01

    Quartz-molybdenite veins up to 15 cm in width occur in fine to medium-grained porphyritic biotite-hornblende granodiorite at Priestly Lake north-central Maine. An area of about 150 m x 150 m contains quartz-molybdenite veins; a larger area is characterized by barren quartz veins. Quartz-molybdenite veins are concentrated within the most felsic variants of the intrusion as suggested by lower mafic mineral contents. The pluton has a narrow range in SiO2 (67-70 wt.%), major oxides, and in trace-element compositions. Molybdenite occurs as coarse grained clusters in pockets within the quartz veins, and fills fractures in the quartz veins and host rocks. Disseminated molybdenite in the granodiorite is relatively rare and occurs only in the area characterized by a high density of quartz veins (up to 50 veins per square meter). Alteration envelopes along the quartz veins are very thin or absent, although in some areas the granodiorite appears to be selectively and pervasively altered. Sericite, chlorite, epidote, calcite, pyrite, and quartz are concentrated near the quartz-molybdenite veins. Many of the field and geochemical characteristics of the Priestly Lake pluton are unlike those of major molybdenum-producing areas (Climax, Henderson, Urad). For example, the area of alteration seems to be of limited extent, the host rock is not intensely altered hydrothermally at the surface, the density of fractures is rather low in the mineralized area, and the amount of disseminated molybdenite appears to be small. However, the Priestly Lake pluton may be a small fraction of a concealed batholith as suggested by geophysical data. It is conceivable that the type of mineralization at the surface might be the expression of more extensive molybdenite mineralization at depth. The quartz-molybdenite veins in the Priestly Lake pluton are significant because they indicate that potential molybdenum sources for producing mineralized granites were available at depth. Future studies should be

  8. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence analysis of quartz reveals complex growth histories in veins from the Butte porphyry copper deposit, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusk, Brian; Reed, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis of quartz reveals textures that cannot be observed using optical microscopy or backscattered electrons. These cryptic textures yield insight into timing and physical conditions of quartz growth, especially in environments with multiple quartz-precipitation events. Hydrothermal quartz from quartz-sulfide veins in the porphyry copper deposit in Butte, Montana, was analyzed by SEM-CL, revealing the following textures: euhedral growth zones, wide nonluminescing bands that cut across multiple quartz grains, rounded luminescent quartz grain cores with euhedral overgrowths, nonluminescing “splatters” of quartz connected by networks of cobweb-like nonluminescing quartz in otherwise luminescent quartz, concentric growth zones, and wide nonluminescent grain boundaries. These textures indicate that many veins have undergone fracturing, dilation, growth of quartz into fluid-filled space, quartz dissolution, and recrystallization of quartz. Precipitation and dissolution textures indicate that early quartz-molybdenite veins formed as a result of pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic at high temperatures, and later pyrite-quartz veins formed near hydrostatic pressure in response to temperature decrease through and beyond the field of retrograde quartz solubility.

  9. Ion-microprobe dating of zircon from quartz-graphite veins at the Bristol, New Hampshire, metamorphic hot spot

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.K. ); Barreiro, B.; Chamberlain, C.P. ); Rumble, D. III )

    1990-07-01

    Detrital zircons entrained in hydrothermal quartz-graphite-rutile veins found near the Bristol, New Hampshire, metamorphic hot spot are overgrown by thin rims. Ion-microprobe analyses of these rims date their growth at 408 {plus minus} 6 Ma. These measurements quantitatively confirm textural evidence that the graphite veins were emplaced during peak metamorphism associated with the Acadian orogeny, and they provide a direct positive test of the hypothesis, based on petrological and stable-isotope evidence, that the hydrothermal systems responsible for the quartz-graphite veins were also responsible for the hot-spot metamorphism.

  10. A discussion of 'Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia - Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity?'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, Edwin

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents arguments against the statement made by Koeberl et al. (1989) to the effect that various differences between the quartz of the three quartz pebbles from the Roter Kamm impact crater (Namibia) and the quartz of the pegmatites present in the basement rocks of this crater can be best interpreted as evidence that the pebbles were formed (or 'recrystallized') by a post-impact hydrothermal system. Arguments are presented that suggest that the three quartz pebbles are, most likely, fragments of a preimpact vein quartz of hydrothermal origin.

  11. Cathodoluminescence investigation and fluid inclusion analyses of hydrothermal quartz in the Erdenetiin Ovoo porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B.; Lee, I.; Seo, J.; Moon, I.

    2012-12-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) reveals textures in quartz that are not apparent with other methods such as optical microscopy or backscattered electron images. Hydrothermal quartz from quartz-sulfide veins in the Erdenetiin Ovoo porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Mongolia was analyzed by SEM-CL. They reveal euhedral growth zones with CL-bright and gray, wide CL-dull bands that cut across multiple quartz grains, CL-dark splatters of quartz connected by networks of cobweb-shaped CL-dark quartz with decreasing in luminescence along splatters and grain boundaries, and recrystallization of CL-bright quartz to CL-gray quartz. These cryptic textures indicate that a single vein of molybdenite-quartz vein has undergone at least 4 events: (1) precipitation of CL-bright and CL-gray quartz with euhedral quartz, (2) fracturing and following growth of CL-dull quartz, (3) dissolution along microfractures and following CL-dark precipitation with decreasing in luminescence intensity along microfractures and grain boundaries, and (4) precipitation of pyrite-quartz vein cutting the molybdenite-quartz vein. Fluid inclusions in molybdenite-quartz veins are presented by liquid type, liquid-vapor type (vapor occupies 20 volume %), and liquid-vapor type bearing a solid phase. The liquid-vapor type inclusions within CL-gray quartz of the first event show their homogenization temperatures ranging from 204 to 312°C. Typical homogenization temperatures of porphyry deposits range from 250 to 800°C. Molybdenite-quartz vein in the Erdenetiin Ovoo porphyry system formed through the low temperature hydrothermal processes. Keywords: Erdenetiin Ovoo, hydrothermal, quartz, veins, cathodoluminescence, fluid inclusions

  12. Titanium-in-quartz thermometry on synkinematic quartz veins in a retrograde crustal-scale normal fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertel, Mike; Herwegh, Marco; Pettke, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that estimation of deformation temperatures in quartz mylonites by titanium-in-quartz geothermometry is only possible at temperatures > 500 °C, above which efficient Ti-exchange is achieved via grain boundary migration recrystallization. Based on quartz mylonite samples collected across the Simplon Fault Zone (SFZ) we demonstrate that deformation temperatures of dynamic recrystallization can be obtained down to ~ 350 °C. A prerequisite for such temperature estimates at the low temperature end of ductile deformation of quartz is the formation of synkinematic quartz veins and their immediate overprint either by subgrain rotation (SGR) or bulging recrystallization (BLG). It is the slow growth of the synkinematically precipitating vein quartz that allows for equilibration of Ti in the vein quartz. This Ti-concentration may only slightly be modified during SGR; hence, Ti-in-qtz thermometry provides a close approach to the vein formation temperature. Ti-concentrations are partially reset during BLG, and resulting temperatures are thus maximum temperatures of quartz recrystallization. Importantly, undeformed vein quartz always yield vein formation temperatures. Investigation of the dynamic recrystallization processes overprinting synkinematic quartz veins thus allows for a critical, independent evaluation of the Ti-in-quartz temperatures obtained. For the SFZ, there is a decrease in recrystallized grain sizes towards the fault plane and a change in the dominant recrystallization process associated with a narrowing of the shear zone. As indicated by the Ti-in-quartz temperature estimates, this strain localization correlates with cooling from ~ 560 °C in the oldest microstructures at the periphery of the shear zone down to ~ 350 °C in the youngest microstructures of the footwall near the hanging wall contact. A great benefit of the approach presented here is that intermediate to low temperature plastic deformation in quartz can now also

  13. Formation of Quartz-Carbonate Veins: Evidence From Experimental Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Brine-Rock System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecky, D. R.; Kaszuba, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Quartz-carbonate veins are common in a variety of moderate temperature hydrothermal systems and ore deposits. Associated fluid inclusions have a wide range of compositions, including liquid carbon dioxide fillings. Examination of chemical and physical conditions which result precipitation of quartz and carbonate in veins raises several key questions about multiphase fluid processes and reaction rates. We have been experimentally investigating physical-chemical reaction processes of mixed brine-carbon dioxide fluids for the shallow crust. Synthetic arkose (microcline + oligoclase + quartz + biotite) plus argillaceous shale were reacted with 5.5 molal NaCl brine. The system was held at 200 C and 200 bars for 32 days to approach steady state, then injected with carbon dioxide and allowed to react for an additional 45 days. In a parallel experiment, the system was allowed to react for 77 days without injection of carbon dioxide. Trace ions initially absent from NaCl brine appeared in solution at mM (K, Ca, and silica) to uM (Mg, Al, Fe and Mn) quantities, reflecting reaction of brine with rock. Without carbon dioxide injection, the silica concentration (2.4 mM) was stable below calculated quartz solubility (3.9 mM). Injection of carbon dioxide resulted in decreased pH and increased silica concentration to a level near calculated chalcedony solubility (5.4 mM). Dissolution of silicate minerals is apparently coupled to the acidity, and concomitant inhibition of the precipitation of quartz (and other silicates). A significant increase in concentration of trace metals is consistent with in-situ pH decrease and increased carbon dioxide dissolved in brine. Multi-phase fluid reaction relationships between supercritical carbon dioxide and brine-rock systems allow formation of carbonate vein precipitates in substantial quantities. Brine and continued rock reactions provide a substantial reservoir for Ca, Mg and Fe components. A separate carbon dioxide liquid allows

  14. SIMS Investigations on Growth and Sector Zoning in Natural Hydrothermal Quartz: Isotopic and Trace Element Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, E.; Vennemann, T. W.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Meisser, N.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz is the most abundant mineral in the Earth's crust and is found in virtually every geological context. Despite its ubiquity and the detailed studies on the conditions of quartz crystallization, some questions concerning its growth and sector zoning with regard to trace element incorporation and oxygen isotope fractionations and the implications thereof for interpretations on the conditions of formation remain (e.g., Jourdan et al., 2009). This study presents new in-situ measurements of trace element and oxygen isotope ratios on natural hydrothermal quartz from an extensional gold-bearing quartz vein in the western Swiss Alps. The temperature of formation of the veins is estimated by quartz-hematite oxygen isotope thermometry to be about 360°C. A detailed SEM-CL study of this sample shows cyclic lamellar growth, alternating with phases of dissolution that are directly followed by macro-mosaic growth of the quartz, before returning to a cyclic lamellar growth again. Trace element concentrations (measured for Na, K, Li, Al, and Ti) notably showed Al/Si variations of three orders of magnitude and coupled Al and Li variations, likely substituting for Si in different growth zones with lower values in macro-mosaic zones precipitating after the period of dissolution. The oxygen isotope composition of the crystal, in contrast, is homogeneous through all growth zones (δ18O values between 15.6‰ and 16.2‰) indicating that the fluid must have been buffered by the host-rock and/or the source of the fluid remained the same despite the period of quartz dissolution. Furthermore, the temperature during crystallization of the quartz crystal has likely also remained similar. The fact that no variations are measured in oxygen isotope compositions but some variations in trace element contents may suggest that changes in pressure were important during the formation of this quartz crystal. Give the pressure effects on the solubility of quartz (Fournier and Potter, 1982), both

  15. Emerald mineralization and metasomatism of amphibolite, khaltaro granitic pegmatite - Hydrothermal vein system, Haramosh Mountains, Northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laurs, B.M.; Dilles, J.H.; Snee, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    Emerald mineralization is found within 0.1- to 1-m-thick hydrothermal veins and granitic pegmatites cutting amphibolite within the Nanga Parbat - Haramosh massif, in northern Pakistan. The amphibolite forms a sill-like body within garnet-mica schist, and both are part of a regional layered gneiss unit of Proterozoic (?) age. The 40Ar/39Ar data for muscovite from a pegmatite yield a plateau age of 9.13 ?? 0.04 Ma. Muscovite from mica schist and hornblende from amphibolite yield disturbed spectra with interpreted ages of 9 to 10 Ma and more than 225 Ma, respectively, which indicate that peak Tertiary metamorphism reached 325 to 550??C prior to 10 Ma. Pegmatites were emplaced after peak metamorphism during this interval and are older than pegmatites farther south in the massif. At Khaltaro, simply zoned albite-rich miarolitic pegmatites and hydrothermal veins containing various proportions of quartz, albite, tourmaline, muscovite, and beryl are associated with a 1- to 3-m-thick heterogeneous leucogranite sill, that is locally albitized. The pegmatites likely crystallized at 650 to 600??C at pressures of less than 2 kbar. Crystals of emerald form within thin (0.20, 0.54-0.89 wt%), to pale blue beryl (<0.07, 0.10-0.63%), to colorless beryl (<0.07, 0.07-0.28%). The amphibolite is metasomatized in less than 20-cm-wide selvages that are symmetrically zoned around veins or pegmatites. A sporadic inner zone containing F-rich biotite, tourmaline, and fluorite, with local albite, muscovite, quartz, and rare beryl, gives way to an intermediate zone containing biotite and fluorite with local plagioclase and quartz, and to an outer zone of amphibolite containing sparse biotite and local quartz. The inner and intermediate zones experienced gains of K, H, F, B, Li, Rb, Cs, Be, Ta, Nb, As, Y and Sr, and losses of Si, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cr, V and Sc. The outer alteration zone has gained F, Li, Rb, Cs, and As. Oxygen isotope analyses of igneous and hydrothermal minerals indicate that a

  16. SEM-Cathodoluminescence and fluid inclusion study of quartz veins in Hugo Dummett porphyry Cu-Au deposit,South Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjaa, M.; Fujimaki, H.; Ken-Ichiro, H.

    2010-12-01

    The Hugo Dummett porphyry copper-gold deposit in Oyu Tolgoi, South Mongolia is a high-sulfidation type deposit which consists of Cu-Au bearing quartz veins. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluid inclusion microthermometer were performed to elucidate the relationship between CL structures, fluid inclusion microthermometer of different quartz generations, and ore forming process of the Hugo Dummett deposit. Hydrothermal quartz from quartz-sulfide veins in the porphyry Cu-Au deposit in Hugo Dummett, revealing the following textures: (1) euhedral growth zones (2) embayed and rounded CL-bright cores, with CL-dark and CL-gray overgrowths, (3) concentric and non concentric growth zones, and (4) CL dark/bright microfractures. These textures indicate that many veins have undergone fracturing, growth of quartz into fluid-filled space and quartz dissolution of quartz. SEM-CL imaging indicates vein quartz in the Hugo Dummett deposit, initially grew as individual CL-bright crystals 356 ± 10°C liquid-reservoir (average Th value for fluid inclusions in the crystal cores is 359°C). In contract, SEM-CL imaging shows the edges of the micron-scale growth zones of varying CL intensity, reflecting quartz precipitation at some later time, when the Hugo Dummett deposit hydrothermal system had cooled, when reservoir conditions were about 211 ± 25°C (average Th value of 212°C). Crystal growth is SEM-CL evidence of the vein quartz having been partly dissolved. Pressure change has a large effect on quartz solubility and may have been responsible for quartz dissolution and precipitation textures in the cooling hydrothermal system. CL-dark microfractures homogenization temperatures lower 169 ± 16°C (average Th value 170°C) than CL bright and CL gray. Temperature and pressure of the mineralized fluid estimates a pressure of formation of 0.3-0.5 kbar (lithostatic), was formed at approximately 2 km depth, as well as a formation temperature

  17. Carbonaceous matter in sulfide-quartz veins at the Kurultyken base-metal deposit, eastern Transbaikal region, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, M. I.; Troshin, Yu. P.; Boiko, S. M.; Razvozzhaeva, E. A.; Zorina, L. D.; Martikhaeva, D. Kh.

    2010-06-01

    The carbonaceous matter filling cavities in sulfide-quartz veins at the Kurultyken hydrothermal base-metal deposit in the Khapcheranga ore district, Transbaikal region, was studied using chromatography/mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, thermal and isotopic analyses, and IR spectroscopy. It was established that carbonaceous matter was a maltha composed of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Chrysene, pyrene, and benzpyrelene identified among PAHs are evidence for the hydrothermal origin of the initial carbonaceous matter of maltha. The main mass of carbonaceous matter was synthesized under reductive conditions and at a low temperature, i.e., at the final stage of base-metal ore formation. Nevertheless, the thermometric data indicate that part of the carbonic compounds could have formed at 480°C, i.e., at the high-temperature stage of the postmagmatic process. The contribution of host rocks as a source of carbonaceous matter was minimal.

  18. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich lower greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjøll, H. J.; Viola, G.; Menegon, L.; Sørensen, B. E.

    2015-06-01

    We studied by Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) and optical microscopy a coarse-grained (ca. 0.5-6 mm) quartz vein embedded in a phyllonitic matrix to gain insights into the recrystallization mechanisms and the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under lower greenschist facies conditions, broadly coincident with the brittle-viscous transition. The vein deformed during faulting along a phyllonitic thrust of Caledonian age within the Porsa Imbricate Stack in the Paleoproterozoic Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The phyllonite hosting the vein formed at the expense of a metabasaltic protolith through feldspar breakdown to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body. Viscous deformation in the vein was initially accommodated by quartz basal slip. Under the prevailing deformation conditions, however, dislocation glide- and possibly creep-accommodated deformation of quartz was inefficient, and this resulted in localized strain hardening. In response to the (1) hardening, (2) progressive and cyclic increase of the fluid pressure, and (3) increasing competence contrast between the vein and the weakly foliated host phyllonite, vein quartz crystals began to deform by brittle processes along specific, suitably oriented lattice planes, creating microgouges along microfractures. Nucleated new grains rapidly sealed these fractures as fluids penetrated the actively deforming system. The grains grew initially by solution precipitation and later by grain boundary migration. We suggest that the different initial orientation of the vein crystals led to strain accommodation by different mechanisms in the individual crystals, generating remarkably different microstructures. Crystals suitably oriented for basal slip, for example, accommodated strain mainly viscously and experienced only minor fracturing. Instead, crystals

  19. Analysis of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock in the Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Marina; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit is located on the western slope of the Polar Urals. It is one of the largest deposits of vein quartz and rock crystal in Russia. Most of the mineralization is hosted within a single horizon of very firm quartz-sandstone, where plastic deformation did not occur almost entirely. All tectonic stress was released by the development of numerous thrust faults of different scales. Cavities formed during this process were later filled with quartz and rock crystal. In order to obtain more details on conditions under which mineralization took place, analysis of trace element contents in vein quartz and host rocks, and the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz have been carried out. The trace element composition of vein quartz and of the host rock has been determined by ICP-MS. The results have shown that concentrations of most of the 46 studied elements in quartz are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and more than three orders of magnitude lower than in the upper crust. Even though Pb and Li have the highest concentrations in quartz samples, levels are only nearly comparable in chondrite, and substantially lower in the upper crust. At the same time, negative anomalies of Pb and Li concentrations in the host rock may indicate the removal of these elements during vein quartz formation. Contents of most REEs are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and three orders of magnitude lower than in the host rock. Generally, the patterns of REE distribution in vein quartz and the host rock express a clear correlation; confirming the genetic link between vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock. However, the process of quartz recrystallization led to an intense decrease of REEs content, and of all other impurities, which consequently influenced industrial value of the Zhelannoe deposit. As a result of the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz, the following physical

  20. Quartz veining in slates and Variscan deformation: Insights from the Luarca sector (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Alonso, J.; Fuertes-Fuente, M.; Bastida, F.

    2016-03-01

    A structural and geochemical analysis of quartz veins is made in order to determine their evolution and the physical-chemical conditions that enabled their development. In this sector of the Variscan belt (Westasturian-Leonese Zone), three phases of deformation have been described. However, only the first and third phases are represented in the study sections. The first phase (D1) resulted in tight or closed folds (F1) verging towards the foreland and associated slaty cleavage (S1). The third phase (D3) resulted in approximately upright asymmetric folds (F3) with associated crenulation cleavage (S3). The veins are hosted in slates and approximately follow the slaty cleavage (S1). The veins started their development at the beginning of the deformation phase D3 as a result of S1 near parallel shortening. Through a process of progressive deformation, this compression gave rise to the folding of the cleavage and, eventually, of the veins. The F3 folds have associated crenulation cleavage parallel to the axial planes. In some cases, the location of the veins was controlled by irregularities in the bedding due to sedimentary structures. The quartz of the veins underwent notable intracrystalline plastic deformation, and the contact zone between the veins and the host rock was affected by pressure solution. The microstructures produced by the latter mechanism indicate the greatest compressive stress forming a high angle with the vein walls at a time post-dating vein generation. Quartz precipitated from an aqueous-carbonic fluid at temperatures between 350 °C and 375 °C under fluid pressure fluctuations of up to 140 MPa at constant depth. Maximum values of fluid pressure of 220 MPa and minimum values of 75 MPa were recorded by fluid inclusion assemblages in quartz of the veins under study. Pressure fluctuation from lithostatic to infralithostatic at constant depth was caused by the opening and sealing of the dilatant fractures.

  1. Repeated hydrothermal quartz crystallization and cataclasis in the Bavarian Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tim I.; Prosser, Giacomo; Liotta, Domenico; Kruhl, Jörn H.; Gilg, H. Albert

    2014-11-01

    Field and microstructural data of the Pfahl shear zone in north-eastern Bavaria (Germany) reveal the intimate spatial-temporal connection between fragmentation, fluid influx and quartz crystallization. These processes and their interaction led to complex-structured quartz units: (i) a dense network of early quartz veins, (ii) two domains of fine-grained reddish to grayish quartz masses, (iii) an extended central zone of massive white quartz, and (iv) late cross-cutting closely spaced parallel fractures and partly open quartz veins. The fine-grained quartz domains result from repeated and coeval cataclasis, fluidization and quartz precipitation. Material transport in these domains is at least partly governed by the flow of mobile fluid-quartz-particle suspensions. The complex internal meso-to microstructures of the massive white quartz are generated by repeated processes of fragmentation and grain growth. In general, the brittle part of the Pfahl shear zone represents a key example of cyclic dissolution/precipitation and fragmentation on large scale.

  2. Hydrothermal quartz formation during fluctuations of brittle shear-zone activity and fluid flow: grain growth and deformation structures of the Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, T.; Prosser, G.; Liotta, D.; Kruhl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Bavarian Pfahl shear zone is a WNW-ESE trending dextral strike-slip shear zone at the SW margin of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe). It was discontinuously active during decreasing PT-conditions, i.e. from ductile to brittle, from the late-Carboniferous to the late-Cretaceous - Paleocene times. Triassic hydrothermal activity produced a 150 km long and 30-100 m wide quartz dyke along the main fault, surrounded by sheared basement rocks. Within a zone of >10 m metasomatism transformed the wall rocks to mostly kaolinite, chlorite and phyllosilicates. The quartz dyke exhibits a layered to lenticular and partly symmetric structure with different types of quartz masses, transected by a complex quartz vein network. This already indicates pulses of fluid flux and fragmentation during the lifetime of the shear zone. Analyses by optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) and SEM-EDX reveal at least four subsequent stages of quartz crystallization and fragmentation. (i) The oldest generation of quartz is represented by a homogeneous dark grey to reddish quartz mass made up by ~10-20 μm-sized crystals. It contains mm- to cm-sized angular wall-rock fragments, completely altered to kaolinite, indicating intense wall-rock alteration prior to the earliest event of silica precipitation. This rules out the possibility that the quartz mass developed from silicification of the wall rocks. This first type of quartz occurs as cm- to dm-large angular fragments in (ii) a light grey to pink quartz mass formed by ~10-50 μm-sized crystals. The different colours result from variable types and amounts of inclusions. Quartz of both generations shows random crystallographic orientations and complex inclusion structures. It probably developed during two fragmentation events and possibly from a silica gel precursor that crystallized after precipitation. (iii) The third quartz generation formed as a set of mm- to dm-wide veins roughly parallel to the trend of the Pfahl zone

  3. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich low greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjøll, H. J.; Viola, G.; Menegon, L.; Sørensen, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    A coarse grained, statically crystallized quartz vein, embedded in a phyllonitic matrix, was studied by EBSD and optical microscopy to gain insights into the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under low-grade conditions, broadly coincident with the frictional-viscous transition. The vein is from a high strain zone at the front of the Porsa Imbricate Stack in the Paleoproterozoic Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The vein was deformed under lower greenschist facies conditions during deformation along a large out-of-sequence phyllonitic thrust of Caledonian age. The host phyllonite formed at the expense of metabasalt wherein feldspar broke down to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the studied quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body deforming mainly by coaxial strain. Viscous deformation was initially accommodated by basal ⟨a⟩ slip of quartz during the development of a mesoscopic pervasive extensional crenulation cleavage. Under the prevailing boundary conditions, however, dislocation glide-accommodated deformation of quartz resulted inefficient and led to dislocation tangling and strain hardening of the vein. In response to hardening, to the progressive increase of fluid pressure and the increasing competence contrast between the vein and the weak foliated host phyllonite, quartz crystals began to deform frictionally along specific, optimally oriented lattice planes, creating microgouges along microfractures. These were, however, rapidly sealed by nucleation of new grains as transiently over pressured fluids penetrated the deforming system. The new nucleated grains grew initially by solution-precipitation and later by grain boundary migration. Due to the random initial orientation of the vein crystals, strain was accommodated differently in the individual crystals, leading to the development of remarkably different microstructures. Crystals

  4. Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia - Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Fredriksson, Kurt; Goetzinger, Michael; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    1989-01-01

    Quartz pebbles from the Roter Kamm impact crater (the Namib Desert, SWA/Namibia) were examined for evidence of impact-induced hydrothermal activity, using results from microprobe analyses, neutron activation analyses, transmission IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the pebbles consisted of pure quartz, which contains three different types of fluid inclusions. These were identified as primary inclusions (5-10 microns) that record the formation conditions of the quartz, very small (less than 1 micron) secondary inclusions associated with the grain boundaries, and late inclusions of irregular size. It is concluded that the quartz and the primary inclusions may provide evidence for a postimpact phase of extensive hydrothermal activity, generated by the residual heat from the kinetic energy of the impact.

  5. Copper deposition during quartz dissolution by cooling magmatic hydrothermal fluids: The Bingham porphyry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landtwing, Marianne R.; Pettke, Thomas; Halter, Werner E.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Redmond, Patrick B.; Einaudi, Marco T.; Kunze, Karsten

    2005-06-01

    Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging is used to map successive generations of fluid inclusions in texturally complex quartz veinlets representing the main stage of ore metal introduction into the porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit at Bingham, Utah. Following conventional fluid inclusion microthermometry, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is applied to quantify copper and other major and trace-element concentrations in the evolving fluid, with the aim of identifying the ore-forming processes. Textures visible in cathodoluminescence consistently show that the bulk of vein quartz (Q1), characterized by bright luminescence, crystallized early in the vein history. Cu-Fe-sulfides are precipitated later in these veins, in a microfracture network finally filled with a second generation of dull-luminescing Q2 quartz. Mapping of brine and vapor inclusion assemblages in these successive quartz generations in combination with LA-ICPMS microanalysis shows that the fluids trapped before and after Cu-Fe-sulfide precipitation are very similar with respect to their major and minor-element composition, except for copper. Copper concentrations in inclusions associated with ore formation drop by two orders of magnitude, in a tight pressure-temperature interval between 21 and 14 MPa and 425-350 °C, several hundred degrees below the temperature of fluid exsolution from the magma. Copper deposition occurs within a limited P- T region, in which sulfide solubility shows strong normal temperature dependence while quartz solubility is retrograde. This permits copper sulfide deposition while secondary vein permeability is generated by quartz dissolution. The brittle-to-ductile transition of the quartz-feldspar-rich host rocks occurs in the same temperature range, which further enhances vein reactivation and promotes cooling and expansion of fluids ascending across the transition from lithostatic to hydrostatic conditions.

  6. Fluid immiscibility and gold deposition in the Birimian quartz veins of the Angovia deposit (Yaouré, Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulibaly, Y.; Boiron, M. C.; Cathelineau, M.; Kouamelan, A. N.

    2008-02-01

    The Paleoproterozoic terranes (Birimian) of West Africa are well known to host numerous economic gold mineralizations. The Angovia gold mineralization is located in a brecciated and mylonitic zone within the Birimian greenstones. The sulfide-gold mineralization is mainly represented by gold associated with pyrite and chalcopyrite. A fluid inclusion study undertaken on mineralized quartz veins revealed the presence of aqueous-carbonic (CO 2-H 2O) fluids, the association of carbonic (CO 2) and early aqueous fluids, followed by later aqueous (H 2O-salt) and finally nitrogen-rich fluids. Entrapment of the initial homogeneous aqueous-carbonic fluids prior to fluid immiscibility depicts the evolution of the P-T conditions during the exhumation of the terranes after the peak of green-schist metamorphism. The CO 2 rich-fluid occurs especially in gold-bearing quartz, and are considered as the main evidence of the ore-forming process in the gold-bearing quartz veins. It is considered as a product of immiscibility of the CO 2-H 2O parent. The volatile fraction of carbonic and aqueous-carbonic fluid inclusions is dominated by CO 2, containing minor amounts of N 2, even smaller amounts of CH 4 and sporadically, H 2S. The aqueous-carbonic fluids have moderate salinity (3-10 wt.% eq. NaCl). Late aqueous and N 2 - (CH 4-CO 2) fluids are considered as later, unrelated to the main ore stage, and were trapped during the cooling of the hydrothermal system from 300 to 200 °C. The immiscibility has been favored by a strong pressure drop, the main trapping P-T conditions being 320-370 °C and 105-135 MPa. The mineralizing process is likely related to the immiscibility event, which was probably favored by the release of the fluid pressure after fracturing along the main shear zones. The ore process is likely to have occurred along the main shear zones or related secondary structures affected by cycling of the fluid pressure and quartz sealing-fracturing processes. The superimposed

  7. The nature of faults and hydrothermal veins in corehole SB-15-D, The Geysers Steam Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Porosity in The Geysers Coring Project corehole SB-15-D is concentrated along vuggy, steeply-dipping, hydrothermal calcite-quartz {plus_minus} adularia veins. There is little difference in the texture and abundance of these veins between the upper two thirds of the core, interpreted as caprock, and the lower two-thirds, in which two, vein-controlled, fluid-loss zones (probable steam entries) were encountered. However, vugs in the caprock veins are locally choked with mixed-layer clay, whereas those in the deeper steam-reservoir veins generally lack this clay but contain calc-silicate minerals. Steeply-dipping, concordant faults concentrated in argillite throughout the core show predominantly strike-slip displacement. Although movement was predominantly along argillites, the lithology appears to have deformed in a ductile manner, and porosity development was minimal. High-angle dilational fractures were developed contemporaneously in the graywackes. These fractures in the graywacke were only partially filled by secondary minerals, and are potential steam conduits in the vapor-dominated geothermal system.

  8. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich low greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Viola, Giulio; Menegon, Luca; Sørensen, Bjørn

    2015-04-01

    A coarse grained, statically crystallized quartz vein with a random CPO, embedded in a phyllonitic matrix, was studied by optical microscopy, SEM imaging and EBSD to gain insights into the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under low greenschist facies conditions at the frictional-viscous transition. The vein is located in a high strain zone at the front of an imbricate stack of Caledonian age along the northwesternmost edge of the Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The vein was deformed within the Nussirjavrri Fault Zone (NFZ), an out-of-sequence thrust with a phyllonitic core characterized by a ramp-flat-ramp geometry, NNW plunging stretching lineations and top-to-the SSE thrusting kinematics. Deformation conditions are typical of the frictional-viscous transition. The phyllonitic core formed at the expense of metabasalt wherein feldspar broke down to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the studied quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body deforming mainly by coaxial strain. Viscous deformation, related to the development of a mesoscopic pervasive extensional crenulation cleavage, was accommodated within the vein initially by basal slip of suitably oriented quartz crystals, which produced e.g. undulose extinction, extinction bands and bulging grain boundaries. In the case of misoriented quartz crystals, however, glide-accommodated dislocation creep resulted soon inefficient and led to localized dislocation tangling and strain hardening. In response to 1) hardening, 2) progressive increase of fluid pressure within the actively deforming vein and 3) increasing competence contrast between the vein and the surrounding weak, foliated phyllonitic fault core, quartz crystals began to deform frictionally along specific lattice planes oriented optimally with respect to the imposed stress field. Microfaulting generated small volumes of gouge along

  9. Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia: Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, C. Univ. of Vienna ); Fredriksson, K. ); Goetzinger, M. ); Reimold, W.U. )

    1989-08-01

    Centimeter-sized quartz pebbles have been found on the rim of the Roter Kamm impact crater. The Roter Kamm crater has a diameter of about 2.5 km and is situated in the Namib Desert, SWA/Namibia. Because of the sand coverage, impact products are exposed exclusively in the form of ejecta on the crater rim. The quartz pebbles were found close to the main deposits of the impact breccias and show signs of wind abrasion. Thin sections revealed that the pebbles consist of individual quartz domains that are up to 1 mm in size. Under crossed nicols (polarized light), all individual domains show extinction almost simultaneously within {plus minus}2{degree}, which is a rare phenomenon. Microprobe studies, neutron activation analyses, and X-ray diffractometry confirmed that the material consists of pure quartz. The quartz contains three different types of fluid inclusions: primary inclusions that record the formation conditions of the quartz, very small (<1 {mu}m) secondary inclusions associated with the grain boundaries, and late inclusions of irregular size. Freezing point depression measurements of the primary inclusions indicate fluid salinities between 18.3 and 19.6 wt% NaCl. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for the primary inclusions range from 165 to 250{degree}C. The quartz and the primary inclusions may provide evidence for a post-impact phase of extensive hydrothermal activity, generated by the residual heat from the kinetic energy of the impact.

  10. Tectonic conditions of hydrothermal polymetallic vein-type mineralization, Sainte Marie-aux-Mines, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeznia, Y.; Bourlange, S.; Ohnenstetter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines (SMM) mines host one of the most famous and oldest silver deposits in Europe. The SMM district is located in the central part of the Vosges mountains, France, within gneiss and granites of the Moldanubian zone. The SMM district includes the Neuenberg E-W vein-type Cu-Ag-As/Pb-Zn deposit and the Altenberg N-S vein-type Pb-Zn-Ag deposit. Deposition of the SMM hydrothermal mineralization occurred under a brittle tectonic regime that might be connected to neo-Variscan and/or post-Variscan tectonics, in a similar way as the polymetallic vein deposits of the Black Forest, Germany. A structural study was done in the Neuenberg area, in the vicinity of the Saint-Jacques vein, and within the Gabe Gottes mine, considering the orientation, extent, chronology and density of faults as well as the nature of the infilling minerals. In the Gabe-Gottes mine, the Saint-Jacques vein comprises multiple successive, sub-parallel subvertical veinlets with gangue minerals, mostly carbonates and quartz, and metal-bearing phases, sulfides and sulfosalts. The veinlets are 2 to 50 cm thick and strike N80° to N110°, the earlier veins slightly dipping towards the north, and the latest one, to the south. Seven systems of faults were identified, which may be classified into three major groups formed respectively before, during and after the main stage of ore deposition: a) Pre-mineralization faults - These consist of sinistral NE-SW strike-slip faults, and NW-SE and NE-SW steeply dipping normal faults. These could be related to Carboniferous events considering their relationships with the granitoid intrusives present in the mine area (Brézouard leucogranite ~329 Ma), and the extensional tectonics developed during exhumation processes. b) Faults associated with the main ore-deposition - These faults could be related to late-Hercynian processes from compressional to extensional tectonic regimes. Mineralization controlling faults consist of dextral and sinistral E

  11. Comparison of thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (ESEM-CL) properties between hydrothermal and metamorphic quartzes.

    PubMed

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Topak, Y; Göksu, H Y

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the Thermoluminescence (TL) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of well-characterized hydrothermal milky quartz specimens from Hakkari in Turkey, labeled THQ, and Madrid in Spain, labeled SHQ, and metamorphic quartz from Madrid, in Spain, labeled SMQ. Both hydrothermal and metamorphic quartz samples display similar UV-IR CL spectra consisting of five groups of components centered at 330 nm and 380 nm linked to [AlO(4)]° centers, 420 nm due to intrinsic defects such as oxygen vacancies, lattice defects, and impurities which modify the crystal structure, 480 nm associated with [AlO(4)]° centers of substitutional Al(3+), and a red broad band related to the hydroxyl defects in the quartz lattice as precursors of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) and substitutional point defects. The Turkish quartz specimen exhibits higher CL intensity in the UV region (up to 330 nm) than the Spanish specimens probably linked to the presence of Ca (0.95% in THQ and less than 0.1% in SHQ and SMQ). At wavelengths greater than 330 nm, SMQ (formed at high pressure 6000 bars and temperatures over 500-600°C) shows higher intensity than the hydrothermal (growth at 2000 bars and temperatures 200-300°C) samples associated with the formation process. The natural blue TL glow curves of both THQ and SHQ display a weaker TL intensity than the SMQ, attributable to the Al (0.32%), Ti (0.14%), K (0.01%) and Zr (76 ppm) content. It is shown that mineralogical formation, crystallinity index and the content of the impurities seem to be the main parameters of influence in the shape intensity of the CL and TL glow curve emission.

  12. Comparison of thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (ESEM-CL) properties between hydrothermal and metamorphic quartzes.

    PubMed

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Topak, Y; Göksu, H Y

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the Thermoluminescence (TL) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of well-characterized hydrothermal milky quartz specimens from Hakkari in Turkey, labeled THQ, and Madrid in Spain, labeled SHQ, and metamorphic quartz from Madrid, in Spain, labeled SMQ. Both hydrothermal and metamorphic quartz samples display similar UV-IR CL spectra consisting of five groups of components centered at 330 nm and 380 nm linked to [AlO(4)]° centers, 420 nm due to intrinsic defects such as oxygen vacancies, lattice defects, and impurities which modify the crystal structure, 480 nm associated with [AlO(4)]° centers of substitutional Al(3+), and a red broad band related to the hydroxyl defects in the quartz lattice as precursors of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) and substitutional point defects. The Turkish quartz specimen exhibits higher CL intensity in the UV region (up to 330 nm) than the Spanish specimens probably linked to the presence of Ca (0.95% in THQ and less than 0.1% in SHQ and SMQ). At wavelengths greater than 330 nm, SMQ (formed at high pressure 6000 bars and temperatures over 500-600°C) shows higher intensity than the hydrothermal (growth at 2000 bars and temperatures 200-300°C) samples associated with the formation process. The natural blue TL glow curves of both THQ and SHQ display a weaker TL intensity than the SMQ, attributable to the Al (0.32%), Ti (0.14%), K (0.01%) and Zr (76 ppm) content. It is shown that mineralogical formation, crystallinity index and the content of the impurities seem to be the main parameters of influence in the shape intensity of the CL and TL glow curve emission. PMID:22476018

  13. Hydrothermal alteration in the Bosumtwi impact structure: Evidence from 2M1-muscovite, alteration veins, and fracture fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael T.; Newsom, Horton E.; Nelson, Melissa J.; Moore, Duane M.

    Drill-core samples from the Bosumtwi impact structure (1.07 Myr old and 10.5 km in diameter) in Ghana exhibit mineralogical evidence for post-impact hydrothermal alteration. Nine samples of drill core obtained through the 2004 International Continental Scientific Drilling Project (ICDP) were studied, including an uppermost fallback layer overlying impactite breccias, and partly deformed massive meta-graywacke bedrock. The petrographic study revealed alteration veins containing secondary sericitic muscovite (comparable to 2M1-muscovite) crosscutting original bedding in meta-graywacke and forming a matrix between clasts in impactite breccias. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that these impactite samples are rich in 2M1-muscovite, consistent with post-impact fluid deposition and alteration. Optical analysis indicates the presence of a pre-impact stratiform chlorite in meta-graywacke samples and a secondary alteration chlorite occurring in all samples. Secondary illite was detected in upper impactites of drill core LB-08A and samples containing accretionary lapilli. The lower temperature constraint for the hydrothermal event is given by 2M1-muscovite, secondary chlorite, and illite, all of which form at temperatures greater than 280 °C. An absence of recrystallization of quartz and feldspar indicates an upper temperature constraint below 900 °C. The presence of alteration materials associated with fractures and veins in the uppermost impactites of drill cores LB-07A and LB-08A indicates that a post-impact hydrothermal system was present in and adjacent to the central uplift portion of the Bosumtwi impact structure. A sample containing accretionary lapilli obtained from drill core LB-05A exhibits limited evidence that hydrothermal processes were more widespread within the impactites on the crater floor.

  14. Intensity of quartz cathodoluminescence and trace-element content in quartz from the porphyry copper deposit at Butte, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusk, B.G.; Reed, M.H.; Dilles, J.H.; Kent, A.J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Textures of hydrothermal quartz revealed by cathodoluminescence using a scanning electron microscope (SEM-CL) reflect the physical and chemical environment of quartz formation. Variations in intensity of SEM-CL can be used to distinguish among quartz from superimposed mineralization events in a single vein. In this study, we present a technique to quantify the cathodoluminescent intensity of quartz within individual and among multiple samples to relate luminescence intensity to specific mineralizing events. This technique has been applied to plutonic quartz and three generations of hydrothermal veins at the porphyry copper deposit in Butte, Montana. Analyzed veins include early quartz-molybdenite veins with potassic alteration, pyrite-quartz veins with sericitic alteration, and Main Stage veins with intense sericitic alteration. CL intensity of quartz is diagnostic of each mineralizing event and can be used to fingerprint quartz and its fluid inclusions, isotopes, trace elements, etc., from specific mineralizing episodes. Furthermore, CL intensity increases proportional to temperature of quartz formation, such that plutonic quartz from the Butte quartz monzonite (BQM) that crystallized at temperatures near 750 ??C luminesces with the highest intensity, whereas quartz that precipitated at ???250 ??C in Main Stage veins luminesces with the least intensity. Trace-element analyses via electron microprobe and laser ablation-ICP-MS indicate that plutonic quartz and each generation of hydrothermal quartz from Butte is dominated by characteristic trace amounts of Al, P, Ti, and Fe. Thus, in addition to CL intensity, each generation of quartz can be distinguished based on its unique trace-element content. Aluminum is generally the most abundant element in all generations of quartz, typically between 50 and 200 ppm, but low-temperature, Main Stage quartz containing 400 to 3600 ppm Al is enriched by an order of magnitude relative to all other quartz generations. Phosphorous

  15. Alteration and fluid flow around a sulfide-carbonate-quartz vein, Lucky Friday mine, Northern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gitlin, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    Wall rocks at the Lucky Friday mine, Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho, contain a >500m wide zone about a steeply dipping Pb-Zn-Ag vein. This zone has experienced local conditions distinct from the regional metamorphism of the quartzite + argillite host rock. Within the district, the host rock (Precambrian Revett Formation) has undergone low grade metamorphism and contains varying proportions of quartz, phengitic muscovite, detrital alkali feldspar, magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, rutile, zircon, tourmaline, +/- calcite, +/- ankeritic dolomite. In contrast, the Lucky Friday wall rocks lack feldspar and Fe-bearing oxides, and contain Fe-poor muscovite and up to 40% carbonate: siderite, ankerite, and/or calcite. A comparison of district-wide Revett rocks with Lucky Friday wall rocks suggests that the wall rocks have undergone localized dephengitization with concomitant Fe-enrichment in the carbonates and Fe-depletion of the oxides. Pertinent metamorphic reactions consume CO/sub 2/ and liberate H/sub 2/O. Fluid inclusions from the vein and wall rock stringers have homogenization temperatures from approx. =200/sup 0/ to <375/sup 0/C, but they define no temperature gradient. With few exceptions, compositions of the carbonates are identical throughout the altered wall rock. These observations suggest that the carbonate subzone contacts are not isograds but isofluxes: the loci of equivalent fluid/reactant mineral ratio. The disposition of isofluxes around a dominant fluid channelway, i.e. the vein, affords an opportunity to interpret fluid flow pathways during low temperatures metamorphism.

  16. Colorado quartz: occurrence and discovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Modreski, P.J.; Kile, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The many varieties and associations of quartz found throughout the state rank it as one of the premier worldwide localities for that species. This paper briefly outlines the historical importance of the mineral, the mining history and the geological setting before discussing the varieties of quartz present, its crystallography and the geological enviroments in which it is found. The latter include volcanic rocks and near surface igneous rocks; pegmatites; metamorphic and plutonic rocks; hydrothermal veins; skarns and sedimentary deposits. Details of the localities and mode of occurrence of smoky quartz, amethyst, milky quartz, rock crystal, rose quartz, citrine, agate and jasper are then given. -S.J.Stone

  17. Three sets of fine extinction bands in a tectonically deformed vein-quartz single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Van der Donck, Tom; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Intracrystalline fine extinction bands (FEBs) in quartz, are narrow (less than 5µm thick), planar microstructures with a misorientation up to 5° with respect to the host crystal, occurring in closely spaced sets (spacing of 4-5μm). FEBs have been commonly attributed to a large range of brittle and/or crystal-plastic mechanisms, revealing considerable disagreement on the responsible crystal-plastic slip systems and the ambient conditions. Another question that arises, is whether or not the FEBs rotate from a basal plane orientation to orientations ranging between the basal and prism planes. Usually only one set of FEBs occurs in a single crystal, though two sets are observed, in particular with increasing strain. Tentatively, a maximum of two sets of sub-basal FEBs has been postulated to develop in a single quartz crystal in a tectonic context. However, we identified several crystals in naturally deformed vein-quartz containing three sets of FEBs. The vein-quartz has been deformed under sub-greenschist metamorphic conditions, during the late Palaeozoic Variscan orogeny, in the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium). The vein-quartz has been subjected to bulging dynamic recrystallisation and shows a high degree of undulatory extinction, abundant subgrains and wide extinction bands sub-parallel to the c-axis. We attempted to characterise these three sets of FEBs by means of light microscopy, EBSD-OIM and universal stage microscopy. In both cases studied the c-axis is inclined less than 8° with respect to the thin-section plane. The different sets of FEBs show a consistent orientation with respect to the c-axis. One set of FEBs deviates maximum 10° from the basal plane. The other two sets deviate between 15 and 35° from a basal plane orientation. Corresponding FEBs, at the same angle with respect to the c-axis, have similar morphologies. In relative EBSD orientation maps FEBs show a maximum misorientation of 3°, and have a lower pattern quality than the host crystal

  18. The formation of auriferous quartz-sulfide veins in the Pataz region, northern Peru: A synthesis of geological, mineralogical, and geochemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, D. W.; Amstutz, G. C.; Fontboté, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Pataz region in the eastern part of the North Peruvian Department La Libertad hosts a number of important gold mining districts like La Lima, El Tingo, Pataz, Parcoy, and Buldibuyo. Economic gold mineralization occurs in quartz-sulfide veins at the margin of the calc-alkaline Pataz Batholith, that mainly consists of granites, granodiorites, and monzodiorites. The batholith is of Paleozoic age and cuts the Precambrian to Early Paleozoic low-grade metamorphic basement series. Its intrusion was controlled by a NNW-trending fault of regional importance. The gold-bearing veins are characterized by a two-stage sulfide mineralization. Bodies of massive pyrite and some arsenopyrite were formed in stage 1, and after subsequent fracturing they served as sites for deposition of gold, electrum, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. It is concluded that gold was transported as a AuCl{2/-}-complex by oxidizing chloride solutions and deposited near older pyrite by micro-scale redox changes and a slight temperature decrease. Mineralogical, textural, geochemical, and microthermometric features are interpreted as a consequence of mineralization at considerable depth produced by a hydrothermal system linked with the emplacement of the Pataz Batholith. acteristics in order to outline a general physicochemical model of the hydrothermal ore-forming processes.

  19. Mass transfer during wall-rock alteration: An example from a quartz-graphite vein, Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Galbreath, K.C.; Duke, E.F.; Papike, J.J. ); Laul, J.C. )

    1988-07-01

    Mass transfer and fluid-rock interaction have been evaluated along two sample traverses in low-sillimanite grade quartz-mica schist adjacent to a synmetamorphic quartz-graphite vein in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. In an {approximately}17 cm halo between apparently unaltered schist and the vein contact is an outer zone of cryptic alteration and three inner zones of visible alteration. The cryptic zone consists of the original prograde metamorphic mineral assemblage plus anomalously high amounts of tourmaline. The outermost visible zone contains abundant graphite. The second visible zone is defined by intensive bleaching of the schist. The innermost visible zone, immediately adjacent to the vein, is tourmaline + quartz + plagioclase + limonite + graphite. The vein is composed almost entirely of quartz, but also contains trace amounts of graphite. Mass balance calculations indicate that Al was essentially inert. The predominant chemical changes during wall-rock alteration were addition of B and C from the vein-forming fluid along with loss of K from the wall rocks, corresponding to precipitation of tourmaline and graphite, and the progressive destruction of microcline, biotite, and muscovite toward the vein. In addition, the elements V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, W, and Au were introduced into the country rock, whereas Si, Rb, Ba, and Cs were removed. Fluid-rock interaction modeling suggests that between one and four equivalent masses of fluid interacted chemically with the most altered mineral assemblages. In addition, greater than one equivalent mass of reactive fluid penetrated to distances of at least 5 cm from the vein contact.

  20. Development of discrete aggregates of recrystallization along micro-shear zones in quartz ribbons during multistage ductile evolution of a quartz vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Bestmann, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The post-magmatic ductile deformation of the Rieserferner pluton (Eastern Alps) includes localized ductile shear zones exploiting a set of joint-filling quartz veins. These deformed veins show different stages of evolution, from coarse grained vein quartz to the fine grained recrystallized aggregates of ultramylonites, locally recorded in different domains of heterogeneously sheared veins. The microstructural evolution includes, with increasing strain: (i) Development of ribbon mylonites consisting of elongated grains, oblique to the shear zone boundary, derived from different quartz veins crystals. The individual ribbons have different crystallographic orientations and aspect ratios. (ii) Dismantling of ribbons along a fracture-like network of fine grained recrystallized quartz aggregates, that commonly represent micro-shear zones (μSZ). These discrete recrystallization zones are preferentially developed in ribbons whose crystallographic axis is oriented either parallel or normal to ribbon elongation. (iii) Extensive dynamic recrystallization to fine-grained (10-20 μm) aggregates leading to quartz ultramylonites. Typically ultramylonites show a layered texture with bands having different crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) that probably reflect the original heterogeneity in crystallographic orientations of the vein. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis indicates that the μSZ within quartz ribbons are mainly parallel to {r} or {z} planes of the host grain, and the new grain inside μSZ show a weak CPO with their basal plane parallel to the μSZ boundary. There is no systematic relationships between the Dauphiné twinning and the μSZ. Misorientation analysis suggests that in the host grain dislocation creep is dominant on {m} slip system, whereas it is probably a minor mechanism within μSZ. Subgrains and low-angle boundaries (LAB) are heterogeneously developed at the border of the μSZ, and more commonly occur around the tips of

  1. Fluid fractionation of tungsten during granite-pegmatite differentiation and the metal source of peribatholitic W quartz veins: Evidence from the Karagwe-Ankole Belt (Rwanda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsbosch, Niels; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Dewaele, Stijn; Muchez, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The identification of a magmatic source for granite-associated rare metal (W, Nb, Ta and Sn) mineralisation in metasediment-hosted quartz veins is often obscured by intense fluid-rock interactions which metamorphically overprinted most source signatures in the vein system. In order to address this recurrent metal sourcing problem, we have studied the metasediment-hosted tungsten-bearing quartz veins of the Nyakabingo deposit of the Karagwe-Ankole belt in Central Rwanda. The vein system (992 ± 2 Ma) is spatiotemporal related to the well-characterised B-rich, F-poor G4 leucogranite-pegmatite suite (986 ± 10 Ma to 975 ± 8 Ma) of the Gatumba-Gitarama area which culminated in Nb-Ta-Sn mineralisation. Muscovite in the Nyakabingo veins is significantly enriched in granitophile elements (Rb, Cs, W and Sn) and show alkali metal signatures equivalent to muscovite of less-differentiated pegmatite zones of the Gatumba-Gitarama area. Pegmatitic muscovite records a decrease in W content with increasing differentiation proxies (Rb and Cs), in contrast to the continuous enrichment of other high field strength elements (Nb and Ta) and Sn. This is an indication of a selective redistribution for W by fluid exsolution and fluid fractionation. Primary fluid inclusions in tourmaline of these less-differentiated pegmatites demonstrate the presence of medium to low saline, H2O-NaCl-KCl-MgCl2-complex salt (e.g. Rb, Cs) fluids which started to exsolve at the G4 granite-pegmatite transition stage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry shows significant tungsten enrichment in these fluid phases (∼5-500 ppm). Fractional crystallisation has been identified previously as the driving mechanism for the transition from G4 granites, less-differentiated biotite, biotite-muscovite towards muscovite pegmatites and eventually columbite-tantalite mineralised pegmatites. The general absence of tungsten mineralisation in this magmatic suite, including the most differentiated

  2. Measuring quartz solubility by in situ weight-loss determination using a hydrothermal diamond cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Halan M.; Henderson, Grant S.; Brenan, James M.

    2004-12-01

    The solubility of quartz was determined using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) within the temperature and pressure ranges of 126 to 490°C and up to 8.9 kbar, respectively. A novel approach has been used to measure the amount of dissolved silica. The quartz was abraded into spheres which have a diameter of ˜40 μm. The spheres were then placed in pure water inside the diamond anvil cell and heated externally. Because the transparency of the diamonds allows direct observation of the sample chamber during the experiment, we were able to estimate the amount of quartz dissolved in the water at various stages of the dissolution process by measuring the decrease in the sphere's diameter over time. Experiments were performed along isochores between 0.92 and 0.99 g/cm 3. The maximum solubility measured was 0.165 molal. The experimental solubility data were limited to 370°C because of overestimation of solubilities above this temperature. Reprecipitation of silica inside the HDAC sample chamber and the refaceting of the spheres to trigonal form at temperatures above 350°C are major contributors to the overestimation.

  3. Quartz precipitation and fluid inclusion characteristics in sub-seafloor hydrothermal systems associated with volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Han, Liang; Lowell, Robert P.; Rimstidt, J. Donald; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    Results of a numerical modeling study of quartz dissolution and precipitation in a sub-seafloor hydrothermal system have been used to predict where in the system quartz could be deposited and potentially trap fluid inclusions. The spatial distribution of zones of quartz dissolution and precipitation is complex, owing to the fact that quartz solubility depends on many inter-related factors, including temperature, fluid salinity and fluid immiscibility, and is further complicated by the fact that quartz exhibits both prograde and retrograde solubility behavior, depending on the fluid temperature and salinity. Using the PVTX properties of H2O-NaCl, the petrographic and microthermometric properties of fluid inclusions trapped at various locations within the hydrothermal system have been predicted. Vapor-rich inclusions are trapped as a result of the retrograde temperature-dependence of quartz solubility as the convecting fluid is heated in the vicinity of the magmatic heat source. Coexisting liquid-rich and vapor-rich inclusions are also trapped in this region when quartz precipitates as a result of fluid immiscibility that lowers the overall bulk quartz solubility in the system. Fluid inclusions trapped in the shallow subsurface near the seafloor vents and in the underlying stockwork are liquid-rich with homogenization temperatures of 200-400°C and salinities close to that of seawater. Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits represent the uplifted and partially eroded remnants of fossil submarine hydrothermal systems, and the relationship between fluid-inclusion properties and location within the hydrothermal system described here can be used in exploration for VMS deposits to infer the direction towards potential massive sulfide ore.

  4. Crack-seal microstructure evolution in multiphase rocks: an example of quartz-chlorite veins formed at the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Urai, J.; Scholz, K.; Kukla, P.

    2009-04-01

    For this study we analyzed core samples from the deep geothermal well RWTH-1 (Aachen-Germany), which intersects Carboniferous to Devonian siliciclastics and carbonates deformed during Variscan thrusting and subsequent normal faulting events. From several successive generations of veins, we focussed on quartz-chlorite +/- calcite veins formed by crack-seal processes in the brittle to ductile transition realm (< 390 °C, 150 - 250 MPa, Lögering, 2008). The veins are common in sections of the well which are interpreted as Variscan thrusts based on image logs and seismic data. Veins are up to 1 cm thick, formed in pull-apart sections of brittle-ductile shear zones. The change in angle (releasing angle = alpha) of the shear fracture is the main factor controlling vein geometry. Two end-member types of vein geometry can be defined. The first type, the "flat" vein is formed when alpha is less than a few degrees, it contains chlorite and quartz ribbons and commonly shows evidence for ductile shearing. The quartz ribbons often show peculiar "blocky-sawtooth" boundaries. The second type, the "fat" vein quartz forms when alpha is large, up to 90 degrees. Here, stretched-crystal-type fibrous veins are common, with irregular grain boundaries between the chlorite and quartz fibres. Chlorite is present as inclusion bands or trails. Multiple crack-seal events are interpreted to be the basic microstructural process in the veins. The clearest evidence for this is found in very thin, incipient veins, where "stretched" host rock grains are common. The length of these stretched crystals increases in wider veins, together with an increasing density of healed fractures as shown by fluid inclusion trails. To understand the microstructural evolution, we extend earlier models of polycrystal growth in fractures (Urai et al, 1991) to the growth of two phases (Quartz and Chlorite) from a supersaturated solution, onto a crack-wall containing both phases. When the relative growth rates of the

  5. Combining in situ isotopic, trace element and textural analyses of quartz from four magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Dominique; Henley, Richard W.; Mavrogenes, John A.; Holden, Peter

    2013-10-01

    This study couples in situ 16O, 17O and 18O isotope and in situ trace element analyses to investigate and characterize the geochemical and textural complexity of magmatic-hydrothermal quartz crystals. Euhedral quartz crystals contemporaneous with mineralization were obtained from four magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits: El Indio Au-Ag-Cu deposit; Summitville Au-Ag-Cu deposit; North Parkes Cu-Au deposit and Kingsgate quartz-Mo-Bi-W deposit. The internal features of the crystals were imaged using cathodoluminescence and qualitative electron microprobe maps. Quantitative isotopic data were collected in situ using 157 nm laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (for 40 trace elements in quartz) and sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (for 3 isotopes in quartz). Imaging revealed fine oscillatory zoning, sector zoning, complex "macromosaic" textures and hidden xenocrystic cores. In situ oxygen isotope analyses revealed a δ18O range of up to 12.4 ± 0.3 ‰ in a single crystal—the largest isotopic range ever ascribed to oscillatory zonation in quartz. Some of these crystals contain a heavier δ18O signature than expected by existing models. While sector-zoned crystals exhibited strong trace element variations between faces, no evidence for anisotropic isotope fractionation was found. We found: (1) isotopic heterogeneity in hydrothermal quartz crystals is common and precludes provenance analysis (e.g., δD-δ18O) using bulk analytical techniques, (2) the trace element signature of quartz is not an effective pathfinder toward noble metal mineralization and (3) in three of the four samples, both textural and isotopic data indicate non-equilibrium deposition of quartz.

  6. Geology, Ore-microscopy and Fluid inclusion study on Auriferous Quartz Veins at the Gidami Gold Mine, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Monsef, Mohamed; Salem, Ibrahim; Slobodnik, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The gold deposits are represented by auriferous quartz veins and aplitic dykes that are cutting through granitic rocks. The main lode of gold is confined to two principal veins occupying fracture zones and fissures. The main auriferous vein is striking mainly NNW-SSE with dipping 85° NE, it extends up to 450 m with an average thickness 120 cm. The second vein is striking NW-SE and dipping 60° E, it extends for 150 m with an average thickness 35 cm. The gold bearing veins are made up of fine grained quartz that is always massive, milky-white with reddish or greenish tint. They commonly include vugs, some of them are occasionally filled with iron oxides, carbonate and clay minerals. Sometimes the quartz veins enclose remnants of altered wall rock materials as an indication for the metamorphic or syntectonic nature of the veins. Brecciation, comb layering, swelling and nodules manganese dendrites are usually detected. The microscopic examination for thin and polished sections of auriferous quartz veins revealed that quartz and calcite are the predominant minerals commonly associated with accessory minerals (fluorite, apatite, zircon, muscovite and sericite). Ore mineral assemblage is found as disseminated sulfide minerals (pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite, pyrrhotite covellite, galena and pentlandite). Ilmenite and goethite are the main iron oxide mineral phases. Gold most commonly occurs as small inclusions within pyrite or goethite. Gold also occurs as tiny grains scattered within quartz vein (in close proximity to the sulfides) or as disseminated grains in the altered wall rocks. Hydrothermal alteration includes silicification, kaolinitization, sericitisation, carbonatisation confined to a delicate set of veins. Petrography and microthermometry of fluid inclusions revealed that the majority of inclusions are of primary/pseudosecondary nature that occur in clusters and along growth zones or along intra-granular planar trails (pseudosecondary

  7. New Peak Temperature Constraints Using RSCM Geothermometry on Lucia Subterrane in Franciscan Complex (California, USA): Detection of Thermal Anomalies in Gold-Bearing Quartz Veins Surrounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahfid, A.; Delchini, S.; Lacroix, B.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of deposits hosted by carbonaceous materials-rich metasediments is widespread. Therefore, we aims in this study to investigate the potential of the Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) geothermometry to detect thermal anomalies in hydrothermal ore deposits environment and to demonstrate the ability of warm fluids, migrating through the sedimentary sequence to locally disturb the thermal gradient and associated peak temperatures. For this purpose, we have chosen the Lucia subterrane in the Franciscan Complex (California, USA), which includes gold-bearing quartz veins that witness a hydrothermal overprint (Underwood et al., 1995).The sediments in this zone essentially comprise greywacke and shale-matrix mélange (e.g. Frey and Robinson, 1999), which have undergone high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphism. The thermal history of the Lucia subterrane has been previously proposed by Underwood et al. (1995), essentially using vitrinite reflectance method (Rm). Rm values increase from the south to the north; they vary between 0.9 and 3.7 % (~150-280°C). All these results suggest that the Lucia subterrane underwent a regional increase of thermal gradient toward the north. Anomalous Rm values from 4.5% to 4.9% (~305-315°C) are recorded near Cape San Martin. These highest temperatures estimated are likely, associated with a late hydrothermal event (Underwood et al., 1995). Estimated Raman temperatures 1) confirmed the increase in the metamorphic grade towards the north already shown by Underwood et al. (1995), using classical methods like mineralogy and vitrinite reflectance and 2) exhibit anomalous values (temperatures reach 350°C). These anomalies are probably due to the later hydrothermal event. This result suggests that RSCM could be used as a reliable tool to determine thermal anomalies caused by hot fluid-flow.

  8. Crack-seal microstructure evolution in bi-mineralic quartz-chlorite veins in shales and siltstones from the RWTH-1 well, Aachen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stephan; Hilgers, Christoph; Kukla, Peter A.; Urai, Janos L.

    2011-04-01

    In core samples from the deep geothermal well RWTH-1 we studied Variscan quartz-chlorite veins formed by crack-seal processes in siliciclastics at the brittle to ductile transition. These sheared veins are common in sections of the well, which are interpreted as Variscan thrust zones based on image logs and seismic data. Microstructures interpreted to reflect different stages in the evolution of such crack-seal veins suggest the veins started in microcracks sealed by quartz and chlorite, to veinlets crossing multiple grains, and bundles of veinlets evolving by progressive localization into low-angle extensional shear veins and high-angle dilational jog veins. In the sheared veins, chlorite and quartz ribbons show evidence for crack-seal and simultaneous ductile shearing during vein evolution, forming peculiar fin-shaped microstructures in quartz ribbons. In high-angle dilational jogs fibrous crystals of quartz and chlorite point to multiple crack-seal events with simultaneous growth of two different mineral phases. This is interpreted to be the basic microstructural process in the veins. We extend earlier models of polycrystal growth in fractures and present a series of 2D simulations of the kinematics of crystal growth in these bi-mineralic veins for both localized and non-localized cracking. Results are compared with the observed microstructures. We show that when the relative growth rates of the two mineral phases are different, serrated grain boundaries evolve. The similarities between observation and model suggest that the assumption of our model is valid, although many second order processes require a more detailed study. We propose that the principles observed here can be applied to other bi-mineralic crack-seal veins.

  9. Metamorphic origin of ore-forming fluids for orogenic gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the North American Cordillera: constraints from a reconnaissance study of δ15N, δD, and δ18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jia, Y.; Kerrich, R.; Goldfarb, R.

    2003-01-01

    The western North American Cordillera hosts a large number of gold-bearing quartz vein systems from the Mother Lode of southern California, through counterparts in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska, to the Klondike district in central Yukon. These vein systems are structurally controlled by major fault zones, which are often reactivated terrane-bounding sutures that formed in orogens built during accretion and subduction of terranes along the continental margin of North America. Mineralization ages span mid-Jurassic to early Tertiary and encompass much of the evolution ofthe Cordilleran orogen. Nitrogen contents and ??15N values of hydrothermal micas from veins are between 130 and 3,500 ppm and 1.7 to 5.5 per mil, respectively. These values are consistent with fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration reactions within the Phanerozoic accretion-subduction complexes, which have ??15N values of 1 to 6 per mil. The ??18O values of gold-bearing vein quartz from different locations in the Cordillera are between 14.6 and 22.2 per mil but are uniform for individual vein systems. The ??D values of hydrothermal micas are between -110 and -60 per mil. Ore fluids have calculated ??18O values of 8 to 16 per mil and ??D values of -65 to -10 per mil at an estimated temperature of 300??C; ??D values of ore fluids do not show any latitudinal control. These results indicate a deep crustal source for the ore-forming fluids, most likely of metamorphic origin. Low ??DH2O values of -120 to -130 per mil for a hydrous muscovite from the Sheba vein in the Klondike district reflect secondary exchange between recrystallizing mica and meteoric waters. Collectively, the N, H, and O isotope compositions of ore-related hydrothermal minerals indicate that the formation of these gold-bearing veins involved dilute, aqueous carbonic, and nitrogen-bearing fluids that were generated from metamorphic dehydration reactions at deep crustal levels. These data are not consistent with either mantle

  10. Recrystallization fabrics of sheared quartz veins with a strong pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation from a seismogenic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Nancy A.; Song, Won Joon; Johnson, Scott E.; Gerbi, Christopher C.; Beane, Rachel J.; West, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural investigations were carried out on quartz veins in schist, protomylonite, and mylonite samples from an ancient seismogenic strike-slip shear zone (Sandhill Corner shear zone, Norumbega fault system, Maine, USA). We interpret complexities in the microstructural record to show that: (1) pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in the host rock may persist in the new CPO patterns of the shear zone and (2) the inner and outer parts of the shear zone followed diverging paths of fabric development. The host rocks bounding the shear zone contain asymmetrically-folded quartz veins with a strong CPO. These veins are increasingly deformed and recrystallized with proximity to the shear zone core. Matrix-accommodated rotation and recrystallization may position an inherited c-axis maximum in an orientation coincident with rhomb < a > or basal < a > slip. This inherited CPO likely persists in the shear zone fabric as a higher concentration of poles in one hemisphere of the c-axis pole figure, leading to asymmetric crossed girdle or paired maxima c-axis patterns about the foliation plane. Three observed quartz grain types indicate a general trend of localization with decreasing temperature: (1) large (> 100 μm), low aspect ratio (<~5) and (2) high aspect ratio (~ 5-20) grains overprinted by (3) smaller (<~80 μm), low aspect ratio (<~4) grains through subgrain rotation-dominated recrystallization. In the outer shear zone, subgrain rotation recrystallization led to a well-developed c-axis crossed girdle pattern. In the inner shear zone, the larger grains are completely overprinted by smaller grains, but the CPO patterns are relatively poorly developed and are associated with distinctively different misorientation angle histogram profiles ("flat" neighbor-pair profile with similar number fraction for angles from 10 to 90°). This may reflect the preferential activation of grain size sensitive deformation processes in the inner-most part of the

  11. Crystallochemical and structural evolution of tourmaline in auriferous quartz veins of the Iskel terrane prospect (western Hoggar, Tamanrasset, South Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, Mohamed; Chaouche, Ismahane; Fuchs, Yves

    2016-04-01

    A mylonite zone limits the Iskane Terrane tectonic unit (Western Hoggar). This zone is intruded by granitic units belonging to the Taourirt cycle. North -South and North East-South West trending auriferous quartz veins are hosted in the cataclased areas. Visible gold can be observed but gold is also present in sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite). Tourmaline is abundant in these veins. Mossbauer spectrometry as well as FTIR spectrometry shows that in some sectors tourmaline underwent an oxidation process posterior to its formation. The general structure of tourmaline studied, shows the coexistence of ferric iron Fe3+ with ferrous iron Fe2+ in the Y site. This represents a tourmaline "deprotonated". This oxidation induced a partial transformation of Fe2+ in Fe3+ that is charge compensated by a deshydroxylation of the central OH group. The relationship of the gold deposition with the oxidation of tourmaline is discussed. Key words: Tourmaline, oxidation, "deprotonation-deshydroxylation", sulfides, gold.

  12. Age and genesis of precious metals deposits, Buffalo Hump district, central Idaho: implications for depth of emplacement of quartz veins.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Snee, L.W.; Evans, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    Three samples (metamorphic country rock, Idaho batholith granite, and auriferous quartz vein) were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique. The lode deposits are Cretaceous (71 m.y.); their cooling histories and depths of emplacement, inferred from the age spectra, are evidence for the granite plutons and the lode deposits having been emplaced at the same 40-9 km depth and being genetically related. Thus, the Idaho batholith is not barren, and at least two precious-metal mineralizing events, Cretaceous and Eocene in age, occur in central Idaho. Class differences between the two ages of deposits, of style, alteration and mineralogy, are suggested. -G.J.N.

  13. Direct measurement of asperity contact growth in quartz at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake recurrence requires interseismic fault restrengthening which results from solid state deformation in room-temperature friction and indentation experiments. In contrast exhumed fault zones show solution-transport processes such as pressure solution and contact overgrowths influence fault zone properties . In the absence of fluid flow, overgrowths are driven by gradients in surface curvature where material is dissolved, diffuses, and precipitates at the contact without convergence normal to the contact. To determine the rate of overgrowth for quartz, we conducted single contact experiments in an externally heated pressure vessel. Convergence was continuously monitored using reflected-light interferometry through a long-working-distance microscope. Contact normal force was constant with an initial effective normal stress of 1.7 MPa, temperature was between 350 and 530{degree sign}C, and water pressure was constant at 150 MPa. Two control experiments were conducted: one dry at 425{degree sign}C and one bi-material (sapphire) at 425{degree sign}C and 150 MPa water pressure. No contact growth or convergence was observed in the controls. For wet single-phase contacts, growth was initially rapid and then decreased with time. No convergence was observed. Fluid inclusions indicate that the contact is not uniformly wetted. The contact is bounded by small regions of high aperture, reflecting local free-face dissolution as the source for the overgrowth. The apparent activation energy is ~125 kJ/mol. Extrapolation predicts rates of contact area increase orders of magnitude faster than in dry, room-temperature and hydrothermal friction experiments, suggesting that natural strength recovery near the base of the seismogenic zone could be dominated by contact overgrowth.

  14. Structure, alteration, and geochemistry of the Charlotte quartz vein stockwork, Mt Charlotte gold mine, Kalgoorlie, Australia: time constraints, down-plunge zonation, and fluid source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Andreas G.

    2015-02-01

    The Kalgoorlie district in the Archean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, comprises two world-class gold deposits: Mt Charlotte (144 t Au produced to 2013) in the northwest and the Golden Mile (1,670 t Au) in the southeast. Both occur in a folded greenschist-facies gabbro sill adjacent to the Golden Mile Fault (D2) in propylitic alteration associated with porphyry dikes. At Mt Charlotte, a shear array of fault-fill veins within the Golden Mile Fault indicates sinistral strike-slip during Golden Mile-type pyrite-telluride mineralization. The pipe-shaped Charlotte quartz vein stockwork, mined in bulk more than 1 km down plunge, is separated in time by barren D3 thrusts from Golden Mile mineralization and alteration, and occurs between two dextral strike-slip faults (D4). Movement on these faults generated an organized network of extension and shear fractures opened during the subsequent infiltration of high-pressure H2S-rich fluid at 2,655 ± 13 Ma (U-Pb xenotime). Gold was deposited during wall rock sulphidation in overlapping vein selvages zoned from deep albite-pyrrhotite (3 g/t Au) to upper muscovite-pyrite assemblages (5 g/t Au bulk grade). Chlorite and fluid inclusion thermometry indicate that this kilometre-scale zonation is due to fluid cooling from 410-440 °C at the base to 350-360 °C at the top of the orebody, while the greenstone terrane remained at 250 °C ambient temperature and at 300 MPa lithostatic pressure. The opened fractures filled with barren quartz and scheelite during the retrograde stage (300 °C) of the hydrothermal event. During fracture sealing, fluid flux was periodically restricted at the lower D3 thrust. Cycles of high and low up-flow, represented by juvenile H2O-CO2 and evolved H2O-CO2-CH4 fluid, respectively, are recorded by the REE and Sr isotope compositions of scheelite oscillatory zones. The temperature gradient measured in the vein stockwork points to a hot (>600 °C) fluid source 2-4 km below the mine workings, and several

  15. U-Pb-Th geochronology of monazite and zircon in albitite metasomatites of the Rožňava-Nadabula ore field (Western Carpathians, Slovakia): implications for the origin of hydrothermal polymetallic siderite veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurai, V.; Paquette, J.-L.; Lexa, O.; Konečný, P.; Dianiška, I.

    2015-10-01

    Sodic metasomatites (albitites) occur around and within siderite veins in the southern part of the Gemeric tectonic unit of the Western Carpathians. Accessory minerals of the metasomatites represented by monazite, zircon, apatite, rutile, tourmaline and siderite are basically identical with the quartz-tourmaline stage of other siderite and stibnite veins of the tectonic unit. Statistical analysis of chemical Th-U(total)-Pb isochron method (CHIME) of monazite dating yielded Jurassic-Cretaceous ages subdivided into 3-4 modes, spreading over time interval between 78 and 185 Ma. In contrast, LA-ICPMS 206Pb/238U dating carried out on the same monazite grains revealed a narrow crystallization interval, showing ages of Th-poor cores with phengite inclusions identical within the error limit with Th-rich rims with cauliflower-like structure. The determined lower intercept at 139 ± 1 Ma overlapped the Vallanginian-Berriasian boundary, thus corroborating the model of formation of hydrothermal vein structures within an arcuate deformation front built up in the Variscan basement as a response to Early Cretaceous compression, folding and thrusting. In contrast, associated zircons are considerably older than the surrounding Early-Palaeozoic volcano-sedimentary rocks, showing Neoproterozoic ages. The zircon grains in albitite metasomatites are thus interpreted as fragments of Pan-African magmatic detritus incorporated in the vein structures by buoyant hydrothermal fluids.

  16. Scaling the 3-D Mohr circle and quantification of paleostress during fluid pressure fluctuation - Application to understand gold mineralization in quartz veins of Gadag (southern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sivaji; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, orientations of 157 quartz veins occurring in metabasalts of the Gadag region (Dharwar craton, southern India) are used to plot the 3-D Mohr stress circle, which provides information about relative stress/fluid pressure (Pf) conditions, as well as stress state during Pf fluctuation. To scale the 3-D Mohr circle, vein orientation data are integrated with (a) available estimates from fluid inclusions of highest recorded Pf (390 MPa) and lowest recorded Pf (50 MPa) and (b) intrinsic rupture criterion that empirically quantify rock properties. Based on the scaled 3-D Mohr circle, the absolute magnitudes of the three principal stresses are quantified for high and low Pf. Of 157 veins investigated here, 14 veins are identified as having favourable orientation for dilation at high as well as low Pf. These 14 veins have a mean strike of 150°, which is similar to the orientation of the gold-bearing quartz lodes reported in the region. The effective normal stress (σ‧n = σn-Pf) prevalent during dilation of fracture/fabric anisotropy with 150° strike is calculated to be -11.5 MPa at high Pf, and -1.0 MPa at low Pf. Thus, it is interpreted that in the Gadag region, a change in σ‧n of 10.5 MPa prevailed during Pf fluctuation and associated separation of gold from the fluid.

  17. A new LA-ICP-MS method for Ti-in-Quartz: Implications and application to HP rutile-quartz veins from the Czech Erzgebirge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Uribe, A. M.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Zack, T.; Feineman, M. D.; Woods, G.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental determination of the pressure and temperature controls on Ti solubility in quartz provide a calibration of the Ti-in-quartz (TitaniQ) geothermometer applicable to geologic conditions up to ~20 kbar (Thomas et al. (2010) Contrib Mineral Petrol 160, 743-759). One of the greatest limitations to analyzing Ti in metamorphic quartz by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is the lack of a suitable matrix-matched reference material. Typically LA-ICP-MS analyses of Ti in minerals use 49Ti as a normalizing mass because of an isobaric interference from 48Ca, which is present in most well characterized reference glasses, on 48Ti. The benefit of using a matrix-matched reference material to analyze Ti in quartz is the opportunity to use 48Ti (73.8 % abundance) as a normalizing mass, which results in an order of magnitude increase in signal strength compared to the less abundant isotope 49Ti (5.5 % abundance), thereby increasing the analytical precision. Here we characterize Ti-bearing SiO2 glasses from Heraeus Quarzglas and natural quartz grains from the Bishop Tuff by cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and LA-ICP-MS, in order to determine their viability as reference materials for Ti in quartz. Titanium contents in low-CL rims in the Bishop Tuff quartz grains were determined to be homogenous by EPMA (41 ± 2 µg/g Ti, 2σ), and are a potential natural reference material. We present a new method for determining 48Ti concentrations in quartz by LA-ICP-MS at the 1 µg/g level, relevant to quartz in HP-LT terranes. We suggest that natural quartz such as the homogeneous low-CL rims of the Bishop Tuff quartz are more suitable than NIST reference glasses as an in-house reference material for low Ti concentrations because matrix effects are limited and Ca isobaric interferences are avoided, thus allowing for the use of 48Ti as a normalizing mass. Titanium concentration from 33 analyses of low

  18. Geochemistry of gases from fluid inclusions within gold-quartz veins in the Chugach and Kenai Mountains, south-central Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Leach, D.L.; Hofstra, A.H.; Landis, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Gold-bearing quartz veins within the Valdez Group turbidite sequences of the Chugach and Kenai Mountains are largely restricted to areas of medium-grade greenschist facies. The veins postdate accretion, deformation, and peak regional metamorphism of the Valdez Group. Liquid dominant, low salinity (<5 wt.% NaCl equivalent) fluid inclusions in quartz from four mining districts show homogenization temperatures generally ranging from 210/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/C. Estimated minimum trapping pressures of 1.5 kbar were obtained from quartz decrepitation data. The authors observations tend to support the theory that ore-forming fluids were derived during regional metamorphism. Microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the volatile components of fluid inclusions from the four districts. Inclusions adjacent to gold and sulfide grains from each district contained 7-10 mole % CO/sub 2/, 0-2 mole % CH/sub 4/, and 0-2 mole % N/sub 2/. Both a pure CO/sub 2/ volatile phase and CO/sub 2/-N/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ mixtures were consistently observed within quartz embaying intergrown gold and sulfide grains. Gas solubility data and the observed inclusion homogenization temperatures support minimum trapping pressures in approximate agreement with the quartz decrepitation data. The estimated minimum pressures correspond to a minimum depth of vein development at 3.5-5 km under the condition that fluid pressure equals lithostatic pressure. The ubiquitous presence of appreciable and similar dissolved gases, along with the consistent salinities and homogenization temperatures, provide further support for a regional process of ore genesis.

  19. Orientation of tectonic stresses in central Kentucky during U. Devonian/L. Mississippian times: Evidence from quartz veins (after gypsum) in NE-trending, systematic joints in shales

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Quartz replacing fibrous gypsum and anhydrite pseudomorphically (QAS; quartz after sulfate''), and preserving characteristic crack-seal'' and chickenwire'' textures, occurs in extensional veins at four locations in central KY. The veins occupy a systematic set of NE-SW-trending, vertical joints within the essentially flat-lying shales of the Renfro Member of the Mississippian Borden Formation and the Late Devonian New Albany Shale. The four QAS occurrences discovered to date are located northeast of the Borden Front. At one site in the New Albany Shale, QAS veins show clear evidence of penecontemporaneous deformation. It is proposed that at all QAS locations, gypsum precipitated in incipient joints before complete lithification of the sediment, and grew perpendicular to the fractures to form extensional veins in the soft but firm muds. The orientations of the joints now marked by QAS veins are broadly consistent with regional patterns of NE-SW-trending systematic joints and lineaments in southern IN and in central and eastern KY. These systematic fracture patterns do not correspond directly to known basement faults or rift systems, although they are consistent with modern stress directions in eastern and western KY, measured in situ in wells and by earthquake fault-plane solutions. It is proposed that this systematic trend marks the regional tectonic stress pattern characteristic of southern IN and central and eastern KY at, and since the Late Devonian. The evidence of penecontemporaneous sedimentary deformation in joints of U. Devonian age, marked and preserved by quartz replacement of early gypsum, is sufficient to show that while the systematic NE-trending joint set in KY may also be modern it is not uniquely so.

  20. Tracing the evolution of crustal-scale, transient permeability in a tectonically active, mid-crustal, low-permeability environment by means of quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    In mid-crustal, low-permeability environments pervasive fluid flow is primarily driven by the production of internally-derived metamorphic fluids, causing a near permanent state of near-lithostatic fluid-pressure conditions. In a tectonically active crust, these overpressured fluids will generate intermittently an enhanced permeability that will facilitate fluid flow through the crust. The High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Germany) can be considered as a fossil (late Palaeozoic) analogue of such mid-crustal, low-permeability environment at the brittle-plastic transition (depth range from 7 to 15 km). Low-grade metamorphic (250°C-350°C), predominantly fine-grained, siliciclastic metasediments were affected by a contraction-dominated deformation, materialized by a pervasive slaty cleavage. Quartz veins, abundantly present in the slate belt, are used as a proxy for the enhanced permeability. Detailed structural, petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical studies of different quartz-vein occurrences has enabled to reconstruct the evolution of the crustal-scale permeability , as well as to constrain the coupled fluid-pressure and stress-state evolution throughout the orogenic history. Extensive veining on a regional scale seems confined to periods of tectonic stress inversion, both at the onset (compressional stress inversion) and in the final stages (extensional stress inversion) of orogeny. Firstly, compressional stress inversion is expressed by pre-orogenic bedding-normal extension veins, consistently arranged in parallel arrays, followed by early orogenic bedding-parallel hybrid veins. Fluid-inclusion studies demonstrate near-lithostatic to supralithostatic fluid pressures, respectively. Secondly, discordant veins, transecting the pre-existing cleavage fabric, are interpreted to be initiated shortly after the extensional stress inversion, reflecting the late-orogenic extensional destabilisation of the slate belt. Veining again occurred at high fluid

  1. From evaporated seawater to uranium-mineralizing brines: Isotopic and trace element study of quartz-dolomite veins in the Athabasca system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Antonin; Boulvais, Philippe; Mercadier, Julien; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel; Cuney, Michel; France-Lanord, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Stable isotope (O, H, C), radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd) and trace element analyses have been applied to quartz-dolomite veins and their uranium(U)-bearing fluid inclusions associated with Proterozoic unconformity-related UO2 (uraninite) ores in the Athabasca Basin (Canada) in order to trace the evolution of pristine evaporated seawater towards U-mineralizing brines during their migration through sediments and basement rocks. Fluid inclusion data show that quartz and dolomite have precipitated from brines of comparable chemistry (excepted for relatively small amounts of CO2 found in dolomite-hosted fluid inclusions). However, δ18O values of quartz veins (δ18O = 11‰ to 18‰) and dolomite veins (δ18O = 13‰ to 24‰) clearly indicate isotopic disequilibrium between quartz and dolomite. Hence, it is inferred that this isotopic disequilibrium primarily reflects a decrease in temperature between the quartz stage (˜180 °C) and the dolomite stage (˜120 °C). The δ13C values of CO2 dissolved in dolomite-hosted fluid inclusions (δ13C = -30‰ to -4‰) and the δ13C values of dolomite (δ13C = -23.5‰ to -3.5‰) indicate that the CO2 dissolved in the mineralizing brines originated from brine-graphite interactions in the basement. The resulting slight increase in the fluid partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) may have triggered dolomite precipitation instead of quartz. δ18O values of quartz veins and previously published δ18O values of the main alteration minerals around the U-ores (illite, chlorite and tourmaline) show that quartz and alteration minerals were isotopically equilibrated with the same fluid at ˜180 °C. The REE concentrations in dolomite produce PAAS-normalized patterns that show some similarities with that of UO2 and are clearly distinct from that of the other main REE-bearing minerals in these environments (monazite, zircon and aluminum phosphate-sulfate (APS) minerals). The radiogenic isotope compositions of dolomite (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7053 to 0

  2. Formation of parting in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Eske Sørensen, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents hydrothermal quartz with macroscopic planar parting from the Mesoproterozoic Modum complex in southern Norway. Similar macroscopic parting in hydrothermal quartz with macroscopic planar structures has only been described from two localities in the world; Madagascar (Flörke et al., 1981) and Southern California (Murdoch et al., 1938). The study area consists of well foliated and banded sillimanite- garnet- amphibolite- mica gneiss that is cut at high angle by hydrothermal veins containing albite, chlinoclore, hornblende, hydroxyl apatite and quartz. The rim of the veins is generally made up of almost pure end-member euhedral albite. Then there is vugs with euhedral hornblende (10-25cm long) and euhedral hydroxyl apatite with size ranging from mm scale to several cm. Some places the quartz encloses apatite and hornblende. The quartz is anhedral, inequigranular with undulose extinction bordering sub grain rotation. It has large planar penetrative parting faces with pearly luster; however this is not consistent throughout the outcrop and some places the penetrative faces disappears and the quartz has a conchoidal fracture. The planar faces continue throughout the specimens with a few mm spacing. Thin sections oriented perpendicular to the most pronounced planar structure show lamellas that extinguishes at small angles (2 degrees) to each other. EBSD mapping of the planar faces shows two orientations {0-111} and {1-101}, corresponding to the r- and z-faces respectively, separated by irregular boundaries. The misorientation between these two crystallographic orientations on the parting is a 60 degree rotation on [0 0 1] in correspondence to the dauphiné twin law. Investigations conducted on thin sections cut orthogonal to the parting shows that the parting cuts and offsets the dauphiné twins, indicating a late genesis of the parting. However some internal stress induced movement of the twins are visible. SEM-CL documents three generations of quartz

  3. An X-ray excited optical luminescence study of a zoned quartz crystal from an emerald-bearing quartz vein, Hiddenite, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgensen, Astrid; Anderson, Alan J.; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2009-04-01

    The optical luminescence excited with synchrotron radiation along a preferential orientation of a quartz crystal has been investigated. It is found that the crystal is composed of two distinct regions, only one of which luminesces upon X-ray excitation. This luminescence is generally uniform and exhibits emission bands in the blue (470 nm with a shoulder at 522 nm) and in the UV (340 nm) regions of the spectrum. The branching ratio for the intensity of these bands is sensitive to the excitation energy across the Si K-edge. XANES spectra collected by partial luminescence yield (PLY) suggest that both emission bands originate from the de-excitation of Si atoms in the quartz. The possible defect sites within the crystal structure that could account for the observed luminescence are investigated and discussed. Additional experiments are proposed to verify this assignment of the optical emission bands.

  4. Huebnerite veins near Round Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Foord, E.E.; Conklin, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small huebnerite-bearing quartz veins occur in and near Cretaceous (about 95 m.y. old) granite east and south of Round Mountain. The veins are short, lenticular, and strike mostly northeast and northwest in several narrow east-trending belts. The quartz veins were formed about 80 m.y. ago near the end of an episode of doming and metamorphism of the granite and emplacement of aplite and pegmatite dikes in and near the granite. An initial hydrothermal stage involved deposition of muscovite, quartz, huebnerite, fluorite, and barite in the veins. Veins were then sheared, broken, and recrystallized. A second hydrothermal stage, possibly associated with emplacement of a rhyolite dike swarm and granodiorite stock about 35 m.y. ago, saw deposition of more muscovite, quartz, fluorite, and barite, and addition of scheelite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, several sulfide minerals, and chalcedony. Finally, as a result of near-surface weathering, secondary sulfide and numerous oxide, tungstate, carbonate, sulfate, phosphate, and silicate minerals formed in the veins. Depth of burial at the time of formation of the veins, based on geologic reconstruction, was about 3-3.5 km. The initial hydrothermal stage ended with deposition of quartz at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C and pressures of about 240 to 280 bars from fluids with salinity of about 5 wt % sodium chloride. Fluorite then was deposited at about 250/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/C from solutions of similar salinity and containing a small amount of carbon dioxide. During shearing that followed initial mineralization, quartz was recrystallized at a temperature of 270/sup 0/ to 290/sup 0/C and in association with fluids of about 5 wt % sodium chloride equivalent and containing carbon dioxide. Late-stage fluorite was deposited from fluids with similar salinity but devoid of carbon dioxide at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C. 76 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Partitioning and Leaching Behavior of Actinides and Rare Earth Elements in a Zirconolite- Bearing Hydrothermal Vein System

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Timothy E.; Hart, Kaye P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; McGlinn, Peter J.; Giere, Reto

    2007-07-01

    Chemical extraction techniques and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the distribution and behavior of actinides and rare earth elements (REE) in hydrothermal veins at Adamello (Italy). The six samples discussed in this paper were from the phlogopite zone, which is one of the major vein zones. The samples were similar in their bulk chemical composition, mineralogy, and leaching behavior of major elements (determined by extraction with 9 M HCl). However, there were major differences in the extractability of REE and actinides. The most significant influence on the leaching characteristics appears to be the amounts of U, Th and REE incorporated in resistant host phases (zirconolite and titanite) rather than readily leached phases (such as apatite). Uranium and Th are very highly enriched in zirconolite grains. Actinides were more readily leached from samples with a higher content of U and Th, relative to the amount of zirconium. The results show that REE and actinides present in chemically resistant host minerals can be retained under aggressive leaching conditions. (authors)

  6. Mineralogical siting and distribution of gold in quartz veins and sulfide ores of the Ashanti mine and other deposits in the Ashanti belt of Ghana: genetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberthür, T.; Weiser, T.; Amanor, J. A.; Chryssoulis, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Ashanti belt of Ghana constitutes a gold province which has produced a total of about 1500 t of gold historically. Gold mineralization is found in steep, NNE-SSW to NE-SW trending shear zones predominantly transecting metasediments of the Palaeoproterozoic Birimian Supergroup (2.2-2.1 Ga), disseminated in ca. 2.1 Ga granitoids, in paleo-conglomerates of the Tarkwaian Group (< 2135 Ma), and in recent placers. The distribution of gold, its chemistry, paragenesis and mineralogical siting in the mesothermal ores of the major mines in the Ashanti belt, namely Konongo, Ashanti, Bogosu and Prestea mine, are the subject of this study. At the localities studied, gold is present in two main types of ores: 1. Quartz veins with free-milling gold. The gold is relatively silver-rich (true fineness values from 730 to 954) and is accompanied by a distinct suite of Cu, Pb, Sb sulfides. 2. Sulfide ores, consisting of arsenopyrite, pyrite and rarer pyrrhotite and marcasite, with refractory gold. The ores have apparent fineness values larger than 910. Arsenopyrite and locally (at Bogosu) pyrite were identified as the hosts of submicroscopic gold. Mean concentrations of gold in arsenopyrite in various samples from the different mines, obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), range from 67 to 314 ppm Au. Gold concentration mapping in individual arsenopyrite crystals from the different deposits revealed similar patterns of gold distribution: the grains possess a gold-poor core, and elevated gold contents are present along distinct crystal growth zones towards their rims. The outermost crystal layer is usually gold-poor. The well-preserved distribution patterns also indicate that remobilization of gold from the sulfides played an insignificant role in the ores of the Ashanti belt. Multiple quartz veining and growth zoning of the sulfides are interpreted as manifestations of multiple episodes of fluid infiltration, fluid flow and mineral deposition. The bimodal occurrence of

  7. Zonation of primary haloes of Atud auriferous quartz vein deposit, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: A potential exploration model targeting for hidden mesothermal gold deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, Hassan Z.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The Atud gold mine located in the Neoproterozoic diorite and metagabbro of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt has been initially excavated during Pharaonic times. Between 1953 and 1969, the Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority performed underground prospection in the auriferous quartz vein and metasomatic alteration zones in the main Atud area, estimating a principal gold lode of 19,000 tones (16.28 g/ton), and 1600 tons of damp (1.24 g/ton). Yet the potentiality of the deposit has not been exhausted. However, for exploration of hidden ore, quantitative characterization using trace elements zoning of mineralization haloes with 280 samples from surface and three underground mining levels is applied. This was through multivariate statistical analysis (Factor analysis) of 11 selected trace elements. Axial (vertical) extents of primary haloes above and beneath gently dipping orebody are also visualized to interpret the level of erosion, determine the direction of mineralizing solutions as well as to examine whether the hidden orebody is promising at the Atud mine. Axial zones of primary dispersion aureoles of trace elements are: Ag, As, S and U around the auriferous quartz veins; Cu, and Pb in the surface horizons; and Zn, Ni, Co, and U along the lower margin of mineralization zone. Gold contents in bedrock and quartz vein samples from level-42M are the highest (5.7 and 40.3 ppm, respectively). In the transverse (lateral) direction, the maximum relative accumulation of Au and Zn occurs at the Northern Shaft; Pb, Cu, As, and U at the Main Shaft; and Ag, S, Co, and Ni at the Southern Shaft. The estimated axial zonation sequence of indicator elements using the variability index is Pb → Cu → Ag → Au → As → S → Ni → Co → U → Zn. According to this zonation, an index such as (Pb × Cu)D/(U × Zn)D can be a significant for predicting the Au potentiality at a particular depth. In addition, the Pb/U zonality index is an appropriate indicator for the

  8. Colloidal gold and silica in mesothermal vein systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, R. J.; Wilkinson, J. J.

    1993-06-01

    Some of the textural features of mesothermal gold-quartz veins may be best explained by the initial precipitation of amorphous silica gel (colloid), which subsequently crystallizes to quartz. This can occur in brittle-ductile shear zones where a significant fluid-pressure drop occurs during stick-slip failure. Such a process rapidly supersaturates the hydrothermal fluid with respect to amorphous silica, which precipitates instead of quartz, owing to favorable kinetics. Depressurization also commonly leads to fluid unmixing and destabilization of soluble gold complexes. However, the presence of colloidal silica can stabilize gold colloid, allowing further transport of particulate gold in suspension in the hydrothermal fluid. Silica gel would be highly unstable under mesothermal conditions and would undergo rapid syneresis and crystallization to form quartz; solid impurities would tend to be expelled toward grain boundaries. This model can account for the primary anhedral aggregate textures typical of mesothermal quartz veins, the concentration of gold along grain boundaries and the formation of discrete gold nuggets, and the rare occurrence of low-order silica polymorphs and relict spheroidal structures. The transport of gold in colloidal form may be one reason for the frequently consistent bulk grade distribution in gold-quartz vein systems over many hundreds of metres (in some cases kilometres) of depth. In addition, the formation of charged colloidal particles may help to explain the attraction of gold grains to specific mineral surfaces.

  9. Superdense CO2 inclusions in Cretaceous quartz stibnite veins hosted in low-grade Variscan basement of the Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Márian; Thomas, Rainer; Hurai, Vratislav; Koneèný, Patrik; Chovan, Martin

    2006-03-01

    CO2 inclusions with density up to 1,197 kg m-3 occur in quartz stibnite veins hosted in the low-grade Palaeozoic basement of the Gemericum tectonic unit in the Western Carpathians. Raman microanalysis corroborated CO2 as dominant gas species accompanied by small amounts of nitrogen (<7.3 mol%) and methane (<2.5 mol%). The superdense CO2 phase exsolved from an aqueous bulk fluid at temperatures of 183 237°C and pressures between 1.6 and 3.5 kbar, possibly up to 4.5 kbar. Low thermal gradients (˜12 13°C km-1) and the CO2 CH4 N2 fluid composition rule out a genetic link with the subjacent Permian granites and indicate an external, either metamorphogenic (oxidation of siderite, dedolomitization) or lower crustal/mantle, source of the ore-forming fluids. According to microprobe U Pb Th dating of monazite, the stibnite-bearing veins formed during early Cretaceous thrusting of the Gemeric basement over the adjacent Veporic unit. The 15- to 18-km depth of burial estimated from the fluid inclusion trapping PT parameters indicates a 8- to 11-km-thick Upper Palaeozoic Jurassic accretionary complex overlying the Gemeric basement and its Permo-Triassic autochthonous cover.

  10. The Laramide Caborca orogenic gold belt of northwestern Sonora, Mexico; white mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from gold-rich quartz veins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izaguirre, Aldo; Kunk, Michael J.; Iriondo, Alexander; McAleer, Ryan; Caballero-Martinez, Juan Antonio; Espinosa-Arámburu, Enrique

    2016-02-12

    The COGB is approximately 600 kilometers long and 60 to 80 km wide, trends northwest, and extends from west-central Sonora to southern Arizona and California. The COGB contains mineralized gold-rich quartz veins that contain free gold associated with white mica (sericite), carbonate minerals (calcite and ankerite), and sulfides such as pyrite and galena. Limited geochronologic studies exist for parts of the COGB, and previous work was concentrated in mining districts. These previous studies recorded mineralization ages of approximately 70 to 40 Ma. Therefore, some workers proposed that the orogenic gold mineralization in the region occurred during a single pulse that was associated with the Laramide Orogeny that took place during the Cretaceous to early Eocene in the western margin of North America. However, the geochronologic dataset was quite limited, making any regional interpretations tenuous. Accordingly, one of the objectives of this geochronology study was to get a better representative sampling of the COGB in order to obtain a more complete record of the mineralization history. The 63 samples presented in this work are broadly distributed throughout the area of the COGB and allow us to better test the hypothesis that mineralization occurred in a single pulse.

  11. The Laramide Caborca orogenic gold belt of northwestern Sonora, Mexico; white mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from gold-rich quartz veins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izaguirre, Aldo; Kunk, Michael J.; Iriondo, Alexander; McAleer, Ryan; Caballero-Martinez, Juan Antonio; Espinosa-Arámburu, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The COGB is approximately 600 kilometers long and 60 to 80 km wide, trends northwest, and extends from west-central Sonora to southern Arizona and California. The COGB contains mineralized gold-rich quartz veins that contain free gold associated with white mica (sericite), carbonate minerals (calcite and ankerite), and sulfides such as pyrite and galena. Limited geochronologic studies exist for parts of the COGB, and previous work was concentrated in mining districts. These previous studies recorded mineralization ages of approximately 70 to 40 Ma. Therefore, some workers proposed that the orogenic gold mineralization in the region occurred during a single pulse that was associated with the Laramide Orogeny that took place during the Cretaceous to early Eocene in the western margin of North America. However, the geochronologic dataset was quite limited, making any regional interpretations tenuous. Accordingly, one of the objectives of this geochronology study was to get a better representative sampling of the COGB in order to obtain a more complete record of the mineralization history. The 63 samples presented in this work are broadly distributed throughout the area of the COGB and allow us to better test the hypothesis that mineralization occurred in a single pulse.

  12. Genesis of the hydrothermal gold deposits in the Canan area, Lepaguare District, Honduras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Michele; Menichetti, Marco; Renzulli, Alberto; Toscani, Lorenzo; Salvioli-Mariani, Emma; Suarez, Pedro; Murroni, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    The Canan area (Honduras) is characterized by a gold-bearing ore deposit that is associated with quartz-veined shear zones. Gold mineralization occurs in low-to medium-grade metamorphic host-rocks (graphitic and sericitic schists). Hydrothermal fluids, which are associated with the emplacement of Cretaceous-Tertiary granodioritic intrusions, are responsible for the formation of quartz veins and the hydrothermal alteration of wall-rocks. Three main altered zones have been detected in the wall-rocks as far as 150 cm from the quartz veins. The distal zone (up to 50-cm thick) contains quartz, chlorite and illite. The intermediate zone is the thickest (up to 80 cm) and is marked by quartz, muscovite, sulphides, kaolinite and native elements such as Au and Ag. The proximal zone, which is close to the quartz veins, is rather thin (up to 25 cm) and contains clay minerals, Al-oxides-hydroxides and sulphides. The transition from the distal to the proximal zone is accompanied by the enrichment of SiO2 and the depletion of all other major elements, except for Fe2O3(tot). Precious metals occur in the highest concentrations in the intermediate zone (Au up to 7.6 ppm and Ag up to 11 ppm). We suggest that gold was transported as a reduced sulphur complex and was precipitated from the hydrothermal solution by the reaction of the sulphur complexes with Fe2+ from the alteration of the mafic minerals of the host-rock. Fluid-wall-rock interactions seem to be the main cause of gold mineralization. Genetic relationships with a strike-slip fault system, hydrothermal alteration zones within the metamorphic wall-rocks, and an entire set of geochemical anomalies are consistent with orogenic-type gold deposits of the epizonal class.

  13. Time scales of porphyry Cu deposit formation: insights from titanium diffusion in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Reed, Mark H.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyry dikes and hydrothermal veins from the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit at Butte, Montana, contain multiple generations of quartz that are distinct in scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images and in Ti concentrations. A comparison of microprobe trace element profiles and maps to SEM-CL images shows that the concentration of Ti in quartz correlates positively with CL brightness but Al, K, and Fe do not. After calibrating CL brightness in relation to Ti concentration, we use the brightness gradient between different quartz generations as a proxy for Ti gradients that we model to determine time scales of quartz formation and cooling. Model results indicate that time scales of porphyry magma residence are ~1,000s of years and time scales from porphyry quartz phenocryst rim formation to porphyry dike injection and cooling are ~10s of years. Time scales for the formation and cooling of various generations of hydrothermal vein quartz range from 10s to 10,000s of years. These time scales are considerably shorter than the ~0.6 m.y. overall time frame for each porphyry-style mineralization pulse determined from isotopic studies at Butte, Montana. Simple heat conduction models provide a temporal reference point to compare chemical diffusion time scales, and we find that they support short dike and vein formation time scales. We interpret these relatively short time scales to indicate that the Butte porphyry deposit formed by short-lived episodes of hydrofracturing, dike injection, and vein formation, each with discrete thermal pulses, which repeated over the ~3 m.y. generation of the deposit.

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of a Late Permian coal in the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, China: Influence from siliceous and iron-rich calcic hydrothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Chou, C.-L.; Yue, M.; Luo, K.; Ren, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of siliceous and iron-rich calcic low-temperature hydrothermal fluids (LTHF) on the mineralogy and geochemistry of the Late Permian No. 11 Coal (anthracitic, Rr =2.85%) in the Dafang Coalfield in northwestern Guizhou Province, China. The No. 11 Coal has high contents of vein ankerite (10.2 vol.%) and vein quartz (11.4 vol.%), with formation temperatures of 85 and 180 ??C, respectively, indicating that vein ankerite and vein quartz were derived from low-temperature calcic and siliceous hydrothermal fluids in two epigenetic episodes. The vein quartz appears to have formed earlier than vein ankerite did, and at least three distinct stages of ankerite formation with different Ca/Sr and Fe/Mn ratios were observed. The two types of mineral veins are sources of different suites of major and trace metals. Scanning electron microscope and sequential extraction studies show that, in addition to Fe, Mg, and Ca, vein ankerite is the dominant source of Mn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the coal, and the contents of these five elements are as high as 0.09% and 74.0, 33.6, 185, and 289 ??g/g, respectively. In contrast, vein quartz is the main carrier mineral for platinum-group elements (PGEs) Pd, Pt, and Ir in the coal, and the contents of Pd, Pt, and Ir are 1.57, 0.15, and 0.007 ??g/g, respectively. Sequential extraction showed a high PGE content in the silicate fraction, up to 10.4 ??g/g Pd, 1.23 ??g/g Pt, and 0.05 ??g/g Ir, respectively. It is concluded that the formation of ankerite and quartz and the anomalous enrichment of trace elements in the No. 11 Coal in the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, result from the influx of calcic and siliceous low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-07-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  16. Detailed paragenesis and Li-mica compositions as recorders of the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of the Maoping W-Sn deposit (Jiangxi, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Hélène; Marignac, Christian; Mercadier, Julien; Cuney, Michel; Richard, Antonin; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Charles, Nicolas; Lespinasse, Marc-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Li-micas have been used as indicators of the evolution of granites. However, hydrothermal Li-micas are less documented. World-class W-Sn deposits associated with Early Yanshanian granites (South Jiangxi, China) show magmatic and hydrothermal Li-micas which could help unravelling the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of rare metal deposits. Six types of Li-micas have been identified in the vein system of the Maoping W-Sn deposit through detailed petrography and EPMA and LA-ICP-MS analyses, by chronological order: (i) late-magmatic Li-micas in feldspar veins, associated with late crystallization of a peraluminous melt; (ii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas (Fe-Li mica veins and selvages); (iii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas in W-Sn veins; (iv) Fe-Li micas in later banded quartz veins; (v) Li-muscovite in the final stages; and finally (vi) micas associated with alteration at each stage. Based on oscillatory variations and trends in major elements composition, the chemical variations in Li-micas from the successive stages and in hydrothermal micas that crystallized in the veins are interpreted to reflect mixing between at least three fluids of possible magmatic, meteoric and metamorphic origins. The crystallization of zircons and REE minerals, combined with variations of major and trace element concentrations in the Li-micas, notably an enrichment of rare metals (W-Sn-Ta-Nb) in the Li-micas, implies emplacement of a hidden peralkaline REE-rich magma during the crystallization of the banded quartz veins, a source which was different to the pre-existing peraluminous granites. The possible involvement of both peraluminous and peralkaline intrusives suggests the existence of polyphase magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the Maoping deposit, during the Yanshanian event (190-80 Ma).

  17. Competitive hydration and dehydration at olivine-quartz boundary revealed by hydrothermal experiments: Implications for silica metasomatism at the crust-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyanagi, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hirano, Nobuo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Serpentinization occurs via interactions between mantle peridotite and water that commonly passes through the crust. Given that such a fluid has a high silica activity compared with mantle peridotite, it is thought that serpentinization and silica metasomatism occur simultaneously at the crust-mantle boundary. In this study, we conducted hydrothermal experiments in the olivine (Ol)-quartz (Qtz)-H2O system at 250 °C and vapor-saturated pressure under highly alkaline conditions (NaOHaq, pH = 13.8 at 25 °C) to clarify the mechanism of silica metasomatism at the crust-mantle boundary. Composite powders consisting of a Qtz layer and an Ol layer were set in tube-in-tube vessels. After the experiments, the extents of serpentinization and metasomatic reactions were evaluated as a function of distance from the Ol-Qtz boundary. The mineralogy of the reaction products in the Ol-hosted region changed with increasing distance from the Ol-Qtz boundary, from smectite + serpentine (Smc zone) to serpentine + brucite + magnetite (Brc zone). Olivine hydration proceeded in both zones, but the total H2O content in the products was greater in the Brc zone than in the Smc zone. Mass balance calculations revealed that olivine hydration occurred without any supply of silica in the brucite zone. In contrast, the Smc zone was formed by silica metasomatism via competitive hydration and dehydration reactions. In the Smc zone, smectite formed via the simultaneous progress of olivine hydration and serpentine dehydration, and around the boundary of the Smc and Brc zones, serpentine formation occurred by olivine hydration and brucite dehydration. The relative extent of hydration and dehydration reactions controlled the along-tube variation in the rate of H2O production/consumption and the rate of volume increase. Our findings suggest that the competitive progress of serpentinization and silica metasomatic reactions would cause fluctuations in pore fluid pressure, possibly affecting the

  18. Porphyry-Cu-Mo Stockwork Formation by Dynamic, Transient Hydrothermal Pulses: Mineralogic Insights From the Deposit at Butte, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. N.; Reed, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The temperature profile in magmatic-hydrothermal systems directly affects the chemical behavior and pressure regime of hydrothermal fluids and the resulting diversity of mineralization. We combine textural observations of igneous and hydrothermal minerals using SEM-CL and -BSE images with three independent mineral thermobarometers to better understand the thermal profile at the porphyry-Cu-Mo deposit in Butte, Montana. We apply the two most recent (and controversial) forms of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer from Thomas et al. (2010) and Huang and Audétat (2011), the Zr-in-rutile thermobarometer of Tomkins et al. (2007), and the XMg-Ti-in-biotite thermometer of Henry et al. (2005) to estimate the formation temperatures of these magmatic and hydrothermal minerals. In a comparison of isobaric temperature distributions from Ti-in-quartz (Thomas et al., 2010) and Zr-in-rutile we find that the Thomas et al. calibration consistently yields temperatures that are 50 to 200°C lower than those from Zr-in-rutile. These quartz temperatures are unreasonably low for quartz phenocrysts and are considerably lower than previous estimates for vein quartz. Temperature estimates from the Zr-in-rutile and XMg-Ti-in-biotite thermobarometers agree well with each other and with previous temperature estimates. We conclude that application of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer of Thomas et al. is not appropriate for this natural system. Quartz temperatures calculated using the calibration of Huang and Audétat (2011) are closer to those from rutile and biotite. Application of the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer of Huang and Audétat to hydrothermal samples yields maximum temperature estimates, however, and requires evaluation of trace element abundances (e.g., Ti, Al) and other crystal lattice impurities (e.g., fluid inclusions) in growth zones as a means to determine whether growth zones represent slow or fast-growing quartz. Using thermobarometry from rutile, biotite, and quartz (Huang and

  19. Genesis of the vein-type tungsten mineralization at Nyakabingo (Rwanda) in the Karagwe-Ankole belt, Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, S.; De Clercq, F.; Hulsbosch, N.; Piessens, K.; Boyce, A.; Burgess, R.; Muchez, Ph.

    2016-02-01

    The vein-type tungsten deposit at Nyakabingo in the central Tungsten belt of Rwanda is located in the eastern flank of the complex Bumbogo anticlinal structure. The host rock is composed of alternating sequences of sandstones, quartzites, and black pyritiferous metapelitic rocks. Two types of W-mineralized quartz veins have been observed: bedding-parallel and quartz veins that are at high angle to the bedding, which are termed crosscutting veins. Both vein types have been interpreted to have been formed in a late stage of a compressional deformation event. Both vein types are associated with small alteration zones, comprising silicification, tourmalinization, and muscovitization. Dating of muscovite crystals at the border of the veins resulted in a maximum age of 992.4 ± 1.5 Ma. This age is within error similar to the ages obtained for the specialized G4 granites (i.e., 986 ± 10 Ma). The W-bearing minerals formed during two different phases. The first phase is characterized by scheelite and massive wolframite, while the second phase is formed by ferberite pseudomorphs after scheelite. These minerals occur late in the evolution of the massive quartz veins, sometimes even in fractures that crosscut the veins. The ore minerals precipitated from a H2O-CO2-CH4-N2-NaCl-(KCl) fluid with low to moderate salinity (0.6-13.8 eq. wt% NaCl), and minimal trapping temperatures between 247 and 344 °C. The quartz veins have been crosscut by sulfide-rich veins. Based on the similar setting, mineralogy, stable isotope, and fluid composition, it is considered that both types of W-mineralized quartz veins formed during the same mineralizing event. Given the overlap in age between the G4 granites and the mineralized quartz veins, and the typical association of the W deposits in Rwanda, but also worldwide, with granite intrusions, W originated from the geochemically specialized G4 granites. Intense water-rock interaction and mixing with metamorphic fluids largely overprinted the

  20. Melt inclusions in veins: linking magmas and porphyry Cu deposits.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anthony C; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; White, Noel C; van Achterbergh, Esmé; Ryan, Chris G

    2003-12-19

    At a porphyry copper-gold deposit in Bajo de la Alumbrera, Argentina, silicate-melt inclusions coexist with hypersaline liquid- and vapor-rich inclusions in the earliest magmatic-hydrothermal quartz veins. Copper concentrations of the hypersaline liquid and vapor inclusions reached maxima of 10.0 weight % (wt %) and 4.5 wt %, respectively. These unusually copper-rich inclusions are considered to be the most primitive ore fluid found thus far. Their preservation with coexisting melt allows for the direct quantification of important oreforming processes, including determination of bulk partition coefficients of metals from magma into ore-forming magmatic volatile phases. PMID:14684818

  1. Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy Characterization of Quartz Exhibiting Different Alkali-Silica Reaction Potential.

    PubMed

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Götze, Jens; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Different quartz types from several localities in the Czech Republic and Sweden were examined by polarizing microscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, spectroscopy, and petrographic image analysis, and tested by use of an accelerated mortar bar test (following ASTM C1260). The highest alkali-silica reaction potential was indicated by very fine-grained chert, containing significant amounts of fine-grained to cryptocrystalline matrix. The chert exhibited a dark red CL emission band at ~640 nm with a low intensity. Fine-grained orthoquartzites, as well as fine-grained metamorphic vein quartz, separated from phyllite exhibited medium expansion values. The orthoquartzites showed various CL of quartz grains, from blue through violet, red, and brown. Two CL spectral bands at ~450 and ~630 nm, with various intensities, were detected. The quartz from phyllite displayed an inhomogeneous dark red CL with two CL spectral bands of low intensities at ~460 and ~640 nm. The massive coarse-grained pegmatite quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be nonreactive and displayed a typical short-lived blue CL (~480 nm). The higher reactivity of the fine-grained hydrothermal quartz may be connected with high concentrations of defect centers, and probably with amorphized micro-regions in the quartz, respectively; indicated by a yellow CL emission (~570 nm).

  2. Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy Characterization of Quartz Exhibiting Different Alkali-Silica Reaction Potential.

    PubMed

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Götze, Jens; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Different quartz types from several localities in the Czech Republic and Sweden were examined by polarizing microscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, spectroscopy, and petrographic image analysis, and tested by use of an accelerated mortar bar test (following ASTM C1260). The highest alkali-silica reaction potential was indicated by very fine-grained chert, containing significant amounts of fine-grained to cryptocrystalline matrix. The chert exhibited a dark red CL emission band at ~640 nm with a low intensity. Fine-grained orthoquartzites, as well as fine-grained metamorphic vein quartz, separated from phyllite exhibited medium expansion values. The orthoquartzites showed various CL of quartz grains, from blue through violet, red, and brown. Two CL spectral bands at ~450 and ~630 nm, with various intensities, were detected. The quartz from phyllite displayed an inhomogeneous dark red CL with two CL spectral bands of low intensities at ~460 and ~640 nm. The massive coarse-grained pegmatite quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be nonreactive and displayed a typical short-lived blue CL (~480 nm). The higher reactivity of the fine-grained hydrothermal quartz may be connected with high concentrations of defect centers, and probably with amorphized micro-regions in the quartz, respectively; indicated by a yellow CL emission (~570 nm). PMID:26790877

  3. External micro-PIXE analysis of fluid inclusions: Test of the LABEC facility on samples of quartz veins from Apuan Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, M.; Calusi, S.; Giuntini, L.; Ruggieri, G.; Dini, A.

    2008-05-01

    Fluid inclusions are small portions, usually smaller than 100 μm, of fluid trapped within minerals during or after growth. Their characteristics provide therefore fundamental information on nature and evolution of fluids present in the past in different geological environments. At the LABEC laboratory in Firenze, high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz crystals, coming from the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex, were analysed at the external scanning microbeam. Results, although still preliminary, have already provided us with hints on fluid-rock interaction processes during the metamorphism of the Apuan Alps.

  4. Sinter-vein correlations at Buckskin Mountain, National district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    At Buckskin Mountain (elev 2,650 m, 8,743 ft), Humboldt County, Nevada, a hydrothermal system, imposed on a middle Miocene volcanic sequence with contrasting permeabilities and tensile strengths, produced alteration assemblages controlled by elevation, from Hg-mineralized sinter to subjacent precious metal veins over a vertical distance exceeding 790 m. Sinter and epiclastic deposits, interpreted to be remnant paleosurface basinal strata enclosed by 16.6 to 16.1 Ma rhyolites, overlie older volcaniclastic basinal deposits and were part of a regional fluvial-lacustrine system developed among ca. 16 to 12 Ma basalt-rhyolite eruptive centers throughout the northern Great Basin. Because of contrasting erosional resistance among altered and unaltered rocks, Buckskin Mountain represents inverse topography with sinter and silicified epiclastic deposits at the summit. Sinter and veins, correlated by common elements, similar mineralogy, age constraints, textures, S isotope compositions, and fluid inclusion microthermometry, were deposited by sinter-vein fluid, the first of two sequential hydrothermal fluid regimes that evolved in response to magmatism, tectonism, hydrology, and topography. Thermal quenching of distally derived sinter-vein fluid in planar conduits caused deposition of banded quartz-silicate-selenide-sulfide veins ???270 to > 440 m below sinter at 16.1 Ma; vei??ns were initially enveloped by zoned selvages of proximal K-feldspar + K-mica + quartz + pyrite and distal illite + chlorite + calcite + pyrite. Mixing of sinter-vein fluid with local meteoric water in saturated basinal deposits caused deposition of silica, Hg-Se-S-Cl minerals, and precious metals in sinter and epiclastic deposits. Elevated ???Se/???S in sinter-vein fluid, and the relatively large stability fields of reduced aqueous selenide species in the temperature range of 250?? to <100??C, enabled (but was not the cause of) codeposition of selenide-sulfide minerals and common element associations

  5. Organic inclusions within hydrothermal minerals from S.W. Africa and elsewhere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, G.

    1972-01-01

    It was observed that quartz crystals from veins within a diabase dike of precambrian age from S.W. Africa contain organic particles which closely resemble, in detailed morphology, coacervates, proteinoid microspheres or fossil and recent microorganisms. The microphotospectrographs in visible and near-ultraviolet light of these minute particles revealed a strong absorption peak at the vicinity of 4000 A, which is indicative of lipids. Hydrothermal mineral from veins from a number of other localities proved to contain the biomorphic organic particles. The theoretical significance of these organic particles is discussed with reference to problems of origin of life.

  6. A case study of impact-induced hydrothermal activity: The Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Lee, Pascal; Parnell, John; Spray, John G.; Baron, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The well-preserved state and excellent exposure at the 39 Ma Haughton impact structure, 23 km in diameter, allows a clearer picture to be made of the nature and distribution of hydrothermal deposits within mid-size complex impact craters. A moderate- to low-temperature hydrothermal system was generated at Haughton by the interaction of groundwaters with the hot impact melt breccias that filled the interior of the crater. Four distinct settings and styles of hydrothermal mineralization are recognized at Haughton: a) vugs and veins within the impact melt breccias, with an increase in intensity of alteration towards the base; b) cementation of brecciated lithologies in the interior of the central uplift; c) intense veining around the heavily faulted and fractured outer margin of the central uplift; and d) hydrothermal pipe structures or gossans and mineralization along fault surfaces around the faulted crater rim. Each setting is associated with a different suite of hydrothermal minerals that were deposited at different stages in the development of the hydrothermal system. Minor, early quartz precipitation in the impact melt breccias was followed by the deposition of calcite and marcasite within cavities and fractures, plus minor celestite, barite, and fluorite. This occurred at temperatures of at least 200 °C and down to ˜100-120 °C. Hydrothermal circulation through the faulted crater rim with the deposition of calcite, quartz, marcasite, and pyrite, occurred at similar temperatures. Quartz mineralization within breccias of the interior of the central uplift occurred in two distinct episodes (˜250 down to ˜90 °C, and <60 °C). With continued cooling (<90 °C), calcite and quartz were precipitated in vugs and veins within the impact melt breccias. Calcite veining around the outer margin of the central uplift occurred at temperatures of ˜150 °C down to <60 °C. Mobilization of hydrocarbons from the country rocks occurred during formation of the higher

  7. Fluid chemistry and evolution of hydrothermal fluids in an Archaean transcrustal fault zone network: The case of the Cadillac Tectonic Zone, Abitibi greenstone belt, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neumayr, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Banks, D.A.; Yardley, B.W.D.; Couture, J.-F.; Landis, G.P.; Rye, R.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed fluid geochemistry studies on hydrothermal quartz veins from the Rouyn-Noranda and Val-d'Or areas along the transcrustal Cadillac Tectonic Zone (CTZ) indicate that unmineralized (with respect to gold) sections of the CTZ contained a distinct CO2-dominated, H2S-poor hydrothermal fluid. In contrast, both gold mineralized sections of the CTZ (e.g., at Orenada #2) and associated higher order shear zones have a H2O-CO2 ?? CH4-NaCl hydrothermal fluid. Their CO2/H2S ratios indicate H2S-rich compositions. The Br/Cl compositions in fluid inclusions trapped in these veins indicate that hydrothermal fluids have been equilibrated with the crust. Oxygen isotope ratios from hydrothermal quartz veins in the CTZ are consistently 2??? more enriched than those of associated higher order shear zones, which are interpreted to be a function of greater fluid/rock ratios in the CTZ and lower fluid/rock ratios, and more efficient equilibration of the hydrothermal fluid with the wall rock, in higher order shear zones. An implication from this study is that the lower metal endowment of the transcrustal CTZ, when compared with the higher metal endowment in higher order shear zones (ratio of about 1 : 1000), may be the result of the lack of significant amounts of H2O-H2S rich fluids in most of the CTZ. In contrast, gold mineralization in the higher order shear zones appear to be controlled by the high H2S activity of the aqueous fluids, because gold was likely transported in a bisulfide complex and was deposited during sulfidation reactions in the wall rock and phase separation in the quartz veins. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  8. The Pb-rich sulfide veins in the Boccassuolo ophiolite: Implications for the geochemical evolution of hydrothermal activity across the ocean-continent transition in the Ligurian Tethys (Northern-Apennine, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garuti, Giorgio; Zaccarini, Federica; Scacchetti, Maurizio; Bartoli, Omar

    2011-06-01

    Galena bearing sulfide veins have been discovered coexisting with Fe-Cu-Zn dominated veins in the hydrothermal stockwork of the Boccassuolo ophiolite (External Ligurides, Northern Apennine, Italy). The galena-rich veins cut across a volcanic pile composed of pillow lava flows, pillow breccia, and ophiolitic sandstone. Bulk-ore analyses indicate significant enrichment in Pb giving raise to mantle normalized Pb-Ag-Au-Zn-Cu patterns with unusual negative slope, in contrast with the average flat pattern of most sulfide deposits in the Internal Liguride ophiolites which reflect the Fe-Cu-Zn assemblage of ophiolite-hosted Volcanic-associated Massive Sulfide (VMS) deposits all over the world. A wide literature shows that, in contrast with the Internal Ligurides, plutonic and volcanic rocks of the External Ligurides display less depleted and even enriched geochemical characters, not consistent with common oceanic crust at mid oceanic ridges (MOR), but probably originated in the ocean-continent transition of the Adria continental margin. In this geodynamic context, pillow basalts become locally enriched in Pb with high Pb/Cu ratios, and other crustal-compatible elements such as Mo and U. The Pb enrichment observed in the veins Boccassuolo is interpreted to be a result of leaching of such anomalous volcanics forming the ophiolitic substrate. The case of Boccassuolo supports the conclusion that the geochemical character of hydrothermal activity evolved from Cu-Zn rich in MOR-type assemblages of the Internal Ligurides, towards composition enriched in Pb in the External Liguride domain, representing the transition from the Ligurian ocean to the Adria continental margin.

  9. Fluid inclusion evidence for hydrothermal fluid evolution in the Darreh-Zar porphyry copper deposit, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nateghi, Arash; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2013-09-01

    The Darreh-Zar porphyry copper deposit is associated with a quartz monzonitic-granodioritic-porphyritic stock hosted by an Eocene volcanic sedimentary complex in which magmatic hydrothermal fluids were introduced and formed veins and alteration. Within the deepest quartz-rich and chalcopyrite-poor group A veins, LVHS2 inclusions trapped high salinity, high temperature aqueous fluids exsolved directly from a relatively shallow magma (0.5 kbar). These late fluids were enriched in NaCl and reached halite saturation as a result of the low pressure of magma crystallization and fluid exsolution. These fluids extracted Cu from the crystallizing melt and transported it to the hydrothermal system. As a result of ascent, the temperature and pressure of these fluids decreased from 600 to 415 °C, and approximately 500-315 bars. At these conditions, K-feldspar and biotite were stabilized. Type A veins were formed at a depth of ∼1.2 km under conditions of lithostatic pressure and abrupt cooling. Upon cooling and decompressing, the fluid intersected with the liquid-vapor field resulting in separation of immiscible liquid and vapor. This stage was recorded by formation of LVHS1, LVHS3 and VL inclusions. These immiscible fluids formed chalcopyrite-pyrite-quartz veins with sericitic alteration envelopes (B veins) under the lithostatic-hydrostatic pressure regime at temperatures between 415 and 355 °C at 1.3 km below the paleowater table. As the fluids ascended, copper contents decreased and these fluids were diluted by mixing with the low salinity-external fluid. Therefore, pyrite-dominated quartz veins were formed in purely hydrostatic conditions in which pressure decreased from 125 bars to 54 bars and temperature decreased from 355 to 298 °C. During the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution, the composition and P-T regime changed drastically and caused various types of veins and alterations. The abundance of chalcopyrite precipitation in group B veins suggests that boiling and

  10. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the skin. They usually occur in ... of the body. Hemorrhoids are a type of varicose vein. Your veins have one-way valves that help ...

  11. Permeability enhancement during gold mineralization: Evidences from Kestanelik epithermal vein system, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyuz, Nilay; Shipton, Zoe; Kuscu, Ilkay; Lord, Richard A.; Gladwell, David R.; Kaymakci, Nuretdin

    2016-04-01

    The most favourable and principal mineral deposition mechanism in low sulphidation epithermal systems is boiling. Mineralization in these systems occurs dominantly as veins and stockworks; therefore, structures play major role in the localization of epithermal fluid flow. Epithermal fluids rise from depth along structural conduits at high temperatures under enough pressure to prevent boiling. When the pressure drops suddenly (for instance, through faulting or any fracturing), boiling occurs, and CO2 and H2S are released to the vapour phase. Change in fluid chemistry due to the boiling causes first the base metals, and then the ore and gangue minerals to deposit in a well-recognized temporal and vertical sequence until all open spaces are filled. Vein infill in epithermal deposits indicate that mineralization is multiphase and associated with repeated and episodic fluid flow rather than a steady-state process. How can permeability enhancement be achieved after deposition of minerals in fractures and faults chokes permeable pathways and restrict fluid flow? Although geochemical aspects of LS epithermal systems are well known, limited studies exist on the permeability enhancement mechanisms in LS epithermal veins. The main aim of the study is to understand the permeability enhancement mechanisms in epithermal gold deposits by focussing on the structures and quartz textures of a well-preserved low sulphidation epithermal quartz vein/breccia system in Lapseki, NW Turkey. We revealed the kinematics of the structure-vein network by mapping the geometries of epithermal quartz veins and associated structures and collecting detailed structural data from them. In addition, we determined the different phases of fluid flow and mineralization with the cross-cutting and structural relationships among them by examining the quartz textures and breccias and mapping their spatial distribution on vein outcrops and in drill cores with the help of thin section analyses. On-going work

  12. Deposition conditions and distribution features of native gold individuals in the veins of the Tokur mesothermal deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, N. S.; Neroda, O. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper discusses factors in the deposition and concentration of native gold and the spatial distribution of its individuals within the sufide-poor gold-quartz veins at the mesoabyssal Tokur deposit. The major factors in deposition of gold were sealing of the hydrothermal system, a sudden drop in fluid pressure, and repeated immiscibility in the fluid. Native gold was deposited in relation to initial acts of prolonged and discrete opening and preopening of cavities in three mineral assemblages of the productive association II. Most native gold individuals with a visible size of 0.1-1.5 mm were together with the early generation of quartz 2 on cavity walls adjacent to altered rocks. This is caused by the high content of Au complexes in initial hydrothermal solutions favoring rapid oversaturation during cavity formation. Gold fills interstices between grains of quartz 2 throughout the deposit and mineral assemblages. The vertical-flow distribution of gold has been established in economic veins; the upper and middle levels are enriched in gold, and samples with the greatest gold grade of 100-500 g/t or higher are concentrated there. This is caused both by the predominance of mineral association II at these levels and probable natural flotation of gold grains contained in the gold-gas associate for immiscibility of the hydrothermal fluid at the second stage of the ore-forming process.

  13. A structural analysis of the Minas da Panasqueira vein network and related fracture generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Dominique; Vieira, Romeu; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    and tip lines, we try to sort out if a dominant σ2 propagation direction, typical for hydrofractures, exists within the vein network. By doing so, we can evaluate whether the subhorizontal vein network formed under a compressive stress regime, or was mainly dictated by the strength anisotropy of the rocks under near-isotropic stress conditions of σhmax ≡ σhmin. The regional dominance of subhorizontal aplites, pegmatites and hydrothermal veins, exploiting subhorizontal fracture networks, occurs over a wide area of more than 100 km2 along the Serra de Estrela granitic massif (Derré et al., 1986). This orientation contrasts with the more common vertical attitude of granite-related hydrothermal veins, observed throughout the Iberian massif. A detailed orientation analysis of the fracture sets should allow to explore the possible causes of this particular late orogenic, flat-lying fracture network related to the granitic intrusion. References Derré, C., Lecolle, M., Roger, G., Tavares de Freitas Carvalho, J., 1986. Tectonics, magmatism, hydrothermalism and sets of flat joints locally filled by Sn-W, aplite-pegmatite and quartz veins, southeastern border of the Serra de Estrela granitic massif (Beira Baixa, Portugal). Ore Geology Reviews 1, 43-56. Foxford, K. A., Nicholson, R., Polya, D. A., and Hebblethwaite, R. P. B., 2000. Extensional failure and hydraulic valving at Minas da Panasqueira, Portugal; evidence from vein spatial distributions, displacements and geometries. Journal of Structural Geology 22, 1065-1086.

  14. Quartz rheology from field observations and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigull, Susanne; Ellis, Susan M.; Little, Timothy A.; Hill, Matthew P.; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical properties of quartz strongly influence the strength of the continental crust and therefore the depth of the brittle-ductile transition and the nucleation depth of major earthquakes. Despite quartz being one of the most abundant minerals constituting the crust, natural examples to constrain quartz rheology are rare. Here, we present a brittle-ductile fault array in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and use it as a natural laboratory into the rheology of deformed quartz rocks. The faults formed in the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault during the late Cenozoic at ≥ 21 km depth. They are near-vertical, systematically and closely spaced, extend laterally and vertically over tens of metres, and strike sub-parallel to the Alpine Fault. They consistently express both dextral and NW-up senses of slip. The faults displace quartzofeldspathic meta-greywacke (Alpine Schist) through predominantly brittle processes. Brittle shearing usually ceases where the faults intersect centimetre-thick quartz veins that are hosted by the Alpine Schist and that are discordant to the dominant schist foliation. In these quartz veins shearing is variably ductile to brittle, with ductile shear strains of up to ~15 over shear zone widths of ~3 cm. We use field-observed geometrical scaling relationships related to the sheared quartz veins, such as ductile shear zone width vs. ductile slip, and interactions between brittle faults and ductilely deforming quartz veins that intersect them to produce a set of viable numerical models reflecting the field observations. Quartz rheology is modelled by linear or power law creep, and the material parameters extracted for the quartz veins, together with viscous and brittle strength ratios between vein quartz and schist. The results indicate that under the prevailing deformation conditions, the dominant deformation mechanism in the quartz veins was dislocation creep, resulting in a non-linear viscous quartz flow behaviour.

  15. The Benedikt hydrothermal system (north-eastern Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Peter; Eichinger, Lorenz; Kralj, Polona

    2009-10-01

    Deep welling in the Benedikt area has proven the existence of recently active hydrothermal system in pre-Tertiary basement composed of banded gneiss, marble and schist originating from a regionally metamorphosed sequence of clastic sediments. Two aquifers with very high fracture porosity were tapped—at depths between 1,485-1,530 and 1,848-1,857 m, where the welling stopped owing to a technical failure. The water temperature exceeds 90°C, while the yield of 100 l/s is limited only by the well performances. The Na-HCO3 dominated water is classified as a CO2-rich healing mineral water suitable for drinking, bottling and balneology. The free degassing gas is almost pure CO2 (99.9 %) and its δ13C composition indicates volcanic origin. The tapped water is relatively old, probably of Pleistocene age at least, and the planned exploitation must consider reinjection in order to protect this valuable natural resource from overexploitation. This recent hydrothermal system is characterised by dominating vertical circulation of waters and is superimposed on older, already inactive hydrothermal system(s), recognised by veins of either metal sulphides and quartz, or calcite. These vein minerals precipitated from hydrothermal fluids migrating from a deeper source towards the ancient surface through a fracture system, which is now self-sealed already. The distribution of metal sulphides indicates that the source might have been a deep-seated Neogene pluton genetically related to the tonalites and quartz diorites that outcrop in the Pohorje Mountains, or a subvolcanic-level volcanic body related to the Neogene volcanic activity in the Graz Basin.

  16. Hydrothermal uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite in the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rasmussen, J.D.; Steven, T.A.; Rye, R.O.; Rowley, P.D.; Romberger, S.B.; Selverstone, J.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite occur in the Central Mining Area, near Marysvale, Utah, and formed in an epithermal vein system that is part of a volcanic/hypabyssal complex. They represent a known, but uncommon, type of deposit; relative to other commonly described volcanic-related uranium deposits, they are young, well-exposed and well-documented. Hydrothermal uranium-bearing quartz and fluorite veins are exposed over a 300 m vertical range in the mines. Molybdenum, as jordisite (amorphous MoS2, together with fluorite and pyrite, increase with depth, and uranium decreases with depth. The veins cut 23-Ma quartz monzonite, 20-Ma granite, and 19-Ma rhyolite ash-flow tuff. The veins formed at 19-18 Ma in a 1 km2 area, above a cupola of a composite, recurrent, magma chamber at least 24 ?? 5 km across that fed a sequence of 21- to 14-Ma hypabyssal granitic stocks, rhyolite lava flows, ash-flow tuffs, and volcanic domes. Formation of the Central Mining Area began when the intrusion of a rhyolite stock, and related molybdenite-bearing, uranium-rich, glassy rhyolite dikes, lifted the fractured roof above the stock. A breccia pipe formed and relieved magmatic pressures, and as blocks of the fractured roof began to settle back in place, flat-lying, concave-downward, 'pull-apart' fractures were formed. Uranium-bearing, quartz and fluorite veins were deposited by a shallow hydrothermal system in the disarticulated carapace. The veins, which filled open spaces along the high-angle fault zones and flat-lying fractures, were deposited within 115 m of the ground surface above the concealed rhyolite stock. Hydrothermal fluids with temperatures near 200??C, ??18OH2O ~ -1.5, ?? -1.5, ??DH2O ~ -130, log fO2 about -47 to -50, and pH about 6 to 7, permeated the fractured rocks; these fluids were rich in fluorine, molybdenum, potassium, and hydrogen sulfide, and contained uranium as fluoride complexes. The hydrothermal fluids reacted with the wallrock resulting in

  17. Hydrothermal factors in porosity evolution and caprock formation at the Geysers steam field, California--insight from the Geysers Coring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1995-01-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/geothermal industry-sponsored Geysers Coring Project (GCP) has yielded 236.8 m of continuous core apparently spanning the transition between the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its caprock. Both zones in the corehole are developed in superficially similar, fractured, complexly veined and locally sericitized, Franciscan (late Mesozoic) graywacke-argillite sequences. However, whereas the reservoir rocks host two major fluid conduits (potential steam entries), the caprock is only sparingly permeable. This discrepancy appears to reflect principally vein texture and mineralogy. Two types of veins are common in the core--randomly-oriented, Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins; and high-angle, late Cenozoic veins deposited by The Geysers hydrothermal system. The older veins locally contain hydrothermal carbonate-dissolution vugs, which, although concentrated at the larger fluid conduit, are scattered throughout the core. The younger veins, commonly with intercrystalline vugs, consist dominantly of euhedral quartz, calcite, K-feldspar, wairakite, and pyrite--those in the reservoir rock also contain minor epidote and illite. The corresponding caprock veins are devoid of epidote but contain abundant, late-stage, mixed-layer illite/smecite (5-18% smectite interlayers) with minor chlorite/smectite (40-45% smectite interlayers). We suggest that clots of these two expandable clays in the caprock clog otherwise permeable veins and carbonate-dissolution networks at strategic sites to produce or enhance the seal on the underlying steam reservoir. Illite/smectite geothermometry indicates that the SB-15-D caprock clays were precipitated in the approximate temperature range 180-218 C, and those in the reservoir at about 218-238 C. These temperatures, along with occurrence of the clays on commonly etched calcite, K-feldspar, or wairakite, suggest that the clays were precipitated from mildly acidic steam condensate under conditions similar to

  18. Hydrothermal alteration, ore fluid characteristics, and gold depositional processes along a trondhjemite-komatiite contact at Tarmoola, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duuring, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Cassidy, K.F.; Johnson, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Tarmoola is a structurally controlled Archean orogenic gold deposit hosted in greenschist facies metamorphosed komatiite and trondhjemite in the Leonora district of the Eastern Goldfields province, Yilgarn craton. High-grade (>1 g/t Au) orebodies are located in komatiite wall rock adjacent to the eastern and northeastern margins of the asymmetrical, north-south-striking, Tarmoola trondhjemite intrusion. Gold-bearing veins post-date trondhjemite emplacement (ca. 2700 Ma), quartz diorite dikes (ca. 2667 Ma), and regional greenschist facies metamorphism. Textures and crosscutting relationships in gold-bearing veins indicate two stages of hydrothermal fluid infiltration associated with a single gold-related hydrothermal event: a volumetrically dominant, but gold-poor, stage I fluid and a gold-rich stage II fluid. Gold-bearing veins contain stage I milky quartz and pyrite that are overprinted by stage II quartz-ankerite-muscovite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-galena-gold-tellurides ?? albite ?? chlorite ?? fuchsite ?? epidote ?? scheelite. Stage I hydrothermal alteration assemblages are different in trondhjemite and komatiite due to contrasting reactions between a common ore fluid and disparate wall-rock chemistry. Stage II fluid-wall rock interaction was minor compared to stage I and is indicated by the overprinting of stage I mineral assemblages by stage II microveins. Wall-rock alteration proximal to veins in trondhjemite is characterized by replacement of igneous plagioclase, amphibole, biotite, and metamorphic chlorite by hydrothermal quartz, muscovite, ankerite, calcite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, tellurides, and gold, whereas in proximal alteration in komatiite, metamorphic chlorite and talc are replaced by ankerite, quartz, muscovite, albite, chlorite, fuchsite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, tellurides, and gold. The stage II fluid was enriched in H2O, CO2, Si, Ca, K, Na, S, Au, Ag, Cu, Pb, W, Bi, As, Mo, Zn, and Te. Based on fluid inclusion

  19. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  20. Shallow Hydrothermal Flow in a Strike-Slip Fault System, Mt Isa, Australia: A Proterozoic Analog for Modern Geothermal Systems Along Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M.

    2014-12-01

    Strong E-W shortening during the Isan Orogeny (1590-1500 Ma) led to crustal thickening and compressional inversion of former intracontinental rift basins. The resulting metamorphic/plutonic basement complex is disrupted by conjugate, mutually cross-cutting sets of brittle, late-orogenic strike-slip faults. Dextral strike-slip faults (separations < 25 km) strike NE-NNE, while conjugate sinistral faults strike SE-SSE, defining a wrench regime (σv = σ2) with horizontal maximum compression, σ1, trending c. 100°. The strike-slip faults are recessive except in dilational sites where upwelling hydrothermal fluids have silicified the cataclastic shear zones (CSZ) which protrude as blade-like ridges extending for kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. The mineralized fault segments include sinuous releasing bends where the fault trace is deflected <10° as well as more abrupt dilational stepovers with distributed extension fracturing linking en echelon fault segments. Other components of structural permeability include: (1) innumerable fault-parallel quartz-veins (cm to m thickness) within the CSZ; (2) irregular stringer veins; and (3) a regional set of predominantly extensional, subvertical planar quartz veins oriented 080-120° at moderate angles to the main faults. Broad contemporaneity is indicated by mutual cross-cutting relationships between all structural components. Measured strike separations along shear fractures are consistent with seismic slip increments which refreshed fracture permeability and promoted hydrothermal flow. Textures suggest the faults were exhumed from epithermal boiling environments (<1-2 km depth). Restoration of fault cohesive strength by hydrothermal cementation was critical in allowing continued vein formation by hydraulic extension fracturing. The distribution of hydrothermal quartz within the fault system provides a guide to structural localization of upflow zones in geothermal fields developed along strike-slip faults.

  1. Lithogeochemistry and fluid inclusions of an Au-Ag vein deposit in a granodiorite intrusive

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, R.; Ikramuddin, M.

    1985-01-01

    Forty-eight samples of altered and unaltered rocks and quartz veins from the Acme mine in northeast Washington, an Au-Ag vein deposit in a granodiorite intrusive, have been analyzed for SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Feo, MgO, CaO, Na/sub 2/O, K/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, MnO, P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, Ag, Au, Ba, Cu, Pb, Rb, Sr, Tl, and Zn. A comparison of major and trace elements shows that the altered granodiorite is enriched in SiO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, Ag, Au, Ba, Cu, Pb, Rb, Tl, and Zn and depleted in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, MnO, P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, and Sr. The average contents of Au in unaltered and altered granodiorite and quartz veins are 9 ppb. 270 ppb and 1020 ppb respectively. The average Ba/Tl ratio in the altered samples decrease and average Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios increase. K, Rb, and Tl are enriched in the altered granodiorite by factors of 1.5, 1.6, and 1.4 respectively. Tl is not enriched relative to Rb and K in the altered samples due to the high temperature of the deposit. The Ba/Tl, K/Tl and K/Rb ratios do not show complete separation of altered from unaltered samples. However, the Ba/Tl and K/Tl ratios in the quartz vein are significantly lower than the unaltered and altered granodiorite. This is due to the enrichment of Tl over K and Rb in the quartz veins. The Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios are higher in the altered granodiorite and quartz veins compared to unaltered samples. The enrichment of Tl and presence of low Ba/Tl and high Rb/Sr and Tl/Sr ratios in a granodiorite indicate that the rocks are hydrothermally altered and represent a possible Au-Ag target.

  2. Geology and hydrothermal alteration at the Madh adh Dhahab epithermal precious-metal deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, J.L.; LeAnderson, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Vein-related alteration consisting of quartz-sericite-pyrite, chloritic, argillic, and silicic halos was superimposed on broad zones of pervasive silicic, potassic, and argillic alteration that surrounds the rhyolite intrusive body. Quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration associated with the earliest stage of mineralization was followed by broad, pervasive, stratigraphically controlled potassic alteration. Subsequent mineralization was accompanied by quartz-sericitepyrite alteration and was followed by the main stage of mineralization that formed strong chloritic alteration halos. Development of broad zones and halos of argillic alteration also may have been related to the main stage of mineralization. Development of silicic halos was characteristic of the late stages of mineralization. Broad, pervasive propylitic alteration was then superimposed on all alteration types and represents cooling and inward encroachment of the hydrothermal system. All alteration, except the early silicic alteration is interpreted to have been related to circulating meteoric fluids heated by the rhyolite.

  3. Age and origin of base and precious metal veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Criss, R.E.; Eaton, G.F.; Cleland, R.W.; Wavra, C.S.; Bond, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Ore-bearing quartz-carbonate veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district yield 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.74 to >1.60 for low Rb/Sr, carbonate gangue minerals, similar to current ranges measured in Middle Proterozoic, high Rb/Sr rocks of the Belt Supergroup. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies establish a genetic relationship between vein formation and metamorphic-hydrothermal systems of the region. These extraordinary 87Sr/86Sr ratios require accumulation of radiogenic 87Sr in a high Rb/Sr system over an extended period prior to incorporation of Sr into the hydrothermal veins. Evaluation of the age and composition of potential sources of highly radiogenic Sr indicates that the ore-bearing veins of the Coeur d'Alene district formed during the Cretaceous from components scavenged from rocks of the Belt Supergroup, the primary host rocks of the district. Proterozoic Pb isotope ratios observed in galena from many Coeur d'Alene veins were established when Pb separated from uranium during deposition or diagenesis of the Belt Supergroup at 1400 to 1500 Ma, possibly as disseminated syngenetic deposits. K-Ar and Rb-Sr apparent ages and ??18O values of Belt Supergroup rocks decrease from the Coeur d'Alene district toward the Idaho and Kaniksu batholiths, approximately normal to the trends of metamorphic isograds, fold axes, foliation, and the major reverse faults of the district. Isoclinal folding, thrust faulting, high-temperature metamorphism, granitic plutonism, and regional-scale metamorphic-hydrothermal activity is documented in the region between 140 and 45 Ma, representing the only such combination of events in the Coeur d'Alene region subsequent to about 1300 Ma. The Sr and oxygen results and geologic evidence favor formation of the ore-bearing carbonate veins by fluids related to a complex metamorphic-hydrothermal system during the Cretaceous. Pb with Proterozoic isotopic compositions was probably mobilized and incorporated like other metals into the hydrothermal

  4. Mineralogy and stable isotope geochemistry of hydrothermally altered oceanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stakes, D.S.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mineralogical and isotopic variations observed in altered glassy and crystalline rocks from the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge provide information about the temperatures of alteration and seawater/rock ratios for various hydrothermal regimes within the oceanic crust. A systematic increase in alteration temperature is evident for the glassy rocks in the sequence: (1) nontronite and celadonite vesicle fillings (35??C), (2) saponite-rich pillow breccias (130-170??C), (3) calcite-rich greenstone breccias and epidote-rich greenstone (200-350??C). These results include the highest temperatures thus far reported for saponite formation. The "seawater-dominated" hydrothermal alteration process that formed the saponite-rich pillow breccias is characterized by high water/rock ratios (>50:1), low to moderate temperatures, a seawater origin of most of the carbon in vein calcites (??13 C ??? 0) and the predominance of Fe-rich saponite and calcite as secondary phases. Greenstones (chlorite-quartz-epidote) and greenstone breccias (chlorite-quartz-albite-calcite) are altered in a "rock-dominated" system with lower water/rock ratios (50:1 to < 1:1), higher temperatures, and vein calcites with carbon that is principally of magmatic origin (??13 C ??? -4). The crystalline rocks (diabase, gabrro, and metagabbro) are affected to varying degrees by pervasive high-temperature seawater interactions that commence soon after solidification, producing varying proportions of fine-grained secondary minerals including talc, smectite, chlorite, vermiculite, actinolite, and sodic plagioclase. Hydrothermal solutions, derived from alteration of the crystalline rocks, are of the appropriate temperature and isotopic composition to alter the overlying glassy rocks to the observed mineralogies as well as being the source of metal-rich deposits associated with the oceanic spreading centers. ?? 1982.

  5. Experimental and spectroscopic constraints on the solubility of hydroxyl in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovetta, Mark R.

    1989-06-01

    Treatment of natural quartz under hydrogen fugacities (ƒH 2) buffered by iron-wüstite-fluid (OH) or nickel-nickel oxide-fluid(OH) at 1.5 GPa and 900-1050°C introduces two types of hydroxyl defects into the mineral lattice: (1) interstitial protons screening Al in Si sites, giving rise to sharp IR peaks near 3400 cm -1, and (2) hydroxyl defects characteristic of synthetic quartz and amethyst, giving rise to sharp IR peaks near 3600 cm -1 and broad-band absorbance. The latter type of IR absorbance has been assigned to SiOH and H 2O defects believed to be responsible for the hydrolytic weakening of quartz single crystals. Quartz treated in H 2-buffered experiments at 900°C, 1.5 GPa, and ƒH 2 ≈ 15 MPa incorporated 10 2-10 3 OH per 10 6 Si in uncracked regions of the sample after 20 h of treatment. Unbuffered experiments performed by other investigators at 900°C, 1.5 GPa, and ƒH 2 < 0.05 MPa incorporated < 100 per OH 10 6 Si after treatment for 43 days and showed no spectroscopic evidence for the presence of SiOH or H 2O defects. A thermodynamic model is proposed for the formation of hydroxyl defects in quartz that can account for ƒH 2 dependence. Hydroxyl defects form by the diffusion of hydrogen into the quartz lattice and the subsequent reaction of hydrogen interstitials with lattice oxygen. No diffusion of oxygen is required; therefore, this mechanism can produce hydroxyl defects in quartz crystals without the additional assumption of H 2O transport through microfractures. Equilibrium concentrations of three model hydroxyl defects in quartz, [Si OOH] t, [(Al)' SiOOH] t, and [HOH] O, are calculated as functions of ƒH 2 and temperature at a total pressure of 1.5 GPa. Calculated X OH = ƒ(T, ƒ H2) surfaces fit experimental data from three laboratories and it is possible to attribute much interlaboratory variation to differences in experimental ƒH 2. Comparing the model with an empirical Al-quartz geothermometer shows that quartz from hydrothermal

  6. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other veins often mistaken for varicose veins are spider veins and reticular veins, which are the visible ... greenish-blue veins that appear in our legs. Spider veins or teleangiectesias are tiny veins that you ...

  7. Raman and micro-thermometric investigation of the fluid inclusions in quartz in a gold-rich formation from Lepaguare mining district (Honduras, Central America).

    PubMed

    Bersani, D; Salvioli-Mariani, E; Mattioli, M; Menichetti, M; Lottici, P P

    2009-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in the quartz crystals present in gold-rich veins from central Honduras have been studied by means of micro-thermometry and micro-Raman spectroscopy in order to provide information on the physico-chemical conditions and chemical composition of the mineralizing fluids. The use of a confocal micro-Raman apparatus allowed to obtain information on the fluid composition, in particular on the gas phase, minimizing the contributions of the host matrix to the Raman signal. The samples studied were collected from an area (Lepaguare mining district, Northern-Central Honduras) rich in ore deposits due to the Cenozoic magmatic activity, where the gold and sulphide mineralization is connected with a system of quartz veins (few decimetres thick) occurring in low-grade metamorphic rocks and produced by hydrothermal fluids. The quartz crystals present in the gold-rich veins often contain fluid inclusions. Four types of fluid inclusions have been observed, but their assemblage in the same clusters and fracture systems, as well as their comparable salinity and homogenization data, suggest that they have the same origin. Micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy provide a composition of the mineralizing fluids attributable to the system H(2)O-NaCl-KCl-CO(2)-CH(4), with temperature and pressure intervals of 210-413 degrees C and 1050-3850 bar, respectively. These data agree with an epigenetic origin of the gold deposit (depth < 6 km) related to granitoid or granodiorite intrusions associated to orogenic environments.

  8. Raman and micro-thermometric investigation of the fluid inclusions in quartz in a gold-rich formation from Lepaguare mining district (Honduras, Central America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, D.; Salvioli-Mariani, E.; Mattioli, M.; Menichetti, M.; Lottici, P. P.

    2009-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in the quartz crystals present in gold-rich veins from central Honduras have been studied by means of micro-thermometry and micro-Raman spectroscopy in order to provide information on the physico-chemical conditions and chemical composition of the mineralizing fluids. The use of a confocal micro-Raman apparatus allowed to obtain information on the fluid composition, in particular on the gas phase, minimizing the contributions of the host matrix to the Raman signal. The samples studied were collected from an area (Lepaguare mining district, Northern-Central Honduras) rich in ore deposits due to the Cenozoic magmatic activity, where the gold and sulphide mineralization is connected with a system of quartz veins (few decimetres thick) occurring in low-grade metamorphic rocks and produced by hydrothermal fluids. The quartz crystals present in the gold-rich veins often contain fluid inclusions. Four types of fluid inclusions have been observed, but their assemblage in the same clusters and fracture systems, as well as their comparable salinity and homogenization data, suggest that they have the same origin. Micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy provide a composition of the mineralizing fluids attributable to the system H 2O-NaCl-KCl-CO 2-CH 4, with temperature and pressure intervals of 210-413 °C and 1050-3850 bar, respectively. These data agree with an epigenetic origin of the gold deposit (depth < 6 km) related to granitoid or granodiorite intrusions associated to orogenic environments.

  9. Raman and micro-thermometric investigation of the fluid inclusions in quartz in a gold-rich formation from Lepaguare mining district (Honduras, Central America).

    PubMed

    Bersani, D; Salvioli-Mariani, E; Mattioli, M; Menichetti, M; Lottici, P P

    2009-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in the quartz crystals present in gold-rich veins from central Honduras have been studied by means of micro-thermometry and micro-Raman spectroscopy in order to provide information on the physico-chemical conditions and chemical composition of the mineralizing fluids. The use of a confocal micro-Raman apparatus allowed to obtain information on the fluid composition, in particular on the gas phase, minimizing the contributions of the host matrix to the Raman signal. The samples studied were collected from an area (Lepaguare mining district, Northern-Central Honduras) rich in ore deposits due to the Cenozoic magmatic activity, where the gold and sulphide mineralization is connected with a system of quartz veins (few decimetres thick) occurring in low-grade metamorphic rocks and produced by hydrothermal fluids. The quartz crystals present in the gold-rich veins often contain fluid inclusions. Four types of fluid inclusions have been observed, but their assemblage in the same clusters and fracture systems, as well as their comparable salinity and homogenization data, suggest that they have the same origin. Micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy provide a composition of the mineralizing fluids attributable to the system H(2)O-NaCl-KCl-CO(2)-CH(4), with temperature and pressure intervals of 210-413 degrees C and 1050-3850 bar, respectively. These data agree with an epigenetic origin of the gold deposit (depth < 6 km) related to granitoid or granodiorite intrusions associated to orogenic environments. PMID:19117796

  10. In search of early life: Carbonate veins in Archean metamorphic rocks as potential hosts of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Carl A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Webb, Gregory E.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; George, Simon C.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of early life signatures using hydrocarbon biomarkers in Precambrian rocks struggles with contamination issues, unspecific biomarkers and the lack of suitable sedimentary rocks due to extensive thermal overprints. Importantly, host rocks must not have been exposed to temperatures above 250 °C as at these temperatures biomarkers are destroyed. Here we show that Archean sedimentary rocks from the Jeerinah Formation (2.63 billion yrs) and Carawine Dolomite (2.55 billion yrs) of the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) drilled by the Agouron Institute in 2012, which previously were suggested to be suitable for biomarker studies, were metamorphosed to the greenschist facies. This is higher than previously reported. Both the mineral assemblages (carbonate, quartz, Fe-chlorite, muscovite, microcline, rutile, and pyrite with absence of illite) and chlorite geothermometry suggest that the rocks were exposed to temperatures higher than 300 °C and probably ∼400 °C, consistent with greenschist-facies metamorphism. This facies leads to the destruction of any biomarkers and explains why the extraction of hydrocarbon biomarkers from pristine drill cores has not been successful. However, we show that the rocks are cut by younger formation-specific carbonate veins containing primary oil-bearing fluid inclusions and solid bitumens. Type 1 veins in the Carawine Dolomite consist of dolomite, quartz and solid bitumen, whereas type 2 veins in the Jeerinah Formation consist of calcite. Within the veins fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures and calcite twinning geothermometry indicate maximum temperatures of ∼200 °C for type 1 veins and ∼180 °C for type 2 veins. Type 1 veins have typical isotopic values for reprecipitated Archean sea-water carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 3 ‰ to 0‰ and δ18OVPDB ranging from - 13 ‰ to - 7 ‰, while type 2 veins have isotopic values that are similar to hydrothermal carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 18

  11. Chabazite in spodumene-bearing Alpine-type fissure veins from Hiddenite, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael A.

    2009-07-01

    Alpine-type fissure vein mineralization in the Hiddenite area of western North Carolina, USA consists mostly of quartz, but locally contains Cr-bearing beryl (emerald) or Cr-bearing spodumene (hiddenite). These gem minerals occur in mineral-lined cavities and may be accompanied by euhedral crystals of quartz, calcite, muscovite, rutile, albite, pyrite, siderite and dolomite. Chabazite-Ca occurs as a late stage phase in spodumene-bearing veins, but is absent in emerald-bearing veins. Chabazite-Ca occurs as simple penetrating twins of pseudocubic rhombohedra and as the lens-shaped variety, phacolite. Chabazite-Ca from Hiddenite contains minor amounts of Na, Mg, Fe and K. Phacolitic chabazite-Ca shows Fe-enriched but Mg-depleted cores relative to the rims. Chemical zoning is absent in rhombohedral chabazite. The Hiddenite chabazite apparently precipitated under low temperature (< 250°C) and low pressure (< 2 kbar) conditions during the waning stages of crystallization of an alkaline hydrothermal fluid.

  12. AGE AND ORIGIN OF BASE- AND PRECIOUS-METAL VEINS OF THE COEUR D'ALENE MINING DISTRICT, IDAHO

    SciTech Connect

    Fleck, R J; Criss, R E; Eaton, G F; Cleland, R W; Wavra, C S; Bond, W D

    2000-11-07

    Ore-bearing quartz-carbonate veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district yield {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of 0.74 to >1.60 for low-Rb/Sr, carbonate gangue minerals, similar to current ranges measured in Middle Proterozoic, high-Rb/Sr rocks of the Belt Supergroup. Stable-isotope and fluid-inclusion studies establish a genetic relationship between vein formation and metamorphic-hydrothermal systems of the region. These extraordinary {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios require accumulation of radiogenic {sup 87}Sr in a high Rb/Sr system over an extended period prior to incorporation of Sr into the veins by hydrothermal processes. Evaluation of the age and composition of potential sources of highly radiogenic Sr indicates that the ore-bearing veins of the Coeur d'Alene district formed within the last 200 Ma from components scavenged from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Belt Supergroup, the primary host-rocks of the district. These results are consistent with a Cretaceous or Early Tertiary age for these veins. Pb-Zn deposits that yield Pb isotope, K-Ar, and Ar-Ar results indicative of a Proterozoic age probably formed during deposition or diagenesis of the Belt Supergroup at 1350-1500 Ma, possibly as Sullivan-type syngenetic deposits. K-Ar and Rb-Sr apparent ages and {delta}{sup 18}O values of Belt Supergroup rocks decrease southward from the Coeur d'Alene district toward the Idaho batholith, normal to the trends of metamorphic isograds, fold axes, foliation, and the major reverse faults of the district. Isoclinal folding, thrust faulting, high-temperature metamorphism, granitic plutonism, and regional-scale metamorphic-hydrothermal activity is documented in the region between 140 Ma and 45 Ma, but no similar combination of events is recognized for Late Proterozoic time. Combined with Sr results from the veins, the evidence strongly favors formation of the ore-bearing carbonate veins of the district by fluids related to a complex metamorphic-hydrothermal system

  13. Quartz ball value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Quartz ball valve consisting of two quartz joints sealed back-to-back and seated in quartz sockets perform at temperatures of up to 1,250 C and in corrosive chemical environments without contamination or degradation.

  14. Textural and structural evidence for a predeformation hydrothermal origin of the Tungsten Queen Deposit, Hamme District, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.; Slack, J.F.; Casadevall, T.

    1980-01-01

    The Hamme tungsten district is composed of a series of steeply dipping quartz-wolframite veins in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Veins are concentrated near the border of the lower Paleozoic Vance County pluton, along its western contact with green-schist-facies metapelites and metavolcanic rocks of the Carolina slate belt. One of these quartz veins, the Snead-Walker, hosts the Tungsten Queen deposit. The vein is 0 to 10 m thick and trends N 35 degrees E for approximately 3,500 m through slate belt rocks and the granitic pluton. The deposit has been worked to a depth of nearly 520 m and contains eight en echelon ore lodes that plunge 42 degrees to 65 degrees between S 10 degrees E and S 10 degrees W. Ore lodes commonly are encased in thin lenses of quartz-sericite greisen. The principal ore mineral is huebnerite and is accompanied by scattered occurrences of pyrite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, and tetrahedrite. The gangue is predominantly quartz with minor amounts of fluorite, sericite, and carbonate.Studies of minor structures and mineral textures indicate that both the wall rock and the ore and gangue minerals within the vein have been deformed by at least two events. The first event produced relatively gentle, open, and shallow-plunging folds; later, an intense episode of right-lateral shearing developed steeply plunging, tight folds and numerous northeast-trending shears. This latter deformation also developed a prominent alignment of ore and gangue minerals oblique to the vein walls and may have formed the en echelon distribution of ore lodes.In relatively undeformed parts of the vein, clusters of euhedral huebnerite crystals are oriented perpendicular to vein layering. Some prismatic crystals have terminations with cappings of sulfides and in polished thin section show concentric growth zones. These features are similar to textures found in unmetamorphosed tungsten-bearing hydrothermal vein deposits such as those at Pasto Bueno, Peru; Carrock Fell

  15. Stratigraphic development and hydrothermal activity in the central western Cascade Range, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, M.L.; Bull, M.K. ); Pollock, J.M. ); Thompson, G.D. )

    1990-11-10

    Two volcanic sequences bounded by erosional unconformities compose the stratigraphy of the North Santiam mining district, Western Cascade Range, Oregon. Diorite, grandodiorite, and leucocratic quartz porphyry dikes, stocks, and sills intrude the breccias, flows, and tuffs of a volcanic center in the older Sardine Formation. Tourmaline-bearing breccia pipes are associated with the porphyritic granodiorite intrusions. An erosional unconformity separates the Sardine Formation from the overlying Elk Lake formation. The alteration patterns in the two formations are consistent with the development of hydrothermal systems during the eruption of each formation. However, the development of the two hydrothermal systems is separated by a period of erosion of the older volcanic pile. Early formation of mineralization that resembles porphyry copper deposits occurred within the Sardine Formation, and later, after eruption of the Elk Lake formation, epithermal veins and alteration developed along faults, fractures, and the margins of dikes in the Sardine Formation.

  16. Timing of porphyry (Cu-Mo) and base metal (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) mineralisation in a magmatic-hydrothermal system—Morococha district, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Honza; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Bendezú, Aldo; Ovtcharova, Maria; Spikings, Richard; Stein, Holly; Fontboté, Lluís

    2015-12-01

    The Morococha district in central Peru is characterised by economically important Cordilleran polymetallic (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) vein and replacement bodies and the large Toromocho porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in its centre. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology data for various porphyry-related hydrothermal mineralisation styles record a 3.5-Ma multi-stage history of magmatic-hydrothermal activity in the district. In the late Miocene, three individual magmatic-hydrothermal centres were active: the Codiciada, Toromocho, and Ticlio centres, each separated in time and space. The Codiciada centre is the oldest magmatic-hydrothermal system in the district and consists of a composite porphyry stock associated with anhydrous skarn and quartz-molybdenite veins. The hydrothermal events are recorded by a titanite U-Pb age at 9.3 ± 0.2 Ma and a molybdenite Re-Os age at 9.26 ± 0.03 Ma. These ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages for porphyry intrusions of the composite stock and indicate a time span of 0.2 Ma for magmatic-hydrothermal activity. The small Ticlio magmatic-hydrothermal centre in the west of the district has a maximum duration of 0.3 Ma, ranging from porphyry emplacement to porphyry mineralisation at 8.04 ± 0.14 Ma (40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling age). The Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre has a minimum of five recorded porphyry intrusions that span a total of 1.3 Ma and is responsible for the formation of the giant Toromocho Cu-Mo deposit. At least two hydrothermal pulses are identified. Post-dating a first pulse of molybdenite mineralisation, wide-spread hydrous skarn covers an area of over 6 km2 and is recorded by five 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages at 7.2-6.8 Ma. These ages mark the end of the slowly cooling and long-lived Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre soon after last magmatic activity at 7.26 ± 0.02 Ma. District-wide (50 km2) Cordilleran base metal vein and replacement bodies post-date the youngest recorded porphyry mineralisation event at Toromocho

  17. Geology of the epithermal Ag-Au Huevos Verdes vein system and San José district, Deseado massif, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Andreas; Gutierrez, Ronald; Nelson, Eric P.; Layer, Paul W.

    2012-03-01

    The San José district is located in the northwest part of the Deseado massif and hosts a number of epithermal Ag-Au quartz veins of intermediate sulfidation style, including the Huevos Verdes vein system. Veins are hosted by andesitic rocks of the Bajo Pobre Formation and locally by rhyodacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Chon Aike Formation. New 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the age of host rocks and mineralization define Late Jurassic ages of 151.3 ± 0.7 Ma to 144.7 ± 0.1 Ma for volcanic rocks of the Bajo Pobre Formation and of 147.6 ± 1.1 Ma for the Chon Aike Formation. Illite ages of the Huevos Verdes vein system of 140.8 ± 0.2 and 140.5 ± 0.3 Ma are 4 m.y. younger than the volcanic host rock unit. These age dates are among the youngest reported for Jurassic volcanism in the Deseado massif and correlate well with the regional context of magmatic and hydrothermal activity. The Huevos Verdes vein system has a strike length of 2,000 m, with several ore shoots along strike. The vein consists of a pre-ore stage and three main ore stages. Early barren quartz and chalcedony are followed by a mottled quartz stage of coarse saccharoidal quartz with irregular streaks and discontinuous bands of sulfide-rich material. The banded quartz-sulfide stage consists of sulfide-rich bands alternating with bands of quartz and bands of chlorite ± illite. Late-stage sulfide-rich veinlets are associated with kaolinite gangue. Ore minerals are argentite and electrum, together with pyrite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, minor bornite, covellite, and ruby silver. Wall rock alteration is characterized by narrow (< 3 m) halos of illite and illite/smectite next to veins, grading outward into propylitic alteration. Gangue minerals are dominantly massive quartz intergrown with minor to accessory adularia. Epidote, illite, illite/smectite, and, preferentially at deeper levels, Fe-chlorite gangue indicate near-neutral pH hydrothermal fluids at temperatures of >220°C. Kaolinite occurring with

  18. Fluid inclusion and stable isotopes studies of epithermal gold-bearing veins in the SE Afar Rift (Djibouti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, N.; Boiron, M. C.; Grassineau, N.; Fouquet, Y.; Le Gall, B.; Mohamed, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Afar rift results from the interaction of a number of actively-propagating tectono-magmatic axes. Recent field investigations in the SE Afar rift have emphasized the importance of hydrothermal system in rift-related volcanic complexes. Mineralization occur as gold-silver bearing veins and are associated with felsic volcanism. Late carbonate veins barren of sulfides and gold are common. The morphologies and textures of quartz show crustiform colloform banding, massive and breccias. Microthermometric measurements were made on quartz-hosted two phases (liquid + vapor) inclusions; mean homogenization temperature range from 150°C to 340°C and ice-melting temperatures range from -0.2° to 1.6°C indicating that inclusion solutions are dilute and contain 0.35 to 2.7 equivalent wt. % NaCl. Furthermore, δ18O and δ13C values from calcite range from 3.7 to 26.6 ‰ and -7.5 to 0.3‰, respectively. The presence of platy calcite and adularia indicate that boiling condition existed. This study shows that precious-metal deposition mainly occurred from hydrothermal fluids at 200°C at around 300 and 450 m below the present-day surface in a typical low-sulphidation epithermal environment.

  19. The interplay of evolved seawater and magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in the 3.24 Ga panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide hydrothermal system, North Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drieberg, Susan L.; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Huston, David L.; Landis, Gary; Ryan, Chris G.; Van Achterbergh, Esmé; Vennemann, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The ~3240 Ma Panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) district is unusual for its high degree of exposure and low degree of postdepositional modification. In addition to typical seafloor VHMS deposits, this district contains greisen- and vein-hosted Mo-Cu-Zn-Sn mineral occurrences that are contemporaneous with VHMS orebodies and are hosted by the Strelley granite complex, which also drove VHMS circulation. Hence the Panorama district is a natural laboratory to investigate the role of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in VHMS hydrothermal systems. Regional and proximal high-temperature alteration zones in volcanic rocks underlying the VHMS deposits are dominated by chlorite-quartz ± albite assemblages, with lesser low-temperature sericite-quartz ± K-feldspar assemblages. These assemblages are typical of VHMS hydrothermal systems. In contrast, the alteration assemblages associated with granite-hosted greisens and veins include quartz-topaz-muscovite-fluorite and quartz-muscovite (sericite)-chlorite-ankerite. These vein systems generally do not extend into the overlying volcanic pile. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies suggest that the greisens were produced by high-temperature (~590°C), high-salinity (38–56 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids with high densities (>1.3 g/cm3) and high δ18O (9.3 ± 0.6‰). These fluids are compatible with the measured characteristics of magmatic fluids evolved from the Strelley granite complex. In contrast, fluids in the volcanic pile (including the VHMS ore-forming fluids) were of lower temperature (90°–270°C), lower salinity (5.0–11.2 wt % NaCl equiv), with lower densities (0.88–1.01 g/cm3) and lower δ18O (−0.8 ± 2.6‰). These fluids are compatible with evolved Paleoarchean seawater. Fluids that formed the quartz-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-cassiterite veins, which are present within the granite complex near the contact with the volcanic pile, were intermediate in temperature and isotopic composition between the greisen

  20. 43 CFR 3864.1-3 - Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Millsites for quartz mills or reduction... APPLICATIONS Millsite Patents § 3864.1-3 Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works. In case the owner of a quartz mill or reduction works is not the owner or claimant of a vein or lode claim the law permits...

  1. 43 CFR 3864.1-3 - Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Millsites for quartz mills or reduction... APPLICATIONS Millsite Patents § 3864.1-3 Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works. In case the owner of a quartz mill or reduction works is not the owner or claimant of a vein or lode claim the law permits...

  2. 43 CFR 3864.1-3 - Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Millsites for quartz mills or reduction... APPLICATIONS Millsite Patents § 3864.1-3 Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works. In case the owner of a quartz mill or reduction works is not the owner or claimant of a vein or lode claim the law permits...

  3. 43 CFR 3864.1-3 - Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Millsites for quartz mills or reduction... APPLICATIONS Millsite Patents § 3864.1-3 Millsites for quartz mills or reduction works. In case the owner of a quartz mill or reduction works is not the owner or claimant of a vein or lode claim the law permits...

  4. A Hydrothermal System Associated with the Siljan Impact Structure, Sweden-Implications for the Search for Fossil Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; von Dalwigk, Ilka; Broman, Curt

    2003-06-01

    The Siljan ring structure (368 +/- 1.1 Ma) is the largest known impact structure in Europe. It is a 65-km-wide, eroded, complex impact structure, displaying several structural units, including a central uplifted region surrounded by a ring-shaped depression. Associated with the impact crater are traces of a post-impact hydrothermal system indicated by precipitated and altered hydrothermal mineral assemblages. Precipitated hydrothermal minerals include quartz veins and breccia fillings associated with granitic rocks at the outer margin of the central uplift, and calcite, fluorite, galena, and sphalerite veins associated with Paleozoic carbonate rocks located outside the central uplift. Two-phase water/gas and oil/gas inclusions in calcite and fluorite display homogenization temperatures between 75°C and 137°C. With an estimated erosional unloading of ~1 km, the formation temperatures were probably not more than 10-15°C higher. Fluid inclusion ice-melting temperatures indicate a very low salt content, reducing the probability that the mineralization was precipitated during the Caledonian Orogeny. Our findings suggest that large impacts induce low-temperature hydrothermal systems that may be habitats for thermophilic organisms. Large impact structures on Mars may therefore be suitable targets in the search for fossil thermophilic organisms.

  5. Weathering of post-impact hydrothermal deposits from the Haughton impact structure: implications for microbial colonization and biosignature preservation.

    PubMed

    Izawa, M R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Osinski, G R; Flemming, R L; Parnell, J; Cockell, C S

    2011-01-01

    Meteorite impacts are among the very few processes common to all planetary bodies with solid surfaces. Among the effects of impact on water-bearing targets is the formation of post-impact hydrothermal systems and associated mineral deposits. The Haughton impact structure (Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, 75.2 °N, 89.5 °W) hosts a variety of hydrothermal mineral deposits that preserve assemblages of primary hydrothermal minerals commonly associated with secondary oxidative/hydrous weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral deposits at Haughton include intra-breccia calcite-marcasite vugs, small intra-breccia calcite or quartz vugs, intra-breccia gypsum megacryst vugs, hydrothermal pipe structures and associated surface "gossans," banded Fe-oxyhydroxide deposits, and calcite and quartz veins and coatings in shattered target rocks. Of particular importance are sulfide-rich deposits and their associated assemblage of weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages were characterized structurally, texturally, and geochemically with X-ray diffraction, micro X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Primary sulfides (marcasite and pyrite) are commonly associated with alteration minerals, including jarosite (K,Na,H(3)O)Fe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6), rozenite FeSO(4)·4(H(2)O), copiapite (Fe,Mg)Fe(4)(SO(4))(6)(OH)(2)·20(H(2)O), fibroferrite Fe(SO(4))(OH)·5(H(2)O), melanterite FeSO(4)·7(H(2)O), szomolnokite FeSO(4)·H(2)O, goethite α-FeO(OH), lepidocrocite γ-FeO(OH) and ferrihydrite Fe(2)O(3)·0.5(H(2)O). These alteration assemblages are consistent with geochemical conditions that were locally very different from the predominantly circumneutral, carbonate-buffered environment at Haughton. Mineral assemblages associated with primary hydrothermal activity, and the weathering products of such deposits, provide constraints on possible microbial activity in the post-impact environment. The initial period of

  6. Weathering of post-impact hydrothermal deposits from the Haughton impact structure: implications for microbial colonization and biosignature preservation.

    PubMed

    Izawa, M R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Osinski, G R; Flemming, R L; Parnell, J; Cockell, C S

    2011-01-01

    Meteorite impacts are among the very few processes common to all planetary bodies with solid surfaces. Among the effects of impact on water-bearing targets is the formation of post-impact hydrothermal systems and associated mineral deposits. The Haughton impact structure (Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, 75.2 °N, 89.5 °W) hosts a variety of hydrothermal mineral deposits that preserve assemblages of primary hydrothermal minerals commonly associated with secondary oxidative/hydrous weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral deposits at Haughton include intra-breccia calcite-marcasite vugs, small intra-breccia calcite or quartz vugs, intra-breccia gypsum megacryst vugs, hydrothermal pipe structures and associated surface "gossans," banded Fe-oxyhydroxide deposits, and calcite and quartz veins and coatings in shattered target rocks. Of particular importance are sulfide-rich deposits and their associated assemblage of weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages were characterized structurally, texturally, and geochemically with X-ray diffraction, micro X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Primary sulfides (marcasite and pyrite) are commonly associated with alteration minerals, including jarosite (K,Na,H(3)O)Fe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6), rozenite FeSO(4)·4(H(2)O), copiapite (Fe,Mg)Fe(4)(SO(4))(6)(OH)(2)·20(H(2)O), fibroferrite Fe(SO(4))(OH)·5(H(2)O), melanterite FeSO(4)·7(H(2)O), szomolnokite FeSO(4)·H(2)O, goethite α-FeO(OH), lepidocrocite γ-FeO(OH) and ferrihydrite Fe(2)O(3)·0.5(H(2)O). These alteration assemblages are consistent with geochemical conditions that were locally very different from the predominantly circumneutral, carbonate-buffered environment at Haughton. Mineral assemblages associated with primary hydrothermal activity, and the weathering products of such deposits, provide constraints on possible microbial activity in the post-impact environment. The initial period of

  7. Hydrothermal alteration in basalts from Vargeão impact structure, south Brazil, and implications for recognition of impact-induced hydrothermalism on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Elder; Nédélec, Anne; Baratoux, David; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Fabre, Sébastien; Berger, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    The 12-km-wide Vargeão impact structure was formed 123 Myr ago in the Paraná basaltic province (southern Brazil). At this time the province region had a dry climate, although a large brackish aquifer had been formed in the underlying sandstones. It is therefore one of the best terrestrial analogs for studying impact-related products on a dry martian surface environment with preserved ice-rich ground. The basalts within the impact structure display cm-sized breccia veins filled with lithic clasts, glassy remnants, newly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides and secondary phases, such as calcite, phyllosilicates and, subordinately quartz and zeolite. The textural and mineralogical study of these phases demonstrate their hydrothermal origin. Although the very center of the structure has experienced the highest pressures and temperatures, the most developed hydrothermal changes are recognized in an inner collar surrounding the central depression. This inner collar is also the location of major modifications of the rock magnetic properties. These magnetic signatures are related to the distribution of impact-related faults and to the formation of new iron oxides. Geochemical modeling indicate that hydrothermal phases formation required low water/rock ratios. Our observations therefore suggest that hydrothermal alteration took place following the perturbation of the aquifer by the impact, but evidence for hydrothermal circulation is limited in comparison with other impact-related hydrothermal systems. This situation may be explained by the presence of the aquifer below the heat source, such a setting being exceptional for the Earth, but common on Mars. However, the spectroscopic signatures in visible/near infrared images suggest that this kind of impact-related hydrothermal alteration may be still indentified in large impact craters on Mars by orbital instruments. These results does not exclude the possibility that more developed alteration took place in breccias that are today

  8. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor if you think you have them. Spider Veins Spider veins are a smaller version of varicose veins and a less serious type of telangiectasias. Spider veins involve the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels ...

  9. Hydrothermal alteration features in the Vargeão basaltic impact structure (South Brazil): Implications about the presence of liquid water in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, E.; Nédélec, A.; Baratoux, D.; Berger, G.; Trindade, R. I.

    2013-05-01

    This study presents new petrological data about the hydrothermal fluid percolation in impact craters. Impact cratering process is of primary importance in the evolution of solid bodies of the Solar System. However, impact craters on basaltic rocks, which are the best analog for the surface of other planets and satellites, are rare on Earth. Recently, one medium-size complex crater was identified on volcanic rocks of the Paraná basin (south Brazil), providing an additional analog for the craters of most rocky planets and satellites. The 12 km wide Vargeão is a complex impact structure formed on volcanics rocks of the Serra Geral Formation (about 133-131 Ma), which are locally intertrapped by aeolian-sandstones of Botucatu Formation. Vargeão is morphologically characterized by a well-preserved rim and a smoothed central uplift. The rim region is characterized by concentric gravitational faults that affect tholeiitic basalt flows hundreds of meters thick and rhyodacites few tens of meters thick. Associated with these faults occur the formation of local networks of small red breccia veins. The central uplift has fractured basaltic rocks that contain a lot of red oxidized breccias veins cutted by some white veins. This study is focused on the petrogenesis of these centimeter breccia veins that are found in all lithologies. We conducted a detailed petrological study (petrography, microprobe, SEM, Raman spectroscopy, Magnetic data, Spectroscopy of reflectance and XRD) on these veins and their host-rocks. Our results show that the veins were strongly affected by the post-impact hydrothermal fluids. The hydrothermal alteration varies geographically in the structure. On the rim area this alteration consists of total or partial substitution of the melt matrix by quartz, calcite, iron oxides, zeolites and clay minerals. At the central area, the alteration mineral assembly is composed of quartz, iron oxides, zeolites, clay minerals and rarely calcite. Usually, the alteration

  10. Reconstructing the oxygen isotope composition of late Cambrian and Cretaceous hydrothermal vent fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Shaun T.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Coggon, Rosalind M.; Chi, Guoxiang; Bédard, Jean H.; Skulski, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses (δ18O) of 16 quartz-epidote pairs from late Cambrian (Betts Cove and Mings Bight, Newfoundland), Ordovician (Thetford Mines, Québec, Canada) and Cretaceous (Troodos, Cyprus) ophiolites are used to calculate the δ18O of the hydrothermal fluids from which they crystallized. We combine these with 3 quartz-fluid inclusion measurements and 3 quartz-magnetite measurements from the Cambrian ophiolites to explore how the range in the δ18O of submarine hydrothermal vent fluid has varied between the late Cambrian, Cretaceous and today. The range of calculated δ18O values of vent fluid (-4 to +7.4) is larger than that of modern seafloor hydrothermal vent fluid (0 to +4). We employ two numerical models to ascertain whether this range is most consistent with changes in paleo-seawater δ18O or with changes in the reactive flow path in ancient hydrothermal systems. A static calculation of the vent fluid oxygen isotope composition as a function of the water-rock ratio suggests that in an ocean with a lower δ18O than today, the range of vent fluid δ18O should be larger. Our data, however, show little evidence that the δ18O of the ocean was much lower than the global ice-free value of -1.2. A dual porosity model for reactive flow through fractured and porous media is used to model the relative evolution of the 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O of vent fluid in contact with rock. Our 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O for Cretaceous epidotes suggest the strontium concentration of the Cretaceous oceans may have been much higher than at present. The 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O data from Cambrian epidotes are strikingly different from the younger samples, and are difficult to model unless fluid-rock interaction in the Cambrian hydrothermal systems was substantially different. It is also possible that some of the quartz-epidote veins have been reset by obduction-related metamorphism. Our data suggest that the high calcium-to-sulfate ratio in early (and Cretaceous) seawater may have affected

  11. Mass change calculations of hydrothermal alterations within the volcanogenic metasediments hosted Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization at Halilar area, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Abdelnasser, Amr; Doner, Zeynep; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The Halilar Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization that is formed in the volcanogenic metasediments of Bagcagiz Formation at Balikesir province, NW Turkey, represents locally vein-type deposit as well as restricted to fault gouge zone directed NE-SW along with the lower boundary of Bagcagiz Formation and Duztarla granitic intrusion in the study area. Furthermore, This granite is traversed by numerous mineralized sheeted vein systems, which locally transgress into the surrounding metasediments. Therefore, this mineralization closely associated with intense hydrothermal alteration within brecciation, and quartz stockwork veining. The ore mineral assemblage includes chalcopyrite, galena, and some sphalerite with covellite and goethite formed during three phases of mineralization (pre-ore, main ore, and supergene) within an abundant gangue of quartz and calcite. The geologic and field relationships, petrographic and mineralogical studies reveal two alteration zones occurred with the Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization along the contact between the Bagcagiz Formation and Duztarla granite; pervasive phyllic alteration (quartz, sericite, and pyrite), and selective propylitic alteration (albite, calcite, epidote, sericite and/or chlorite). This work, by using the mass balance calculations, reports the mass/volume changes (gain and loss) of the chemical components of the hydrothermal alteration zones associated with Halilar Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization at Balikesir area (Turkey). It revealed that the phyllic alteration has enrichments of Si, Fe, K, Ba, and LOI with depletion of Mg, Ca, and Na reflect sericitization of alkali feldspar and destruction of ferromagnesian minerals. This zone has high Cu and Pb with Zn contents represents the main mineralized zone. On the other hand, the propylitic zone is characterized by addition of Ca, Na, K, Ti, P, and Ba with LOI and Cu (lower content) referring to the replacement of plagioclase and ferromagnesian minerals by albite, calcite, epidote, and sericite

  12. Gold Veins near Great Falls, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John Calvin, Jr.; Reed, John C.

    1969-01-01

    Small deposits of native gold are present along an anastomosing system of quartz veins and shear zones just east of Great Falls, Montgomery County, Md. The deposits were discovered in 1861 and were worked sporadically until 1951, yielding more than 5,000 ounces of gold. The vein system and the principal veins within it strike a few degrees west of north, at an appreciable angle to foliation and fold axial planes in enclosing rocks of the Wissahickon Formation of late Precambrian (?) age. The veins cut granitic rocks of Devonian or pre-Devonian age and may be as young as Triassic. Further development of the deposits is unlikely under present economic conditions because of their generally low gold content and because much of the vein system lies on park property, but study of the Great Falls vein system may be useful in the search for similar deposits elsewhere in the Appalachian Piedmont.

  13. Paired stable isotopes (O, C) and clumped isotope thermometry of magnesite and silica veins in the New Caledonia Peridotite Nappe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Benoît; Boulvais, Philippe; Gautier, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; John, Cédric M.; Dierick, Malorie; Agrinier, Pierre; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    The stable isotope compositions of veins provide information on the conditions of fluid-rock interaction and on the origin of fluids and temperatures. In New Caledonia, magnesite and silica veins occur throughout the Peridotite Nappe. In this work, we present stable isotope and clumped isotope data in order to constrain the conditions of fluid circulation and the relationship between fluid circulation and nickel ore-forming laterization focusing on the Koniambo Massif. For magnesite veins occurring at the base of the nappe, the high δ18O values between 27.8‰ and 29.5‰ attest to a low temperature formation. Clumped isotope analyses on magnesite give temperatures between 26 °C and 42 °C that are consistent with amorphous silica-magnesite oxygen isotope equilibrium. The meteoric origin of the fluid is indicated by calculated δ18Owater values between -3.4‰ to +1.5‰. Amorphous silica associated with magnesite or occurring in the coarse saprolite level displays a narrow range of δ18O values between 29.7‰ and 35.3‰. For quartz veins occurring at the top of the bedrock and at the saprolite level, commonly in association with Ni-talc-like minerals, the δ18O values are lower, between 21.8‰ and 29.0‰ and suggest low-temperature hydrothermal conditions (∼40-95 °C). Thermal equilibration of the fluid along the geothermic gradient before upward flow through the nappe and/or influence of exothermic reactions of serpentinization could be the source(s) of heat needed to form quartz veins under such conditions.

  14. The Marianas-San Marcos vein system: characteristics of a shallow low sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit in the Cerro Negro district, Deseado Massif, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Conrado Permuy; Guido, Diego M.; Jovic, Sebastián M.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Moncada, Daniel; Melgarejo, Joan Carles; Hames, Willis

    2016-08-01

    The Cerro Negro district, within the Argentinian Deseado Massif province, has become one of the most significant recent epithermal discoveries, with estimated reserves plus resources of ˜6.7 Moz Au equivalent. The Marianas-San Marcos vein system contains about 70 % of the Au-Ag resources in the district. Mineralization consists of Upper Jurassic (155 Ma) epithermal Au- and Ag-rich veins of low to intermediate sulfidation style, hosted in and genetically related to Jurassic intermediate composition volcanic rocks (159-156 Ma). Veins have a complex infill history, represented by ten stages with clear crosscutting relationships that can be summarized in four main episodes: a low volume, metal-rich initial episode (E1), an extended banded quartz episode with minor mineralization (E2), a barren waning stage episode (E3), and a silver-rich late tectonic-hydrothermal episode (E4). The first three episodes are interpreted to have formed at the same time and probably from fluids of similar composition: a 290-230 °C fluid dominated by meteoric and volcanic waters (-3‰ to -0‰ δ18Owater), with <3 % NaCl equivalent salinity and with a magmatic source of sulfur (-1 to -2 ‰ δ34Swater). Metal was mainly precipitated at the beginning of vein formation (episode 1) due to a combination of boiling at ˜600 to 800 m below the paleowater table, and associated mixing/cooling processes, as evidenced by sulfide-rich bands showing crustiform-colloform quartz, adularia, and chlorite-smectite banding. During episodes 2 and 3, metal contents progressively decrease during continuing boiling conditions, and veins were filled by quartz and calcite during waning stages of the hydrothermal system, and the influx of bicarbonate waters (-6 to -8.5 ‰ δ18Owater). Hydrothermal alteration is characterized by proximal illite, adularia, and silica zone with chlorite and minor epidote, intermediate interlayered illite-smectite and a distal chlorite halo. This assemblage is in agreement with

  15. Characterization and modeling of illite crystal particles and growth mechanisms in a zoned hydrothermal deposit, Lake City, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, D.J.; Eberl, D.D.; McCarty, D.K.; Meeker, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Mean thickness measurements and crystal-thickness distributions (CTDs) of illite particles vary systematically with changes in hydrothermal alteration type, fracture density, and attendant mineralization in a large acid-sulfate/Mo-porphyry hydrothermal system at Red Mountain, near Lake City, Colorado. The hydrothermal illites characterize an extensive zone of quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration beneath two deeply rooted bodies of magmatic-related, quartz-alunite altered rock. Nineteen illites from a 3000 ft vertical drill hole were analyzed by XRD using the PVP-10 intercalation method and the computer program MudMaster (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique). Mean crystallite thicknesses, as determined from 001 reflections, range from 5-7 nanometers (nm) at depths from 0-1700 ft, then sharply increase to 10-16 nm at depths between 1800-2100 ft, and decrease again to 4-5 nm below this level. The interval of largest particle thickness correlates strongly with the zone of most intense quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration (QSP) and attendant high-density stockwork fracturing, and with the highest concentrations of Mo within the drill core. CTD shapes for the illite particles fall into two main categories: asymptotic and lognormal. The shapes of the CTDs are dependent on conditions of illite formation. The asymptotic CTDs correspond to a nucleation and growth mechanism, whereas surface-controlled growth was the dominant mechanism for the lognormal CTDs. Lognormal CTDs coincide with major through-going fractures or stockwork zones, whereas asymptotic CTDs are present in wallrock distal to these intense fracture zones. The increase in illite particle size and the associated zone of intense QSP alteration and stockwork veining was related by proximity to the dacitic magma(s), which supplied both reactants and heat to the hydrothermal system. However, no changes in illite polytype, which in other studies reflect temperature transitions, were observed within this interval.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  17. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  18. Quartz-calcite oxygen isotope thermometry: A calibration based on natural isotopic variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Kirschner, D. L.

    1994-10-01

    An empirical calibration for the quartz-calcite thermometer was derived from measured Δ18O( qz- cc) values from greenschist-facies marbles, veins composed of cogenetic quartz and calcite and various low-grade metamorphic rocks. The Δ18O( qz- cc) values vary systematically with independently determined formation temperature and can be fit to the expression 1000 ln α( qz- cc) = 0.87(±0.06) × 10 6/ T2. In contrast, published results from direct-exchange experiments between calcite and quartz are 1000 ln α( qz- cc) = 0.38(±0.06) × 10 6/ T2, far smaller than in the present study. Application of the experimental mineral-water and especially the direct-exchange calibrations to natural samples, yields unreasonably low geological temperatures. It is difficult to envision a mechanism whereby the measured fractionations in greenschist-grade marbles can be reconciled with the very low temperature estimates obtained with the direct-exchange experimental calibration. Oxygen diffusion rates in quartz are too slow to explain the discrepancy. Postmetamorphic exchange could have occurred with a hydrothermal fluid, but it is unlikely that the δ18O( calcite) values of all samples would be shifted by an amount that would result in a linear relationship between 1000 ln α( qz- cc) and T-2. More likely, the discrepancy is due to a kinetic effect in the experiments. The very small fractionations observed in the direct-exchange experiments may have been caused by diffusion-related effects during recrystallization of the quartz and calcite. The problem of recrystallization is eliminated in mineral-CO 2 exchange experiments. Combined CO 2-calcite and CO 2-quartz glass experiments yield the expression 1000 ln α (qz-cc) = 0.78 ( 0¯.08) , in good agreement with the empirical calibration. The new empirical calibration yields reasonable temperature estimates for a wide range of samples and can be used for thermometry in rock types and over temperature intervals where other quantitative

  19. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose ...

  20. Fluid inclusion petrography and microthermometry of the Cocos Ridge hydrothermal system, IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2), Site U1414

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, J.; Kurz, W.; Krenn, K.; Micheuz, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present new data from microthermometric analyses of fluid inclusions entrapped in hydrothermal veins within lithified sediments and Cocos Ridge (CCR) basalt from IODP Expedition 344 site U1414 (Costa Rica) and concern on a primary task of Expedition 344, i.e. to evaluate fluid/rock interaction, the hydrologic system, and the geochemical processes (indicated by composition and volume of fluids) active within the incoming Cocos Plate. Mineralization of the veins and crosscutting relationships gives constraints for the different generation of veins. Calcium carbonate, commonly aragonite in the upper part and calcite in the lower part of the igneous basement, is usually present in veins as a late phase following the quartz precipitation and the clay minerals formation. The sequence of vein generations in the lithified sediments close to the contact within the CCR basalt is characterized by smaller veins filled by quartz, followed by massive intersecting calcite veins. A high fluid pressure can be concluded, due to wall rock fragments embedded within the filling and fractured mineral grains in the ground mass, which are close to the veins. This requires that the magmatic basement and the lithified sediments were covered by sequences of low permeability sediments forming a barrier that enabled build up elevated fluid pressure. The investigation of fluid inclusions in the lowest units of borehole 344-U1414, give clues about the source of the fluids and about the vein evolution within the incoming Cocos Plate close to Middle American Trench. The microthermometric analyses of the primary, almost aqueous, inclusions indicate a temperature range during entrapment between 200 and 420°C. The data indicate that seawater within the Cocos Ridge aquifer communicated with high-temperature fluids and/or were modified by heat advection. We consider the Galapagos hotspot and/ or the Cocos-Nazca spreading center as heat source. Fluids originated from mobilized sediment pore water

  1. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  2. The anatomy of a hydrothermal (explosion ) breccia, Abbot Village, central Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    An apparently intrusive hydrothermal breccia is exposed in a large outcrop along Kingsbury Stream downstream from the Route 6 bridge in Abbot Village. The breccia intrudes the Siluro-Devonian Madrid Formation which is comprised of thick-bedded metasandstone interbedded with less fine-grained schist and phyllite at regional biotite grade. In the vicinity of the breccia, the bedding attitude in the Madrid is N60E 70SE and the section faces SE. The breccia is a concordant body with respect to bedding and the exposure shows what appears to the SW terminus of the intrusion which extends an unknown distance NE. The main phase of the breccia consists of randomly oriented and angular clasts'' of Madrid metasandstone and schist that are cemented by a quartz-dominated matrix. The random orientation of the clasts is present this phase were it is in contact with the country rock. The matrix comprises about 15% of the volume of the breccia and, in addition to quartz, contains biotite, galena, chalcopyrite ( ), pyrite, and an iron-carbonate. In some interstitial matrix, apparently late iron-carbonate fills post-quartz vugs that contain quartz-crystal terminations. The wall phase contains a higher proportion of biotite schist clasts that in places are bent around each other and metasandstone clasts. Quartz veins extending into the country rock near the breccia follow prominent regional joint directions and suggest hydrofracturing of the Madrid was the principal mechanism for breccia formation. The breccia is interpreted to be of explosive origin with the main phase of the body representing clasts that fell down within the vent'' following upward transport. The wall phase is taken to have formed due to adhesion to the wall of breccia clasts during the eruptive stage.

  3. Lineation-parallel c-axis Fabric of Quartz Formed Under Water-rich Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Li, P.

    2014-12-01

    The crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz is of great significance because it records much valuable information pertinent to the deformation of quartz-rich rocks in the continental crust. The lineation-parallel c-axis CPO (i.e., c-axis forming a maximum parallel to the lineation) in naturally deformed quartz is generally considered to form under high temperature (> ~550 ºC) conditions. However, most laboratory deformation experiments on quartzite failed to produce such a CPO at high temperatures up to 1200 ºC. Here we reported a new occurrence of the lineation-parallel c-axis CPO of quartz from kyanite-quartz veins in eclogite. Optical microstructural observations, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) techniques were integrated to illuminate the nature of quartz CPOs. Quartz exhibits mostly straight to slightly curved grain boundaries, modest intracrystalline plasticity, and significant shape preferred orientation (SPO) and CPOs, indicating dislocation creep dominated the deformation of quartz. Kyanite grains in the veins are mostly strain-free, suggestive of their higher strength than quartz. The pronounced SPO and CPOs in kyanite were interpreted to originate from anisotropic crystal growth and/or mechanical rotation during vein-parallel shearing. FTIR results show quartz contains a trivial amount of structurally bound water (several tens of H/106 Si), while kyanite has a water content of 384-729 H/106 Si; however, petrographic observations suggest quartz from the veins were practically deformed under water-rich conditions. We argue that the observed lineation-parallel c-axis fabric in quartz was inherited from preexisting CPOs as a result of anisotropic grain growth under stress facilitated by water, but rather than due to a dominant c-slip. The preservation of the quartz CPOs probably benefited from the preexisting quartz CPOs which renders most quartz grains unsuitably oriented for an easy a-slip at

  4. Controls to hydrothermal gold mineralization in the Witwatersberg Goldfield; situated in the floor to the south of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killick, A. M.; Scheepers, R.

    2005-02-01

    An exploration programme over the Blaauwbank group of gold deposits in the Witwatersberg Goldfield, which lies to the south and in the footwall of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, has shown that these deposits possess many similarities and some differences to turbidite-hosted gold deposits. The dominant control to this hydrothermal mineralization is structural, with the associated quartz veins being localized along bedding planes, fold axes and a variety of semi-ductile to brittle faults. The deposits of the Witwatersberg Goldfield are also preferentially located in the Klapperkop Quartzite Member and overlying shales of the Timeball Hill Formation, Transvaal Supergroup. The rocks do not appear to form a particularly favourable protore but rather represent a favourable depositional site. The competency contrast of the shales, siltstones and sandstones in this stratigraphic interval is regarded as being important in facilitating vein formation, and the zone is also characterized by a high Fe 2+/Fe 3+ ratio and high C content, which may have reduced the mineralizing fluids and caused gold to precipitate. Fluid inclusion data show the quartz veins formed at 250-330 °C and pressures of 1.3-1.75 kb, from CaCl 2-rich brines. Comparison with structural studies to the north and with the Sabie-Pilgrim's Rest Goldfield to the east suggest that the mineralization probably predates the peak of metamorphism related to the intrusion of the Bushveld Complex.

  5. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  6. Tectonic record, magmatic history and hydrothermal alteration in the Hercynian Guérande leucogranite, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballouard, C.; Boulvais, P.; Poujol, M.; Gapais, D.; Yamato, P.; Tartèse, R.; Cuney, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Guérande peraluminous leucogranite was emplaced at the end of the Carboniferous in the southern part of the Armorican Massif. At the scale of the intrusion, this granite displays structural heterogeneities with a weak deformation in the southwestern part, whereas the northwestern part is marked by the occurrence of S/C and mylonitic extensional fabrics. Quartz veins and pegmatite dykes orientations as well as lineations directions in the granite and its country rocks demonstrate both E-W and N-S stretching. Therefore, during its emplacement in an extensional tectonic regime, the syntectonic Guérande granite has probably experienced some partitioning of the deformation. The southwestern part is characterized by a muscovite-biotite assemblage, the presence of restites and migmatitic enclaves, and a low abundance of quartz veins compared to pegmatite dykes. In contrast, the northwestern part is characterized by a muscovite-tourmaline assemblage, evidence of albitization and gresenization and a larger amount of quartz veins. The southwestern part is thus interpreted as the feeding zone of the intrusion whereas the northwestern part corresponds to its apical zone. The granite samples display continuous compositional evolutions in the range of 69.8-75.3 wt.% SiO2. High initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and low εNd(T) values suggest that the peraluminous Guérande granite (A/CNK > 1.1) was formed by partial melting of metasedimentary formations. Magmatic evolution was controlled primarily by fractional crystallization of K-feldspar, biotite and plagioclase (An20). The samples from the apical zone show evidence of secondary muscovitization. They are also characterized by a high content in incompatible elements such as Cs and Sn, as well as low Nb/Ta and K/Rb ratios. The apical zone of the Guérande granite underwent a pervasive hydrothermal alteration during or soon after its emplacement. U-Th-Pb dating on zircon and monazite revealed that the Guérande granite was emplaced

  7. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  8. Vacuum electrolysis of quartz

    DOEpatents

    King, James Claude

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure is directed to a method for processing quartz used in fabricating crystal resonators such that transient frequency change of resonators exposed to pulse irradiation is virtually eliminated. The method involves heating the crystal quartz in a hydrogen-free atmosphere while simultaneously applying an electric field in the Z-axis direction of the crystal. The electric field is maintained during the cool-down phase of the process.

  9. Origin of alternate amphibole and quartz rich bands in amphibole bearing quartzite from North Khetri Copper Belt, Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J.; Baidya, A. S.; Pal, D. D. C.

    2015-12-01

    North Khetri Copper Belt (NKCB), located in the northern part of Western Indian shield, is one of most important copper repositories in India. Mineralization is hosted by quartzite containing abundant amphibole in the form of alternation of amphibole ± albite and quartz ± albite bands. In a succession near Chandmari mine of NKCB, this thick banded unit is laterally extended over few hundreds of meters. Band thickness varies from few millimetres to tens of centimetres. Such banding (commonly appearing as gneissic banding) of amphibole ± albite is unlikely to be generated in a quartzo-feldspathic rock metamorphosed at lower amphibolite facies. Amphibole, under microscope, shows pleochroism in shades of green. Their grains are inclusion free and do not show any orientation. From major oxide analysis, their average composition is found to be Ca2Mg2.5Fe2+1.5Fe3+0.5Al1.5Si7O22(OH)2. Forming Fe-Mg rich amphibole in a quartzo-feldspathic unit is again challenging its metamorphic origin. Also, amphibole of same composition found in the form of veins within the host rock. All these observations inferring that the amphibole is probably of hydrothermal origin. Albite in host rock can supply Si, Al and O. If a fluid containing Fe, Mg and Ca intrudes into the host rock, the amphibole of desirable composition may form. However, such alternating banding of amphibole ± albite and quartz ± albite is enigmatic. It is possible that the banded nature is inherited from an existing banded rock with different mineralogy and mineral solubility, e.g. alternation of impure/siliceous carbonate and siliciclastic rocks. Presence of carbonate, mainly dolomite, has been reported early and also observed in field. When a hydrothermal fluid, containing some Fe, had invaded this unit, it reacted with carbonate units and replaced the carbonate by amphibole. This will result in amphibole of expected composition and will also mimic the inherited banded nature in original succession. Reaction will

  10. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    and vein-fi lling; and (5) areal dimensions of many large hydrothermal explosion craters in Yellowstone are similar to those of its active geyser basins and thermal areas. For Yellowstone, our knowledge of hydrothermal craters and ejecta is generally limited to after the Yellowstone Plateau emerged from beneath a late Pleistocene icecap that was roughly a kilometer thick. Large hydrothermal explosions may have occurred earlier as indicated by multiple episodes of cementation and brecciation commonly observed in hydrothermal ejecta clasts. Critical components for large, explosive hydrothermal systems include a watersaturated system at or near boiling temperatures and an interconnected system of well-developed joints and fractures along which hydrothermal fluids flow. Active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera, active faulting and moderate local seismicity, high heat flow, rapid changes in climate, and regional stresses are factors that have strong infl uences on the type of hydrothermal system developed. Ascending hydrothermal fluids flow along fractures that have developed in response to active caldera deformation and along edges of low-permeability rhyolitic lava flows. Alteration of the area affected, self-sealing leading to development of a caprock for the hydrothermal system, and dissolution of silica-rich rocks are additional factors that may constrain the distribution and development of hydrothermal fields. A partial lowpermeability layer that acts as a cap to the hydrothermal system may produce some over-pressurization, thought to be small in most systems. Any abrupt drop in pressure initiates steam fl ashing and is rapidly transmitted through interconnected fractures that result in a series of multiple large-scale explosions contributing to the excavation of a larger explosion crater. Similarities between the size and dimensions of large hydrothermal explosion craters and thermal fields in Yellowstone may indicate that catastrophic events which result in l

  11. Hydrogen Isotope Evidence for Giant Meteoric-Hydrothermal Systems Associated with Extension and Magmatism in the Southern Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holk, G. J.; McCarthy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Over 400 published mineral and fluid inclusion δD values from the southern Canadian Cordillera and our new data from the Eocene Penticton Group Volcanics and Coryell Intrusive Suite of the Southern Omineca Belt and the Western Metamorphic Belt of the Central Coast Orogen are compiled using GIS. δDH2O is estimated using published D/H fractionation factors at 400°C; the error is ±20‰, small enough to distinguish deep magmatic/metamorphic fluids from meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. Histogram plots of δDH2O values estimated from minerals reveal peaks at δD = -60‰ (deep fluid) and ­-110‰ (Early Cenozoic meteoric-hydrothermal fluid); this provides a clear distinction between the two kinds of fluid. Our analysis reveals that syn-extensional meteoric-hydrothermal systems (δDH2O < -80‰) affected the eastern margin of the Coast Ranges Batholith between latitude 49° and 55° and the Omineca Belt between latitude 49° and 52°45'; both regions were affected by detachment faulting during late stages of magmatism in the Early Cenozoic (e.g., Parrish et al., 1988; Crawford et al., 2009). Zones that escaped the effects of meteoric-hydrothermal systems, preserving the D/H signature of deep fluids (δD > -80‰), include the Western Metamorphic Belt, the Western and Central Coast Ranges Batholith, the belt of Jurassic metamorphism that extends from the Cariboo Mountains to the Purcell Mountains, and the deepest structural levels of the Shuswap Metamorphic Core Complex; most of these samples have quartz-feldspar 18O/16O fractionations indicative of magmatic temperatures. High δDH2O values (> -50‰) suggest seawater alteration of the plutons of Vancouver Island (Magaritz and Taylor, 1986). Histogram plots of vein quartz fluid inclusion δD values (Nesbitt and Muehlenbachs, 1995) reveal three peaks that include the two produced by the mineral δD values, but these data are dominated by a large peak at δD = -150, a value similar to modern meteoric waters in the region

  12. Fluid evolution in a volcanic-hosted epithermal carbonate-base metal-gold vein system: Alto de la Blenda, Farallón Negro, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez-Zavalía, M. Florencia; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Alto de la Blenda is a ˜6.6-Ma intermediate-sulphidation epithermal vein system in the Farallón Negro Volcanic Complex, which also hosts the 7.1-Ma porphyry-Cu-Au deposit of Bajo de la Alumbrera. The epithermal vein system is characterised by a large extent and continuity (2 km × 400 m open to depth × 6 m maximum width) and an average gold grade of ˜8 g/t. The vein is best developed within an intrusion of a fine-grained equigranular monzonite, interpreted as the central conduit of a stratovolcano whose extrusive activity ended prior to porphyry-Cu-Au emplacement at Bajo de la Alumbrera, which is in turn cut by minor epithermal veins. The Alto de la Blenda vein consists predominantly of variably Mn-rich carbonates and quartz, with a few percent of pyrite, sphalerite, galena and other sulphide and sulphosalt minerals. Four phases of vein opening, hydrothermal mineralisation and repeated brecciation can be correlated between different vein segments. Stages 2 and 3 contain the greatest fraction of sulphide and gold. They are separated by the emplacement of a polymictic breccia containing clasts of quartz feldspar porphyry as well as basement rocks. Fluid inclusions in quartz related to stages 2 to 4 are liquid rich with 2-4 wt% NaCl(eq). They homogenise between 160 and 300 °C, with very consistent values within each assemblage. Vapour inclusions are practically absent in the epithermal vein. Quartz fragments in the polymictic breccia contain inclusions of intermediate to vapour-like density and similar low salinity (˜3 wt% NaCl(eq)), besides rare brine inclusions containing halite. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of epithermal inclusions indicate high concentrations of K, Fe, As, Sb, Cs, and Pb that significantly vary within and through subsequent vein stages. Careful consideration of detection limits for individual inclusions shows high gold concentrations of ˜0.5 to 3 ppm dissolved in the ore fluid, which

  13. Fluid evolution in a volcanic-hosted epithermal carbonate-base metal-gold vein system: Alto de la Blenda, Farallón Negro, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez-Zavalía, M. Florencia; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-03-01

    Alto de la Blenda is a ˜6.6-Ma intermediate-sulphidation epithermal vein system in the Farallón Negro Volcanic Complex, which also hosts the 7.1-Ma porphyry-Cu-Au deposit of Bajo de la Alumbrera. The epithermal vein system is characterised by a large extent and continuity (2 km × 400 m open to depth × 6 m maximum width) and an average gold grade of ˜8 g/t. The vein is best developed within an intrusion of a fine-grained equigranular monzonite, interpreted as the central conduit of a stratovolcano whose extrusive activity ended prior to porphyry-Cu-Au emplacement at Bajo de la Alumbrera, which is in turn cut by minor epithermal veins. The Alto de la Blenda vein consists predominantly of variably Mn-rich carbonates and quartz, with a few percent of pyrite, sphalerite, galena and other sulphide and sulphosalt minerals. Four phases of vein opening, hydrothermal mineralisation and repeated brecciation can be correlated between different vein segments. Stages 2 and 3 contain the greatest fraction of sulphide and gold. They are separated by the emplacement of a polymictic breccia containing clasts of quartz feldspar porphyry as well as basement rocks. Fluid inclusions in quartz related to stages 2 to 4 are liquid rich with 2-4 wt% NaCl(eq). They homogenise between 160 and 300 °C, with very consistent values within each assemblage. Vapour inclusions are practically absent in the epithermal vein. Quartz fragments in the polymictic breccia contain inclusions of intermediate to vapour-like density and similar low salinity (˜3 wt% NaCl(eq)), besides rare brine inclusions containing halite. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of epithermal inclusions indicate high concentrations of K, Fe, As, Sb, Cs, and Pb that significantly vary within and through subsequent vein stages. Careful consideration of detection limits for individual inclusions shows high gold concentrations of ˜0.5 to 3 ppm dissolved in the ore fluid, which

  14. Veins in the northern part of the Boulder batholith, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinckney, D.M.

    1965-01-01

    About 20 miles north of Butte and extending nearly to Helena, is an area of 350 square miles containing hundreds of veins and altered zones. The bedrock of the area is 1) late Cretaceous volcanic rocks, forerunners of the Boulder batholith, 2) the Boulder batholith of late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age and 3) two groups of Tertiary volcanic rocks lying on the eroded batholith. The veins are post-batholith and pre-Tertiary in age. The veins are largely either quartz-sulfide veins of mesothermal type or chalcedony veins of epithermal type. The relations of these two types of veins have been the subject of conflicting ideas for 60 years. Three workers have proposed three different genetic classifications. This report shows that the quartz veins and the chalcedony veins are closely related parts of a strongly zoned hypogene vein system. Strong zonal patterns were established using the grain size of quartz (or pyrite vs. carbonate in one district) as well as features of the altered rocks. The scale of the zoning ranges from single veins through groups of veins or mining districts to the entire mineralized area. Single veins are zoned around a core of coarse-grained quartz; the quartz outward from the core becoming progressively finer-grained. The cores are zoned around eight major centers and several lesser ones. The centers and their nearby related veins are assigned to central, intermediate, and peripheral zones. Nearly all of the veins around the edge of the mineralized area are chalcedony. Envelopes of altered rocks consist of seven major bands representing three major groups of constituents, aluminum silicates, iron-bearing minerals, and silica. Plagioclase altered successively to montomorillite, kaolinite, and sericite; potassium feldspar altered to sericite (aluminum silicate group). Biotite released iron which formed successively, iron oxides, iron-bearing carbonate, and pyrite (iron-bearing minerals). Excess silica formed silicified bands. Constituents for

  15. Composite synvolcanic intrusions associated with Precambrian VMS-related hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Alan G.

    2003-06-01

    Large subvolcanic intrusions are recognized within most Precambrian VMS camps. Of these, 80% are quartz diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite composite intrusions. The VMS camps spatially associated with composite intrusions account for >90% of the aggregate sulfide tonnage of all the Precambrian, intrusion-related VMS camps. These low-alumina, low-K, and high-Na composite intrusions contain early phases of quartz diorite and tonalite, followed by more voluminous trondhjemite. They have a high proportion of high silica (>74% SiO2) trondhjemite which is compositionally similar to the VMS-hosting rhyolites within the volcanic host-rock successions. The quartz-diorite and possibly tonalite phases follow tholeiitic fractionation trends whereas the trondhjemites fall within the composition field for primitive crustal melts. These transitional M-I-type primitive intrusive suites are associated with extensional regimes within oceanic-arc environments. Subvolcanic composite intrusions related to the Archean Sturgeon Lake and Noranda, and Paleoproterozoic Snow Lake VMS camps range in volume from 300 to 1,000 km3. Three have a sill morphology with strike lengths between 15 and 22 km and an average thickness between 1,500 and 2,000 m. The fourth has a gross stock-like shape. The VMS deposits are principally restricted to the volcanic strata above the strike length of the intrusions, as are areally extensive, thin exhalite units. The composite intrusions contain numerous internal phases which are commonly clustered within certain parts of the composite intrusion. These clusters underlie eruptive centers surrounded by areas of hydrothermal alteration and which contain most of the VMS deposits. Early quartz-diorite and tonalite phases appear to have intruded in rapid succession. Evidence includes gradational contacts, magma mixing and disequilibrium textures. They appear to have been emplaced as sill-dike swarms. These early phases are present as pendants and xenoliths within later

  16. Optical contacting of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strength of the bond between optically contacted quartz surfaces was investigated. The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment to test the theories of general relativity requires extremely precise measurements. The quartz components of the instruments to make these measurements must be held together in a very stable unit. Optical contacting is suggested as a possible method of joining these components. The fundamental forces involved in optical contacting are reviewed and relates calculations of these forces to the results obtained in experiments.

  17. Quartz ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A ball valve particularly suited for use in the handling of highly corrosive fluids is described. It is characterized by a valve housing formed of communicating segments of quartz tubing, a pair of communicating sockets disposed in coaxial alignment with selected segments of tubing for establishing a pair of inlet ports communicating with a common outlet port, a ball formed of quartz material supported for displacement between the sockets and configured to be received alternately thereby, and a valve actuator including a rod attached to the ball for selectively displacing the ball relative to each of the sockets for controlling fluid flow through the inlet ports.

  18. Shallow to near-surface, vein-type epithermal gold mineralization at Lalab in the Sibutad gold deposit, Zamboanga del Norte, Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, F. A.; Yumul, G. P.; Maglambayan, V. B.; Tamayo, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Sibutad vein-type epithermal gold deposit is the most promising economically feasible gold mineralization found in recent years in Zamboanga del Norte province in Zamboanga Peninsula, Mindanao island. The Sibutad gold deposit occurs in Pliocene to Pleistocene volcanic rocks, resting on a deformed island arc block to the east of the tectonically active Sindangan-Cotabato-Daguma Lineament. The host rocks are the Malindang Volcanics, composed of lower and upper members, which are both intruded by andesite porphyry. The lower member is made up of andesite flows, dacite tuff and tuffite, whereas volcanic breccia and tuff breccia characterize the upper member. The Sibutad gold deposit is subdivided into the Larayan and Lalab prospects. In Lalab, which is the prospect studied, hydrothermal activity and gold mineralization occur in the andesite flows. The geology, alteration and mineralization of the Lalab orebody are of adularia-sericite type that suggests the gold was precipitated from reduced, near-neutral pH solutions within a shallow to near-surface environment. The following events produced the Lalab orebody: (1) pre-breccia wallrock alteration, (2) hydrothermal brecciation, (3) post-breccia wallrock alteration, and (4) gold mineralization. Gold precipitated in quartz veins was a response to boiling, followed by fluid mixing. Prolific gold zones occur between 30 m below sea level and 200 m above sea level.

  19. Galileo quartz clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, M.; Meirs, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Garriga, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    A quartz oscillator for use in the Galileo experiment (orbiter and Probe) for Jupiter mission 1982 are described. This oscillator has achieved significant performance breakthroughs by the use of an SC cut, double rotated, crystal in a titanium dewar flask. Some of the performance parameters as well as the design feature of the oscillator are presented.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration and mass exchange in the hornblende latite porphyry, Rico, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peter B.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Naeser, Charles W.

    1994-03-01

    The Rico paleothermal anomaly, southwestern Colorado, records the effects of a large hydrothermal system that was active at 4 Ma. This hydrothermal system produced the deep Silver Creek stockwork Mo deposit, which formed above the anomaly's heat source, and shallower base and precious-metal vein and replacement deposits. A 65 Ma hornblende latite porphyry is present as widespread sills throughout the area and provided a homogenous material that recorded the effects of the hydrothermal system up to 8 km from the center. Hydrothermal alteration in the latite can be divided into a proximal facies which consists of two assemblages, quartz-illite-calcite and chlorite-epidote, and a distal facies which consists of a distinct propylitic assemblage. Temperatures were gradational vertically and laterally in the anomaly, and decreased away from the centra heat source. A convective hydrothermal plume, 3 km wide and at least 2 km high, was present above the stock-work molybdenum deposit and consisted of upwelling, high-temperature fluids that produced the proximal alteration facies. Distal facies alteration was produced by shallower cooler fluids. The most important shallow base and precious-metal vein deposits in the Rico district are at or close to the boundary of the thermal plume. Latite within the plume had a large loss of Na2O, large addition of CaO, and variable SiO2 exchante. Distal propylitized latite samples lost small amounts of Na2O and CaO and exchanged minor variable amounts of SiO2. The edge of the plume is marked by steep Na2O exchange gradients. Na2O exchange throughout the paleothermal anomaly was controlled by the reaction of the albite components in primary plagioclase and alkali feldspars. Initial feldspar alteration in the distal facies was dominated by reaction of the plagioclase, and the initial molar ratio of reactants (alkali feldspar albite component to plagioclase albite component) was 0.35. This ratio of the moles of plagioclase to alkali feldspar

  1. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  2. Internal vein texture and vein evolution of the epithermal Shila-Paula district, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Alain; Bailly, Laurent; André, Anne-Sylvie; Monié, Patrick; Cassard, Daniel; Tajada, Fernando Llosa; Vargas, Juan Rosas; Tuduri, Johann

    2006-07-01

    The epithermal Shila-Paula Au-Ag district is characterized by numerous veins hosted in Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Western Cordillera (southern Peru). Field studies of the ore bodies reveal a systematic association of a main E-W vein with secondary N55-60°W veins—two directions that are also reflected by the orientation of fluid-inclusion planes in quartz crystals of the host rock. In areas where this pattern is not recognized, such as the Apacheta sector, vein emplacement seems to have been guided by regional N40°E and N40°W fractures. Two main vein-filling stages are identified. stage 1 is a quartz-adularia-pyrite-galena-sphalerite-chalcopyrite-electrum-Mn silicate-carbonate assemblage that fills the main E-W veins. stage 2, which contains most of the precious-metal mineralization, is divided into pre-bonanza and bonanza substages. The pre-bonanza substage consists of a quartz-adularia-carbonate assemblage that is observed within the secondary N45-60°W veins, in veinlets that cut the stage 1 assemblage, and in final open-space fillings. The two latter structures are finally filled by the bonanza substage characterized by a Fe-poor sphalerite-chalcopyrite-pyrite-galena-tennantite-tetrahedrite-polybasite-pearceite-electrum assemblage. The ore in the main veins is systematically brecciated, whereas the ore in the secondary veins and geodes is characteristic of open-space crystallization. Microthermometric measurements on sphalerite from both stages and on quartz and calcite from stage 2 indicate a salinity range of 0 to 15.5 wt% NaCl equivalent and homogenization temperatures bracketed between 200 and 330°C. Secondary CO2-, N2- and H2S-bearing fluid inclusions are also identified. The age of vein emplacement, based on 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained on adularia of different veins, is estimated at around 11 Ma, with some overlap between adularia of stage 1 (11.4±0.4 Ma) and of stage 2 (10.8±0.3 Ma). A three-phase tectonic model has been constructed to explain the

  3. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements of the hydrothermal alterations within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doner, Zeynep; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This work reports the geochemical characteristics and behavior of the rare earth elements (REE) of the hydrothermal alteration of the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit located in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Biga peninsula (Locally Balikesir province), NW Turkey. The Cu-Mo-Au mineralization at this deposit hosted in the hornfels rocks and related to the silicic to intermediate intrusion of Eybek pluton. It locally formed with brecciated zones and quartz vein stockworks, as well as the brittle fracture zones associated with intense hydrothermal alteration. Three main alteration zones with gradual boundaries formed in the mine area in the hornfels rock that represents the host rock, along that contact the Eybek pluton; potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration zones. The potassic alteration zone that formed at the center having high amount of Cu-sulfide minerals contains biotite, muscovite, and sericite with less amount of K-feldspar and associated with tourmalinization alteration. The propylitic alteration surrounds the potassic alteration having high amount of Mo and Au and contains chlorite, albite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The phyllic alteration zone also surrounds the potassic alteration containing quartz, sericite and pyrite minerals. Based on the REE characteristics and content and when we correlate the Alteration index (AI) with the light REEs and heavy REEs of each alteration zone, it concluded that the light REEs decrease and heavy REEs increase during the alteration processes. The relationships between K2O index with Eu/Eu* and Sr/Sr* reveals a positive correlation in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones and a negative correlation in the propylitic alteration zone. This refers to the hydrothermal solution which is responsible for the studied porphyry deposits and associated potassic and phyllic alterations has a positive Eu and Sr anomaly as well as these elements were added to the altered rock from the hydrothermal solution. Keywords: Rare

  4. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  5. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  6. Orogenesis, high-T thermal events, and gold vein formation within metamorphic rocks of the Alaskan Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Snee, L.W.; Pickthorn, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Mesothermal, gold-bearing quartz veins are widespread within allochthonous terranes of Alaska that are composed dominantly of greenschist-facies metasedimentary rocks. The most productive lode deposits are concentrated in south-central and southeastern Alaska; small and generally nonproductive gold-bearing veins occur upstream from major placer deposits in interior and northern Alaska. Ore-forming fluids in all areas are consistent with derivation from metamorphic devolatilisation reactions, and a close temporal relationship exists between high-T tectonic deformation, igneous activity, and gold mineralization. Ore fluids were of consistently low salinity, CO2-rich, and had ??18O values of 7 ???-12??? and ??D values between -15??? and -35???. Upper-crustal temperatures within the metamorphosed terranes reached at least 450-500??C before onset of significant gold-forming hydrothermal activity. In southern Alaska, gold deposits formed during latter stages of Tertiary, subduction-related, collisional orogenesis and were often temporally coeval with calc-alkaline magmatism. -from Authors

  7. Gamma ray spectrometry for recognition of hydrothermal alteration zones related to a low sulfidation epithermal gold mineralization (eastern Pontides, NE Türkiye)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maden, Nafiz; Akaryalı, Enver

    2015-11-01

    This study presents an interpretation of radiospectrometric and magnetic data of Arzular mineralization site, which is one of the best examples for epithermal gold deposits located in the southern zone of the Eastern Pontides (NE Türkiye). Potassium is generally the most useful pathfinder element for gold mineralization zones because of its high level in altered rock surrounding the deposits. Where gold is hosted within quartz veins, typically the vein is low in the radioelements, but the hydrothermally altered host rocks will usually have a distinct radioelement signature useful for exploration. In this study, magnetic, susceptibility and radiospectrometric survey data radiometric signatures associated with the host rocks favorable for the mineralization, enhancing techniques such as the ratio maps as well as potassium (%K), equivalent thorium (eTh ppm) and equivalent uranium (eU ppm) maps were utilized. Our analysis showed that the gold mineralization associated with the alteration is significantly related to increase in potassium, due to adularia, a low T K-feldspar, and decreases in uranium and thorium due to the hydrothermal alteration and magmatic intrusion processes during the regional tectonic activities.

  8. The compression pathway of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Richard M.; Downs, Robert T.; Dera, Przemyslaw

    2011-11-07

    The structure of quartz over the temperature domain (298 K, 1078 K) and pressure domain (0 GPa, 20.25 GPa) is compared to the following three hypothetical quartz crystals: (1) Ideal {alpha}-quartz with perfectly regular tetrahedra and the same volume and Si-O-Si angle as its observed equivalent (ideal {beta}-quartz has Si-O-Si angle fixed at 155.6{sup o}). (2) Model {alpha}-quartz with the same Si-O-Si angle and cell parameters as its observed equivalent, derived from ideal by altering the axial ratio. (3) BCC quartz with a perfectly body-centered cubic arrangement of oxygen anions and the same volume as its observed equivalent. Comparison of experimental data recorded in the literature for quartz with these hypothetical crystal structures shows that quartz becomes more ideal as temperature increases, more BCC as pressure increases, and that model quartz is a very good representation of observed quartz under all conditions. This is consistent with the hypothesis that quartz compresses through Si-O-Si angle-bending, which is resisted by anion-anion repulsion resulting in increasing distortion of the c/a axial ratio from ideal as temperature decreases and/or pressure increases.

  9. Plastic Deformation of Quartz: Unfinished business?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Starting at Harvard in the mid-1930's, David Griggs built a series of high pressure machines for experimental rock deformation. One persistent aim was to achieve the plastic deformation of quartz. Each time he built a new machine for higher pressure and/or temperature, one of the first materials he tested would be quartz. This search went on through a 500 MPa liquid-medium machine at temperatures up to 300°C, then with a gas-medium machine for temperatures up to 800°C, and finally with a solid-medium machine for higher pressures and temperatures. Quartz proved stubbornly resistant to deformation except at extremely high stresses until, finally and somewhat serendipitously, it was found possible to deform quartz at relatively low stresses in the presence of water under special conditions. The breakthrough came in an experiment in a 1500 MPa solid-medium apparatus in which talc was used as pressure medium. At the temperature of the experiment, the talc dehydrated and so released water. Under these conditions, natural quartz proved to be very weak and to readily undergo plastic deformation, a phenomenon that became known as "hydrolytic weakening". Soon after this discovery, it was also found that certain synthetic single crystals could be easily deformed ab initio. These crystals were from a particular set that had been grown rapidly under hydrothermal conditions and had incorporated water during growth. Attempts in our laboratory to weaken crystals in a gas-medium apparatus at around 300 MPa by cooking dry quartz in the presence of added water were all unsuccessful, although we could deform wet synthetic crystals. There was considerable speculation about a role of high pressure in promoting hydrolytic weakening, but the dilemma was eventually clarified by electron microscope studies by Fitz Gerald and coworkers. These studies showed that crystals that had been subjected to high pressure and temperature in the solid-medium apparatus were extensively microcracked

  10. Fluid inclusion and isotopic systematics of an evolving magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.N.; Gunderson, R.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Geysers, California, is the site of a long-lived hydrothermal system that initially developed 1.5-2 m.y. ago in response to the intrusion of a hypabyssal granitic pluton. Although wells drilled into The Geysers produce only dry steam, fluid inclusion, isotopic, and mineralogic data demonstrate that the present vapor-dominated regime evolved from an earlier and more extensive, liquid-dominated hydrothermal system. Circulation of these early fluids produced veins characterized by tourmaline {+-} biotite {+-} actinolite {+-} clinopyroxene within the pluton and adjacent biotite-rich hornfels, actinolite {+-} ferroaxinite {+-} epidote and epidote {+-} chlorite within the intermediate parts of the thermal system and calcite in the outer parts. Potassium feldspar and quartz are present in all assemblages. Pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures and apparent salinities of fluid inclusions trapped in vein minerals range from 440{degrees}C and 44 wt% NaCl equivalent within the hornfels (<600 m from the pluton) to 325{degrees}C and 5 wt% NaCl equivalent at distances of approximately 1500 m from the intrusion. We suggest that the shallow, moderate salinity fluids are connate waters modified by water-rock interactions while the high-salinity fluids are interpreted as magmatic brines. Halite-dissolution temperatures of inclusions in the hornfels and pluton indicate that the magnetic fluids were trapped at lithostatic pressures (300-900 bars). In contrast, homogenization temperatures of the connate fluids suggest trapping under hydrostatic pressures of less than several hundred bars. Whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values of samples from The Geysers display systematic variations with respect to depth, location within the field, and grade of alteration. At depths below +610 m relative to mean sea level, the {delta}{sup 18}O values are strongly zoned around a northwest-southeast trending low located near the center of the steam reservoir. 77 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Geology and geochemistry of epithermal precious metal vein systems in the intra-oceanic arcs of Palau and Yap, western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, J.J.; Miller, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    -northeast. Hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks consists of a widespread weak to moderately strong propylitic alteration and a more restricted sericitic alteration adjacent to the veins and shear zones. Sulfide minerals in the veins consist primarily of pyrite accompanied by lesser amounts of sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, acanthite, native silver, cerargyrite, and iodyrite in partly oxidized parts of the vein system. Gold is typically fine-grained, 1-20 microns, and occurs as native gold, electrum and gold-silver-telluride. Elements correlated with high gold concentrations include molybdenum, tellurium, bismuth, lead, silver, copper, zinc and arsenic. In Yap a similar vein system to that present in Palau is hosted by the Miocene Tomil Volcanics on the islands of Maap and Gagil Tamil. The quartz veins and quartz-cemented breccias contain up to 3.7 ppm gold and trace elements associated with the gold include tellurium, copper, silver and vanadium. Within the mineralized area an unusually iron-rich (3-20%), 4-m-thick, hot-spring deposit contains up to 1.04 ppm gold and high concentrations of tellurium, copper and vanadium. Hydrothermal eruption breccia beds are present within the deposit. The presence of the hot-spring deposit and banded and comb textures of the vein quartz suggest that the vein system presently exposed formed at a shallow level. The vein systems in Palau and Yap have similar textures, geochemical suites and alteration assemblages. Both vein systems formed late in the volcanic evolution of the intra-oceanic arc. Media tested for their effectiveness in geochemical exploration in the tropical, deeply weathered environment of Palau and Yap included stream sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments, and sediment from the mangrove coastal environment which is well developed around most of the islands of Yap and Palau. Geochemical surveys in both Yap and Palau of mangrove sediment show that adjacent to areas of gold mineralization, gold and tellu

  12. The origin of vein-type copper-lead-zinc deposits Host in Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks at the Southeast Anatolian Orogenic Belt (Küplüce-Adıyaman, Southeastern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyıldız, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Nail; Gören, Burcu; Yıldırım, Esra; Ilhan, Semiha

    2015-02-01

    The study area is located around the town of Küplüce between the Çelikhan and Sincik districts (Adıyaman, Turkey). Mineralisations are located at the Southeast Anatolian Orogenic Belt. Despite many differential units, especially in age and lithology, that coexist in the region, mineralisation and alteration are only developed in partly concordant/partly disconcordant veins/veinlets of quartz within chlorite schists, sericite schists, mica schists/mica gneisses, quartz schists and metadiabases of the Palaeozoic Pütürge metamorphics. Pyrite, chalcopyrite and sphalerite are dominant minerals in mineral paragenesis. Chalcocite, covellite and carollite are also found in trace amounts. Quartz, calcite, sericite and chlorite are the gang minerals. Silicification, sericitisation, chloritisation, epidotisation and limonitisation are widespread in limited areas around ore veins. The estimated Co/Ni (1.8-4.3) ratio in pyrites belonging to mineralisation deposits indicates that mineralisation in the region is related to magmatic hydrothermal deposits. In addition, REE (rare earth element) contents of mineralisation deposits in chondrite-normalised diagrams are enriched and show a similar trend to that of chondritic values. This indicates that metals that form mineralisation deposits are related to magmatic rocks. Values of δ34S estimated in the Küplüce region vary between 1.6‰ and 2.34‰. Values of δ34S close to 0 indicate that the sulphur forming the mineralisation is of magmatic origin. In addition, δ18O values vary between 8‰ and 10.8‰ and are consistent with magmatic water. Analyses of the fluid inclusions in quartz samples from mineralisation deposits were performed, and the homogenisation temperature was estimated to be between 90 and 150 °C. These temperature values can be explained by the mixing of a solution with surface water. It was determined that mineralisation deposits were vein-type hydrothermal deposits that had developed due to Middle Eocene

  13. Hydrothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; von Damm, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    What is Hydrothermal Circulation?Hydrothermal circulation occurs when seawater percolates downward through fractured ocean crust along the volcanic mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. The seawater is first heated and then undergoes chemical modification through reaction with the host rock as it continues downward, reaching maximum temperatures that can exceed 400 °C. At these temperatures the fluids become extremely buoyant and rise rapidly back to the seafloor where they are expelled into the overlying water column. Seafloor hydrothermal circulation plays a significant role in the cycling of energy and mass between the solid earth and the oceans; the first identification of submarine hydrothermal venting and their accompanying chemosynthetically based communities in the late 1970s remains one of the most exciting discoveries in modern science. The existence of some form of hydrothermal circulation had been predicted almost as soon as the significance of ridges themselves was first recognized, with the emergence of plate tectonic theory. Magma wells up from the Earth's interior along "spreading centers" or "MORs" to produce fresh ocean crust at a rate of ˜20 km3 yr-1, forming new seafloor at a rate of ˜3.3 km2 yr-1 (Parsons, 1981; White et al., 1992). The young oceanic lithosphere formed in this way cools as it moves away from the ridge crest. Although much of this cooling occurs by upward conduction of heat through the lithosphere, early heat-flow studies quickly established that a significant proportion of the total heat flux must also occur via some additional convective process (Figure 1), i.e., through circulation of cold seawater within the upper ocean crust (Anderson and Silbeck, 1981). (2K)Figure 1. Oceanic heat flow versus age of ocean crust. Data from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans, averaged over 2 Ma intervals (circles) depart from the theoretical cooling curve (solid line) indicating convective cooling of young ocean crust by circulating seawater

  14. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  15. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1956-04-17

    This patent pertains to quartz fiber electroscopes of small size for use by personnel to monitor nuclear radiation. The invention resides tn a novel way of charging the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope is carried out without obtaining contact with the fiber system or its support and the electroscope can therefore be constructed without a protective cap to prevent wrongful discharge. The electroscope is charged by placing a voltage between an electrode located in close proximity to the element to be charged and the electroscope me metallic case. ABSTRACTS

  16. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Nižná Boca Sb-Au Hydrothermal Ore Deposit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Pršek, Jaroslav; Chovan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Samples from hydrothermal Sb-Au mineralization in the area SE of Nižná Boca village in the N&iAzke Tatry Mountains were investigated using a variety of geochemical and mineralogical methods. Ore minerals typically occur in N-S striking quartz-carbonate veins hosted by an I-type biotite granodiorite to tonalite of Variscan Age (the Ďumbier Type). Paragenetic associations in the deposit are comparable to other mineralizations of the same type in the Ďumbierske Nízke Tatry Mountains. A quartz-arsenopyrite, pyrite stage of mineralization is the oldest with a calculated temperature of formation of about 445°C. It is followed by a quartz-carbonate-stibnite, zinkenite stage and, in turn, a quartz-carbonate-sphalerite-galena, boulangerite-gold stage. The gold typically contains between 9-18 wt.% Ag regardless of mineral association. No evidence for further generations of gold was found although it is possible that some gold was remobilized from the structure of the auriferous arsenopyrite. The Au and Ag content of the bulk ore ranges from 0.53 g.t-1 to 20.2 g.t-1 and from 0.9 g.t-1 to 31.2 g.t-1, respectively. A tetrahedrite-chalcopyrite stage is followed by a barite-hematite stage - the youngest assemblage in the deposit. Fluid inclusions from the first mineralization stage are usually less than 3 μm in size and contain less than 3.6 wt.% CO2; salinity, density and homogenization temperature range from 2.7-16.3 wt.% NaCl(eq), 0.85-1.03 g.cm-1 and 128-280°C, respectively.

  17. Comparison of metasomatic reactions between a common CO2-rich vein fluid and diverse wall rocks: intensive variables, mass transfers, and Au mineralization at Alleghany, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The gold deposits at Alleghany, California, are typical of many epigenetic gold-bearing hydrothermal vein systems in metamorphic terranes worldwide. Detailed analyses of alteration halos in serpentinite, mafic amphibolite, and granite wall rocks at Alleghany indicate that widely contrasting deposit types, ranging from fuchsite-carbonate schists to pyrite-albitites, resulted when different wall rocks interacted with the same externally derived CO2-rich hydrothermal vein fluid. Patterns of element redistribution within halos and among lithologic units suggest a complex process involving fluid flow along vein fractures and diffusion (?? infiltration) normal to the veins. Wall rocks locally controlled both the directions and magnitudes of chemical fluxes across vein walls. -from Author

  18. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S H

    2011-11-16

    We are using a Qpod quartz crystal microbalance (manufactured by Inficon) for use as a low-volume non-volatile residue analysis tool. Inficon has agreed to help troubleshoot some of our measurements and are requesting to view some sample data, which are attached. The basic principle of an NVR analysis is to evaporate a known volume of solvent, and weigh the remaining residue to determine the purity of the solvent. A typical NVR analysis uses 60 g of solvent and can measure residue with an accuracy of +/- 0.01 mg. The detection limit is thus (0.01 mg)/(60 g) = 0.17 ppm. We are attempting to use a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to make a similar measurement. The attached data show the response of the QCM as a 5-20 mg drop of solvent evaporates on its surface. The change in mass registered by the QCM after the drop evaporates is the residue that deposits on the crystal. On some measurements, the change in mass in less than zero, which is aphysical since the drop will leave behind {>=}0 mass of residue. The vendor, Inficon, has agreed to look at these data as a means to help troubleshoot the cause.

  19. Mineralogical, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope constraints on mechanisms of ore deposition at the Samgwang mine (Republic of Korea)—a mesothermal, vein-hosted gold-silver deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Bong Chul; Lee, Hyun Koo; White, Noel C.

    2010-02-01

    The Samgwang mine is located in the Cheongyang gold district (Cheonan Metallogenic Province) of the Republic of Korea. It consists of eight massive, gold-bearing quartz veins that filled NE- and NW-striking fractures along fault zones in Precambrian granitic gneiss of the Gyeonggi massif. Their mineralogy and paragenesis allow two separate vein-forming episodes to be recognized, temporally separated by a major faulting event. The ore minerals occur in quartz and calcite of stage I, associated with fracturing and healing of veins. Hydrothermal wall-rock alteration minerals of stage I include Fe-rich chlorite (Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios 0.74-0.81), muscovite, illite, K-feldspar, and minor arsenopyrite, pyrite, and carbonates. Sulfide minerals deposited along with electrum during this stage include arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, galena, argentite, pyrargyrite, and argentian tetrahedrite. Only calcite was deposited during stage II. Fluid inclusions in quartz contain three main types of C-O-H fluids: CO2-rich, CO2-H2O, and aqueous inclusions. Quartz veins related to early sulfides in stage I were deposited from H2O-NaCl-CO2 fluids (1,500-5,000 bar, average 3,200) with T htotal values of 200°C to 383°C and salinities less than about 7 wt.% NaCl equiv. Late sulfide deposition was related to H2O-NaCl fluids (140-1,300 bar, average 700) with T htotal values of 110°C to 385°C and salinities less than about 11 wt.% NaCl equiv. These fluids either evolved through immiscibility of H2O-NaCl-CO2 fluids as a result of a decrease in fluid pressure, or through mixing with deeply circulated meteoric waters as a result of uplift or unloading during mineralization, or both. Measured and calculated sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SH2S = 1.5 to 4.8‰) of hydrothermal fluids from the stage I quartz veins indicate that ore sulfur was derived mainly from a magmatic source. The calculated and measured oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (δ18OH2O

  20. Controls on quartz silt formation by crystalline defects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Jefferson, I F; O'hara-Dhand, K; Smalley, I J

    2006-04-01

    Silt composed predominately of quartz occurs abundantly in the sedimentary material found in deposits worldwide. Its origin is still the subject of many debates, but one acknowledged source is due to glacial grinding. To examine this problem and test the apparent contradictory evidence in the literature, a series of experiments were performed. In these experiments, the Bromhead ring shear apparatus was used as it can simulate glacial grinding due to its uninterrupted shearing action; hence, it provides an effective reproduction of glacial grinding. Experiments conducted on unweathered sand-sized vein quartz produced little silt, while use of sand from a sedimentary deposit, Leighton Buzzard sand, produced plentiful silt. Experimental results suggest that there is an internal mineralogical control on the formation of quartz silt particles. It is argued that the processes involved in the formation of quartz introduce defects (Moss defects) into the low-quartz crystal structure, demonstrated by the presence of peaks in the particle size curve around 20 microm. This indicates that there is a lithological control for the silt yielded under weathering, and this could explain why a pronounced mode at around 20-60 micirom is commonly observed in silts, such as loess.

  1. ORIGIN OF QUARTZ IN COAL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Cecil, C. Blaine; Stanton, Ronald W.

    1984-01-01

    Both a scanning electron microscope and an electron microprobe (EMP) were used in this study to analyze the cathodoluminescence properties of quartz grains in samples of the Upper Freeport coal bed because quartz grains in coal are small (silt sized) and below the resolution capabilities of a standard luminoscope. Quartz grains were identified by the detection of silicon alone with energy dispersive X-ray units attached to both the SEM and the EMP.

  2. Temporal relations of volcanism and hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Goff, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Two hydrothermal alteration events (8.07 Ma, one sample; 6.51-5.60 Ma, six samples) related to the waning stages of late Miocene volcanism ({ge} 13 to {le} 5.8 Ma) are recognized at the Cochiti district (southeast Jemez Mountains). Most of the K/Ar dates (0.83 {plus minus} 0.11-0.66 {plus minus} 0.21 Ma, four samples) in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A at Sulfur Springs, Valles caldera, indicate post-Valles caldera hydrothermal alteration. A sample from acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole was too young to be dated by the K/Ar method and is possibly associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. Oxygen-isotope data from illite/smectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from {minus}2.15{per thousand} to {plus}7.97{per thousand} (SMOW), depending upon temperature, extent of rock-fluid interaction, and composition. The samples from VC-2A get lighter with depth ({minus}0.20{per thousand} to {plus}1.62{per thousand}). The K/Ar and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were deposited in the late Miocene (5.99-5.60 Ma) and mid-Quaternary ({approximately}0.66 Ma), respectively, by hydrothermal fluids composed primarily of meteoric water.

  3. Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1989-03-01

    K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

  4. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  5. Timing and duration of hydrothermal activity at the Los Bronces porphyry cluster: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckart, K.; Silva, W.; Spröhnle, C.; Vela, I.

    2014-06-01

    New geochronological data from the Los Bronces cluster of the Río Blanco-Los Bronces mega-porphyry Cu-Mo district establish a wide range of magmatism, hydrothermal alteration, and mineralization ages, both in terms of areal extent and time. The northern El Plomo and southernmost Los Piches exploration areas contain the oldest barren porphyritic intrusions with U-Pb ages of 10.8 ± 0.1 Ma and 13.4 ± 0.1 Ma, respectively. A hypabyssal barren intrusion adjacent northwesterly to the main pit area yields a slightly younger age of 10.2 ± 0.3 Ma (San Manuel sector, U-Pb), whereas in the Los Bronces (LB) open-pit area, the present day mineral extraction zone, porphyries range from 8.49 to 6.02 Ma (U-Pb). Hydrothermal biotite and sericite ages are up to 0.5 Ma younger but consistent with the cooling of the corresponding intrusion events of each area. Two quartz-molybdenite B-type veins from the LB open pit have Re-Os molybdenite ages of 5.65 ± 0.03 Ma and 5.35 ± 0.03 Ma consistent with published data for the contiguous Río Blanco cluster. The San Manuel exploration area within the Los Bronces cluster, located about 1.5-2 km southeast of the open-pit extraction zone, shows both the oldest hydrothermal biotite (7.70 ± 0.07 Ma; 40Ar/39Ar) and breccia cement molybdenite ages (8.36 ± 0.06 Ma; Re-Os) registered in the entire Río Blanco-Los Bronces district. These are also older than those reported from the El Teniente porphyry Cu(-Mo) deposit, suggesting that mineralization in the late Miocene to early Pliocene porphyry belt of Central Chile commenced 2 Ma before the previously accepted age of 6.3 Ma.

  6. The Third Dimension of an Active Back-arc Hydrothermal System: ODP Leg 193 at PACMANUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, R.; Barriga, F.; Miller, D.

    2001-12-01

    This first sub-seafloor examination of an active hydrothermal system hosted by felsic volcanics, at a convergent margin, obtained drill core from a high-T "smoker" site (penetrated to sim200 mbsf) and a low-T site of diffuse venting (~400mbsf). We aimed to delineate the lateral and vertical variability in mineralisation and alteration patterns, so as to understand links between volcanological, structural and hydrothermal phenomena and the sources of fluids, and to establish the nature and extent of microbial activity within the system. Technological breakthroughs included deployment of a new hard-rock re-entry system, and direct comparison in a hardrock environment of structural images obtained by wireline methods and logging-while-drilling. The PACMANUS hydrothermal site, at the 1700m-deep crest of a 500m-high layered sequence of dacitic lavas, is notable for baritic massive sulfide chimneys rich in Cu, Zn, Au and Ag. Below an extensive cap 5-40m thick of fresh dacite-rhyodacite, we found unexpectedly pervasive hydrothermal alteration of vesicular and flow-banded precursors, accompanied by variably intense fracturing and anhydrite-pyrite veining. Within what appears one major hydrothermal event affecting the entire drilled sequence, there is much overprinting and repetition of distinctly allochemical argillaceous (illite-chlorite), acid-sulfate (pyrophyllite-anhydrite) and siliceous assemblages. The alteration profiles include a transition from metastable cristobalite to quartz at depth, and are similar under low-T and high-T vent sites but are vertically condensed in a manner suggesting higher thermal gradients beneath the latter. The altered rocks are surprisingly porous (average 25%). Retention of intergranular pore spaces and open vesicles at depth implies elevated hydrothermal pressures, whereas evidence from fluid inclusions and hydrothermal brecciation denotes local or sporadic phase separation. A maximum measured temperature of 313 degC measured 8 days

  7. The Compression Pathway of Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, P. K.; Thompson, R. M.; Downs, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    The important Earth material quartz may constitute as much as 20% of the upper continental crust. Quartz is composed solely of corner-sharing SiO4 silica tetrahedra, a primary building block of many of the Earth's crustal and mantle minerals, lunar and Martian minerals, and meteoritic minerals. Quartz is therefore an outstanding model material for investigating the response of this fundamental structural unit to changes in P, T, and x. These facts have spawned a vast literature of experimental and theoretical studies of quartz at ambient and non-ambient conditions. Investigations into the behavior of quartz at high pressure have revealed an anomalous distortion in the silicate tetrahedron with pressure not typically seen in other silicates. The tetrahedron assumes a very distinct geometry, becoming more like the Sommerville tetrahedron of O'Keeffe and Hyde (1996) as pressure increases. Traditionally, this distortion has been considered a compression mechanism for quartz, along with Si-O-Si angle-bending and a very small component of bond compression. However, tetrahedral volume decreases by only 1% between 0.59 GPa and 20.25 GPa, while unit cell volume decreases by 21%. Therefore, most of the compression in quartz is happening in tetrahedral voids, not in the silicate tetrahedron, and the distortion of the silicate tetrahedron may not be the direct consequence of decreasing volume in response to increasing pressure. The structure of quartz at high temperature and high pressure, including new structural refinements from synchrotron singe-crystal data collected to 20.25 GPa, is compared to the following three hypothetical quartz crystals: (1) Ideal quartz with perfectly regular tetrahedra and the same volume and Si-O-Si angle as its observed. (2) Model quartz with the same Si-O-Si angle and cell parameters as its observed equivalent, derived from ideal by altering the axial ratio. (3) BCC quartz with a perfectly body-centered cubic arrangement of oxygen anions and

  8. The dependence of cobalt concentration on the growth temperature in synthetic blue quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk Lee, Young; Jin Chung, Su

    1999-01-01

    Co-doped blue quartz crystals were grown hydrothermally in an Na 2CO 3 solution. The concentration of cobalt in as-grown quartz crystal was observed to be independent of the concentration of cobalt in the nutrient but to be strongly affected by the growth temperature. It is concluded that transparent dark-blue quartz could be grown in the narrow temperature range, that is, 340-345°C. From TEM observations, the origin of the blue color in synthetic blue quartz is thought to be an inclusion effect resulting from the entrapped clusters of Co-Si-OH colloids, which is different from other reports [Wood, Ballman, Am. Mineral. 51 (1966) 216; Lehmann, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 30 (1969) 395]. The as-grown synthetic blue quartz crystal was jewel grade.

  9. Dual quartz crystal microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, G.C.; Benson, N.H.; Petelenz, D.; Janata, J. )

    1995-01-15

    Construction and performance of a dual quartz crystal microbalance is described. The final probe has a dipstick configuration that is particularly suitable for sensing and monitoring applications in viscous and/or conducting liquids. The differential (heterodyned) frequency measurement substantially eliminates the deleterious effects of viscosity, temperature, and conductivity. The corresponding performance coefficients are temperature df/dT = 1.5 Hz/[degree]C, viscosity df/d[eta][sub L] = 103 Hz/cP, and conductivity df/dM = 108 Hz/M, where conductivity is expressed in terms of molarity of sodium chloride. As an example, the etching of a 2000-A-thick layer of aluminum has been monitored as a function of time. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Quartz resonator processing system

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  11. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  12. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  13. Silica Transport and Distribution in Saline, Immiscible Fluids: Application to Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Macinnis, M.; Bodnar, R. J.; Lowell, R.; Rimstidt, J. D.

    2009-05-01

    Quartz is a nearly ubiquitous gangue mineral in hydrothermal mineral deposits, most often constituting the bulk of hydrothermal mineralization. The dissolution, transport and precipitation of quartz is controlled by the solubility of silica; in particular, in hot hydrothermal fluids in contact with quartz, silica saturation can generally be assumed, as rates of dissolution and precipitation are generally much faster than fluid flow rates. The solubility of silica in aqueous fluids can be used to understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems by tracing the silica distribution in these systems through time. The solubility of quartz in an aqueous fluid is dependent upon the pressure, temperature and composition (PTX) of the fluid. Silica solubility in pure water as a function of pressure and temperature is well understood. However, natural fluids contain variable amounts of dissolved ionic species, thus it is necessary to include the effects of salinity on silica solubility to accurately predict quartz distribution in hydrothermal systems. In particular, addition of NaCl results in enhanced quartz solubility over a wide range of PT conditions. Furthermore, if phase separation occurs in saline fluids, silica is preferentially partitioned into the higher salinity brine phase; if vapor is removed from the system, the bulk salinity in the system evolves towards the brine end member, and overall silica solubility is enhanced. There is abundant evidence from natural fluid inclusions for fluid immiscibility in hydrothermal ore deposits. Additionally, recent hydrothermal models that include fluid phase equilibria effects predict that phase separation may be an important control on the distribution of dissolved components in seafloor hydrothermal systems. An empirical equation describing the solubility of silica in salt-bearing hydrothermal solutions over a wide range of PTX conditions has been incorporated into a multiphase fluid flow model for seafloor hydrothermal

  14. Crustal faults exposed in the Pito Deep Rift: Conduits for hydrothermal fluids on the southeast Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Nicholas W.; Karson, Jeffrey A.

    2009-02-01

    The escarpments that bound the Pito Deep Rift (northeastern Easter microplate) expose in situ upper oceanic crust that was accreted ˜3 Ma ago at the superfast spreading (˜142 mm/a, full rate) southeast Pacific Rise (SEPR). Samples and images of these escarpments were taken during transects utilizing the human-occupied vehicle Alvin and remotely operated vehicle Jason II. The dive areas were mapped with a "deformation intensity scale" revealing that the sheeted dike complex and the base of the lavas contain approximately meter-wide fault zones surrounded by fractured "damage zones." Fault zones are spaced several hundred meters apart, in places offset the base of the lavas, separate areas with differently oriented dikes, and are locally crosscut by (younger) dikes. Fault rocks are rich in interstitial amphibole, matrix and vein chlorite, prominent veins of quartz, and accessory grains of sulfides, oxides, and sphene. These phases form the fine-grained matrix materials for cataclasites and cements for breccias where they completely surround angular to subangular clasts of variably altered and deformed basalt. Bulk rock geochemical compositions of the fault rocks are largely governed by the abundance of quartz veins. When compositions are normalized to compensate for the excess silica, the fault rocks exhibit evidence for additional geochemical changes via hydrothermal alteration, including the loss of mobile elements and gain of some trace metals and magnesium. Microstructures and compositions suggest that the fault rocks developed over multiple increments of deformation and hydrothermal fluid flow in the subaxial environment of the SEPR; faults related to the opening of the Pito Deep Rift can be distinguished by their orientation and fault rock microstructure. Some subaxial deformation increments were likely linked with violent discharge events associated with fluid pressure fluctuations and mineral sealing within the fault zones. Other increments were linked with

  15. HYDROTHERMAL MINERALOGY OF RESEARCH DRILL HOLE Y-3, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Keith E.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    1984-01-01

    The approximate paragenetic sequence of hydrothermal minerals in the Y-3 U. S. Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, is: hydrothermal chalcedony, hematite, pyrite, quartz, clay minerals (smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite), calcite, chlorite, fluorite, pyrite, quartz, zeolite minerals (analcime, dachiardite, laumontite, stilbite, and yugawaralite), and clay minerals (smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite). A few hydrothermal minerals that were identified in drill core Y-3 (lepidolite, aegirine, pectolite, and truscottite) are rarely found in modern geothermal areas. The alteration minerals occur primarily as vug and fracture fillings that were deposited from cooling thermal water. Refs.

  16. Field guide to hydrothermal alteration in the White River altered area and in the Osceola Mudflow, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Rytuba, James J.; Ashley, Roger P.; Blakely, Richard J.; Vallance, James W.; Newport, Grant R.; Heinemeyer, Gary R.

    2003-01-01

    The Cenozoic Cascades arcs of southwestern Washington are the product of long-lived, but discontinuous, magmatism beginning in the Eocene and continuing to the present (for example, Christiansen and Yeats, 1992). This magmatism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust beneath the North American continent. The magmatic rocks are divided into two subparallel, north-trending continental-margin arcs, the Eocene to Pliocene Western Cascades, and the Quaternary High Cascades, which overlies, and is east of, the Western Cascades. Both arcs are calc-alkaline and are characterized by voluminous mafic lava flows (mostly basalt to basaltic andesite compositions) and scattered large stratovolcanoes of mafic andesite to dacite compositions. Silicic volcanism is relatively uncommon. Quartz diorite to granite plutons are exposed in more deeply eroded parts of the Western Cascades Arc (for example, Mount Rainier area and just north of Mt. St. Helens). Hydrothermal alteration is widespread in both Tertiary and Quaternary igneous rocks of the Cascades arcs. Most alteration in the Tertiary Western Cascades Arc resulted from hydrothermal systems associated with small plutons, some of which formed porphyry copper and related deposits, including copper-rich breccia pipes, polymetallic veins, and epithermal gold-silver deposits. Hydrothermal alteration also is present on many Quaternary stratovolcanoes of the High Cascades Arc. On some High Cascades volcanoes, this alteration resulted in severely weakened volcanic edifices that were susceptible to failure and catastrophic landslides. Most notable is the sector collapse of the northeast side of Mount Rainier that occurred about 5,600 yr. B.P. This collapse resulted in formation of the clay-rich Osceola Mudflow that traveled 120 km down valley from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound covering more than 200 km2. This field trip examines several styles and features of hydrothermal alteration related to Cenozoic magmatism in the Cascades arcs

  17. Hydrothermal mineralogy and fluid inclusions chemistry to understand the roots of active geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Dilles, J. H.; Heinrich, C.

    2013-12-01

    An integrated study to link magmatic textures, magmatic mineral compositions, hydrothermal alteration zoning, hydrothermal mineral chemistry, and fluid inclusion compositions has been undertaken to link an intrusive complex and its degassing alteration halo with their surface equivalent in an active geothermal system. Ngatamariki geothermal system, New Zealand, presents a unique feature in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). Drilling intercepted an intrusive complex with a high temperature alteration halo similarly to what is observed in magmatic-derived ore deposits. Thus it presents the perfect opportunity to study the magmatic-hydrothermal transition of the TVZ by characterizing the nature of the deep magmatic fluids link to the heat source of the world known geothermal fields. The record of magmatic-hydrothermal fluid-rock interactions preserved at Ngatamariki may be analogous of processes presently occurring at depth beneath TVZ geothermal systems. The intrusive complex consists of over 5 km3 of tonalite, diorite, basalt and aplitic dykes. Evidence of undercooling subsolidus magmatic textures such as myrmekite and skeletal overgrowth are commonly observed and often linked to volatile loss. The fluids released during the crystallization of the intrusive complex are interpreted to be at the origin of the surrounding high temperature alteration halo. Advanced argillic to potassic alteration and high temperature acidic assemblage is associated with high-temperature quartz veining at depth and vuggy silica at the paleo-surface. Major element compositions of the white micas associated with the high temperature halo show a transition from, muscovite to phengite, muscovitic illite away from the intrusion, with a transition to pyrophyllite and/ or topaz, and andalusite characteristic of more acidic conditions. Abundant high-density (up to 59 wt% NaCl eq and homogenization temperatures of 550 degree Celsius and above) coexist with low-density vapor fluid inclusions. This

  18. Mixing of fluids in hydrothermal ore-forming (Sn,W) systems: stable isotope and rare earth elements data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, T. M.; Popova, J. A.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Ignatiev, A. V.; Matveeva, S. S.; Limantseva, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental and physico-chemical modeling data witness to important role of mixing of different type of fluids during tin and tungsten ore formation in hydrothermal systems. Mixing of magmatogeneous fluids, exsolved from granite melts, with exogenic, initially meteoric waters in hydrothermal ore-forming systems may change chemical composition of ore-forming fluid, causing cassiterite and/or wolframite precipitation (Heinrich, 1990; Sushchevskaya, Ryzhenko, 2002). We studied the process of genetically different fluids mixing for two economic Sn-W deposits, situated in the Iultin ore region (North-East of Russia, Chukotka Penninsula). The Iultin and Svetloe deposits are located in the apical parts of close situated leucogranite stocks, formed at the final stage of the Iultin complex emplacement. Both deposits are composed of a series of quartz veins among the flyschoid rocks (T 1-2), cut by the dikes (K1) of lamprophyre, granodiorite porphyre and alpite. The veins of the deposits are dominated by the productive quartz-wolframite-cassiterite-arsenopyrite-muscovite mineral assemblage. Topaz, beryl, fluorite, and albite occur sporadically. The later sulfide (loellingite-stannite-chalcopyrite) and quartz-fluorite-calcite assemblages show insignificant development. The preore quartz veinlets in host hornfels contain disseminated iron sulfides, chalcopyrite, muscovite. Isotopic (H, O, Ar) study of minerals, supplemented by oxygen isotope data of host granites and metamorphic rocks gave us possibility to conclude, that at the Iultin and the Svetloye deposits fluid mixing was fixed on the early stages of deposit formation and could be regarded as probable cause of metal (W, Sn) precipitation. During postore time the intensive involvement of isotopically light exogenic waters have changed: a) the initial character of oxygen isotope zonality; b) the initial hydrogen isotope composition of muscovites, up to meteoric calculated values for productive fluid (while the δ18O

  19. Hydrothermal alteration minerals in Aluto Langano geothermal wells, Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Gebregzabher, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Aluto Langano geothermal field is characterized by alteration mineral assemblages of calcite, quartz, chlorite, undifferentiated clays, hematite, biotite and epidote. The presence of garnet and sphene is also reported for one of the wells. The measured temperature for the reservoir is above 300/sup 0/C. Permeability of the reservoir is highly influenced by the deposition of hydrothermal minerals.

  20. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  1. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ(7)Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ(7)Liquartz-fluid = -8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R(2) = 0.98; 175 °C-340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ(7)Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ(7)Li range from -0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175-340 °C. This δ(7)Li range, together with Li-O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process. PMID:26347051

  2. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-08

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ(7)Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ(7)Liquartz-fluid = -8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R(2) = 0.98; 175 °C-340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ(7)Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ(7)Li range from -0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175-340 °C. This δ(7)Li range, together with Li-O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process.

  3. Hydrogen speciation in synthetic quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aines, R.D.; Kirby, S.H.; Rossman, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The dominant hydrogen impurity in synthetic quartz is molecular H2O. H-OH groups also occur, but there is no direct evidence for the hydrolysis of Si-O-Si bonds to yield Si-OH HO-Si groups. Molecular H2O concentrations in the synthetic quartz crystals studied range from less than 10 to 3,300 ppm (H/Si), and decrease smoothly by up to an order of magnitude with distance away from the seed. OH- concentrations range from 96 to 715 ppm, and rise smoothly with distance away from the seed by up to a factor of three. The observed OH- is probably all associated with cationic impurities, as in natural quartz. Molecular H2O is the dominant initial hydrogen impurity in weak quartz. The hydrolytic weakening of quartz may be caused by the transformation H2O + Si-O-Si ??? 2SiOH, but this may be a transitory change with the SiOH groups recombining to form H2O, and the average SiOH concentration remaining very low. Synthetic quartz is strengthened when the H2O is accumulated into fluid inclusions and cannot react with the quartz framework. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  4. The N story of a hydrothermal Acheaen BIF-bearing chert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C.; Orberger, B.; Pinti, D. L.; Gallien, J.; Fialin, M.; Daudin, L.; Hashizume, K.

    2004-05-01

    N isotopes in rocks can trace past biological activity, but it implies a deep knowledge of the N trapping sites and of the associated geo-biochemical N fractionation processes. The studied chert (PB 458) belongs to the 3.2 Ga Marble Bar complex, Pilbara, Western Australia. Isotopic analyses showed two N components with d15N of 6.7±1.6% and 10.0±1.6%, respectively. New mineralogical and REE analyses distinguished three microenvironments: 1) a silicified basalt having preserved its porphyric texture, with euhedral hydrothermal Fe-sulfides precipitated in the protomafic minerals; (2) Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide (BIFs) laminae and associated Ni-Cu-Mn-Au-Pd alloys and HREE-Y phosphates alternate with cryptocrystalline quartz, hosting magnetite inclusions. BIFs are initially composed of magnetite and carbonates, segregated from a Fe-Ca-Mg-enriched fluid, resulting from water-basalt interaction; (3) massive cryptocrystalline quartz with interstitial K-feldspar, Ba-K-mica and Fe-sulfides representing the residual fluids. K-Al-silicates incorporated 130 to 2540 ppm of N, probably NH4+ and 2990 to 6970 ppm of C from hydrothermal fluids. Oxidizing and slightly acid fluids later infiltrated the chert, and quartz veins were formed during diagenesis. Goethite and hydrous Mn-Fe minerals replaced carbonates, sulfides and magnetite, incorporating 500 to 4550 ppm of N and 3440 to 6000 ppm of C. N might occur as NH4+, replacing K+ in the Fe-Mn oxyhyroxide structure. The oxyhydroxide texture is vermicular and filamentous Their heterogeneous chemical composition is caused possibly by microbial activity. This is in agreement with measured N/C ratios of 0.06-0.6, similar to those known for marine bacteria. The d15N signatures of N are similar to those measured in marine sediments and derived from metabolic activity of bacteria (d15N=7.6%). The higher measured d15N values of 10% could be due to post-emplacement devolatilization of the sample or alternatively to different redox conditions during

  5. The physical hydrology of magmatic-hydrothermal systems: High-resolution 18O records of magmatic-meteoric water interaction from the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are important economic Cu, Au, Mo and Sn resources (Sillitoe, 2010, Kesler, 1994). The ore formation is a result of superimposed enrichment processes and metals can precipitate due to fluid-rock interaction and/or temperature drop caused by convection or mixing with meteoric fluid (Heinrich and Candela 2014). Microthermometry and LA-ICP MS trace element analyses of fluid inclusions of a well-characterized quartz sample from the Yankee Lode quartz-cassiterite vein deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) suggest that tin precipitation was driven by dilution of hot magmatic water by meteoric fluids (Audétat et al.1998). High resolution in situ oxygen isotope measurements of quartz have the potential to detect changing fluid sources during the evolution of a hydrothermal system. We analyzed the euhedral growth zones of this previously well-studied quartz sample. Growth temperatures are provided by Audétat et al. (1998) and Audétat (1999). Calculated δ 18O values of the quartz- and/or cassiterite-precipitating fluid show significant variability through the zoned crystal. The first and second quartz generations (Q1 and Q2) were precipitated from a fluid of magmatic isotopic composition with δ 18O values of ˜ 8 - 10 ‰. δ 18O values of Q3- and tourmaline-precipitating fluids show a transition from magmatic δ 18O values of ˜ 8 ‰ to ˜ -5 ‰. The outermost quartz-chlorite-muscovite zone was precipitated from a fluid with a significant meteoric water component reflected by very light δ 18O values of about -15 ‰ which is consistent with values found by previous studies (Sun and Eadington, 1987) using conventional O-isotope analysis of veins in the distal halo of the granite intrusion. Intense incursion of meteoric water during Q3 precipitation (light δ 18O values) agrees with the main ore formation event, though the first occurrence of cassiterite is linked to Q2 precipitating fluid with magmatic-like isotope signature. This

  6. Metamorphic fluid flow in the northeastern part of the 3.8 3.7 Ga Isua Greenstone Belt (SW Greenland): A re-evalution of fluid inclusion evidence for early Archean seafloor-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijlen, Wouter; Appel, Peter W. U.; Frezzotti, Maria-Luce; Horsewell, Andy; Touret, Jacques L. R.

    2006-06-01

    -density CH 4 (molar volume > 105.33 cm 3/mol) and low-salinity H 2O-NaCl (0.2-3.7 eq. wt% NaCl). These successive fluid inclusion assemblages record a retrograde P-T evolution close to a geothermal gradient of ˜30 °C/km, but also indicate fluid pressure variations and the introduction of highly reducing fluids at ˜200-300 °C and 0.5-2 kbar. The quartz globules in the pillow fragments only contain sporadic CH 4(+H 2) and brine inclusions, corresponding with the late generations present in the cementing and crosscutting veins. We argue that due to the large extent of static recrystallization in quartz globules in the pillow breccia fragments, only these relatively late fluid inclusions have been preserved, and that they do not represent remnants of an early, seafloor-hydrothermal system as was previously proposed. Modeling the oxidation state of the fluids indicates a rock buffered system at peak-metamorphic conditions, but suggests a change towards fluid-graphite disequilibrium and a logf/fO above the Quartz-Fayalite-Magnetite buffer during retrograde evolution. Most likely, this indicates a control on redox conditions and on fluid speciation by ultramafic rocks in the IGB. Finally, this study shows that microscopic solid graphite in recrystallized metamorphic rocks from Isua can be deposited inorganically from a fluid phase, adding to the complexity of processes that formed reduced carbon in the oldest, well-preserved supracrustal rocks on Earth.

  7. Diagenesis of 1900-year-old siliceous sinter (opal-A to quartz) at Opal Mound, Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynne, Bridget Y.; Campbell, Kathleen A.; Moore, J. N.; Browne, P. R. L.

    2005-08-01

    step, the X-ray powder diffraction trace undergoes an early shift in peak position, from ˜4.0 to 4.09 Å, lining itself up in the position of the next more advanced mineralogical state, prior to emergence of the classic opal-CT blades. In the second step, the bladed lepispheres subsequently change into rectangular nano-rods (˜50 × 100 nm long segments) during early opal-C development. During the third step of early quartz formation, the opal-C nano-rods recrystallize into groups of blocky nanostructures, each up to 200 × 300 nm. Quartz crystals grow at the expense of and pseudomorph opal-C, shown by remnant bands of blocky nanostructures at the base of the quartz crystals. Two generations of quartz crystals occur at Opal Mound: (1) diagenetic, which developed as opal-C nanostructures recrystallize to quartz; and (2) hydrothermal, formed by the injection of silica-infused thermal fluids into fractures and veins within the sinter deposit. Several silica phases commonly co-exist within individual samples. Moganite, a metastable silica phase, occurs with opal-CT, opal-C and diagenetic quartz, but is most abundant with opal-CT. Hence, the complete diagenetic continuum from opal-A to quartz is preserved within this sinter deposit. It formed in the short time span of ≤ 1900 years.

  8. Pathogenesis of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Oklu, Rahmi; Habito, Roy; Mayr, Manuel; Deipolyi, Amy R; Albadawi, Hassan; Hesketh, Robin; Walker, T Gregory; Linskey, Katy R; Long, Chandler A; Wicky, Stephan; Stoughton, Julianne; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of varicose veins and the recent surge in research on the condition, the precise mechanisms underlying their development remain uncertain. In the past decade, there has been a shift from initial theories based on purely mechanical factors to hypotheses pointing to complex molecular changes causing histologic alterations in the vessel wall and extracellular matrix. Despite progress in understanding the molecular aspects of venous insufficiency, therapies for symptomatic varicose veins are directed toward anatomic and physical interventions. The present report reviews current evidence identifying the underlying biochemical alterations in the pathogenesis of varicose veins.

  9. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  10. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  11. Thermoelectrically-cooled quartz microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, D.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature of microbalance can be maintained at ambient temperature or held at some other desired temperature. Microbalance has tow-stage thermoelectric device that controls temperature of quartz crystal. Heat can be pumped to or from balance by Peltier effect.

  12. Field guide to hydrothermal alteration in the White River altered area and in the Osceola Mudflow, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Rytuba, James J.; Ashley, Roger P.; Blakely, Richard J.; Vallance, James W.; Newport, Grant R.; Heinemeyer, Gary R.

    2003-01-01

    The Cenozoic Cascades arcs of southwestern Washington are the product of long-lived, but discontinuous, magmatism beginning in the Eocene and continuing to the present (for example, Christiansen and Yeats, 1992). This magmatism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust beneath the North American continent. The magmatic rocks are divided into two subparallel, north-trending continental-margin arcs, the Eocene to Pliocene Western Cascades, and the Quaternary High Cascades, which overlies, and is east of, the Western Cascades. Both arcs are calc-alkaline and are characterized by voluminous mafic lava flows (mostly basalt to basaltic andesite compositions) and scattered large stratovolcanoes of mafic andesite to dacite compositions. Silicic volcanism is relatively uncommon. Quartz diorite to granite plutons are exposed in more deeply eroded parts of the Western Cascades Arc (for example, Mount Rainier area and just north of Mt. St. Helens). Hydrothermal alteration is widespread in both Tertiary and Quaternary igneous rocks of the Cascades arcs. Most alteration in the Tertiary Western Cascades Arc resulted from hydrothermal systems associated with small plutons, some of which formed porphyry copper and related deposits, including copper-rich breccia pipes, polymetallic veins, and epithermal gold-silver deposits. Hydrothermal alteration also is present on many Quaternary stratovolcanoes of the High Cascades Arc. On some High Cascades volcanoes, this alteration resulted in severely weakened volcanic edifices that were susceptible to failure and catastrophic landslides. Most notable is the sector collapse of the northeast side of Mount Rainier that occurred about 5,600 yr. B.P. This collapse resulted in formation of the clay-rich Osceola Mudflow that traveled 120 km down valley from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound covering more than 200 km2. This field trip examines several styles and features of hydrothermal alteration related to Cenozoic magmatism in the Cascades arcs

  13. Geology and mineralogy of the Santo Nino Ag-Pb-Zn vein, Fresnillo District, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, J.B.; Zantop, H.; Birnie, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Santo Nino Ag-Pb-Zn vein is the major producer of the Fresnillo District, located 750 km NW of Mexico City. It is over 2.4 km long, more than 480 m in vertical extent, more than 2.5 m wide overall, and has average grades of >600 gm/t Ag and <2% combined Pb and Zn. The vein is hosted by a tilted sequence of Cretaceous graywackes, shales and andesitic volcanics and extends upward into a Lower Tertiary conglomerate. Up to 5 separate opening events occurred along the vein, resulting in discontinuous stages of brecciation and crustiform banding. Ore mineral zonation is well developed both vertically and laterally and closely reflects metal and metal ratio distributions. Ore minerals are sphalerite, galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, marcasite, pyrrhotite, acanthite, native silver, and three coexisting solid solution series, pyrargyrite-proustite, polybasite-arsenopolybasite, and tetrahedrite-tennantite in a gangue of quartz, calcite, clay, sericite,and chlorite. A 5-stage paragenetic sequence can be established: 1) pyrite, arsenopyrite, quartz, 2) sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, quartz, 3) tetrahedrite, pyrargyrite, polybasite, quartz, 4) acanthite, native silver, calcite, quartz, and 5) calcite. Preliminary microprobe analyses indicate that the Ag-rich solid solution series are Sb-rich in the central and upper portions of the vein and As-rich at deeper levels.

  14. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  15. Deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  16. Petrology, composition, and age of intrusive rocks associated with the Quartz Hill molybdenite deposit, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, T.; Smith, James G.; Elliott, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A large porphyry molybdenum deposit (Quartz Hill deposit) was recently discovered in the heart of the Coast Range batholithic complex about 70 km E of Ketchikan, SE Alaska. Intrusive rocks associated with the mineral deposit form two composite epizonal to hypabyssal stocks and many dikes in country rocks. All observed metallization and alteration is within the Quartz Hill stock. Molybdenite forms fracture coatings and occurs in veins with quartz. Alteration is widespread and includes development of secondary quartz, pyrite, K-feldspar, biotite, white mica, chlorite, and zeolite. Field relations indicate that the stocks were emplaced after regional uplift and erosion of the Coast Range batholithic complex, and K-Ar data show that intrusion and alteration took place in late Oligocene time, about 27 to 30 Ma ago. Data from the Ketchikan quadrangle indicate that porphyry molybdenum metallization in the Coast Range batholithic complex is associated with regionally extensive but spotty, middle Tertiary or younger, felsic magmatism. -from Authors

  17. Xenopumice erupted on 15 October 2011 offshore of El Hierro (Canary Islands): a subvolcanic snapshot of magmatic, hydrothermal and pyrometamorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, S.; Di Roberto, A.; Meletlidis, S.; Pompilio, M.; Bertagnini, A.; Agostini, S.; Ridolfi, F.; Renzulli, A.

    2015-06-01

    On 15 October 2011, a submarine eruption offshore of El Hierro Island gave rise to floating volcanic products, known as xenopumices, i.e., pumiceous xenoliths partly mingled and coated with the juvenile basanitic magma. Over the last few years, no consensus in the scientific community in explaining the origin of these products has been reached. In order to better understand the formation of xenopumice, we present a textural, mineralogical, and geochemical study of the possible magmatic, hydrothermal, and pyrometamorphic processes, which usually operate in the plumbing systems of active volcanoes. We carried out a comprehensive SEM investigation and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses on some samples representative of three different xenopumice facies. All the data were compared with previous studies, new data for El Hierro extrusives and a literature dataset of Canary Islands igneous and sedimentary rocks. In the investigated xenopumices, we emphasize the presence of restitic magmatic phases as well as crystallization of minerals (mainly olivine + pyroxene + magnetite aggregates) as pseudomorphs after pre-existing mafic phenocrysts, providing evidence of pyrometamorphism induced by the high-T juvenile basanitic magma. In addition, we identify veins consisting of zircon + REE-oxides + mullite associated with Si-rich glass and hydrothermal quartz, which indicate the fundamental role played by hydrothermal fluid circulation in the xenopumice protolith. The petrological data agree with a pre-syneruptive formation of the xenopumice, when El Hierro basanite magma intruded hydrothermally altered trachyandesite to trachyte rocks and triggered local partial melting. Therefore, the El Hierro xenopumice represents a snapshot of the transient processes at the magma-wall rock interface, which normally occurs in the feeding system of active volcanoes.

  18. Geology, alteration, and magmatic-hydrothermal history of The Geysers felsite -- potential applications for exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The [open quotes]felsite[close quotes] is a shallow, young, granitic intrusive body centrally located within and beneath. The Geysers steam field. The field and the felsite are coaxial, and hydrothermal alteration effected by hot-water dominated geothermal systems antedating the modern steam reservoir shows systematic vertical zonation with respect to the pluton. The research summarized in this communication was undertaken both to clarify the role of the pluton in reservoir evolution, and to characterize critical felsite-specific controls on the fields's deep porosity and permeability. The felsite comprises at least three major intrusive phases. Two are high-silica granites probably older than 1.3 Ma. The third is granodiorite (1 Ma), temporally and chemically equivalent to overlying extrusive dacites of the Clear Lake volcanic field. All three intrusive phases are too old to be heat sources for the modern steam field, but probably were the heat engines for the prior liquid-dominant systems. Younger, deeper magmatic heat sources are strongly implied for the current vapor-dominated regime. Porosity in the felsite is provided by: (1) Extensively mineralized fractures and breccias, probably of both tectonic and high-temperature hydrothermal origin; and (2) miarolitic cavities in the upper levels of the pluton. The latter could be analogous to calcite-dissolution cavities in overlying metagraywacke -- they could serve as storage sites for the fields's liquid water reserves. Porosity in these fractures, breccias, and vugs in partially occluded by hydrothermal vein minerals deposited in prior hotwater-dominated systems --tourmaline, ferroaxinite, quartz, potassium feldspar, epidote, actinolite, prehnite, and many others. Such secondary mineralization conceptually could serve as an excellent exploration guide to potentially productive portions of the felsite beyond the field's present boundaries.

  19. The physical hydrology of magmatic-hydrothermal systems: High-resolution 18O records of magmatic-meteoric water interaction from the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are important economic Cu, Au, Mo and Sn resources (Sillitoe, 2010, Kesler, 1994). The ore formation is a result of superimposed enrichment processes and metals can precipitate due to fluid-rock interaction and/or temperature drop caused by convection or mixing with meteoric fluid (Heinrich and Candela 2014). Microthermometry and LA-ICP MS trace element analyses of fluid inclusions of a well-characterized quartz sample from the Yankee Lode quartz-cassiterite vein deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) suggest that tin precipitation was driven by dilution of hot magmatic water by meteoric fluids (Audétat et al.1998). High resolution in situ oxygen isotope measurements of quartz have the potential to detect changing fluid sources during the evolution of a hydrothermal system. We analyzed the euhedral growth zones of this previously well-studied quartz sample. Growth temperatures are provided by Audétat et al. (1998) and Audétat (1999). Calculated δ 18O values of the quartz- and/or cassiterite-precipitating fluid show significant variability through the zoned crystal. The first and second quartz generations (Q1 and Q2) were precipitated from a fluid of magmatic isotopic composition with δ 18O values of ˜ 8 - 10 ‰. δ 18O values of Q3- and tourmaline-precipitating fluids show a transition from magmatic δ 18O values of ˜ 8 ‰ to ˜ -5 ‰. The outermost quartz-chlorite-muscovite zone was precipitated from a fluid with a significant meteoric water component reflected by very light δ 18O values of about -15 ‰ which is consistent with values found by previous studies (Sun and Eadington, 1987) using conventional O-isotope analysis of veins in the distal halo of the granite intrusion. Intense incursion of meteoric water during Q3 precipitation (light δ 18O values) agrees with the main ore formation event, though the first occurrence of cassiterite is linked to Q2 precipitating fluid with magmatic-like isotope signature. This

  20. Geophysical anomalies and quartz microstructures, Eastern Warburton Basin, North-east South Australia: Tectonic or impact shock metamorphic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikson, Andrew Y.; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Saygin, Erdinc

    2013-03-01

    The Eastern Warburton Basin, Northeast South Australia, features major geophysical anomalies, including a magnetic high of near-200 nT centred on a 25 km-wide magnetic low (< 100 nT), interpreted in terms of a magmatic body below 6 km depth. A distinct seismic tomographic low velocity anomaly may reflect its thick (9.5 km) sedimentary section, high temperatures and possible deep fracturing. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of granites resolves microbreccia veins consisting of micron-scale particles injected into resorbed quartz grains. Planar and sub-planar elements in quartz grains (Qz/PE) occur in granites, volcanics and sediments of the > 30,000 km-large Eastern Warburton Basin. The Qz/PE include multiple intersecting planar to curved sub-planar elements with relic lamellae less than 2 μm wide with spacing of 4-5 μm. Qz/PE are commonly re-deformed, displaying bent and wavy patterns accompanied with fluid inclusions. U-stage measurements of a total of 243 planar sets in 157 quartz grains indicate dominance of ∏{10-12}, ω{10-13} and subsidiary §{11-22}, {22-41}, m{10-11} and x{51-61} planes. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis displays relic narrow ≤ 1 μm-wide lamellae and relic non-sub grain boundaries where crystal segments maintain optical continuity. Extensive sericite alteration of feldspar suggests hydrothermal alteration to a depth of 500 m below the unconformity which overlies the Qz/PE-bearing Warburton Basin terrain. The data are discussed in terms of (A) Tectonic-metamorphic deformation and (B) impact shock metamorphism producing planar deformation features (Qz/PDF). Deformed Qz/PE are compared to re-deformed Qz/PDFs in the Sudbury, Vredefort, Manicouagan and Charlevoix impact structures. A 4-5 km uplift of the Big Lake Granite Suite during 298-295 Ma is consistent with missing of upper Ordovician to Devonian strata and possible impact rebound. The occurrence of circular seismic tomography anomalies below the east

  1. Geochronology and Nd isotope geochemistry of the Gameleira Cu-Au deposit, Serra dos Carajás, Brazil: 1.8-1.7 Ga hydrothermal alteration and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Márcio M.; Lindenmayer, Zara G.; Laux, Jorge H.; Armstrong, Richard; de Araújo, Janice Caldas

    2003-01-01

    The Gameleira deposit is one of several important Cu-Au deposits associated with the late Archean (ca. 2.7 Ga) volcanic rocks of the Itacaiúnas supergroup in the Carajás mineral province, southeastern Pará. It comprises mainly biotite- and sulphide-rich veins and quartz-grunerite-biotite-gold hydrothermal veins that cut andesitic rocks. It is interpreted as representative of the Fe oxide Cu-Au class of deposit. Sm-Nd isotopic data indicate an age of 2719±80 Ma (MSWD=3.0) and ɛNd( T) of -1.4 for the host meta-andesites. Metavolcanic rocks and cogenetic gabbros give an age of 2757±81 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -0.8. This is considered the best estimate for the crystallization age of the Gameleira volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. Negative ɛNd( T) and Archean TDM model ages (mostly between 2.8 and 3.1 Ga) suggest some contamination with older crustal material. The andesitic/gabbroic rocks are cut by two generations of granite dykes. The older has striking petrographic and geochemical similarities to the ca. 1.87 Ga alkali-rich Pojuca granite, which is exposed a few kilometers to the northwest of the deposit. The younger is a leucogranite with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 1583+9/-7 Ma. Neodymium isotopic analyses of the two generations of granites indicate a strong crustal affinity and possible derivation from reworking of the Archean crust. The quartz-grunerite-gold hydrothermal vein yields a Sm-Nd isochron (MSWD=.83) age of 1839±15 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -9.2. Pervasive potassic alteration, represented by the widespread formation of biotite in the country rocks, is dated by Ar-Ar at 1734±8 Ma, and a similar age of 1700±31 Ma (1 σ) is indicated by the Sm-Nd isochron for the biotite-sulphide veins. Similar to that for the quartz-grunerite vein, the ɛNd( T) value for the sulphide-rich veins is strongly negative (-8.2), thereby suggesting that the original fluids percolated through, leached, or were derived from igneous rocks with an Archaean Nd isotopic signature

  2. Role of Substrate on Quartz Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farver, J. R.; Winslow, D.; Onasch, C.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz cementation in quartz aggregates has been experimentally investigated. The starting material was disaggregated detrital quartz grains from the well-sorted, mature St. Peter Sandstone. The ‘as-is’ grains have patches of iron oxide coatings and some have euhedral overgrowths that contain iron oxide dust rims. In addition a set of experiments was run using grains that were cleaned by soaking in sodium hydrosulfite and sodium bisulfate solutions to remove exposed iron oxide coatings. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (≈30 mg) to provide a source of silica for the quartz cement, AlCl3 powder (≈3 mg) to provide a tracer for Cathodoluminescence (CL) identification of cement formed during the experiment, 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (≈25 mg) to increase the silica solubility and to better mimic oil field brines, and the natural quartz grains (100-130 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in Au capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 250°C to 450°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 8 weeks. After the experiments, the samples were vacuum impregnated with a low viscosity epoxy containing a blue dye. After curing, the sample charge was sawn in half along its long axis and one half was polished (to 1 micron diamond paste) for analysis. The nature and amount of quartz cement in the samples were determined by a combination of CL, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Photomosaics of the samples were created and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement formed during the experiment was easily recognized from the quartz grains (and previous overgrowths) by the difference in luminescence. The results indicate the amorphous silica powder provides a ready source for silica for quartz cementation due to its greater solubility than the quartz. The cementation rates are rapid (>14% cement formed in 2 weeks at 450°C and >7% in 8 weeks at 250°C). Compared to

  3. Long-lived interaction between hydrothermal and magmatic fluids in the Soultz-sous-Forêts granitic system (Rhine Graben, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardien, Véronique; Rabinowicz, Michel; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis; Dubois, Michel; Boulvais, Philippe; Martini, Rossana

    2016-03-01

    The 5 km deep drilling at Soultz-sous-Forêts samples a granitic intrusion under its sedimentary cover. Core samples at different depths allow study of the evolving conditions of fluid-rock interaction, from the syn-tectonic emplacement of Hercynian granites at depth until post-cooling history and alteration close to the surface. Hydrogen, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of CO2 and H2O have been measured in fluid inclusions trapped in magmatic quartz within samples collected along the drill core. Early Fluid Inclusions Assemblage (FIA) contains aqueous carbonic fluids whereas the latest FIA are H2O-rich. In the early FIA, the amount of CO2 and the δ13C value both decrease with depth, revealing two distinct sources of carbon, one likely derived from sedimentary carbonates (δ13C = - 2‰ V-PDB) and another from the continental crust (δ13C = - 9‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotope composition of bulk granites indicates a third carbon source of organic derivation (δ13C = - 20‰ V-PDB). Using a δD - δ18O plot, we argue that the water trapped in quartz grains is mainly of meteoric origin somewhat mixed with magmatic water. The emplacement of the Soultz-sous-Forêts granite pluton occurred in a North 030-040° wrench zone. After consolidation of the granite mush at ~ 600 °C, sinistral shear (γ ~ 1) concentrated the final leucocratic melt in vertical planes oriented along (σ1, σ2). Crystallization of this residual leucocratic melt occurred while shearing was still active. At a temperature of ~ 550 °C, crystallization ended with the formation of vertical quartz veins spaced about 5 mm, and exhibiting a width of several cm. The quartz veins form a connected network of a few kilometers in height, generated during hydrothermal contraction of the intrusion. Quartz crystallization led to the exsolution of 30% by volume of the aqueous fluid. As quartz grains were the latest solid phase still plastic, shearing localized inside the connected quartz network. Aqueous

  4. Natural fracking and the genesis of five-element veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Gregor; Burisch, Mathias; Neumann, Udo

    2016-08-01

    Hydrothermal Ag-Co-Ni-Bi-As (five-element vein type) ore deposits show very conspicuous textures of the native elements silver, bismuth, and arsenic indicating formation from a rapid, far-from-equilibrium process. Such textures include up to dm-large tree- and wire-like aggregates overgrown by Co-Ni-Fe arsenides and mostly carbonates. Despite the historical and contemporary importance of five-element vein type deposits as sources of silver, bismuth, and cobalt, and despite of spectacular museum specimens, their process of formation is not yet understood and has been a matter of debate since centuries. We propose, based on observations from a number of classical European five-element vein deposits and carbon isotope analyses, that "natural fracking," i.e., liberation of hydrocarbons or hydrocarbon-bearing fluids during break up of rocks in the vicinity of an active hydrothermal system and mixing between these hydrocarbons (e.g., methane and/or methane-bearing fluids) and a metal-rich hydrothermal fluid is responsible for ore precipitation and the formation of the unusual ore textures and assemblages. Thermodynamic and isotope mixing calculations show that the textural, chemical, and isotopic features of the investigated deposits can entirely be explained by this mechanism.

  5. Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Valla, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis includes thrombosis of the hepatic venous system (Budd-Chiari syndrome) and thrombosis of the portal venous system. Both conditions share uncommon prothrombotic disorders as causal factors, among which myeloproliferative neoplasms rank first. Budd-Chiari syndrome presents with acute or chronic, asymptomatic or severe liver disease. Diagnosis depends on noninvasive imaging of the obstructed hepatic venous outflow tract. A spontaneously fatal course can be prevented by a stepwise approach: (1) anticoagulation therapy, specific therapy for underlying disease, and medical or endoscopic management of liver-related complications, (2) angioplasty/stenting in a second step, and (3) eventually the insertion of transjugular intrahepatic stent shunt or liver transplantation. Recent portal vein thrombosis mostly jeopardizes the gut. Early anticoagulation prevents thrombus extension but is incompletely successful in achieving recanalization. Chronic portal vein thrombosis is complicated by bleeding related to portal hypertension, which can be prevented by usual pharmacological and endoscopic means. The prevention of recurrent thrombosis is achieved by anticoagulation therapy the impact of which on the risk of bleeding remains unclear. Portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis is likely neither a direct consequence of nor a direct cause for liver disease progression. Therefore, the indications and effects of anticoagulation therapy for portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis remain uncertain. PMID:26080307

  6. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S.; Hussain, Fuad F.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Lopez, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  7. An experimental study of hydroxyl in quartz using infrared spectroscopy and ion microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovetta, M. R.; Blacic, J. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Holloway, J. R.

    1989-05-01

    We have measured the concentrations of hydroxyl, deuterium, Al, Fe, Li, Na, K, and Rb in a natural quartz crystal before and after hydrothermal treatment at 1.5 GPa and 800°-1050°C. We employed microbeam infrared spectroscopy and ion probe techniques to avoid impurities trapped in healed cracks and fluid inclusions that might bias a normal bulk analysis. The ƒH2 of our experiments were buffered to the hematite-magnetite-(OH) fluid, nickel-nickel oxide-(OH) fluid, or iron-wustite-(OH) fluid phase assemblages. After hydrothermal treatment, the samples contained local concentrations of hydrogen or deuterium of several hundred atoms/106 Si (the starting crystal contained 45 H/106 Si). We did several experiments with Al2O3 or RbCl added to the sample charge and found local Al enrichment where the deuterium concentration was high but no Rb enrichment. Finally, we measured trace elements and hydroxyl in a quartz sample after plastic deformation in a talc furnace assembly; in regions of the sample containing basal and prismatic deformation lamellae (but no visible healed microcracks at 400× optical magnification) hydroxyl had increased to ˜200 OH/106 Si with no increase in Al or Fe. Samples enriched in hydroxyl but not Al (including the plastically strained sample) gave infrared spectra resembling natural amethyst crystals. We observed that the sharp pleochroic peaks near ˜3400 cm-1 and present in the starting crystal, were very intense only in samples showing Al enrichment, whereas the intensity of the sharp pleochroic peaks near 3600 cm-1 and broad isotropic absorption were independent of Al. Our analyses indicate that more hydrogen was introduced into the treated samples than Al or Fe. Because one proton or alkali cation is needed to screen each Al or Fe atom substituted into a Si lattice site, we conclude that the hydrothermal treatment had produced new hydroxyl defects in the quartz that did not contain Al or Fe. Although the speciation of this excess hydroxyl

  8. Thermochronology of the Cornubian batholith in southwest England: Implications for pluton emplacement and protracted hydrothermal mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesley, J.T.; Halliday, A.N.; Snee, L.W.; Mezger, K.; Shepherd, T.J.; Scrivener, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The metalliferous ore deposits of southwest England are associated with biotite-muscovite granites that intruded upper Paleozoic sediments and volcanic rocks at the end of the Hercynian Orogeny. The hydrothermal mineralization can be subdivided into four stages: 1. (1) exoskarns 2. (2) high-temperature tin and tungsten oxide-bearing sheeted greisen bordered veins and Sn-bearing tourmaline veins and breccias 3. (3) polymetallic quartz-tourmaline-chlorite-sulfide-fluorite-bearing fissure veins, which represent the main episode of economic mineralization 4. (4) late-stage, low-temperature polymetallic fluorite veins. U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime and 40Ar 39Ar dating of muscovite were used to determine emplacement ages and cooling times for individual plutons within the Cornubian batholith, as well as separate intrusive phases within the plutons. In addition, 40Ar 39Ar ages from hornblende and secondary muscovite and Sm-Nd isochron ages from fluorite were employed to determine the relationship between pluton emplacement and different stages of mineralization. The U-Pb ages indicate that granite magmatism was protracted from ~300 Ma down to ~275 Ma with no evidence of a major hiatus. There is no systematic relation between the age of a pluton and its location within the batholith. The U-Pb ages for separate granite phases within a single pluton are resolvable and indicate that magma emplacement within individual plutons occurred over periods of as much as 4.5 myrs. Felsic porphyry dike emplacement was coeval with plutonism, but continued to ~270 Ma. The geochronologic data suggest that the Cornubian batholith originated from repeated melting events over 30 myrs and was formed by a series of small coalescing granitic bodies. Cooling rates of the main plutons are unrelated to emplacement age, but decrease from the southwest to the northeast from ~210??C myr-1 to ~60??C myr-1 with a mean of 100??C myr-1. These slow cooling rates appear to reflect the addition of

  9. Varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Micheal; Fellmer, Peter T; Wetzig, Tino

    2012-03-01

    Venous diseases are common in the general population. After a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, an individual therapeutic approach should be selected on the basis of the findings, with the aim of treating the diseased vein segments and improving quality of life. Numerous therapeutic options are available for the treatment of varicose veins. In addition to conservative methods such as compression therapy, exercise or drugs, surgical procedures such as traditional surgery, thermal ablation techniques or sclerotherapy can be performed. Recent developments include the use of endoluminal water vapor or mechano-chemical endovenous ablation. PMID:22222053

  10. Petrography, sulfide mineral chemistry, and sulfur isotope evidence for a hydrothermal imprint on Musina copper deposits, Limpopo Province, South Africa: Evidence for a breccia pipe origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumba, Jeff B.; Mundalamo, Humbulani R.; Ogola, Jason S.; Cox, J. A.; Fleisher, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Musina copper deposits are located in the Central Zone of the Limpopo orogenic belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa. We carried out a petrographic, sulfide composition, and δ34S study on samples from Artonvilla and Campbell copper deposits and a country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine to place some constrains on the origin of these deposits. The assemblages at both Artonvilla and Campbell Mines of brecciated quartz, potassium feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite, and amphibole are consistent with sericitic alteration. Quartz, amphibole, feldspars, and micas often display angular textures which are consistent with breccias. Sulfur concentrations in pyrite from Artonvilla Mine plot in a narrow range, from 50.2 wt. % to 55.7 wt. %. With the exception of a positive correlation between Fe and Cu, no well defined correlations are shown by data from the Musina copper deposits. The occurrence of sulfides both as inclusions in, or as interstitial phases in silicates, suggests that hydrothermal alteration that affected these deposits most likely helped concentrate the mineralization at the Musina copper deposits. Sulfur concentrations in chalcopyrite samples investigated vary widely whereas the copper concentrations in chalcopyrite are not unusually higher compared to those from chalcopyrite from other tectonic settings, probably indicating that either the Cu in the Musina copper deposits occurs in native form, and/or that it is hosted by other phases. This observation lends support to the Cu having been concentrated during a later hydrothermal event. One sample from Artonvilla Mine (AtCal01) yielded pyrite δ34S values of 3.1and 3.6‰ and chalcopyrite from the same sample yielded a value of 3.9‰. A country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine yielded a δ34Spyrite value of 8.2‰. For Campbell Mine samples, one quartz vein sample has a δ34Spyrite value of 0.5‰ whereas chalcopyrite samples drilled from different areas within the same sample yielded

  11. Petrography, sulfide mineral chemistry, and sulfur isotope evidence for a hydrothermal imprint on Musina copper deposits, Limpopo Province, South Africa: Evidence for a breccia pipe origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumba, Jeff B.; Mundalamo, Humbulani R.; Ogola, Jason S.; Cox, J. A.; Fleisher, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Musina copper deposits are located in the Central Zone of the Limpopo orogenic belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa. We carried out a petrographic, sulfide composition, and δ34S study on samples from Artonvilla and Campbell copper deposits and a country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine to place some constrains on the origin of these deposits. The assemblages at both Artonvilla and Campbell Mines of brecciated quartz, potassium feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite, and amphibole are consistent with sericitic alteration. Quartz, amphibole, feldspars, and micas often display angular textures which are consistent with breccias. Sulfur concentrations in pyrite from Artonvilla Mine plot in a narrow range, from 50.2 wt. % to 55.7 wt. %. With the exception of a positive correlation between Fe and Cu, no well defined correlations are shown by data from the Musina copper deposits. The occurrence of sulfides both as inclusions in, or as interstitial phases in silicates, suggests that hydrothermal alteration that affected these deposits most likely helped concentrate the mineralization at the Musina copper deposits. Sulfur concentrations in chalcopyrite samples investigated vary widely whereas the copper concentrations in chalcopyrite are not unusually higher compared to those from chalcopyrite from other tectonic settings, probably indicating that either the Cu in the Musina copper deposits occurs in native form, and/or that it is hosted by other phases. This observation lends support to the Cu having been concentrated during a later hydrothermal event. One sample from Artonvilla Mine (AtCal01) yielded pyrite δ34S values of 3.1and 3.6‰ and chalcopyrite from the same sample yielded a value of 3.9‰. A country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine yielded a δ34Spyrite value of 8.2‰. For Campbell Mine samples, one quartz vein sample has a δ34Spyrite value of 0.5‰ whereas chalcopyrite samples drilled from different areas within the same sample

  12. Low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    A review of numerous genetic interpretations of the individual low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz shows that there is no consensus concerning their formation mechanisms. Therefore, we introduce a new, purely descriptive terminology for the three categories of intracrystalline deformation microstructures formed in the low-quartz stability field: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and localised extinction bands (LEB). The localised extinction bands are further subdivided into blocky (bLEB), straight (sLEB) and granular (gLEB) morphological types. A detailed polarised light microscopy study of vein-quartz from the low-grade metamorphic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium) further reveals a series of particular geometric relationships between these newly defined intracrystalline deformation microstructures. These geometric relationships are largely unrecognised or underemphasised in the literature and need to be taken into account in any future genetic interpretation. Based on our observations and a critical assessment of the current genetic models, we argue that the interpretation of the pertinent microstructures in terms of ambient conditions and deformation history should be made with care, as long as the genesis of these microstructures is not better confined.

  13. Subgrain boundaries and slip systems in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    At elevated temperatures, quartz usually deforms by dislocation glide and dislocation creep. Textures (crystallographic preferred orientations) and microstructures are commonly used to infer the kinematics and physical conditions of deformation. However, it is debatable whether a given texture, represented by a pole figure, is universally indicative of a specific deformation temperature or recrystallization mechanism or e.g. is rather related to strain. Quartz veins in synkinematic, felsic dikes from the footwall of the Mohave Wash detachment fault in the Chemehuevi Mountains are studied by EBSD, CIP and universal stage. Mm-sized quartz grains are homogeneously stretched with aspect ratios of up to 30. Minor recrystallization takes place by subgrain rotation. Three different groups of highly stretched quartz grains can be defined: Grains with peripheral c-axes at a high angle to the foliation (Z-grains), grains with central c-axes perpendicular to the lineation (Y-grains) and grains with c-axes intermediately between the former two (O-grains). The three types of grains do not show a significant difference in their aspect ratios. Bulk pole figures show a kinked single c-axes girdle with a central maximum and an a-axes maximum parallel to the lineation. Misorientation analysis and the orientation of subgrain boundaries are used to make inferences on slip systems. Z-grains are interpreted to be suitable for basal (c)-slip, Y-grains for prism {m}-slip, which is compatible with the bulk misorientation distribution function of entire grains. O-grains could be interpreted as suitably oriented for rhomb {r/z/pi/pi'} slip, however, this is not supported by the bulk misorientation distribution function. Individual subgrain boundaries in Y-grains and Z-grains expected for the 'easy' slip systems {m} and (c) with tilt character ({a} parallel boundaries with [c] or misorientation axes, respectively), are limited to small (< 2°) misorientation angles

  14. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  15. Halogens and noble gases in Mathematician Ridge meta-gabbros, NE Pacific: implications for oceanic hydrothermal root zones and global volatile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Vanko, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Six variably amphibolitised meta-gabbros cut by quartz-epidote veins containing high-salinity brine, and vapour fluid inclusions were investigated for halogen (Cl, Br, I) and noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations. The primary aims were to investigate fluid sources and interactions in hydrothermal root zones and determine the concentrations and behaviours of these elements in altered oceanic crust, which is poorly known, but has important implications for global volatile (re)cycling. Amphiboles in each sample have average concentrations of 0.1-0.5 wt% Cl, 0.5-3 ppm Br and 5-68 ppb I. Amphibole has Br/Cl of ~0.0004 that is about ten times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions and seawater, and I/Cl of 2-44 × 10-6 that is 3-5 times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions but higher than seawater. The amphibole and fluid compositions are attributed to mixing halogens introduced by seawater with a large halogen component remobilised from mafic lithologies in the crust and fractionation of halogens between fluids and metamorphic amphibole formed at low water-rock ratios. The metamorphic amphibole and hydrothermal quartz are dominated by seawater-derived atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and mantle-derived He, with 3He/4He of ~9 R/Ra (Ra = atmospheric ratio). The amphibole and quartz preserve high 4He concentrations that are similar to MORB glasses and have noble gas abundance ratios with high 4He/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar that are greater than seawater and air. These characteristics result from the high solubility of light noble gases in amphibole and suggest that all the noble gases can behave similarly to `excess 40Ar' in metamorphic hydrothermal root zones. All noble gases are therefore trapped in hydrous minerals to some extent and can be inefficiently lost during metamorphism implying that even the lightest noble gases (He and Ne) can potentially be subducted into the Earth's mantle.

  16. Hydrothermal alteration and mass exchange in the hornblende latite porphyry, Rico, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, P.B.; Cunningham, C.G.; Naeser, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Rico paleothermal anomaly, southwestern Colorado, records the effects of a large hydrothermal system that was active at 4 Ma. This hydrothermal system produced the deep Silver Creek stockwork Mo deposit, which formed above the anomaly's heat source, and shallower base and precious-metal vein and replacement deposits. A 65 Ma hornblende latite porphyry is present as widespread sills throughout the area and provided a homogenous material that recorded the effects of the hydrothermal system up to 8 km from the center. Hydrothermal alteration in the latite can be divided into a proximal facies which consists of two assemblages, quartz-illite-calcite and chlorite-epidote, and a distal facies which consists of a distinct propylitic assemblage. Temperatures were gradational vertically and laterally in the anomaly, and decreased away from the centra heat source. A convective hydrothermal plume, 3 km wide and at least 2 km high, was present above the stock-work molybdenum deposit and consisted of upwelling, high-temperature fluids that produced the proximal alteration facies. Distal facies alteration was produced by shallower cooler fluids. The most important shallow base and precious-metal vein deposits in the Rico district are at or close to the boundary of the thermal plume. Latite within the plume had a large loss of Na2O, large addition of CaO, and variable SiO2 exchante. Distal propylitized latite samples lost small amounts of Na2O and CaO and exchanged minor variable amounts of SiO2. The edge of the plume is marked by steep Na2O exchange gradients. Na2O exchange throughout the paleothermal anomaly was controlled by the reaction of the albite components in primary plagioclase and alkali feldspars. Initial feldspar alteration in the distal facies was dominated by reaction of the plagioclase, and the initial molar ratio of reactants (alkali feldspar albite component to plagioclase albite component) was 0.35. This ratio of the moles of plagioclase to alkali feldspar

  17. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  18. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  19. Elastomechanical properties of bovine veins.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Jenn Stroud

    2010-02-01

    Veins have historically been discussed in qualitative, relative terms: "more compliant" than arteries, subject to "lower pressures". The structural and compositional differences between arteries and veins are directly related to the different functions of these vessels. Veins are often used as grafts to reroute flow from atherosclerotic arteries, and venous elasticity plays a role in the development of conditions such as varicose veins and valvular insufficiency. It is therefore of clinical interest to determine the elastomechanical properties of veins. In the current study, both tensile and vibration testing are used to obtain elastic moduli of bovine veins. Representative stress-strain data are shown, and the mechanical and failure properties reported. Nonlinear and viscoelastic behavior is observed, though most properties show little strain rate dependence. These data suggest parameters for constitutive modeling of veins and may inform the design and testing of prosthetic venous valves as well as vein grafts. PMID:20129420

  20. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu–Ni–PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA

    PubMed Central

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R.; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B.

    2015-01-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu–Ni–PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2–3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p–T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6–2.0 kbar) and temperature (810–920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2–H2O–NaCl and CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240–650 bar and 120–150 °C for CO2–H2O–NaCl inclusions and 315–360 bar and 145–165 °C for CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p–T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6–2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite

  1. Origin of the quartz in Antrim Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hathon, C.; Sibley, D.; Cambray, F.W.

    1980-02-15

    Study of the macroscopic and microscopic properties of the Antrim Shale indicated an important anomaly, the quartz. The Antrim Shale (Devonian, Michigan Basin) contains a large, but quantitatively undertermineable volume of authigenic quartz. The shale contains approximately 50% quartz by weight of which, in the >500 mesh size fraction, 56% is polycrystalline. This is approximately 2X the amount of quartz in most shales and 10X the amount of polycrystalline quartz in the silt-size fraction of sandstones and shales. Scanning electron microscopy reveals an authigenic surface composed of hexagonal tabular plates which coalesce to form smooth grain surfaces. These plates have not been previously reported on quartz grains. Oxygen isotopes of quartz and carbonate phases are interpreted to indicate a gradual isotopic lightening of the pore fluids, from approximately -4/sup 0///sub 00/. Most of the authigenic quartz has a delta/sup 18/O = 22/sup 0///sub 00/ (SMOW).

  2. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United

  3. Fluid-rock interaction during progressive migration of carbonatitic fluids, derived from small-scale trace element and Sr, Pb isotope distribution in hydrothermal fluorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühn, B.; Schneider, J.; Dulski, P.; Rankin, A. H.

    2003-12-01

    Associated with the Cretaceous Okorusu carbonatite complex (Namibia) is a hydrothermal fluorite mineralization hosted in Pan-African country rock marbles, which resulted from fluid-rock reaction between the marbles and orthomagmatic, carbonatitic fluids expelled from the carbonatite. Yellow fluorite I was deposited in veins up to 5 cm away from the wallrock contact, followed by purple and colorless fluorite II, smoky quartz and barite, a Mn-rich crust on early calcite, and pure calcite. This clear-cut sequence of mineral growth allows an investigation into fluid-rock interaction processes between the marble and the migrating carbonatitic fluid, and element fractionation patterns between the fluid and subsequent hydrothermal precipitates. Fluorite I shows a progressive change in color from dark yellow to colorless with purple laminations over time of deposition. Subsequent fluorite I precipitates show an increase in Ca, and a continuous decrease in F, Sr, REE, Y, Th, U and Pb contents. The ratios (Eu/Eu*) cn, Th/Pb and U/Pb increase whereas Y/Ho, Th/U and (La/Yb) cn decrease. The Sr-isotopic composition remains constant at 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.70456-0.70459, but with varying, highly radiogenic Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb = 32-190, 238U/ 204Pb = 7-63). Fluorite II has 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.70454-0.70459, 206Pb/ 204Pb = 18.349, and 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.600, and a chemical composition similar to youngest fluorite I. The Mn-rich crust on early calcite accumulated REE, Ba, Pb, Zr, Cs, Th and U, developing into pure calcite with a prominent negative Ce anomaly and successively more radiogenic Sr. The calculated degrees of fluid-rock interaction, f = weight fraction of fluid/(fluid + marble), decrease from fluorite I and most fluorite II (f = 0.5) to calcite (f = 0.2-0.3) and hydrothermal quartz (f ≪ 0.1). A crush-leach experiment for fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal quartz yielded a Rb-Sr isochron age of 103 ± 12 Ma. Crush-leach analysis for the carbonatitic fluid trapped in the wallrock

  4. Quartz microfabrics in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks as indicators of low stress during uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stäb, C.; Kruhl, J. H.; Trepmann, C.; Wang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks form in convergent tectonic settings at depths > 90 km. In general, UHP conditions are defined by the stability of coesite. Coesite inclusions in various host minerals are a common feature in UHP rocks. We present data of typical quartz microfabrics, which resulted from the transformation of coesite to quartz in inclusions and intergranular regions, and evidence of high temperature quartz microfabrics. Jadeite-quartzites and eclogites from the Dabie Shan - Sulu orogenic belt (central China) were investigated, both of which experienced peak UHP conditions of ~ 660°C / > 2.6 GPa (Liou et al., 1997) and 700-800°C / 3.1-4.1 GPa (Yoshida et al., 2004), respectively, at c. 220-230 Ma due to a N-subduction of the Yangtze craton beneath the Sino-Korean craton, followed by a nearly isothermal decompression to ~ 1 GPa. Both rocks contain coesite and/or quartz inclusions (up to 350 μm in diameter) in clinopyroxene and garnet and in their symplectitic rims with various microstructures: (i) rims of palisade quartz commonly in contact to coesite, (ii) quartz aggregates with sutured grain boundaries and central remnants of coesite, (iii) larger central quartz grains with subgrains, (iv) foam quartz (c. 50 μm sized), and (v) apparently strain-free single quartz crystals. The foam quartz shows a random c-axis distribution but preferred crystallographic orientations of grain boundaries. Intergranular foam quartz is found in quartz-eclogites from the Sulu region, most probably indicating quartz-coesite transformation and, therefore, former UHP conditions. The preservation of foam quartz in intergranular regions and inclusions (especially in symplectites) indicates low stress and nearly no deformation during uplift in the stability field of quartz. This points to strain localization in shear zones (Zhao et al., 2003). In veins in the jadeite-quartzites and quartz-eclogites quartz occurs in larger aggregates with sutured grain boundaries

  5. Visualizing trace element distribution in quartz using cathodoluminescence, electron microprobe, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusk, Brian; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Cathodoluminescent (CL) textures in quartz reveal successive histories of the physical and chemical fluctuations that accompany crystal growth. Such CL textures reflect trace element concentration variations that can be mapped by electron microprobe or laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Trace element maps in hydrothermal quartz from four different ore deposit types (Carlin-type Au, epithermal Ag, porphyry-Cu, and MVT Pb-Zn) reveal correlations among trace elements and between trace element concentrations and CL textures. The distributions of trace elements reflect variations in the physical and chemical conditions of quartz precipitation. These maps show that Al is the most abundant trace element in hydrothermal quartz. In crystals grown at temperatures below 300 °C, Al concentrations may vary by up to two orders of magnitude between adjacent growth zones, with no evidence for diffusion. The monovalent cations Li, Na, and K, where detectable, always correlate with Al, with Li being the most abundant of the three. In most samples, Al is more abundant than the combined total of the monovalent cations; however, in the MVT sample, molar Al/Li ratios are ~0.8. Antimony is present in concentrations up to ~120 ppm in epithermal quartz (~200–300 °C), but is not detectable in MVT, Carlin, or porphyry-Cu quartz. Concentrations of Sb do not correlate consistently with those of other trace elements or with CL textures. Titanium is only abundant enough to be mapped in quartz from porphyry-type ore deposits that precipitate at temperatures above ~400 °C. In such quartz, Ti concentration correlates positively with CL intensity, suggesting a causative relationship. In contrast, in quartz from other deposit types, there is no consistent correlation between concentrations of any trace element and CL intensity fluctuations.

  6. Vibration resistant quartz crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfrank, B.; Warner, A.

    1982-11-01

    The principal objectives of this investigation were to provide doubly rotated quartz crystal resonators that exhibit low "g' sensitivity on the order of 1 superscript 10 per "g', and fast warm-up on the order of 1 superscript 9 in three minutes. Effects of changes in the mounting orientation have been investigated with respect to the magnitude of the acceleration sensitivity vector, for 0 angles of 21.95, 23.75 and 25.00, using 5 MHz/5th overtone plano-convex and bi-convex quartz crystal blanks. The mounting technique was three-point thermo-compression bonding; the mounts were 90 degrees apart. A new thermo-compression bonding ribbon was evaluated and instituted. 5 MHz and 10 MHz, third overtone crystals and 20 MHz fifth overtone crystals were measured for the magnitude of the acceleration sensitivity vector. Improved methods of X-ray orientation were also investigated.

  7. Quartz substrates for EUVL reticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.; Weber, F.J.; Vernon, S.P.; Hawryluk, A.; Baker, S.L.; Golub, A.M.; Shikata, A.; Grady, E.C.

    1995-02-10

    A EUVL reticle blank was fabricated on a specially polished quartz blank. The stress-induced distortion of the multilayer coating was unacceptably large. The distortion can be effectively eliminated by coating the backside of the reticle blank with an identical coating. This strategy has the potential to eliminate multilayer induced stress distortion for the reticle blank in a manner which is compatible with the existing reticle fabrication infrastructure.

  8. Cierco Pb-Zn-Ag vein deposits: Isotopic and fluid inclusion evidence for formation during the mesozoic extension in the pyrenees of Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Cardellach, E.; Tritlla, J.; Hanan, B.B.

    1996-01-01

    The Cierco Pb-Zn-Ag vein deposits, located in the central Pyrenees of Spain, crosscut Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks and are in close proximity to Hercynian granodiorite dikes and plutons. Galena and sphalerite in the deposits have average ??34S values of -4.3 and -0.8 per mil (CDT), respectively. Coexisting mineral pairs give an isotopic equilibration temperature range of 89?? to 163??C which overlaps with the 112?? to 198??C range obtained from primary fluid inclusions. Coexisting quartz has a ??18O value of 19 ?? 1 per mil (VSMOW). The fluid which deposited these minerals is inferred to have had ??18OH2o and ??34SH2s values of 5 ?? 1 and -1 ?? 1 per mil, respectively. Chemical and microthermometric analyses of fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite indicate salinities of 3 to 29 wt percent NaCl equiv with Na+ and Ca2+ as the dominant cations in solution. The Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios differ from those characteristic of magmatic waters and pristine seawater, but show some similarity to those observed in deep ground waters in crystalline terranes, basinal brines, and evaporated seawater, Barite, which postdates the sulfides, spans isotopic ranges of 13 to 21 per mil, 10 to 15 per mil, and 0.7109 to 0.7123 for ??34S, ??18O, and 87Sr/86Sr, respectively. The three parameters are correlated providing strong evidence that the barites are products of fluid mixing. We propose that the Cierco deposits formed along an extensional fault system at the margin of a marine basin during the breakup of Pangea at some time between the Early Triassic and Early Cretaceous. Sulfide deposition corresponded to an upwelling of hydrothermal fluid from the Paleozoic basement and was limited by the amount of metals carried by the fluid. Barite deposition corresponded to the waning of upward flow and the collapse of sulfate-rich surface waters onto the retreating hydrothermal plume. Calcite precipitated late in the paragenesis as meteoric or marine waters descended into the fault system

  9. Electron Irradiation Damage in Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayensu, Akwasi; Ocran, John

    2002-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy for observing highly beam sensitive materials had been used to study the microstructure of deformed quartz crystals. At 100 kV accelerating voltage and electron flux of 3 x 10^8 e/cm2/s, beam spots damage appeared within five minutes of exposure to the electron beam. The rate of damage was found to depend on the crystal type; in particular, on the OH content and initial defect density, since these factors controlled the plasticity of quartz. The electron irradiation damage was manifested as black spots, prismatic dislocation loops, defect clusters, hairpin shaped images of dislocations and long segements of dislocation loops. The observed microstructure indicate that during electron beam irradiation, the primary defects in quartz attained sufficiently high mobilities permitting large-scale recombination and clustering leading to rapid creation of secondary defects from the clustering processes. The number of electrons that are lost by the recombination process is determined by the density of the recombination centres and the probability that an electron will interact with the centre.

  10. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  11. Rear polymineral zone of near-veined metasomatic aureole in mesothermal Zun-Holba gold deposit (Eastern Sayan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, T.; Kucherenko, I.; Abramova, R.

    2015-11-01

    Unique data of the mineralogical and petrochemical zoning of near- veined metasomatic aureole of mesothermal Zun-Holba gold deposit are presented and discussed. It was established that mineralogical and petrochemical zoning order is based on Korzhinsky theory describing the differential component mobility. However, the internal polymineral zone structure of metasomatic column in Zun-Holba deposit does not comply with Korzhinsky concept describing the mono-mineral composition of axial (ore-bearing quartz veins) and binary-mineral rear (quartz-sericite) zones. Mineral zoning complication is governed by component diffusion (from fractured fluid to pores) and pulsation mode of metalliferous fluid input into the mineralization area.

  12. Hydrothermal dolomitization and recrystallization of dolomite breccias from the Miocene Monterey Formation, Tepusquet area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, J.J.; Baker, P.A.; Burns, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    Despite the intensity of brecciation and its potential importance as an analog to Monterey fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs, no detailed petrographic, crystallographic, or geochemical analyses have been performed on the breccias from the Tepusquet area. In the present study, petrographic, crystallographic, and geochemical analyses show that the vein-filling dolomites were precipitated from hydrothermal fluids that were associated with hydrocarbon migration, and that the early diagenetic matrix dolomites have been recrystallized, resetting their geochemical and crystallographic properties. The close chemical similarity of the vein dolomites and the most recrystallized matrix dolomites, the episodic association between hydrocarbons and the vein dolomites, and the recrystallization trends in the matrix dolomites, all indicate that evolved formation waters were the source of the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the vein dolomites.

  13. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ7Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ7Liquartz-fluid = –8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R2 = 0.98; 175 °C–340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ7Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ7Li range from −0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175–340 °C. This δ7Li range, together with Li–O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process. PMID:26347051

  14. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  15. METEORIC-HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, Robert E.; Taylor, Hugh P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the salient characteristics of meteoric-hydrothermal systems, emphasing the isotopic systematics. Discussions of permeable-medium fluid dynamics and the geology and geochemistry of modern geothermal systems are also provided, because they are essential to any understanding of hydrothermal circulation. The main focus of the paper is on regions of ancient meteoric-hydrothermal activity, which give us information about the presently inaccessible, deep-level parts of modern geothermal systems. It is shown oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide a powerful method to discover and map fossil hydrothermal systems and to investigate diverse associated aspects of rock alteration and ore deposition.

  16. Redistribution of Water During Deformation of Milky Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A. K.; Lamb, W. M.; Luo, Z.; Neal, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Dislocation creep of quartz is facilitated by the presence of water, and many key observations regarding mechanisms of water weakening can be attributed to the elegant studies of Mervyn Paterson, his colleagues, and his students. In particular, Paterson and Kekulawala (1979) and Kekulawala et al. (1978, 1981) showed that creep strengths of quartz single crystals depend on the character and distribution of extended water defects and clusters. By comparing mechanical properties and infrared (IR) spectra of hydrothermally grown synthetic quartz, dry natural quartz, amethyst, heat-treated synthetic quartz, and natural milky quartz, they demonstrated a correspondence between the chemical weakening effect of water and the broad, non-freezable OH stretching band expressed most clearly by wet synthetic crystals. However, they also showed that natural milky quartz crystals with freezable fluid inclusions exhibit strengths that are intermediate to those of dry natural and wet synthetic crystals. Micro-IR studies of naturally deformed tectonites have since shown that water is incorporated as coarse, freezable fluid inclusions that may decorate dislocations, subgrain walls, and grain boundaries. Non-freezable OH bands have not been detected in natural quartzites. Following the lead of Paterson and colleagues, we have shortened single crystals of milky quartz at 45° to a and c at T = 800° C, ɛ = 10-5 s-1 and confining pressures ranging from 400 to 1820 MPa, and we report on the results of (1) micro-thermometry of fluid inclusions before and after deformation, (2) IR absorption measurements of water content, and (3) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of fine-scale inclusions, subgrain boundaries, and dislocations. Flow strengths measured for Arkansas milky quartz crystals are highly variable (from 300 to 800 MPa at low strains, 5%) and exhibit variable strain softening, corresponding to the heterogeneous initial distribution of fluid inclusions and variations in bulk

  17. Ore-bearing hydrothermal metasomatic processes in the Elbrus volcanic center, the northern Caucasus, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbanov, A. G.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Gazeev, V. M.; Abramov, S. S.; Groznova, E. O.; Shevchenko, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Precaldera, caldera, and postcaldera cycles are recognized in the geological evolution of the Pleistocene-Holocene Elbrus volcanic center (EVC). During the caldera cycle, the magmatic activity was not intense, whereas hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of rocks was vigorous and extensive. The Kyukyurtli and Irik ore-magmatic systems have been revealed in the EVC, with the former being regarded as the more promising one. The ore mineralization in rocks of the caldera cycle comprises occurrences of magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and pyrrhotite (including Ni-Co varieties), arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, millerite, galena, and finely dispersed particles of native copper. Pyrite and pyrrhotite from volcanics of the caldera cycle and dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion are similar in composition and differ from these minerals of the postcaldera cycle, where pyrite and pyrrhotite are often enriched in Cu, Co, and Ni and millerite is noted as well. The composition of ore minerals indicates that the hydrothermal metasomatic alteration related to the evolution of the Kyukyurtli hydrothermal system was superimposed on rocks of the caldera cycle, whereas the late mineralization in rocks of the postcaldera cycle developed autonomously. The homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions in quartz and carbonate from crosscutting veinlets in the apical portion of the Kyukyurtli extrusion is 140-170°C and in quartz from geyserite, 120-150°C. The temperature of formation of the chalcopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite assemblage calculated using mineral geothermometers is 156 and 275°C in dacite from the middle and lower portions of the Malka lava flow and 190°C in dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion. The hydrothermal solutions that participated in metasomatic alteration of rocks pertaining to the Kyukyurtli ore-magmatic system (KOMS) and formed both secondary quartzite and geyserite were enriched in fluorine, as evidenced from the occurrence of F-bearing minerals-zharchikhite, ralstonite,

  18. More vein, less plastic.

    PubMed

    Francis, David Ma

    2005-02-01

    Use of arteriovenous fistulas, grafts and central venous catheters for haemodialysis access varies considerably, because of perceived patient variables and preferences of surgeons, nephrologists and dialysis staff. Evidence clearly indicates that the arteriovenous fistula is superior to other methods of access in terms of patient survival, flow rates, patency, infection rates, expense and ease of maintenance. Strategies to increase the use and longevity of fistulas for definitive haemodialysis access include vein preservation, early referral for fistula surgery, preoperative clinical and ultrasound assessment of the venous and arterial systems, access surveillance, good cannulation technique, and aggressive conservatism in surgical and/or radiological correction of fistula problems. PMID:15705175

  19. Cephalic vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Walid; Selmo, Francesca; Hindi, Mia; Haddad, Fadi; Khalil, Ismail

    2007-11-01

    Cephalic vein aneurysms are rare malformations that may develop in any part of the vascular system, and their history, presentation, and management vary depending on their site. The etiology of venous aneurysms remains unclear, although several theories have been elaborated. Venous aneurysms are unusual vascular malformations that occur equally between the sexes and are seen at any age; they can present as either a painful or a painless subcutaneous mass. No serious complications have been reported from upper extremity venous aneurysms. Surgical excision is the definitive management for most of these. The case reported here presented with a painless and mobile, soft, subcutaneous mass that caused only cosmetic concern.

  20. Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Values for Unaltered and Hydrothermally Altered Samples from the Cretaceous Linga Plutonic Complex of the Peruvian Coastal Batholith near Ica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, L. U.; Holk, G. J.; Clausen, B. L.; Poma Porras, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A portion of the Peruvian Coastal Batholith near Ica, Peru is being studied using stable isotopes to determine the source of hydrothermal fluids that caused propylitic, phyllic, and potassic alteration in the mineralized Linga plutonic complex. Sources of hydrothermal fluids and water/rock ratios are estimated to understand the role of such fluids in alteration during cooling. A set of 64 mineral analysis from 18 igneous samples, 7 unaltered and 11 altered, were analyzed for D/H and 18O/16O isotopes. The δ18O values for whole rocks with no apparent alteration vary from +6.8‰ to +7.9‰, with sets of δ18O mineral values indicating isotopic equilibrium at closure temperatures from 571°C to 651°C, and no interaction with meteoric water. This conclusion is bolstered by hornblende (-87‰ to -64‰) and biotite (-81‰ to -74‰) δD values Most δ18O values for samples with hydrothermal alteration suggest that alteration results from magmatic fluids; however, several analyses indicate interaction with other fluids. The high δ18O values for plagioclase (+9.3‰) and hornblende (+6.3‰) from a metamorphic aureole in volcanic host rock near a plutonic intrusion may be due to interaction with metamorphic or low temperature magmatic fluids. Plagioclase (+2.6‰) and biotite (+0.1‰) δ18O values in a sample from the Jurassic volcanic envelope indicate a significant effect from meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. An altered monzonite yielded δ18O values for quartz (+5.5‰), K-spar (+5.6‰), and magnetite (+0.4‰), also suggesting interaction with meteoric fluids. A diorite from an area with strong epidotization produced an epidote δD value of -25.8‰ and a monzonite from a highly veined area has an epidote δD value of -36.1‰ suggesting interaction with sea water. This new data indicate that the Linga complex was primarily influenced by magmatic hydrothermal fluids, but metamorphic, meteoric, and sea water may have had some influence in producing alteration

  1. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  2. Hydrothermal Mineralization Along the Volcanically Active Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E.; Hein, J. R.; Embley, R. W.; Stern, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    In March and April, 2004, ROPOS ROV dives took place from the R/V T.G. Thompson along the volcanically active Mariana arc to ground truth CTD data collected a year earlier that indicated hydrothermal activity. Dives took place on seven volcanoes, six of which showed hydrothermal activity. We present data on samples collected from NW Rota-1 (14° , 36'N, 144° , 46'E), E. Diamante (15° , 56'N, 145° , 41'E), and NW Eifuku (21° , 29'N, 144° , 03'E), the three sites most studied. All the hydrothermal systems found are associated with volcano summits, or with resurgent domes inside a caldera. Brimstone vent at NW Rota-1 provided a dramatic display of thick, bellowing, yellow plumes that contained ash and molten sulfur. This site occurs at 500 m water depth and clearly shows closely associated magmatic-hydrothermal discharge. Sulfur was the dominant hydrothermal mineral deposited around the vent and occurs as spheres in the surrounding volcaniclastic sediment, fracture fill and veins, and massive deposits. The Black Forest vent field at E Diamante consists of a sulfide-sulfate chimney system developed at about 650 m water depth. This is the only mature system discovered and consists of numerous tall (up to 9 m) chimneys. The measured fluid temperature of 240° C produces boiling at the depth of the vents. The chimneys and mounds are composed of varying amounts of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, barite, and anhydrite. Hydrothermal Mn oxides occur on the surface of inactive chimneys. This mineralogy contrasts with the other two systems, which deposit sulfur as the dominant hydrothermal product. The Cu-Zn-Fe-Ba mineralization is perhaps largely controlled by water/rock interaction. A unique hydrothermal field (Champagne field) was found at NW Eifuku where liquid CO2 is discharging from focused- and diffuse-flow vents at 1600 m water depth. The focused-flow vents consist of small chimneys and mounds up to a meter high that are composed of sulfur and yet to be

  3. Experimental calibration of a Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer: an overview for applications to mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jay

    2013-04-01

    an extensional terrane. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 303, 181-192 Grujic D, Stipp M, Wooden JL (2011) Thermometry of quartz mylonites: Importance of dynamic recrystallization on Ti-in-quartz reequilibration. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 12, doi:10.1029/2010GC003368 Kidder S, Avouac J-P, Chan Y-C (2012) Application of titanium-in-quartz thermobarometry to greenschist facies veins and recrystallized quartzites in the Hsüehshan range, Taiwan. Solid Earth 4, 663-706

  4. Peralkaline fluid composition in equilibrium with K-feldspar, muscovite and quartz at 10 kbar and 700°C: Al transport in crustal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, A.; Manning, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    Aluminum is commonly regarded as one of the least soluble elements during metamorphic and metasomatic processes. However, abundant field evidence suggests that aluminum transport can occur in natural hydrothermal processes. For example, late formed aluminumsilicate-bearing and muscovite-bearing veins are widely observed in high-grade metamorphic rocks, and provide a persuasive argument for considerable mobility of aluminum in aqueous fluid. The present study explores the fluid composition coexisting with K-feldspar (K-fsp), muscovite (ms), corundum (co) and quartz (qz) at deep crustal metamorphic conditions, using a piston cylinder device at 10 kbar and 700°C. Starting materials of natural microcline, quartz, synthetic corundum, reagent Al2O3 and KSi3O6.5 glass was used. Ms and K-fsp dissolve incongruently to co + fluid and ms + fluid, respectively. Fluid composition in equilibrium with co + ms and ms + K-fsp were located in experiments with and without qz. In quartz-absent experiments fluid composition with co+ms (I1) is mAl = 0.11, mK = 0.15, mSi = 0.44, and with K-fsp + ms (I2) mAl = 0.18, mK = 0.28 and mSi = 0.81, where mi is molality of the subscripted element. Fluid compositions with qz are: mAl = 0.08, mK = 0.11 and mSi = 1.18 (co + ms + qtz; II1) and mAl = 0.18, mK = 0.29 and mSi = 1.58 for (K-fsp + ms +qtz; II2). Measured fluid compositions are peralkaline (K/Al < 1.4). Bulk solubility of Al in pure H2O at this P and T is reported to be ~0.3 wt% [1], and increase to ~1.9 wt % Al in the presence of SiO2 [2]. This study shows that Al solubility is further enhanced by the presence of K and Si, increasing from ~4.07 wt% for (I1) to ~ 7.14 wt% at (I2). Presence of quartz enhances the bulk solubility from ~ 7.63 wt% (II1) to ~ 12.05 wt % at (II2). Results indicate that substantial aluminum transfer may occur at deep-crust metamorphic conditions in aqueous solutions equilibrated with common crustal bulk compositions such as metapelites and granites. Such high Al

  5. [Coronary veins and coronary sinus tributary veins in Africans].

    PubMed

    Yangni-Angate, H; Kokoua, A; Kouassi, R; Kassanyou, S; Gnagne, Y; Guessan, G N; Cowppli-Bony, P; Memel, J B

    1995-01-01

    This anatomical study carried out on 40 African adults hearts studied branches of the coronary sinus. By using of injection of the coronary arteries and corrosion of the myocardium, the study identified certain peculiarities of the small coronary vein and the posterior descending interventricular vein in Africans. PMID:8519704

  6. Impact polymorphs of quartz: experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Dutta, R.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We have used the light gas gun at the University of Kent to perform a series of impact experiments firing quartz projectiles onto metal, quartz and sapphire targets. The aim is to quantify the amount of any high pressure quartz polymorphs produced, and use these data to develop our hydrocode modelling to enable the predict ion of the quantity of polymorphs produced during a planetary scale impact.

  7. The twinning microstructure and growth of amethyst quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, A. C.; Pitkethly, D. R.

    1982-07-01

    The characteristic lamellar-twinning of the right-handed ( R) and left-handed ( L) structures in the major rhombohedral growth sectors of amethyst quartz has been studied by optical techniques, X-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM observations show that the region of each Brewster fringe consists of fine-scale Brazil twin lamellae parallel to one of the r, z{10overline {text{1}} 1} planes, and structural considerations suggest that it is one of the r-planes. The twin boundary corresponding to a Brewster fringe has the form of a zig-zag structure consisting of Brazil twin boundaries on two r{10overline {text{1}} 1} planes, with one predominating. The Brewster fringes appear black between crossed polarizers because light travelling along the optic axis [001] passes through almost equal distances of R and L quartz, giving essentially zero optical rotation. From the visibility of the Brazil twin boundaries in electron micrographs and the visibility of the Brewster fringes in X-ray topographs, the fault vector R and the corresponding composition plane of the major Brazil twin associated with each Brewster fringe has been determined. The streaking of the Brewster fringes observed optically and in the X-ray topographs appears to be due to the stair-rod dislocations at the intersections of the Brazil twin boundaries. Experiments in which synthetic quartz was grown hydrothermally on untwinned seeds and on twinned amethyst seeds showed that the initiation of Brazil twins and the development of Brewster fringes was dependent upon the presence of iron in the growth solution.

  8. A Single-Crystalline Mesoporous Quartz Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Takamichi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Kitahara, Masaki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Wada, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-10

    There has been significant interest in the crystallization of nanostructured silica into α-quartz because of its physicochemical properties. We demonstrate a single-crystalline mesoporous quartz superlattice, a silica polymorph with unprecedentedly ordered hierarchical structures on both the several tens of nanometers scale and the atomic one. The mesoporous quartz superlattice consists of periodically arranged α-quartz nanospheres whose crystalline axes are mostly oriented in an assembly. The superlattice is prepared by thermal crystallization of amorphous silica nanospheres constituting a colloidal crystal. We found that the deposition of a strong flux of Li(+) only on the surface of silica nanospheres is effective for crystallization.

  9. Exsolved magmatic fluid and its role in the formation of comb-layered quartz at the Cretaceous Logtung W-Mo deposit, Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Sinclair, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Comb-layered quartz is a type of unidirectional solidification texture found at the roofs of shallow silicic intrusions that are often associated spatially with Mo and W mineralisation. The texture consists of multiple layers of euhedral, prismatic quartz crystals (Type I) that have grown on subplanar aplite substrates. The layers are separated by porphyritic aplite containing equant phenocrysts of quartz (Type II), which resemble quartz typical of volcanic rocks and porphyry intrusions. At Logtung, Type I quartz within comb layers is zoned with respect to a number of trace elements, including Al and K. Concentrations of these elements as well as Mn, Ti, Ge, Rb and H are anomalous and much higher than found in Type II quartz from Logtung or in igneous quartz reported elsewhere. The two populations appear to have formed under different conditions. The Type II quartz phenocrysts almost certainly grew from a high-silica melt between 600 and 800??C (as ??-quartz); in contrast, the morphology of Type I quartz is consistent with precipitation from a hydrothermal solution, possibly as ??-quartz grown below 600??C. The bulk compositions of comb-layered rocks, as well as the aplite interlayers, are consistent with the hypothesis that these textures did not precipitate solely from a crystallising silicate melt. Instead, Type I quartz may have grown from pockets of exsolved magmatic fluid located between the magma and its crystallised border. The Type II quartz represents pre-existing phenocrysts in the underlying magma; this magma was quenched to aplite during fracturing/degassing events. Renewed and repeated formation and disruption of the pockets of exsolved aqueous fluid accounts for the rhythmic banding of the rocks.

  10. Magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of the Cretaceous Duolong gold-rich porphyry copper deposit in the Bangongco metallogenic belt, Tibet: Evidence from U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxiang; Qin, Kezhang; Li, Guangming; Xiao, Bo; Zhao, Junxing; Chen, Lei

    2011-06-01

    The Duolong gold-rich porphyry copper deposit was recently discovered and represents a giant prospect (inferred resources of 4-5 Mt fine-Cu with a grade of 0.72% Cu; 30-50 t fine-gold with a grade of 0.23 g/t Au) in the Bangongco metallogenic belt, Tibet. Zircon SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology shows that the multiple porphyritic intrusions were emplaced during two episodes, the first at about 121 Ma (Bolong mineralized granodiorite porphyry (BMGP) and barren granodiorite porphyry (BGP)) and the second about 116 Ma (Duobuza mineralized granodiorite porphyry (DMGP)). Moreover, the basaltic andesites also have two episodes at about 118 Ma and 106 Ma, respectively. One andesite yields an U-Pb zircon age of 111.9 ± 1.9 Ma, indicating it formed after the multiple granodiorite porphyries. By contrast, the 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 115.2 ± 1.1 Ma (hydrothermal K-feldspar vein hosted in DMGP) reveals the close temporal relationship of ore-bearing potassic alteration to the emplacement of the DMGP. The sericite from quartz-sericite vein (hosted in DMGP) yields a 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 115.2 ± 1.2 Ma. Therefore, the ore-forming magmatic-hydrothermal evolution probably persisted for 6 m.y. Additionally, the zircon U-Pb ages (106-121 Ma) of the volcanic rocks and the porphyries suggest that the Neo-Tethys Ocean was still subducting northward during the Early Cretaceous.

  11. Evolution of the magmatic-hydrothermal acid-sulfate system at Summitville, Colorado: Integration of geological, stable-isotope, and fluid-inclusion evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, P.M.; Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.; Vikre, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Summitville Au-Ag-Cu deposit is a classic volcanic dome-hosted high-sulfidation deposit. It occurs in the Quartz Latite of South Mountain, a composite volcanic dome that was emplaced along the coincident margins of the Platoro and Summitville calderas at 22.5??0.5 Ma, penecontemporaneous with alteration and mineralization. A penecontemporaneous quartz monzonite porphyry intrusion underlies the district and is cut and overlain by pyrite-quartz stockwork veins with traces of chalcopyrite and molybdenite. Alteration and mineralization proceeded through three hypogene stages and a supergene stage, punctuated by at least three periods of hydrothermal brecciation. Intense acid leaching along fractures in the quartz latite produced irregular pipes and lenticular pods of vuggy silica enclosed sequentially by alteration zones of quartz-alunite, quartz-kaolinite, and clay. The acid-sulfate-altered rocks host subsequent covellite+enargite/luzonite+chalcopyrite mineralization accompanied by kaolinite, and later barite-base-metal veins, some containing high Au values and kaolinite. The presence of both liquid- and vapor-rich fluid inclusions indicates the episodic presence of a low-density fluid at all levels of the system. In the mineralized zone, liquid-rich fluid inclusions in healed fractures in quartz phenocrysts and in quartz associated with mineralization homogenize to temperatures between 160 and 390 ??C (90% between 190 and 310 ??C), consistent with the range (200-250 ??C) estimated from the fractionation of sulfur isotopes between coexisting alunite and pyrite. A deep alunite-pyrite pair yielded a sulfur-isotope temperature of 390 ??C, marking a transition from hydrostatic to lithostatic pressure at a depth of about 1.5 km. Two salinity populations dominate the liquid-rich fluid inclusions. One has salinities between 0 and 5 wt.% NaCl equivalent; the other has salinities of up to 43 wt.% NaCl equivalent. The occurrence of high-salinity fluid inclusions in vein

  12. The thermal and chemical evolution of hydrothermal vent fluids in shale hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) systems from the MacMillan Pass district (Yukon, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, J. M.; Gleeson, S. A.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Paradis, S.; Luo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    At Macmillan Pass (YT, Canada), the hydrothermal vent complexes beneath two shale-hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) deposits (Tom, Jason) are well preserved within Late Devonian strata. These deposits provide a unique opportunity to constrain key geochemical parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, fO2, ΣS) that are critical for metal transport and deposition in SHMS systems, and to evaluate the interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the mudstone host rock. This has been achieved using a combination of detailed petrography, isotopic techniques (δ34S, δ13C and δ18O values), carbonate rare earth element analysis (LA-ICP-MS), fluid inclusion analysis (microthermometry, gas analysis via incremental crush fast scan mass spectrometry), and thermodynamic modelling. Two main paragenetic stages are preserved in both vent complexes: Stage 1 comprises pervasive ankerite alteration of the organic-rich mudstone host rock and crosscutting stockwork ankerite veining (±pyrobitumen, pyrite and quartz) and; Stage 2 consists of main stage massive sulphide (galena-pyrrhotite-pyrite ± chalcopyrite-sphalerite) and siderite (±quartz and barytocalcite) mineralisation. Co-variation of δ18O and δ13C values in ankerite can be described by temperature dependent fractionation and fluid rock interaction. Together with fluid inclusion microthermometry, this provides evidence of a steep thermal gradient (from 300 to ∼100 °C) over approximately 15 m stratigraphic depth, temporally and spatially constrained within the paragenesis of both vent complexes and developed under shallow lithostatic (<1 km; 250 bars) to hydrostatic (<400 m; 40 bars) conditions. There is evidence of mixing between diagenetic and hydrothermal fluids recorded in chondrite-normalised rare earth element (REE) profiles of ankerite and siderite. Middle REE enrichments and superchondritic Y/Ho ratios (>28), characteristic of diagenetic fluids, are coupled with positive europium anomalies and variable light REE

  13. Infrared imaging of varicose veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Zeeuw, Raymond; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Wittens, Cees H. A.

    2004-06-01

    It has been established that varicose veins are better visualized with infrared photography. As near-infrared films are nowadays hard to get and to develop in the digital world, we investigated the use of digital photography of varicose veins. Topics that are discussed are illumination setup, photography and digital image enhancement and analysis.

  14. The management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Shiyi; Sun, Yan; Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the current management modalities for varicose veins. There are a variety of management modalities for varicose veins. The outcomes of the treatment of varicose veins are different. The papers on the management of varicose veins were reviewed and the postoperative complications and efficacy were compared. Foam sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation were associated with less pain and faster recovery than endovenous laser ablation and surgical stripping. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are most likely to have a faster recovery time and earlier return to work in comparison with those undergoing conventional high ligation and stripping. A randomized controlled study in multiple centers is warranted to verify which approach is better than others for the treatment of varicose veins.

  15. The economics of vein disease.

    PubMed

    Sales, Clifford M; Podnos, Joan; Levison, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    The management of cosmetic vein problems requires a very different approach than that for the majority of most other vascular disorders that occur in a vascular surgery practice. This article focuses on the business aspects of a cosmetic vein practice, with particular attention to the uniqueness of these issues. Managing patient expectations is critical to the success of a cosmetic vein practice. Maneuvering within the insurance can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and the practice. Practices should use cost accounting principles to evaluate the success of their vein work. Vein surgery--especially if performed within the office--can undergo an accurate break-even analysis to determine its profitability. PMID:17911565

  16. The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field: A hydrothermal system on an active detachment fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last ten years, geophysical studies have revealed that the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field (26°08‧N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is located on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. This is particularly important in light of the recognition that detachment faulting accounts for crustal accretion/extension along a significant portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and that the majority of confirmed vent sites on this slow-spreading ridge are hosted on detachment faults. The TAG hydrothermal field is one of the largest sites of high-temperature hydrothermal activity and mineralization found to date on the seafloor, and is comprised of active and relict deposits in different stages of evolution. The episodic nature of hydrothermal activity over the last 140 ka provides strong evidence that the complex shape and geological structure of the active detachment fault system exerts first order, but poorly understood, influences on the hydrothermal circulation patterns, fluid chemistry, and mineral deposition. While hydrothermal circulation extracts heat from a deep source region, the location of the source region at TAG is unknown. Hydrothermal upflow is likely focused along the relatively permeable detachment fault interface at depth, and then the high temperature fluids leave the low-angle portion of the detachment fault and rise vertically through the highly fissured hanging wall to the seafloor. The presence of abundant anhydrite in the cone on the summit of the TAG active mound and in veins in the crust beneath provides evidence for a fluid circulation system that entrains significant amounts of seawater into the shallow parts of the mound and stockwork. Given the importance of detachment faulting for crustal extension at slow spreading ridges, the fundamental question that still needs to be addressed is: How do detachment fault systems, and the structure at depth associated with these systems (e.g., presence of plutons and/or high

  17. The Quartz Analog Watch: A Wonder Machine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes how a quartz watch works. Discusses the quartz crystal, its form, and how its frequency is set to a standard; the integrated circuit chip that drives the crystal in vibration, scales its frequency down, and forms pulses that turn the motor; and the motor that drives the gear train that turns the hands. (ZWH)

  18. Precise Sealing of Fused-Quartz Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnan, W. J. J.; Clark, I. O.

    1982-01-01

    New technique rapidly evacuates and seals fused-quartz ampoule with precise clearance over contents without appreciably thinning ampoule walls. Quartz plug is lowered into working section of ampoule after ampoule has been evacuated. Plug is then fused to ampoule walls, forming vacuum seal. New technique maintains wall strength and pumping speed.

  19. Sealed-in-quartz resistance heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Electric resistance quartz heater operates at 1,400 F without developing excessively hot spots that can fail prematurely. Since resistance element is sealed in quartz, heater can be used in hostile environments. Sealed construction also keeps heater from contaminating heated object.

  20. Volatile evolution of ore fluids in Coeur D'Alene veins during metamorphism of the Belt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstra, A.H.; Landis, G.P.; Leach, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two major vein types are recognized in the Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho and Montana. Early Zn-rich veins fill axial plane shears of WNW-trending folds in competent lithologies of Prichard Fm. and Ravalli Group metasediments. Later, Ag-rich veins occur predominantly in upper Revett Fm. quartzite in east- to northeast-trending fractures. Both vein types were deposited from fluids generated during regional greenschist grade metamorphism. Volatile composition of individual fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite from these veins were estimated using microthermometry and laser Raman spectroscopy. A high-sensitivity quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to obtain quantitative analyses of fluid extracted from whole crystals. Fluid inclusions from both vein types generally contain less than 10 mole % total gases and 5-10 eq. wt. % NaCl. However, fluid inclusion in Zn-rich veins contain greater concentrations of CH/sub 4/, short chain hydrocarbons, and N/sub 2/ compared to Ag-rich veins in which CO/sub 2/ is the dominant volatile component. The observed change in volatile compositions during metamorphism is consistent with a shift from relatively reducing to oxidizing conditions. The change from Zn- to Ag-rich veins may reflect the combined effects of a) volatile evolution of the metamorphic fluids through time, b) episodic development of large fractures with different orientations, and c) different lithologies contributing metamorphic fluids to these fractures.

  1. Quartz-sericite and argillic alterations at the Peschanka Cu-Mo-Au deposit, Chukchi Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchenko, L. I.; Baksheev, I. A.; Nagornaya, E. V.; Chitalin, A. F.; Nikolaev, Yu. N.; Kal'ko, I. A.; Prokofiev, V. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The porphyry Peschanka copper-molybdenum-gold deposit and the Nakhodka ore field located in the Baimka ore trend on the western Chukchi Peninsula are spatially related to monzonitic rocks of the Early Cretaceous Egdykgych Complex. Two types of quartz-sericite metasomatic rocks (QSR) have been identified at both the deposits and the ore field: (I) chlorite-quartz-muscovite rock with bornite and chalcopyrite (porphyry type) and (II) tourmaline-quartz-carbonate-muscovite ± phengite rock accompanied by veins with base-metal mineralization (subepithermal or transitional type), as well as carbonate-quartz-illite rock (argillic alteration) accompanied by veins with precious metal mineralization (epithermal type). The QSR I chlorite evolves from chamosite to clinochlore, which is caused by increasing H2S activity in mineralizing fluid and precipitation of sulfide minerals. The QSR I clinochlore is significantly depleted in silica as compared with that from the rocks affected by argillic alteration. The chemical composition of muscovite from both quartz-sericite alterations is similar. The QSR II carbonates evolve from calcite through dolomite to siderite, which results from the increasing activity of CO2 followed by the decreasing activity of H2S in mineralizing fluid. The Mn content in dolomite is similar to that in beresite (quartz-muscovite-carbonate-pyrite metasomatic rock) of the intrusion-related gold deposits. Illite from argillic alteration is depleted in Al as compared with that of postvolcanic epithermal Au-Ag deposits. However, carbonates from the discussed argillic alteration rhodochrosite and Mn-rich dolomite are similar to those from quartz-illite rock at postvolcanic epithermal Au-Ag deposits.

  2. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems

  3. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Smith, M.F.; Jonasson, I.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85{degree}49 feet W and 85{degree} 55 feet W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens` equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (<10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems. 50 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Electron irradiation damage in quartz, SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, B.; Flörke, O. W.; Kainka, E.; Wirth, R.

    1996-10-01

    Crystallographically orientated samples of synthetic optical-grade colourless quartz with high chemical purity and low dislocation density together with synthetic gem-grade amethyst with high Fe-concentration and ca. 250 H/106 Si (“dry”) or 600 H/106 Si (“wet”) and with very high dislocation densities were irradiated using TEM. Samples of cuts perpendicular (-cuts) and parallel (-cuts) to the c-axis, that were as-grown or pretreated for 5 days at 820 K on air or under p(H2O)=108 Pa were prepared. Characterization methods used include AAS, FTIR, Raman-spectroscopy, X-ray-topography, REM, TEM in SAED and bright-field mode and polarized light microscopy. Radiolysis was carried out in TEM from 10 to 300 K with 100 kV and from 70 850 K (low-high-transition temperature of quartz) with 200 kV. Irradiation damage was investigated by decay of Kikuchi-lines or of Bragg reflections in SAED and in bright-field mode by development of strain contrast centres and of noncrystalline volume areas. Special preparates where the irradiation damage was of microscopic dimensions were investigated using Raman-spectroscopy. Radiolysis of quartz is able to proceed at 10 K with measurable velocity. The required electron dose for a standardized irradiation damage decreases with increasing temperature. At ca. 500 K it goes through a minimum and then increases steadily up to ca. 700 K. From there the increase is steep until ca. 820 K where it culminates sharply, showing strong fluctuations until 850 K. The -cuts in the as-grown state show significantly higher irradiation damage sensitivity than -cuts. Dry or hydrothermal preheating increases the overall sensitivity of irradiation damage and levels out the orientation differences. The high Fe-concentrations in amethyst in comparison with very pure quartz have no detectable influence on the damage sensitivity. This is also true for different water concentrations independently from the ratio of silanole-group to molecular

  5. Different carbon reservoirs of auriferous fluids in African Archean and Proterozoic gold deposits? Constraints from stable carbon isotopic compositions of quartz-hosted CO2-rich fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüders, Volker; Klemd, Reiner; Oberthür, Thomas; Plessen, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon (and when present, nitrogen) isotope ratios of fluid inclusions in quartz from selected gold deposits in Ghana and Zimbabwe have been analyzed using a crushing device interfaced to an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) in order to constrain possible sources of the auriferous fluids. The study revealed a striking difference in stable carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from Archean and Paleoproterozoic orogenic gold deposits and points to diverse sources of CO2 in the studied deposits. Whether this finding can be generalized for other Archean and Proterozoic orogenic gold deposits worldwide remains open. However, a significant CO2 contribution by mantle degassing can be ruled out for every deposit studied. Devolatilization of greenstone belt rocks is the most likely source for CO2 in some Archean Au deposits in Zimbabwe, whereas CO2 in Proterozoic vein-type Au deposits in the West African Craton is most likely derived from Corg-bearing metasedimentary rocks. The δ13CCO2 values of high-density CO2-rich, water-poor inclusions hosted in quartz pebbles from the world-class Au-bearing conglomerate deposits at Tarkwa (Ghana) differ considerably from the δ13CCO2 values of similar high-density CO2-rich inclusions in vein quartz from the giant Ashanti deposit (Ghana) and disprove the idea of derivation of the Tarkwaian quartz (and gold?) from an older equivalent to the Ashanti vein-type gold deposit.

  6. Isotopic and fluid-inclusion constraints on the formation of polymetallic vein deposits in the central Argentinian Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejonghe, Léon; Darras, Benoît; Hughes, Guillermo; Muchez, Philippe; Scoates, James S.; Weis, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The lead isotope compositions of galena and the fluid-inclusion systematics of nine barite-bearing polymetallic (Au, Ag, Pb, Zn) deposits of the central Argentinian Patagonia (Chubut and Rio Negro provinces) have been investigated to constrain the compositions and sources of the mineralizing fluids. Most of the deposits occur as veins, with less common wall-rock disseminations and/or stockworks, and are low-sulfidation epithermal deposits hosted in Jurassic volcanic rocks. Fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures (Th) from quartz and sphalerite from the deposits fall within the range of 100-300 °C, with the highest measured average temperatures for the most eastern deposits (Mina Angela - 298 °C; Cañadón Bagual - 343 °C). The salinities of the hydrothermal fluids at all deposits were low to moderate (≤10.4 equiv. wt% NaCl). Three groups of ore deposits can be defined on the basis of 206Pb/204Pb ratios for galena and these show a general decrease from west to east (from 18.506 to 18.000). The central Argentinian Patagonia deposits have distinctly less radiogenic lead isotope compositions than similar deposits from Peru and Chile, except for the porphyry copper deposits of central and southern Peru. Galena from the Mina Angela deposit is characterized by very low radiogenic lead isotope compositions (18.000<206Pb/204Pb<18.037 and 38.03<208Pb/204Pb<38.09) and reflects interaction with Precambrian basement. The geographic trend in lead isotope compositions of both galena and whole rocks indicates a crustal contribution which increases eastwards, also reflected in the strontium-neodymium isotope systematics of the host lavas. Finally, due to the lack of precise age determinations for the central Patagonian polymetallic deposits, a potential link with Andean porphyry copper systems remains an open question.

  7. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  8. Quartz cement in sandstones: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Earle F.

    Quartz cement as syntaxial overgrowths is one of the two most abundant cements in sandstones. The main factors that control the amount of quartz cement in sandstones are: framework composition; residence time in the "silica mobility window"; and fluid composition, flow volume and pathways. Thus, the type of sedimentary basin in which a sand was deposited strongly controls the cementation process. Sandstones of rift basins (arkoses) and collision-margin basins (litharenites) generally have only a few percent quartz cement; quartzarenites and other quartzose sandstones of intracratonic, foreland and passive-margin basins have the most quartz cement. Clay and other mineral coatings on detrital quartz grains and entrapment of hydrocarbons in pores retard or prevent cementation by quartz, whereas extremely permeable sands that serve as major fluid conduits tend to sequester the greatest amounts of quartz cement. In rapidly subsiding basins, like the Gulf Coast and North Sea basins, most quartz cement is precipitated by cooling, ascending formation water at burial depths of several kilometers where temperatures range from 60° to 100° C. Cementation proceeds over millions of years, often under changing fluid compositions and temperatures. Sandstones with more than 10% imported quartz cement pose special problems of fluid flux and silica transport. If silica is transported entirely as H 4SiO 4, convective recycling of formation water seems to be essential to explain the volume of cement present in most sandstones. Precipitation from single-cycle, upward-migrating formation water is adequate to provide the volume of cement only if significant volumes of silica are transported in unidentified complexes. Modeling suggests that quartz cementation of sandstones in intracratonic basins is effected by advecting meteoric water, although independent petrographic, isotopic or fluid inclusion data are lacking. Silica for quartz cement comes from both shale and sandstone beds within

  9. The origin of massive hydrothermal alterations: what drives fluid flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Martín-Martín, Juan-Diego; Corbella, Mercè; Stafford, Sherry L.; Griera, Albert; Teixell, Antonio; Salas, Ramón; Travé, Anna

    2014-05-01

    hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). The main question is whether fast flow leaves recognizable signs, like hydrofractures of different scales and hydraulic breccias. We estimate fluid pressures reached at the reaction site, and discuss whether they are high enough to break the host rock, according to its petrophysical properties. Thermal convection could have driven pervasive fluid flow at lower flow rates, keeping the fluid warm and allowing time for the rock to react. But this mechanism would have required a shallow and very large intrusion or an anomalous geothermal gradient in order to activate flow by convection. This contribution presents a quantitative analysis of these hypotheses, and discusses their plausibility. Bons, P.D., 2001. The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics 336, 1-17. Gomez-Rivas, E., Corbella, M., Martín-Martín, J.D., Stafford, S.L., Teixell, A., Bons, P.D., Griera, A. and Cardellach, E. 2014. Reactivity of dolomitizing fluids and Mg source evaluation of fault-controlled dolomitization at the Benicàssim outcrop analogue (Maestrat Basin, E Spain). Marine and Petroleum Geology, in press.

  10. Hydrothermal Alteration in Submarine Basaltic Rocks from the Reykjanes Geothermal Field, Iceland. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Fowler, A. P.; Marks, N.; Fridleifsson, G.; Elders, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    . Drill core collected (100% recovery) at an in situ temperature of 320°C from an inclined off-set hole drilled from RN-17 provides a sharp contrast to the drill cuttings. Original rock textures, including fine-scale banding and quenched crystals in hyalloclastite, are very well preserved, but the core is pervasively altered to amphibole-calcic plagioclase. Fluid inclusions in epidote veins record episodes of seawater boiling, and zonation of strontium isotopes across the veins indicates changing seawater-rock ratios, both of which may relate to dike emplacement. The compositional variation observed in 9 m of drill core far exceeds the compositional variation the lowermost km of drill cuttings. Different areas of the core show addition and depletion of silica, alkalies, and magnesium. The cuttings are highly biased due to selective recovery of relatively fresh igneous plagioclase and pyroxene crystals from intrusive bodies, and resistant alteration minerals such as vein quartz and epidote are more abundant in the cuttings relative to the core. Selective recovery of less altered rock during ocean drilling operations is a known problem, but the recovered core may be less representative of the degree of alteration than is generally appreciated.

  11. Source and evolution of ore-forming hydrothermal fluids in the northern Iberian Pyrite Belt massive sulphide deposits (SW Spain): evidence from fluid inclusions and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-España, Javier; Velasco, Francisco; Boyce, Adrian J.; Fallick, Anthony E.

    2003-08-01

    A fluid inclusion and stable isotopic study has been undertaken on some massive sulphide deposits (Aguas Teñidas Este, Concepción, San Miguel, San Telmo and Cueva de la Mora) located in the northern Iberian Pyrite Belt. The isotopic analyses were mainly performed on quartz, chlorite, carbonate and whole rock samples from the stockworks and altered footwall zones of the deposits, and also on some fluid inclusion waters. Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions in quartz mostly range from 120 to 280 °C. Salinity of most fluid inclusions ranges from 2 to 14 wt% NaCl equiv. A few cases with Th=80-110 °C and salinity of 16-24 wt% NaCl equiv., have been also recognized. In addition, fluid inclusions from the Soloviejo Mn-Fe-jaspers (160-190 °C and ≈6 wt% NaCl equiv.) and some Late to Post-Hercynian quartz veins (130-270 °C and ≈4 wt% NaCl equiv.) were also studied. Isotopic results indicate that fluids in equilibrium with measured quartz (δ18Ofluid ≈-2 to 4‰), chlorites (δ18Ofluid ≈8-14‰, δDfluid ≈-45 to -27‰), whole rocks (δ18Ofluid ≈4-7‰, δDfluid ≈-15 to -10‰), and carbonates (δ18Oankerite ≈14.5-16‰, δ13Cfluid =-11 to -5‰) evolved isotopically during the lifetime of the hydrothermal systems, following a waxing/waning cycle at different temperatures and water/rock ratios. The results (fluid inclusions, δ18O, δD and δ13C values) point to a highly evolved seawater, along with a variable (but significant) contribution of other fluid reservoirs such as magmatic and/or deep metamorphic waters, as the most probable sources for the ore-forming fluids. These fluids interacted with the underlying volcanic and sedimentary rocks during convective circulation through the upper crust.

  12. Formation of Archean batholith-hosted gold veins at the Lac Herbin deposit, Val-d'Or district, Canada: Mineralogical and fluid inclusion constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezeau, Hervé; Moritz, Robert; Beaudoin, Georges

    2016-07-01

    The Lac Herbin deposit consists of a network of mineralized, parallel steep-reverse faults within the synvolcanic Bourlamaque granodiorite batholith at Val-d'Or in the Archean Abitibi greenstone belt. There are two related quartz-tourmaline-carbonate fault-fill vein sets in the faults, which consist of subvertical fault-fill veins associated with subhorizontal veins. The paragenetic sequence is characterized by a main vein filling ore stage including quartz, tourmaline, carbonate, and pyrite-hosted gold, chalcopyrite, tellurides, pyrrhotite, and cubanite inclusions. Most of the gold is located in fractures in deformed pyrite and quartz in equilibrium with chalcopyrite and carbonates, with local pyrrhotite, sphalerite, galena, cobaltite, pyrite, or tellurides. Petrography and microthermometry on quartz from the main vein filling ore stage reveal the presence of three unrelated fluid inclusion types: (1) gold-bearing aqueous-carbonic inclusions arranged in three-dimensional intragranular clusters in quartz crystals responsible for the main vein filling stage, (2) barren high-temperature, aqueous, moderately saline inclusions observed in healed fractures, postdating the aqueous-carbonic inclusions, and considered as a remobilizing agent of earlier precipitated gold in late fractures, and (3) barren low-temperature, aqueous, high saline inclusions in healed fractures, similar to the crustal brines reported throughout the Canadian Shield and considered to be unrelated to the gold mineralization. At the Lac Herbin deposit, the aqueous-carbonic inclusions are interpreted to have formed first and to represent the gold-bearing fluid, which were generated contemporaneous with regional greenschist facies metamorphism. In contrast, the high-temperature aqueous fluid dissolved gold from the main vein filling ore stage transported and reprecipitated it in late fractures during a subsequent local thermal event.

  13. K-feldspar-muscovite-andalusite-quartz-brine phase equilibria: An experimental study at 25 to 60 MPa and 400 to 550 C

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.R.; Candela, P.A.; Piccoli, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Felsic magmas may evolve one or more water or chlorine-rich fluid phases which can transport heat and solutes into associated hydrothermal systems and can contribute to alteration and ore deposition. To understand the role of a high-salinity aqueous phase in the magmatic hydrothermal environment, the composition of a subcritical, vapor-undersaturated high-salinity liquid phase (brine) in equilibrium with K-feldspar-muscovite-quartz and muscovite-andalusite-quartz was determined for pressures and temperatures ranging from 25 MPa and 400 C to 60 MPa and 550 C, with total Cl (NaCl + KCl + HCl) concentrations ranging from 3.42 to 8.56 (moles of solute/kg solution). Comparison of results with previous studies conducted at higher pressures and lower-salinity aqueous phases show that the mineral stability fields in the K-feldspar-muscovite-andalusite-quartz system shift to lower KCl/KCl values with increasing salinity and decreasing pressure.

  14. Geometric Analysis of Vein Fracture Networks From the Awibengkok Core, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatwa, A.; Bruhn, R. L.; Brown, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    Fracture network systems within rocks are important features for the transportation and remediation of hazardous waste, oil and gas production, geothermal energy extraction and the formation of vein fillings and ore deposits. A variety of methods, including computational and laboratory modeling have been employed to further understand the dynamic nature of fractures and fracture systems (e.g. Ebel and Brown, this session). To substantiate these studies, it is also necessary to analyze the characteristics and morphology of naturally occurring vein systems. The Awibengkok core from a geothermal system in West Java, Indonesia provided an excellent opportunity to study geometric and petrologic characteristics of vein systems in volcanic rock. Vein minerals included chlorite, calcite, quartz, zeolites and sulphides. To obtain geometric data on the veins, we employed a neural net image processing technique to analyze high-resolution digital photography of the veins. We trained a neural net processor to map the extent of the vein using RGB pixel training classes. The resulting classification image was then converted to a binary image file and processed through a MatLab program that we designed to calculate vein geometric statistics, including aperture and roughness. We also performed detailed petrographic and microscopic geometric analysis on the veins to determine the history of mineralization and fracturing. We found that multi-phase mineralization due to chemical dissolution and re-precipitation as well as mechanical fracturing was a common feature in many of the veins and that it had a significant role for interpreting vein tortuosity and history of permeability. We used our micro- and macro-scale observations to construct four hypothetical permeability models that compliment the numerical and laboratory modeled data reported by Ebel and Brown. In each model, permeability changes, and in most cases fluctuates, differently over time as the tortuosity and aperture of

  15. Weathering and hydrothermal alteration of basalts in Iceland: mineralogy from VNIR, TIR, XRD, and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Bish, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    thomsonite, basalts with silica/quartz-bearing veins, basalts bearing celadonite, and basalts partially altered to montmorillonite, Fe/Mg smectite, or mixed smectite-chlorite. Analyses included: (1) measurement of reflectance spectra of the whole rock by the ASD; (2) measurement of VNIR and TIR spectra in RELAB of particle-size separates (<25um and <125um) derived from the bulk rock and from precipitated minerals extracted from the vesicles; (3) measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, including quantitative XRD; and (4) electron microprobe chemical analyses. These data emulate orbital data from CRISM, OMEGA, and TES, which detect the infrared active components, linked to in-situ data on whole rock modal mineralogy such as will be measured by the ChemMin instrument on the MSL rover.

  16. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  17. Mechanical twinning in small quartz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughner, J. W.; Newnham, R. E.; Cross, L. E.

    1982-02-01

    Quartz is known to be ferrobielastic; that is, quartz crystals have domain states (Dauphiné twins) which differ in their elastic compliance values and which can be switched by an appropriately oriented stress. Polycrystalline quartz has also been reported (Tullis 1970) to show preferential orientation of these domains following application of large uniaxial stresses. These experiments were designed to study twinning of synthetic quartz “grains” (minimum size 0.07×0.07×0.02 cm) in specially-constructed composites and of grains in three natural quartz aggregates — a quartzite, a novaculite, and a jasper. Backreflection X-ray techniques were used to verify twinning in the composite grains, while special electroding and electrical detection allowed the twinning processes to be examined in “real time.” Small synthetic quartz crystals were found to behave identically to the massive samples previously studied. Electrical pulses due to the reversal of piezoelectric coefficient d 11 in twinned quartz were detected from quartzite and from the man-made composites. Novaculite also gave electrical pulses which were probably from twinning (evidenced by the correlation of expected and observed pulse sizes and shapes), while no pulses from the jaspers indicative of twinning were detected. Grain size distribution differences are considered the main structural reason for the different behaviors.

  18. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Tornabene, Livio L.; Banerjee, Neil R.; Cockell, Charles S.; Flemming, Roberta; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; McCutcheon, Jenine; Parnell, John; Preston, Louisa J.; Pickersgill, Annemarie E.; Pontefract, Alexandra; Sapers, Haley M.; Southam, Gordon

    2013-06-01

    It has long been suggested that hydrothermal systems might have provided habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth, and possibly other planets such as Mars. In this contribution we show that most impact events that result in the formation of complex impact craters (i.e., >2-4 and >5-10 km diameter on Earth and Mars, respectively) are potentially capable of generating a hydrothermal system. Consideration of the impact cratering record on Earth suggests that the presence of an impact crater lake is critical for determining the longevity and size of the hydrothermal system. We show that there are six main locations within and around impact craters on Earth where impact-generated hydrothermal deposits can form: (1) crater-fill impact melt rocks and melt-bearing breccias; (2) interior of central uplifts; (3) outer margin of central uplifts; (4) impact ejecta deposits; (5) crater rim region; and (6) post-impact crater lake sediments. We suggest that these six locations are applicable to Mars as well. Evidence for impact-generated hydrothermal alteration ranges from discrete vugs and veins to pervasive alteration depending on the setting and nature of the system. A variety of hydrothermal minerals have been documented in terrestrial impact structures and these can be grouped into three broad categories: (1) hydrothermally-altered target-rock assemblages; (2) primary hydrothermal minerals precipitated from solutions; and (3) secondary assemblages formed by the alteration of primary hydrothermal minerals. Target lithology and the origin of the hydrothermal fluids strongly influences the hydrothermal mineral assemblages formed in these post-impact hydrothermal systems. There is a growing body of evidence for impact-generated hydrothermal activity on Mars; although further detailed studies using high-resolution imagery and multispectral information are required. Such studies have only been done in detail for a handful of martian craters. The best example so

  19. Geology and geochemistry of the Mammoth breccia pipe, Copper Creek mining district, southeastern Arizona: Evidence for a magmatic-hydrothermal origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, E.D.; Atkinson, W.W.; Marsh, T.; Iriondo, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Copper Creek mining district, southeastern Arizona, contains more than 500 mineralized breccia pipes, buried porphyry-style, copper-bearing stockworks, and distal lead-silver veins. The breccia pipes are hosted by the Copper Creek Granodiorite and the Glory Hole volcanic rocks. The unexposed Mammoth breccia pipe, solely recognized by drilling, has a vertical extent of 800 m and a maximum width of 180 m. The pipe consists of angular clasts of granodiorite cemented by quartz, chalcopyrite, bornite, anhydrite, and calcite. Biotite 40Ar/ 39Ar dates suggest a minimum age of 61.5??0.7 Ma for the host Copper Creek Granodiorite and 40Ar/39Ar dates on hydrothermal sericite indicate an age of 61.0??0.5 Ma for copper mineralization. Fluid inclusion studies suggest that a supercritical fluid with a salinity of approximately 10 wt.% NaCl equiv. condensed to a dilute aqueous vapor (1-2.8 wt.% NaCl equiv.) and a hypersaline brine (33.4-35.1 wt.% NaCl equiv.). Minimum trapping temperatures are 375??C and trapping depths are estimated at 2 km. Sulfur isotope fractionation of cogenetic anhydrite and chalcopyrite yields a temperature of mineralization of 469??25??C. Calculated oxygen and hydrogen isotope values for fluids in equilibrium with quartz and sericite range from 10.2??? to 13.4??? and -60??? to -39???, respectively, suggesting that the mineralizing fluid was dominantly magmatic. Evidence from the stable isotope and fluid inclusion analyses suggests that the fluids responsible for Cu mineralization within the Mammoth breccia pipe exsolved from a gray porphyry phase found at the base of the breccia pipe. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  20. How Are Varicose Veins Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... shun) therapy uses lasers or radiowaves to create heat to close off a varicose vein. Your doctor ...

  1. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  2. Hydrothermal systematics, alteration, and mineralization in the Grant Canyon, Bacon Flat, and Blackburn Oil Fields, Nevada - Intriguing Parallels with Carlin-Type gold deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Nevada's three known thermally active oil reservoirs-Blackburn, Bacon Flat, and Grand Canyon-share a surprisingly long list of essential attributes with the Carlin-type, low-grade, sediment-hosted gold deposits, particularly those of the Alligator Ridge mining district. Like these rich precious-metal ore bodies, the three fields (1) are hosted by Paleozoic carbonate and calcareous silici-clastic strata; (2) occur in structural or structural/stratigraphic traps sealed beneath shales or hydrothermally argillized and silicified tuffs and epiclastic debris, (3) have undergone intense fracturing and brecciation, as well as massive hydrothermal decalcification as major porosity-creating processes; (4) occupy rocks partly altered to or veined by the secondary-mineral assemblage quartz-kaolin-barite-pyrite-marcasite; (5) have a direct geothermal connection; (6) are enriched in the elements arsenic, antimony, mercury, thallium, and even contain significant traces of gold-up 50 ppb in altered Mississippian Chainmain Shale in the Blackburn field. Moreover, measured temperatures, as well as late-stage, fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures (T[sub h]) at the fields-all in the range 100-135[degrees]C-fall within the fluid-inclusion T[sub h] span of 90-165[degrees]C recorded for multiple Alligator Ridge deposits. Fracture-controlled live oil and oil-bearing fluid inclusions in some of the Alligator Ridge ores provide further evidence of genetic similarities with the oil reservoirs. The authors suggest that the three oil fields could represent either weakly mineralized analogs of the gold deposits or an incipient phase in their evolution ultimately leading to ore mineralization.

  3. Three sets of crystallographic sub-planar structures in quartz formed by tectonic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    In quartz, multiple sets of fine planar deformation microstructures that have specific crystallographic orientations parallel to planes with low Miller-Bravais indices are commonly considered as shock-induced planar deformation features (PDFs) diagnostic of shock metamorphism. Using polarized light microscopy, we demonstrate that up to three sets of tectonically induced sub-planar fine extinction bands (FEBs), sub-parallel to the basal, γ, ω, and π crystallographic planes, are common in vein quartz in low-grade tectonometamorphic settings. We conclude that the observation of multiple (2-3) sets of fine scale, closely spaced, crystallographically controlled, sub-planar microstructures is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish PDFs from tectonic FEBs.

  4. Frictional strengths of talc-serpentine and talc-quartz mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Talc is a constituent of faults in a variety of settings, and it may be an effective weakening agent depending on its abundance and distribution within a fault. We conducted frictional strength experiments under hydrothermal conditions to determine the effect of talc on the strengths of synthetic gouges of lizardite and antigorite serpentinites and of quartz. Small amounts of talc weaken serpentinite gouges substantially more than predicted by simple weight averaging. In comparison, mixtures of quartz and talc show a linear trend of strength reduction at talc concentrations 15 wt % and enhanced weakening at higher concentrations. All of the strength data are fit by a modified version of the Reuss mixing law that allows for the dominance of one mineral over the other. The difference in the behavior of serpentinite-talc and quartz-talc mixtures at low talc concentrations is a reflection of their different textures. Lizardite, antigorite, and talc all have platy habits, and displacement within gouges composed of these minerals is localized to narrow shears along which the platy grains have rotated into alignment with the shear surfaces. The shears in the mixed phyllosilicate gouges maximize the proportion of the weaker mineral within them. When mixed with a strong, rounded mineral such as quartz, some minimum concentration of talc is needed to form connected pathways that enhance strength reductions. The typical development of talc by the reaction of Si-rich fluids with serpentinite or dolomite would tend to localize its occurrence in a natural fault and result in enhanced weakening.

  5. The Riviera Deposit: Endo-skarn and Vein-hosted W-MO-REE Mineralization in I-type Granites of the Cape Granite Suite, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozendaal, A.; Moyen, J.

    2009-05-01

    The blind Riviera deposit is located in the western Cape Province and was discovered by stream sediment sampling in the mid 1970's. Resources total 46 million metric tons assaying 0,216 per cent tungsten and 200 parts per million molybdenum, a marginal grade that has prohibited development into an open cast mine. Mineralization is mainly hosted by granitoids of the Riviera Pluton which intruded the regionally metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary Malmesbury Group. These granitoids form part of the Cape Granite Suite, a series of batholiths and plutons with S-, I- and A-type characteristics. The composite Riviera Pluton comprises a suite of metaluminous to slightly peraluminous granitoids. The rocks least affected by hydrothermal alteration are granodioritic to adamelitic in composition whereas the more altered host rocks include quartz-monzonite, granite and quartz syenite. As a whole the suite is subalkaline to K-calcalkaline and conforms to the characteristics of I-type granites. The pluton was emplaced into a dome-shaped interference structure, late in the Neoproterozoic Saldanian orogenic cycle. Alteration, particularly prevalent in the roof or cupola of the pluton, occurs as zones of pervasive sericitization, argillization, silicification and potassic alteration. Their spatial and temporal relationship is complex and indicates several superimposed alteration events. Wall rocks display limited alteration and have acted as an impermeable cap. The cross-cutting granitoid intrusions produced wall rock xenoliths of various dimensions consisting mainly of meta-carbonates displaying various stages of digestion. Economic concentrations of scheelite are spatially linked to these assimilations, particularly proximal to the wall rock contact. The occurrence of diagnostic minerals such as vesuvianite, hornblende, hedenbergite, grandite garnets define a typical endo-skarn association. Accessory minerals include pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and the LREE enriched

  6. Geological setting and timing of the cassiterite vein type mineralization of the Kalima area (Maniema, Democratic Republic of Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, S.; Muchez, Ph; Burgess, R.; Boyce, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Central African Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole belt in the Great Lakes area (DRCongo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Tanzania) forms a metallogenic province that hosts a variety of granite-related mineralization, which contains cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, wolframite/ferberite, spodumene and beryl. The Kalima area in the Maniema province of the DRCongo forms one of the most important areas for cassiterite mineralization in the eastern part of the DRCongo, even after many decades of exploitation. The mineralization dominantly consists of quartz veins that are hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasediments at the contact with granitic rocks of the Kalima granite (Avuanga and Yubuli) or directly crosscutting these granitic rocks (Atondo). Only limited - and mainly unmineralized pegmatites - have been described in the Lutshurukuru area. Mineralized quartz veins - and some granite bodies - intruded following the regional tectonic foliation or existing fracture zones, confirming the late-to post-tectonic origin of the fertile granite system. The emplacement of the quartz veins resulted in an alteration of the metasedimentary and granitic host-rocks, mainly resulting in muscovitization, tourmalinization and silicification. Cassiterite itself formed relatively late during vein formation and is associated with muscovite in fractures in or along the margins of the quartz veins. 40Ar-39Ar age dating of muscovite of an unmineralized pegmatite from the Lutshurukuru area gave an excellent plateau age of 1024 ± 5.5 Ma, while the muscovite associated with mineralization gave plateau ages of 986 ± 5.3 Ma for the Atondo deposit and 992.4 ± 5.4 Ma for the Yubuli deposit. The rather large spread in ages between the supposed parental granite/pegmatite and quartz veins is interpreted to reflect different magmatic events in the evolution of a composite granite system, starting at ∼1020 Ma and ending with mineralized quartz vein formation at ∼990 Ma. The latter age corresponds with

  7. Carbon isotope evidence for a magmatic origin for Archaean gold-quartz vein ore deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, D. R.; Wood, P. C.; Spooner, E. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Sediments from three sites in the Santa Barbara Basin were examined with a 160X power light microscope and TEM equipment to characterize the magnetostatic bacteria (MB) in the samples. Both the free magnetite and the crystals in the MB in the samples had lengths from 40-60 nm in length and increased in size from one end to the next. An intact magnetosome was also observed. Scanning the sediments with saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and altering field demagnetization techniques using a SQUID magnetometer yielded coercivity spectra which showed that the primary remanence carrier in the sediments was single domain magnetite. Although it is expected that the predominance of the bacterial magnetite component will decrease with depth in the open ocean basin, single-domain bacteria as old as 50 Myr have been observed in oceanic sediments.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In the calculations we have assumed that all apatites are magmatic. The presence of chlorite and altered plagioclase within the granite and quartz-monzodiorite suggests that alteration may play a role in leading to erroneous estimates of initial melt Cl and F for 2 reasons: (1) the apatites may in fact not be magmatic in origin, but are hydrothermal, and (2) the halogen signature of magmatic apatite may be changed due to subsolidus exchange with a hydrothermal fluid. We are currently endeavoring to develop criteria for determining whether apatite composition represents earlier or later stages of magmatic-hydrothermal development.

  9. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy: a review.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-03-28

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  10. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  11. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis. PMID:24686729

  12. Quartz crystal microbalance use in biological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. H.; Godfrey, J. F.; Laue, E. G.; Laue, T. M.; Paik, W. W.; Wardle, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Design, development, and applications of quartz crystal microbalance are discussed. Two types of crystals are used. One serves as reference and other senses changes in mass. Specific application to study of bacterial spores is described.

  13. Method of making a quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Vig, John R.; Filler, Raymond L.; Peters, R. Donald; Frank, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A quartz resonator is made from a chemically polished quartz plate. The plate is placed in an enclosure fitted with at least three mounting clips to receive the plate. The plate is secured to the clips with an electrically conductive adhesive capable of withstanding operation at 350 degrees C. The assembly is cleaned and a metallic electrode deposited onto the plate until the desired frequency is reached. The enclosure is then hermetically sealed. The resulting resonator can consistently withstand extremely high shocks.

  14. Quartz resonator fluid monitors for vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.; Martin, S.J.; Wessendorf, K.O.; Terry, M.D.; Rumpf, A.N.

    1994-09-01

    Thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonators operating in a new {open_quotes}Lever oscillator{close_quotes} circuit are used as monitors for critical automotive fluids. These monitors respond to the density and viscosity of liquids contacting the quartz surface. Sensors have been developed for determining the viscosity characteristics of engine lubricating oil, the state-of-charge of lead-acid storage batteries, and the concentration variations in engine coolant.

  15. Quartz resonator fluid monitors for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernosek, R. W.; Martin, S. J.; Wessendorf, K. O.; Terry, M. D.; Rumpf, A. N.

    Thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonators operating in a new 'Lever oscillator' circuit are used as monitors for critical automotive fluids. These monitors respond to the density and viscosity of liquids contacting the quartz surface. Sensors have been developed for determining the viscosity characteristics of engine lubricating oil, the state-of-charge of lead-acid storage batteries, and the concentration variations in engine coolant.

  16. New hole centers in natural quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschmeyer, D.; Lehmann, G.

    1983-11-01

    In natural citrines five new hole centers were detected and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance. An additional one was observed in rose-colored quartz crystals with radiation defects as the cause of coloration. Characteristic hyperfine patterns due to an adjacent aluminum impurity were resolved in the spectra of three of these centers. Their relations to other hole centers of well-known structure in quartz and fused silica are discussed and possible models for their structures are proposed.

  17. Fluid inclusions in quartz crystals from South-West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Roedder, E.

    1971-01-01

    Quartz crystals from calcite veins of unknown age in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks at Geiaus No. 6 and Aukam farms in South-West Africa contain both primary and secondary inclusions filled with one or a variable combination of: organic liquid, moderately saline aqueous liquid, dark-colored solid, and vapor. Analysis of these materials by microscopy and by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry shows the presence of constituents of both low and high molecular weights. The former include CH4, C2H6, C3H8 and possibly C4H10 as well as CO, CO2, H2O, N2 and H2. High molecular weight components are dominantly n-alkanes and isoprenoid hydrocarbons. The n-alkanes range from at least n-C10 to n-C33. Concentrations of n-alkanes larger than n-C17 decrease regularly with increasing carbon number. An homologous series of isoprenoid hydrocarbons ranging from at least C14 to C20 is present in unusually high concentrations. Pristane (C19) is most abundant, and C17 isoprenoid is least abundant. The molecular composition and distribution of hydrocarbons suggest biological precursors for these components. Consideration of data provided by freezing, crushing and heating experiments suggests that the pressures at the time these in part supercritical fluids were trapped probably exceeded 30-40 atm, and the minimum trapping temperature was about 120-160??C. Both primary and secondary inclusions apparently containing only organic materials were trapped by the growth of the host quartz from aqueous solution. The data obtained neither prove nor preclude Precambrian, Paleozoic or younger sources for the organic materials. ?? 1971.

  18. ESR studies on bleached sedimentary quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, R.; Zilles, D.

    Some ESR signals in quartz are reported to be bleachable by sunlight and so they promise to be useful for dating sediments (Grün, 1989). The Ge signal in quartz is the only one that shows bleaching effects with UV light in short time scales (hours). Therefore we used quartz samples from the sites of Mauer ( 'Homo erectus heidelbergensis'), samples from a borehole in the Neckar valley ('Entensee', Ladenburg near Heidelberg) and samples from a pegmatite for basic studies on the Ge signal. The results show that with our standard sample preparation procedure for quartz separation (using red light as for TL samples), the natural Ge signal is not detectable, but rises clearly with gamma irradiation. Several experiments for examination of the stability and sensitivity of the Ge centre in quartz were carried out. For comparison with the behaviour of the Ge signal we measured the Al signal as well. Our experiments show that the Al signal is bleachable in long time scales (weeks). The behaviour on bleaching, irradiation and thermal annealing is very complicated, as the Al centre is a hole centre (it possibly interacts with several electron centres in the quartz and so the processes are of higher order).

  19. Fluid inclusion petrology and microthermometry of the Cocos Ridge hydrothermal system, IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2), Site U1414

    PubMed Central

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Krenn, Kurt; Micheuz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we present new data from microthermometry of fluid inclusions entrapped in hydrothermal veins along the Cocos Ridge from the IODP Expedition 344 Site U1414. The results of our study concern a primary task of IODP Expedition 344 to evaluate fluid/rock interaction linked with the tectonic evolution of the incoming Cocos Plate from the Early Miocene up to recent times. Aqueous, low saline fluids are concentrated within veins from both the Cocos Ridge basalt and the overlying lithified sediments of Unit III. Mineralization and crosscutting relationships give constraints for different vein generations. Isochores from primary, reequilibrated, and secondary fluid inclusions crossed with litho/hydrostatic pressures indicate an anticlockwise PT evolution during vein precipitation and modification by isobaric heating and subsequent cooling at pressures between ∼210 and 350 bar. Internal over and underpressures in the inclusions enabled decrepitation and reequilibration of early inclusions but also modification of vein generations in the Cocos Ridge basalt and in the lithified sediments. We propose that lithification of the sediments was accompanied with a first stage of vein development (VU1 and VC1) that resulted from Galapagos hotspot activity in the Middle Miocene. Heat advection, either related to the Cocos‐Nazca spreading center or to hotspot activity closer to the Middle America Trench, led to subsequent vein modification (VC2, VU2/3) related to isobaric heating. The latest mineralization (VC3, VU3) within aragonite and calcite veins and some vesicles of the Cocos Ridge basalt occurred during crustal cooling up to recent times. Fluid inclusion analyses and published isotope data show evidence for communication with deeper sourced, high‐temperature hydrothermal fluids within the Cocos Plate. The fluid source of the hydrothermal veins reflects aqueous low saline pore water mixed with invaded seawater. PMID:27570496

  20. Fluid inclusion petrology and microthermometry of the Cocos Ridge hydrothermal system, IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2), Site U1414

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Krenn, Kurt; Micheuz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present new data from microthermometry of fluid inclusions entrapped in hydrothermal veins along the Cocos Ridge from the IODP Expedition 344 Site U1414. The results of our study concern a primary task of IODP Expedition 344 to evaluate fluid/rock interaction linked with the tectonic evolution of the incoming Cocos Plate from the Early Miocene up to recent times. Aqueous, low saline fluids are concentrated within veins from both the Cocos Ridge basalt and the overlying lithified sediments of Unit III. Mineralization and crosscutting relationships give constraints for different vein generations. Isochores from primary, reequilibrated, and secondary fluid inclusions crossed with litho/hydrostatic pressures indicate an anticlockwise PT evolution during vein precipitation and modification by isobaric heating and subsequent cooling at pressures between ˜210 and 350 bar. Internal over and underpressures in the inclusions enabled decrepitation and reequilibration of early inclusions but also modification of vein generations in the Cocos Ridge basalt and in the lithified sediments. We propose that lithification of the sediments was accompanied with a first stage of vein development (VU1 and VC1) that resulted from Galapagos hotspot activity in the Middle Miocene. Heat advection, either related to the Cocos-Nazca spreading center or to hotspot activity closer to the Middle America Trench, led to subsequent vein modification (VC2, VU2/3) related to isobaric heating. The latest mineralization (VC3, VU3) within aragonite and calcite veins and some vesicles of the Cocos Ridge basalt occurred during crustal cooling up to recent times. Fluid inclusion analyses and published isotope data show evidence for communication with deeper sourced, high-temperature hydrothermal fluids within the Cocos Plate. The fluid source of the hydrothermal veins reflects aqueous low saline pore water mixed with invaded seawater.

  1. Zonation of Hydrothermal Alteration in the Central Uplift of the Puchezh-Katunki Astrobleme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, M. V.

    1993-07-01

    The giant (D = 80 km) Puchezh-Katunki astrobleme [1,2] is the site of widespread hydrothermal alteration. It occurs mainly in the central uplift composed of brecciated archean rocks and overlain by allogenic breccia, suevites, and coptomict gravelites (the latter is the lowest bed of crater-lake deposits). Distribution and vertical zonation of secondary minerals is controlled by the thermal gradient during cooling of authigenic breccia massif, while the degree of alteration depends on the intensity of brecciation and fracturing of basement rocks. Three types of hydrothermal mineralization are distinguished on the basis of different crystallization conditions: (1) mixed hydrothermal-diagenetic, in coptomict gravelites; (2) metasomatic, including formation of Fe-Mg hydrous phyllosilicates in shocked and thermally altered gneisses and amphibolites; and (3) veins, represented by mineral associations filling fractures and voids in basement rocks, allogenic breccia, and suevites. The second and third types occur together and each displays characteristic zonations, thus several zones may be distinguished in vertical section (zones 2-4 below). The uppermost zone corresponds to mixed hydrothermal-diagenetic conditions described in (1) above. In general, four zones are distinguished, from top downward, as follows. 1. Zone of hydrothermal-diagenetic alteration in coptomict gravelites. In this zone, replacement of impact glass fragments by assemblage of montmorillonite, calcite, and pyrite, and formation of alkali zeolites and calcite as a cement are observed establishing a temperature of alteration of less than 100 degrees C. 2. Zone of low-temperature (100 degrees-200 degrees C) mineralization comosed of suevites, allogenic breccia, and the upper part of authigenic breccia down to 2.5 km. Fe-saponite develops in shocked and recrystallized basement rocks, and various zeolites, apophylite, calcite, anhydrite, and pyrite fill vugs and fractures; in addition, calcite

  2. Mixing from below in hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Markl, Gregor; Walter, Bejamin

    2014-05-01

    Unconformity-related hydrothermal ore deposits typically show indications of mixing of two end-member fluids: (a) hot, deep, rock-buffered basement brines and (b) colder fluids derived from the surface or overlying sediments. The hydromechanics of bringing these fluids together from above and below remain unclear. Classical percolative Darcy-flow models are inconsistent with (1) fluid overpressure indicated by fracturing and brecciation, (2) fast fluid flow indicated by thermal disequilibrium, and (3) strong fluid composition variations on the mm-scale, indicated by fluid inclusion analyses (Bons et al. 2012; Fusswinkel et al. 2013). We propose that fluids first descend, sucked down by desiccation reactions in exhumed basement. Oldest fluids reach greatest depths, where long residence times and elevated temperatures allow them the extensively equilibrate with their host rock, reach high salinity and scavenge metals, if present. Youngest fluids can only penetrate to shallower depths and can (partially) retain signatures from their origin, for example high Cl/Br ratios from the dissolution of evaporitic halite horizons. When fluids are released from all levels of the crustal column, these fluids mix during rapid ascent to form hydrothermal ore deposits. Mixing from below provides a viable hydromechanical mechanism to explain the common phenomenon of mixed shallow and deep fluids in hydrothermal ore deposits. Bons, P.D., Elburg, M.A., Gomez-Rivas, E. 2012. A review of the formation of tectonic veins and their microstructures. J. Struct. Geol. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2012.07.005 Fusswinkel, T., Wagner, T., Wälle, M., Wenzel, T., Heinrich, C.A., Markl, M. 2013. Fluid mixing forms basement-hosted Pb-Zn deposits: Insight from metal and halogen geochemistry of individual fluid inclusions. Geology. doi:10.1130/G34092.1

  3. [Characteristics of Raman spectra of minerals in the veins of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Zhou, Ben-gang; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-cheng; Yi, Li; Chen, Zhi; Cui, Yue-ju; Li, Jing; Chen, Zheng-wei; Du, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz in the veins at the Shenxigou section of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone was investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopic measurement, and the distribution of compressive stress in the fault zone was estimated by the frequency shifts of the 464 cm-1 vibrational mode of quartz grains in the veins. It was showed that the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins near the fault plane shifts by 3. 29 cm-1 , and the corresponding compressive stress is 368. 63 MPa, which is significantly lower than the stress accumulation on both sides due to multi-stage events. Stress accumulation increased with moving away from the fault plane in the footwall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins increasing, which can reach 494. 77 MPa at a distance of 21 m with a high offset of 4. 40 cm-1 of the 464 cm-1 peak. The compressive stress gets the maximum value of 519.87 MPa at a distance of 10 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins being 4. 62 cm-1, followed by a sudden drop in stress accumulation, and it drops to 359. 59 MPa at a distance of 17 m. Because of moving away from the foult plane at the edge of the foult zone, the stress drops to 359. 59 MPa with a small value of 464 cm-1 peak offset 3. 21 cm-1 at a distance of 27 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall due to the little effect by the fault activity. Therefore, the stress of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone is partially released, but the rest of the stress distribution is uneven, and there is also a high stress accumulation in somewhere in the fault zone, which reflects that the mechanical properties of the rocks in the fault zone have a characteristic of unevenness in space.

  4. [Characteristics of Raman spectra of minerals in the veins of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Zhou, Ben-gang; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-cheng; Yi, Li; Chen, Zhi; Cui, Yue-ju; Li, Jing; Chen, Zheng-wei; Du, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz in the veins at the Shenxigou section of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone was investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopic measurement, and the distribution of compressive stress in the fault zone was estimated by the frequency shifts of the 464 cm-1 vibrational mode of quartz grains in the veins. It was showed that the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins near the fault plane shifts by 3. 29 cm-1 , and the corresponding compressive stress is 368. 63 MPa, which is significantly lower than the stress accumulation on both sides due to multi-stage events. Stress accumulation increased with moving away from the fault plane in the footwall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins increasing, which can reach 494. 77 MPa at a distance of 21 m with a high offset of 4. 40 cm-1 of the 464 cm-1 peak. The compressive stress gets the maximum value of 519.87 MPa at a distance of 10 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins being 4. 62 cm-1, followed by a sudden drop in stress accumulation, and it drops to 359. 59 MPa at a distance of 17 m. Because of moving away from the foult plane at the edge of the foult zone, the stress drops to 359. 59 MPa with a small value of 464 cm-1 peak offset 3. 21 cm-1 at a distance of 27 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall due to the little effect by the fault activity. Therefore, the stress of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone is partially released, but the rest of the stress distribution is uneven, and there is also a high stress accumulation in somewhere in the fault zone, which reflects that the mechanical properties of the rocks in the fault zone have a characteristic of unevenness in space. PMID:25993832

  5. Columbium-, rare-earth-element-, and thorium-bearing veins near Salmon Bay, Southeastern Alaska. Open file report

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985 the Bureau of Mines investigated radioactive carbonate veins near Salmon Bay, southeastern Alaska, for concentrations of columbium and associated metals. The veins cut units of graywacke, conglomerate, argillite, and limestone and range in width from less than an inch to greater than 10 ft and have a length ranging from less than a hundred to greater than 1,000 ft. Mineralogy of the veins is complex, and includes thorite, the rare-earth-element minerals monazite, parisite, and bastnaesite, and a columbium mineral that is speculated to be columbite. Gangue minerals include ankerite, dolomite, siderite, quartz and albite. More than seventy veins were sampled but only three contain elevated metal concentrations along a significant strike length. These resources are small compared to columbium, REE, and thorium resources elsewhere in the world.

  6. The Lassen hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Clor, Laura; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The active Lassen hydrothermal system includes a central vapor-dominated zone or zones beneath the Lassen highlands underlain by ~240 °C high-chloride waters that discharge at lower elevations. It is the best-exposed and largest hydrothermal system in the Cascade Range, discharging 41 ± 10 kg/s of steam (~115 MW) and 23 ± 2 kg/s of high-chloride waters (~27 MW). The Lassen system accounts for a full 1/3 of the total high-temperature hydrothermal heat discharge in the U.S. Cascades (140/400 MW). Hydrothermal heat discharge of ~140 MW can be supported by crystallization and cooling of silicic magma at a rate of ~2400 km3/Ma, and the ongoing rates of heat and magmatic CO2 discharge are broadly consistent with a petrologic model for basalt-driven magmatic evolution. The clustering of observed seismicity at ~4–5 km depth may define zones of thermal cracking where the hydrothermal system mines heat from near-plastic rock. If so, the combined areal extent of the primary heat-transfer zones is ~5 km2, the average conductive heat flux over that area is >25 W/m2, and the conductive-boundary length <50 m. Observational records of hydrothermal discharge are likely too short to document long-term transients, whether they are intrinsic to the system or owe to various geologic events such as the eruption of Lassen Peak at 27 ka, deglaciation beginning ~18 ka, the eruptions of Chaos Crags at 1.1 ka, or the minor 1914–1917 eruption at the summit of Lassen Peak. However, there is a rich record of intermittent hydrothermal measurement over the past several decades and more-frequent measurement 2009–present. These data reveal sensitivity to climate and weather conditions, seasonal variability that owes to interaction with the shallow hydrologic system, and a transient 1.5- to twofold increase in high-chloride discharge in response to an earthquake swarm in mid-November 2014.

  7. Significance of geometrical relationships between low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, T.; Pennock, G.; Drury, M. R.; Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although quartz is one of the most studied minerals in the Earth's crust when it comes to its rheology, the interpretation of intracrystalline deformation microstructures with respect to deformation conditions and mechanisms, remains highly contentious. Moreover, inconsistent use of terminology for both deformation microstructures and mechanisms makes a correct assessment of observations and interpretations in published material very difficult. With respect to low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz, different conflicting genetic models have been proposed. Most probably, the lack of consensus means that there is no unique interpretation for these microstructures, primarily because their initiation and development depend on many ambient conditions. We extensively studied these intracrystalline deformation microstructures by means of optical microscopy, Hot-Cathodoluminescence, SEM-Cathodoluminescence and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Orientation Imaging, in vein quartz of the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Luxemburg, Germany), (de)formed in a low-temperature regime. Firstly, we propose a new, purely descriptive terminology for the low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and strings. The strings can be further subdivided into blocky (BS), straight (SS) and recrystallised (RS) morphological types. FEBs have consistently been called deformation lamellae in quartz and planar slip bands in metals. WEBs have been called deformation bands, prismatic kink bands or type II kink bands. Strings have formerly been called shear bands, deformation bands or type I kink bands. No distinction between blocky and straight morphological string types had ever been made. Secondly, a survey of the pre-recrystallisation stages in the history of the intracrystalline deformation microstructures reveals that the different types of low

  8. U-Pb isochron age and Pb isotope systematics of the Golden Fleece vein - implications for the relationship of mineralization to the Lake City caldera, western San Juan Mountains, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hon, K.; Ludwig, K. R.; Simmons, K.R.; Slack, J.F.; Grauch, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    A U/Pb isochron age of 27.5 + or - 0.5 m.y. is determined for the Golden Fleece vein, an age which is identical with the age of the quartz latite lavas that the vein cuts. Within the Lake City area, only the Golden Fleece vein contains pitchblende and Au-Ag tellurides and has Pb isotope ratios that together define it as unique within the area. The 27.5 m.y. age relates this vein to the waning stages of the Uncompahgre caldera (27-29) rather than to the Lake City caldera (23.1 m.y.). -G.J.N.

  9. High-grade iron ore at Windarling, Yilgarn Craton: a product of syn-orogenic deformation, hypogene hydrothermal alteration and supergene modification in an Archean BIF-basalt lithostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angerer, Thomas; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Danyushevsky, Leonid

    2013-08-01

    , carbonate and quartz to form veins and breccia but did not generate significant volumes of iron ore. Ore stage 4 involved Mesozoic(?) to recent supergene oxidation and hydration in a weathering environment reaching down to depths of ˜100 to maximum 200 m below surface. Supergene ore formation involved goethite replacement of dolomite and quartz as well as martitisation. Important `ground preparation' for supergene modification and upgrade were mainly the formation of steep D1 to D4 structures, steep BIF/basalt margins and particularly the syn-D1 to syn-D2 carbonate alteration of BIF that is most susceptible to supergene dissolution. The Windarling deposits are structurally controlled, supergene-modified hydrothermal iron ore systems that share comparable physical, chemical and ore-forming characteristics to other iron ore deposits in the Yilgarn Craton (e.g. Koolyanobbing, Beebyn in the Weld Range, Mt. Gibson). However, the remarkable variety in pre-, syn- and post-deformational ore textures (relative to D1 and D2) has not been described elsewhere in the Yilgarn and are similar to the ore deposits in high-strain zones, such as of Brazil (Quadrilátero Ferrífero or Iron Quadrangle) and Nigeria. The overall similarity of alteration stages, i.e. the sequence of hydrothermal carbonate introduction and hypogene leaching, with other greenstone belt-hosted iron ore deposits supports the interpretation that syn-orogenic BIF alteration and upgrade was crucial in the formation of hypogene-supergene iron ore deposits in the Yilgarn Craton and possibly in other Archean/Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt settings worldwide.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis as a route to mineralogically-inspired structures.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-02-21

    The use of high temperature hydrothermal reactions to prepare crystals having mineralogically-related structures is described. Complex naturally occurring minerals can have fascinating structures and exhibit important features like low dimensionality, noncentrosymmetry, or ion channels that can provide excellent guideposts for the designed synthesis of new materials. Actual minerals, even though they may have intriguing physical properties, are often unsuitable for study because of the persistent impurities inevitably present in natural samples. Hydrothermal fluids at relatively high temperatures provide access to large, high quality single crystals of structures with mineral-like structures. This enables the study of physical properties like ionic conduction, magnetic spin frustration and non-linear optical behavior. Some fundamental considerations of the hydrothermal technique are discussed in the context of synthesizing mineralogically-inspired materials. The metal vanadates provide a surprisingly rich and diversified range of compounds and are selected to illustrate many of the concepts described here. A series of low dimensional mineral analogs featuring isolated units, chains, and layers have been prepared in the laboratory as large single crystals using a high temperature hydrothermal synthetic methods, and their physical properties are under investigation. The metal silicates are also highlighted as another promising field of exploration, since their hydrothermal synthesis surprisingly lags behind the enormous literature of the natural silicate minerals. The introduction of heteroelements, such as boron to make borosilicates, appears to also open the door to additional new materials. Many of these new materials have direct equivalents in the mineral kingdom, while others have no known analogs but are reminiscent of minerals and can be classified in the same ways. From these initial results there appears to be a very rich vein of synthetic minerals waiting

  11. Functional anatomy of bronchial veins.

    PubMed

    Charan, Nirmal B; Thompson, William H; Carvalho, Paula

    2007-01-01

    The amount of bronchial arterial blood that drains into the systemic venous system is not known. Therefore, in this study we further delineated the functional anatomy of the bronchial venous system in six adult, anesthetized, and mechanically ventilated sheep. Through a left thoracotomy, the left azygos vein was dissected and the insertion of the bronchial vein into the azygos vein was identified. A pouch was created by ligating the azygos vein on either side of the insertion of the bronchial vein. A catheter was inserted into this pouch for the measurement of bronchial venous occlusion pressure and bronchial venous blood flow. An ultrasonic flow probe was placed around the common bronchial branch of the bronchoesophageal artery to monitor the bronchial arterial blood flow. Catheters were also placed into the carotid artery and the pulmonary artery. The mean bronchial blood flow was 20.6+/-4.2mlmin(-1) (mean+/-SEM) and, of this, only about 13% of the blood flow drained into the azygos vein. The mean systemic artery pressure was 72.4+/-4.1mmHg whereas the mean bronchial venous occlusion pressure was 38.1+/-2.1mmHg. The mean values for blood gas analysis were as follows: bronchial venous blood pH=7.54+/-0.02, PCO(2)=35+/-2.6, PO(2)=95+/-5.7mmHg; systemic venous blood-pH=7.43+/-0.02, PCO(2)=48+/-3.2, PO(2)=42+/-2.0mmHg; systemic arterial blood-pH=7.51+/-0.03, PCO(2)=39+/-2.1, PO(2)=169+/-9.8mmHg. We conclude that the major portion of the bronchial arterial blood flow normally drains into the pulmonary circulation and only about 13% drains into the bronchial venous system. In addition, the oxygen content of the bronchial venous blood is similar to that in the systemic arterial blood.

  12. Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids at the Hatoma Knoll in Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Shinjo, R.; Ishibashi, J.; Tsunogai, U.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Yamanaka, T.; Kawagucci, S.; Ueno, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Hatoma knoll is a caldera volcano which exists in the southern part of Okinawa Trough, and the hydrothermal field was discovered in the caldera in 1999. A lava dome exists in the center part of the caldera, and clear smokers up to 324.5°C, benthic organism colony and liquid CO2, and CO2 hydrate have been observed around the dome. Since 2000, the investigation cruise (NT00-06, YK07-04, NT07-12, NT08-13, and NT09-10) by "Shinkai2000", "Shinkai6500" and the "HYPER-DOLPHIN 3K" has been carried out. Hydrothermal fluid samples were taken from the hydrothermal system, and chemical and isotopic compositions of the hydrothermal fluid samples were investigated. The chemical composition of hydrothermal fluid has high pH compared with the hydrothermal fluid in the mid-ocean ridge, and ammonium concentration is high, suggesting that the sediments covered the Okinawa Trough contribute to the chemical composition of hydrothermal fluid. The end-members of hydrothermal fluid show a variation, but the ratios of the end-members are consistent with each other, suggesting that the hydrothermal system has a single source and subcritical phase separation occurs below the seafloor. The equilibrium temperature with the quartz based on Si concentration was 350-400°C at 1-2 km below the seafloor. CO2 concentration in hydrothermal fluid showed the high-level value in the hydrothermal system in the world. The origin of the abundant CO2 is the carbonate on the subducting plate and the sediment in the Okinawa Trough based on the carbon isotope and the helium isotope. Methane is also the high-level concentration in the hydrothermal system in the world. Most of methane is generated through methanogenesis based on the carbon isotope ratio. Sr isotopic ratio in the hydrothermal fluid suggests the influence of sediment. However, the knoll surface was covered by rhyolite, the influence of sediment would occur in the recharge zone of the hydrothermal system. The methane would be microbially produced

  13. Hydrothermal alteration maps of the central and southern Basin and Range province of the United States compiled from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator algorithms were used to map hydrothermally altered rocks in the central and southern parts of the Basin and Range province of the United States. The hydrothermally altered rocks mapped in this study include (1) hydrothermal silica-rich rocks (hydrous quartz, chalcedony, opal, and amorphous silica), (2) propylitic rocks (calcite-dolomite and epidote-chlorite mapped as separate mineral groups), (3) argillic rocks (alunite-pyrophyllite-kaolinite), and (4) phyllic rocks (sericite-muscovite). A series of hydrothermal alteration maps, which identify the potential locations of hydrothermal silica-rich, propylitic, argillic, and phyllic rocks on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) band 7 orthorectified images, and geographic information systems shape files of hydrothermal alteration units are provided in this study.

  14. Thrombosis of the Saphenous Vein Stump after Varicose Vein Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated thrombus extension in the proximal stump of the saphenous vein at 6 days, 4 weeks, and 16 weeks after saphenous vein surgery performed between July 2013 and March 2014 (18 patients, 29 limbs, and 31 stumps) using duplex ultrasonography. All thrombotic events were classified as endovenous heat-induced thrombosis (EHIT). Thrombus was observed in 27 stumps (87.1%), with only four (12.9%) stumps remaining without thrombus on postoperative day 6. Thrombus as EHIT class 2 was observed in one stump and as EHIT class 3 in another; in the remaining 25 stumps, it was observed as EHIT class 1 postoperatively. No further extension of thrombus was found at 4 and 16 weeks after surgery. The rate of thrombus formation in the proximal stump of the saphenous vein after conventional surgery is comparatively higher than that after thermoablation techniques. Further studies are required to determine adequate evaluation methods and appropriate therapies for stump thrombosis after varicose vein surgery. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2015; 55: 105–110). PMID:27738460

  15. Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction and Portal Vein Thrombosis in Special Situations: Need for a New Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan A.; Bhat, Riyaz A.; Bhadoria, Ajeet S.; Maiwall, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is a vascular disorder of liver, which results in obstruction and cavernomatous transformation of portal vein with or without the involvement of intrahepatic portal vein, splenic vein, or superior mesenteric vein. Portal vein obstruction due to chronic liver disease, neoplasm, or postsurgery is a separate entity and is not the same as extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction are generally young and belong mostly to Asian countries. It is therefore very important to define portal vein thrombosis as acute or chronic from management point of view. Portal vein thrombosis in certain situations such as liver transplant and postsurgical/liver transplant period is an evolving area and needs extensive research. There is a need for a new classification, which includes all areas of the entity. In the current review, the most recent literature of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is reviewed and summarized. PMID:26021771

  16. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and portal vein thrombosis in special situations: Need for a new classification.

    PubMed

    Wani, Zeeshan A; Bhat, Riyaz A; Bhadoria, Ajeet S; Maiwall, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is a vascular disorder of liver, which results in obstruction and cavernomatous transformation of portal vein with or without the involvement of intrahepatic portal vein, splenic vein, or superior mesenteric vein. Portal vein obstruction due to chronic liver disease, neoplasm, or postsurgery is a separate entity and is not the same as extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction are generally young and belong mostly to Asian countries. It is therefore very important to define portal vein thrombosis as acute or chronic from management point of view. Portal vein thrombosis in certain situations such as liver transplant and postsurgical/liver transplant period is an evolving area and needs extensive research. There is a need for a new classification, which includes all areas of the entity. In the current review, the most recent literature of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is reviewed and summarized.

  17. [Study on Mineralogical Characteristics of Quartz and Calcite from Feieling Skarn-Type Pb-Zn Deposit in Southwest Margin of Yunkai Massif].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Li, Hong-zhong; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang; He, Jun-guo; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Yang, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    The Feieling Pb-Zn deposit of skarn-type is located the in Southwest margin of Yunkai massif, China. This ore deposit can be divided into wall rock near ore, concealed rock mass, endoskarn, exoskarn and orebody. The Raman and FTIR spectrum are conducted to study the mineralogical characteristics of quartz and calcite from five types of rocks from Feieling skarn-type deposit. The analysis shows that the quartz included in the near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, comparing with recrystallized quartz of concealed rock mass, has a tend to change into low symmetry quartz in varying degrees. The crystalinity and order degree of quartz from near ore wall rock to concealed rock mass and to endoskarn are becoming higher, but that of quartz from different exoskarn samples display no regular. The origin or the quartz microstructure changes may be related to the multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. The quartz, included in near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, become easier to recrystallize and adjust microstructure under the influence of the multi-stage hydrothermal and temperature effect. In anyone sample, the earlier crystalline calcite, showing subhedral-euhedral crystal, display higher crystalinity and order degree. On the contrary, the later crystalline calcite, showing xenomorphic crystal, display lower crystalinity and order degree. Calcite crystal of exoskarn rock contains some silica impurity, while endoskarn and orebody rock is pure. The purity of calcite crystal may relate to Multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. At the early and late skarn stage, active silica-containing fluid is easier to join into calcite, which is under higher temperature environments. On the contrary, at the late quartz-surfide stage, the later crystalized calcite displays higher purity, which is under lower temperature environments. Therefore, spectral characteristics of quartz and calcite reflect multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization

  18. [Study on Mineralogical Characteristics of Quartz and Calcite from Feieling Skarn-Type Pb-Zn Deposit in Southwest Margin of Yunkai Massif].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Li, Hong-zhong; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang; He, Jun-guo; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Yang, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    The Feieling Pb-Zn deposit of skarn-type is located the in Southwest margin of Yunkai massif, China. This ore deposit can be divided into wall rock near ore, concealed rock mass, endoskarn, exoskarn and orebody. The Raman and FTIR spectrum are conducted to study the mineralogical characteristics of quartz and calcite from five types of rocks from Feieling skarn-type deposit. The analysis shows that the quartz included in the near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, comparing with recrystallized quartz of concealed rock mass, has a tend to change into low symmetry quartz in varying degrees. The crystalinity and order degree of quartz from near ore wall rock to concealed rock mass and to endoskarn are becoming higher, but that of quartz from different exoskarn samples display no regular. The origin or the quartz microstructure changes may be related to the multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. The quartz, included in near ore wall rock, endoskarn and exoskarn, become easier to recrystallize and adjust microstructure under the influence of the multi-stage hydrothermal and temperature effect. In anyone sample, the earlier crystalline calcite, showing subhedral-euhedral crystal, display higher crystalinity and order degree. On the contrary, the later crystalline calcite, showing xenomorphic crystal, display lower crystalinity and order degree. Calcite crystal of exoskarn rock contains some silica impurity, while endoskarn and orebody rock is pure. The purity of calcite crystal may relate to Multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization process. At the early and late skarn stage, active silica-containing fluid is easier to join into calcite, which is under higher temperature environments. On the contrary, at the late quartz-surfide stage, the later crystalized calcite displays higher purity, which is under lower temperature environments. Therefore, spectral characteristics of quartz and calcite reflect multi-stage evolution of skarn mineralization

  19. Examining the Effect of Water on the Strength of Quartz Using Polycrystalline Quartz Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbery, A. M.; Holyoke, C. W., III; Kronenberg, A. K.; Fukuda, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Quartzite rheology has been extensively studied to model the strength of continental crust. Previous studies have shown that the presence of water in fluid inclusions weakens polycrystalline quartz, and this weakening is usually related to water fugacity. However, no attempt has been made to determine the effect of water content on the strength of quartz. We have deformed hot-pressed quartz aggregates with low water contents at a pressure of 1.5 GPa, a temperature of 1200°C, and strain rates of 10-4 to 10-6/s. Fine synthetic quartz powders were hot-pressed at 1120°C and 1.5 GPa for 24 hours to create quartzites with a grain size of ~20 microns and water contents of <150 H/106Si. The water band in FTIR spectra collected from the hot-pressed quartz aggregates is similar to the broad water band observed in natural quartzites (i.e. free water in fluid inclusions) rather than the spectra observed in synthetic quartz crystals. Results of deformation experiments indicate that the strain rate sensitivity of the strength of these quartz aggregates is consistent with deformation by dislocation creep (n~3.5). Microstructures observed in samples from these experiments include undulatory extinction, flattened grains, and bulging grain boundaries, which are also consistent with dislocation creep. The strength of these quartz aggregates deformed with low water contents (<150 H/106 Si) are an order of magnitude greater than the strengths predicted by polycrystalline quartz flow laws derived from quartzites with high (>2000 H/106Si) water contents. Our results indicate that quartz strength is dependent on water content, in addition to being dependent on water fugacity.

  20. A demonstration of an affinity between pyrite and organic matter in a hydrothermal setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    One of the key-principles of the iron-sulphur world theory is to bring organic molecules close enough to interact with each other, using the surface of pyrite as a substrate in a hydrothermal setting. The present paper explores the relationship of pyrite and organic matter in a hydrothermal setting from the geological record; in hydrothermal calcite veins from Carboniferous limestones in central Ireland. Here, the organic matter is accumulated as coatings around, and through, pyrite grains. Most of the pyrite grains are euhedral-subhedral crystals, ranging in size from ca 0.1-0.5 mm in diameter, and they are scattered throughout the matrix of the vein calcite. The organic matter was deposited from a hydrothermal fluid at a temperature of at least 200°C, and gives a Raman signature of disordered carbon. This study points to an example from a hydrothermal setting in the geological record, demonstrating that pyrite can have a high potential for the concentration and accumulation of organic materials. PMID:21299877

  1. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  2. Tectonophysics of hydrothermal ore formation: an example of the Antei Mo-U deposit, Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. A.; Rebetsky, Yu. L.; Poluektov, V. V.; Burmistrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The Antei deposit of the southeastern Transbaikalian region is one of the largest uranium mines in Russia. It is hosted by the Late Paleozoic granitic basement of the Streltsovskaya caldera and was formed as a result of Late Mesozoic tectonothermal activity. Vein and stockwork-disseminated molybdenum-uranium mineralization at this deposit is controlled by zones of intense hydrothermal alteration, cataclasis, brecciation, and intense fracturing along steeply dipping faults, which acted as conduits for mineralizing fluids and hosts to the ore bodies. The upper edge of the ore-bearing zone is located at a depth of 400 m, and its lower edge was intersected at a depth of 1300 m from the day surface. The conditions of ore localization were determined using structural-geological and petrophysical studies coupled with numerical modeling of the effects of gravitational body forces at purely elastic and postcritical elastoplastic deformational stages. The dynamics of the tectonic stress field in the rock massif was reconstructed using the results of mapping of morphogenetic and kinematic characteristics of fault and fracture systems, as well as data on petrography and mineralogy of rocks and vein-filling material. It was shown that the fault framework of the deposit was formed in four tectonic stages, three of which took place in the geologic past and one of which reflects recent geologic history. Each tectonic stage was characterized by different parameters of the tectonic stress-strain field, fault kinematics, and conditions of mineral formation. The following types of metasomatic rocks are recognized within the deposit: high-temperature K-feldspar rocks and albitites (formed during the Late Paleozoic as the primary structural elements of a granitic massif) and Late Mesozoic low-temperature preore (hydromicatized rocks), synore (hematite, albite, chlorite, and quartz) and postore (kaolinite-smectite) rocks. The following petrophysical parameters were determined for all

  3. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus disease has emerged in the Midsouth and Southeastern United States and was named blackberry yellow vein disease (BYVD). Originally, it was thought the disease was caused by Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) as the virus was found in many diseased plants and symptoms were very similar to thos...

  4. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  5. Leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal vein.

    PubMed

    Shao, I-Hung; Lee, Wei-Chen; Chen, Tai-Di; Chiang, Yang-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal gland is extremely rare in the literature. We present a patient with an adrenal leiomyosarcoma originating from the adrenal vein, the pathologic findings and management. A 66-year-old man who was a hepatitis B virus carrier was found to have a huge left suprarenal mass on sonography and computed axial tomography. A huge tumor in the left suprarenal area with a markedly engorged adrenal vein was found during an adrenalectomy. The tumor thrombus extended into the renal vein, close to the inferior vena cava. The left adrenal gland with the whole tumor thrombus was removed completely. Microscopically, the adrenal gland was compressed but not invaded by the spindle cell tumor, which was composed of interlacing fascicles of neoplastic smooth muscle cells. The tumor was localized within the adrenal vein and arose from the venous wall. The patient had no local recurrence for 18 months after en bloc excision of the tumor. We suggest that en bloc excision with a clear and adequate surgical margin is the most important cure procedure for adrenal leiomyosarcoma.

  6. Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems. Bruce E Hobbs1,2, Alison Ord1 and Mark A. Munro1. 1. Centre for Exploration Targeting, The University of Western Australia, M006, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. 2. CSIRO Earth and Resource Engineering, Bentley, WA, Australia Hydrothermal mineralising systems are presented as large, open chemical reactors held far from equilibrium during their life-time by the influx of heat, fluid and dissolved chemical species. As such they are nonlinear dynamical systems and need to be analysed using the tools that have been developed for such systems. Hydrothermal systems undergo a number of transitions during their evolution and this paper focuses on methods for characterising these transitions in a quantitative manner and establishing whether they resemble first or second (critical) phase transitions or whether they have some other kind of nature. Critical phase transitions are characterised by long range correlations for some parameter characteristic of the system, power-law probability distributions so that there is no characteristic length scale and a high sensitivity to perturbations; as one approaches criticality, characteristic parameters for the system scale in a power law manner with distance from the critical point. The transitions undergone in mineralised hydrothermal systems are: (i) widespread, non-localised mineral alteration involving exothermic mineral reactions that produce hydrous silicate phases, carbonates and iron-oxides, (ii) strongly localised veining, brecciation and/or stock-work formation, (iii) a series of endothermic mineral reactions involving the formation of non-hydrous silicates, sulphides and metals such as gold, (iv) multiple repetitions of transitions (ii) and (iii). We have quantified aspects of these transitions in gold deposits from the Yilgarn craton of Western Australia using wavelet transforms. This technique is convenient and fast. It enables one to establish if

  7. Diversity of primary CL textures in quartz from porphyry environments: implication for origin of quartz eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, O. V.; Kamenetsky, V. S.; Goemann, K.; Davidson, P.

    2013-10-01

    Porphyry-style mineralization is related to the intrusion and crystallization of small stocks, which can be of different compositions (from intermediate to felsic) and can intrude into different host rocks (from magmatic to sedimentary). We used cathodoluminescence and electron probe microanalysis to study the internal textures of more than 300 quartz eyes from six porphyry deposits, Panguna (Papua New Guinea), Far Southeast porphyry (Philippines), Batu Hijau (Indonesia), Antapaccay (Peru), Rio Blanco (Chile) and Climax (USA). Significant diversity of the internal textures in quartz eyes was revealed, sometimes even within a single sample. Quartz grains with Ti-rich cores surrounded by Ti-poor mantles were found next to the grains showing the opposite Ti distribution or only slight Ti fluctuations.We propose that diversity of the internal patterns in quartz eyes can actually reflect in situ crystallization history, and that prolonged crystallization after magma emplacement under conditions of continuous cooling can account for the observed features of internal textures. Formation of quartz eyes begins at high temperatures with crystallization of high titanium Quartz 1, which as the melt becomes more and more evolved and cooler, is overgrown by low Ti Quartz 2. Subsequent fluid exsolution brings about dramatic change in the melt composition: OH - , alkalis and other Cl-complexed elements partition into the fluid phase, whereas Ti stays in the melt, contributing to a rapid increase in Ti activity. Separation of the fluid and its further cooling causes disequilibrium in the system, and the Quartz 2 becomes partially resorbed. Exsolution of the fluid gradually builds up the pressure until it exceeds the yield strength of the host rocks and they then fracture. This pressure release most likely triggers crystallization of Quartz 3, which is higher in Ti than Quartz 2 because Ti activity in the melt is higher and pressure of crystallization is lower. As a result of the

  8. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  9. Mesozoic hydrothermal alteration associated with gold mineralization in the Mercur district, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.N.; Parry, W.T. )

    1990-09-01

    K/Ar dates and chemical data show that a Mesozoic gold-bearing hydrothermal system altered black shales of the Mississippian Great Blue Limestone throughout an area encompassing the Mercur gold district, Utah. K/Ar dates of illite veins and illite-rich, clay-sized separates of altered shales that are enriched in Au, As, Hg, Sc, and other heavy metals indicate that hydrothermal activity occurred from 193 to 122 Ma. Several ages from within the Mercur district cluster near 160 Ma and may date the minimum age of gold mineralization.

  10. Fluids in deeply subducted continental crust: Petrology, mineral chemistry and fluid inclusion of UHP metamorphic veins from the Sulu orogen, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ze-Ming; Shen, Kun; Sun, Wei-Dong; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Liou, J. G.; Shi, Cao; Wang, Jin-Li

    2008-07-01

    The complex vein associations hosted in southern Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) eclogites contain quartz ± omphacite (or jadeite) ± kyanite ± allanite ± zoisite ± rutile ± garnet. These minerals have chemical compositions similar to those of host eclogites. Inclusions of polycrystalline quartz pseudomorphs after coesite were identified in vein allanite and garnet, and coesite inclusions were found in vein zircon. These facts suggest that the veins together with host eclogites have been subjected to synchronous UHP metamorphism. The vein minerals contain relatively high concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), high-field-strength elements (HFSE) and transition metal elements (TME). A kyanite-quartz vein has a whole-rock composition similar to adjacent UHP metamorphic granitic gneisses. Abundant primary multi-solid fluid inclusions trapped within UHP vein minerals contain complex daughter minerals of muscovite, calcite, anhydrite, magnetite, pyrite, apatite, celestite and liquid and gas phase of H 2O with solids up to 30-70% of the inclusion volume. The presence of daughter minerals anhydrite and magnetite indicates the subduction fluids were oxidizing, and provides a possible interpretation for the high oxygen fugacity of subduction zone magmas. These characteristics imply that the UHP vein minerals were crystallized from supercritical silicate-rich aqueous fluids that were in equilibrium with peak-UHP minerals, and that the fluids in deeply subducted continental crust may contain very high concentrations of silicate as well as HREE, HFSE and TME. Such fluids might have resulted in major fractionation between Nb and Ta, i.e. the UHP fluids have subchondritic Nb/Ta values, whereas the host eclogites after extraction of the fluids have suprachondritic Nb/Ta values. Therefore, voluminous residual eclogites with high Nb/Ta ratios may be the complementary suprachondritic reservoir capable of balancing the subchondritic depleted mantle and continental crust

  11. Mass transfer and fluid evolution in late-metamorphic veins, Rhenish Massif (Germany): insight from alteration geochemistry and fluid-mineral equilibria modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsala, Achille; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Element mobility and fluid-rock interaction related to the formation of late-metamorphic quartz veins have been studied by combination of mineral chemistry, whole-rock geochemistry, mass balance analysis and fluid-mineral equilibria modeling. The quartz veins are hosted by very low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the fold-and-thrust belt of the Rhenish Massif (Germany). The veins record two stages of evolution, a massive vein filling assemblage with elongate-blocky quartz, chlorite, apatite and albite, and a later open space filling assemblage with euhedral crystals of quartz, ankerite-dolomite and minor calcite and sulfides. Detailed mass balance analysis of an alteration profile adjacent to a representative quartz vein demonstrates that element mobility is restricted to the proximal zone. The most important element changes are gain of Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and CO2, and loss of Si, K and Na. The data demonstrate that wall-rock carbonation is one of the main alteration features, whereas mobility of Si, K and Na are related to dissolution of quartz and destruction of detrital feldspar and muscovite. The whole-rock geochemical data, in conjunction with fluid composition data and pressure-temperature estimates, were used as input for fluid-mineral equilibria modeling in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-C-S-O-H-B-F-Cl. Modeling involved calculation of rock-buffered fluid compositions over the temperature interval 100-500 °C, and reaction-path simulations where a rock-buffered high-temperature fluid reacts with fresh host-rocks at temperatures of 400, 300 and 200 °C. Calculated rock-buffered fluid compositions demonstrate that retrograde silica solubility is a strong driving force for quartz leaching in the temperature-pressure window of 380-450 °C and 0.5 kbar. These conditions overlap with the estimated temperatures for the initial stage of vein formation. Reaction-path models show that high-temperature alteration can produce the observed silica leaching, suggesting that

  12. Environment of ore deposition in the creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Part V. Epithermal mineralization from fluid mixing in the OH vein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed fluid inclusion studies on coarse-grained sphalerite from the OH vein, Creede, Colorado, have shown that the abrupt color changes between growth zones correspond to abrupt changes in the nature of the ore fluids. Within each growth zone, however, the composition of the fluids remained constant. The base of a distinctive orange-brown growth zone marks a sharp increase in both temperature and salinity relative to the preceding yellow-white zone. The orange-brown growth zone can be correlated along much of the vein and is believed to represent a time-stratigraphic interval. Along the vein, temperatures and salinities of fluid inclusions within this interval show a systematic decrease from about 285??C and 11.5 wt percent NaCl equiv near the base of the vein to about 250??C and 8 wt percent NaCl equiv, respectively, near the top of the vein. The iron concentration of this sphalerite growth zone shows a similar pattern, decreasing from about 2.8 to 1.2 mole percent FeS. When plotted on an enthalpy-salinity diagram, the fluid inclusion data define a spatial trend indicating the progressive mixing of deeply circulating hydrothermal brines with overlying, dilute ground waters. The hydrothermal brines entered the OH vein from below at a temperature, salinity, and density of approximately 285??C, 11.5 wt percent NaCl equiv, and 860 kg/m3, respectively, whereas the overlying ground waters appear to have been preheated to roughly 150??C and had an assumed salinity of 0 wt percent and a density of 920 kg/m3. The greater density of the heated ground water promoted mixing with the hydrothermal brine within the open fractures, causing sphalerite deposition. Although there were also episodes of boiling during vein mineralization, boiling appears unimportant for this sphalerite. Isotopic evidence and geochemical modeling studies also indicate that mixing was the depositional mechanism for sphalerite. An important aspect of the mixing hydrology of the Creede system involves

  13. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Hammerschlag, Sascha; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Fuerst, Guenter

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  14. AMS as a technique for investigating the propagation direction of vein fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Colin; McCarthy, William

    2016-04-01

    An approximately co-planar relationship between mineral orientations and magnetic fabric has been frequently employed when studying petrofabrics, most notably planar silicates in mafic intrusives. In this study this relationship is exploited with respect to mineralising veins, using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to investigate whether magnetic fabrics could reveal the direction of fluid propagation. As mineralising fluids propagate in the crust they cause a hydrothermal overprinting of the existing petrofabric. If this overprinting is random, or too weak and thus swamped by the existing signal AMS will not be able to determine any interpretable signal across the vein; however, if this overprinting is a considerable systematic alteration then AMS will identify an imbrication of AMS tensors approaching veins. The South Munster basin of southwest Ireland is a sedimentary deposit of Devonian-Carboniferous age, within which lie the fluvial sediments north of the town of Allihies which are pervaded by copper bearing lodes likely exolved from the underlying marine strata. Analysis of samples from six locations across these veins was used to construct a picture of the AMS as it changes across a mineralised system. Systematic changes across each system are often subtle and interrupted by stronger signals, especially foliation as a result of regional scale low grade compression. However changes in tensor orientation and shape are both observed in instances which could be consistent with a directional overprint caused by the vein.

  15. Cathodoluminescence characterization of quartz grains from the Upper Cretaceous of dinosaur fossil localities in the Gobi desert, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saneyoshi, M.; Nishido, H.; Masuda, R.; Tsogtbaatar, K.; Chinzorig, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Upper Cretaceous eolian sediments in Mongolia's Gobi desert are one of the most important occurrences of the dinosaurs in the world. Large numbers of confiscated dinosaur fossils illegally worked out by poachers has been stored in the Mongolian Paleontological Center at Ulaanbaatar. In most cases, their localities are unknown. The purpose of this study is to identify their localities by cathodoluminescence (CL) features of quartz grains attached to the dinosaur specimens by comparing to the quartz samples collected from the sediments of circumjacent resources in this area. This study focuses on the confiscated specimen which makes up the nest with the babies' Protoceratops. Most of all Protoceratops in every growth process, have been discovered from the Djadokhta Formation in the Gobi desert. This formation crops out at Tugrikin Shireh and Bayn Dzak in the central part of the Gobi desert, and is derived from medium- to fine-grained sand mainly composed of quartz grains, of which sedimentary environments should be obvious to be eolian. The formation age of the sand beds at Tugrikin Shireh and Bayn Dzak has been estimated to be Middle Campanian. CL spectra of quartz have been demonstrated to show different features between the quartz from hydrothermal, plutonic, volcanic and metamorphic origins, suggesting the spectra reflect the condition of the quartz formation and the local environment. Therefore, we have applied the CL characterization of quartz grains to the evaluation of the provenance of the desert sediments. The quartz grains after sieving (#60-80 mesh size) were embedded in the brass holders with non-luminescent epoxy resin, and their surfaces were polished with 1 μm diamond abrasive. Color CL images obtained by the Luminoscope exhibit blue, violet and red emissions in the grains, suggesting various types of emission centers in the quartz. SEM-CL analysis was conducted using an SEM (JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Mono CL2) to measure

  16. Fused quartz substrates for microchip electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, S.C.; Moore, A.W.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    A fused quartz microchip is fabricated to perform capillary electrophoresis of metal ions complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQS). The channel manifold on the quartz substrate is fabricated using standard photolithographic, etching, and deposition techniques. By incorporating a direct bonding technique during the fabrication of the microchip, the substrate and cover plate can be fused together below the melting temperature for fused quartz. To enhance the resolution for the separation, the electroosmotic flow is minimized by covalently bonding polyacrylamide to the channel walls. A separation length of 16.5 mm and separation field strength of 870 V/cm enable separations to be performed in {<=}15 s. By increasing the concentration of HQS from 5 mM to 20 mM, the separation efficiency improves by approximately 3 times. The low background signal from the fused quartz substrate results in mass detection limits of 85, 61, and 134 amol and concentration detection limits of 46, 57, and 30 ppb for Zn, Cd, and Al, respectively. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Geochemical element mobility during the hydrothermal alteration in the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Doner, Zeynep; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit represents one of the important copper source and mineral deposits in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Balikesir province, NW Turkey. It considered as a vein-type deposit locally associated with intense hydrothermal alteration within the brecciation, quartz stockwork veining, and brittle fracture zones in the main host rock that represented by hornfels, as well as generally related to the shallow intermediate to silicic intrusive Eybek pluton. Based on the field and geologic relationships and types of ore mineral assemblages and the accompanied alteration types, there are two mineralization zones; hypogene (primary) and oxidation/supergene zones are observed associated with three alteration zones; potassic, phyllic, and propylitic zones related to this porphyry deposit. The phyllic and propylitic alterations locally surrounded the potassic alteration. The ore minerals related to the hypogene zone represented by mostly chalcopyrite, Molybdenite, and pyrite with subordinate amount of marcasite, enargite, and gold. On the other hand they include mainly cuprite with chalcopyrite, pyrite and gold as well as hematite and goethite at the oxidation/supergene zone. This study deals with the quantitative calculations of the mass/volume changes (gains and losses) of the major and trace elements during the different episodes of alteration in this porphyry deposit. These mass balance data reveal that the potassic alteration zone that the main Cu- and Mo-enriched zone, has enrichment of K, Si, Fe, and Mg, and depletion of Na referring to replacement of plagioclase and amphibole by K-feldspar, sericite and biotite. While the propylitic alteration that is the main Mo- and Au-enriched zone is accompanied with K and Na depletion with enrichment of Si, Fe, Mg, and Ca forming chlorite, epidote, carbonate and pyrite. On the other hand the phyllic alteration that occurred in the outer part around the potassic alteration, characterized by less amount

  18. Migration of hydrothermal systems in an evolving collisional orogen, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Upton, P.; Horton, T.; Williams, J.

    2013-02-01

    The Pacific-Australian tectonic plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand consists of the transpressional Southern Alps mountain belt and the transcurrent Marlborough Fault System, both of which have active tectonically driven hydrothermal systems, with topographically driven meteoric incursion and warm springs. The Southern Alps hydrothermal system is relatively diffuse, with little or no fault control, and is channelled through scattered extensional sites beneath the mountains, where gold mineralisation is occurring locally. The hydrothermal activity along the Marlborough Fault System is controlled by the principal faults in well-defined valleys separated by narrow high ridges. Lateral evolution of Marlborough fault strands southwestwards into the Southern Alps has caused diversion of diffuse Southern Alps hydrothermal activity into the structural superimposition zone, where fluid flow is increasingly being controlled by faults. This hydrothermal diversion was accompanied by major topographic reorientation and river drainage reversal in the late Quaternary. Vein swarms now exposed in the remnants of the Southern Alps north of the superimposition zone formed at shallow levels, with some evidence for fluid boiling, from a mixture of meteoric and deep-sourced fluid. These veins, some of which contain gold, are part of an abandoned <1 million-year-old hydrothermal zone beneath the fossil topographic divide of the Southern Alps that has now been dismembered by lateral incursion of the Marlborough fault strands. Observations on this active plate boundary provide some insights into processes that controlled orogenic gold mineralisation in ancient belts, particularly with respect to relationships between hydrothermal fluid flow, structure and topography.

  19. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with

  20. Association of gold with uraninite and pyrobitumen in the metavolcanic rock hosted hydrothermal Au-U mineralisation at Rompas, Peräpohja Schist Belt, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Ferenc; Oduro, Harry; Cook, Nick D. J.; Pohjolainen, Esa; Takács, Ágnes; O'Brien, Hugh; Pakkanen, Lassi; Johanson, Bo; Wirth, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Peräpohja Schist Belt comprises a supracrustal sequence of quartzites, mafic volcanics and volcaniclastics, carbonate rocks, black shales, mica schists and greywackes which were deposited from ca. 2.44 to ~1.91 Ga, during the rifting of the Archaean basement in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian shield. Metamorphism and multiple folding of the basin fill took place during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) followed by intrusions of late-orogenic (1.84-1.80 Ga) and post-orogenic granitoids (1.79-1.76 Ga). The Rompas Au-U mineralisation is hosted by deformed calcsilicate veins in mafic volcanic rocks and locally contains very high grade (>10,000 g/t Au) gold pockets with strict spatial association of gold minerals to uraninite and pyrobitumen. Chemical ages from the unaltered domains in the structure of uraninite indicate a 1.95-1.90 Ga age for the deposition of the primary, high temperature (e.g. U/Th < 100 in uraninite) hydrothermal uranium mineralisation. These data are in agreement with the results of previous U-Pb dating of uraninite by SIMS. Textural evidence suggests that metamorphic recrystallisation of the uraninite-bearing quartz-dolomite veins into calcsilicate mineral assemblages during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) was followed by a hydrocarbon-bearing fluid flow event and radiolytic polymerisation of hydrocarbons around grains of uraninite. Gold precipitated during a subsequent hydrothermal process in the fractures of uraninite, as well as in the cracks and on the botryoidal surfaces of uraninite-pyrobitumen nodules. Remobilisation and redeposition of uranium by these hydrothermal events produced secondary uraninite grains with chemical ages between 1.85 and 1.65 Ga. Native gold is associated with galena, altaite, hunchunite, nickeline and rare cobaltite, Pb-bearing maldonite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and titanite. Raman spectra show disordered structure of undeformed pyrobitumen nodules in contrast with the well

  1. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Renal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Kyew; Park, Sung Kwang

    1987-01-01

    The coexistence of nephrotic syndrome and renal vein thrombosis has been of medical interest since Rayer’s description in 1840. Renal vein thrombosis has been underdiagnosed because of its variable clinical and radiological findings but it becomes a more frequently recognizable clinical entity since diagnosis can be easily established by modern angiographic techniques. Generally it has been believed that renal vein thrombosis may cause nephrotic syndrome. But recent articles strongly suggest that renal vein thrombosis is a complication of the nephrotic syndrome rather than a cause. We report three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with renal vein thrombosis. PMID:3154812

  2. Instantaneous healing of micro-fractures during coseismic slip: Evidence from microstructure and Ti in quartz geochemistry within an exhumed pseudotachylyte-bearing fault in tonalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Mostefaoui, Smail; Göken, Mathias; de Wall, Helga

    2016-06-01

    Exhumed faults within the tonalitic Adamello pluton (Southern Alps) were seismic at depth as indicated by the presence of pseudotachylytes (solidified friction-induced melts). During cooling of tonalite, early-formed joints were first exploited by localized ductile shear zones associated with deposition of quartz veins (at ~ 500 °C), and later by pseudotachylyte-bearing cataclastic faults (at ~ 250-300 °C ambient temperature). Adjacent to pseudotachylytes, quartz of the host tonalite shows pervasive thin (1-10 μm wide) healed micro-fractures and ultra-fine (1-2 μm grain size) recrystallized aggregates along micro-shear zones. Under cathodoluminescence (CL) the healed micro-fractures have a darker gray shade than the host "magmatic" quartz that reflects a change in Ti concentrations ([Ti]) as indicated by NanoSIMS measurements. [Ti] vary from 35-55 ppm in the CL-lighter host quartz to 10-13 ppm along the CL-darker healed micro-fractures. These [Ti] were inherited by the ultra-fine recrystallized aggregates that overprinted both the magmatic quartz and the healed micro-fractures during the high temperature transient related to frictional seismic slip. Based on Ti-in-quartz thermometry, we infer that micro-fracture healing occurred at higher temperatures than the ambient temperatures of faulting (250-300 °C at 0.2 GPa), for which [Ti] < 1 ppm would be expected. Micro-fracture healing can be ascribed to the stage of seismic slip of faults on the basis of the observation that: (i) they are absent in the host rock surrounding high-T quartz veins un-exploited by faults; and (ii) they locally occur at the tip of pseudotachylyte injection veins filling new fractures developed during the propagation of the earthquake rupture. The relatively high [Ti] of micro-fractures are therefore interpreted to reflect quartz healing by a fluid overheated during the initial stages of frictional seismic slip and escaping from fault surface through the damage zone. This suggests that

  3. Petrology and Geochemistry of Hydrothermally Altered Volcanic Rocks in the Iheya North Hydrothermal Field, Middle Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iheya North hydrothermal field is located in the middle Okinawa Trough, a young and actively spreading back-arc basin extending behind the Ryukyu arc-trench system in the southeastern margin of the East China Sea. In this hydrothermal field, two scientific drilling expeditions (IODP Exp 331 and SIP CK14-04) were conducted using a deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu," and samples from a total of 27 holes were taken. Through these expeditions, Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS), hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and pumiceous and pelagic sediments were recovered. The recovered core provided important information about the relationship between hydrothermal activity, alteration, and ore mineralization. Whole-rock major element composition and trace element (TE) patterns of pumices were very similar to those of rhyolites in the middle Okinawa Trough (RMO). However, pumices were relatively enriched in chalcophile elements Sr and Nb, which suggest incipient mineralization. Volcanic rock generally demonstrated strong silicification and was greenish pale gray in color. Regardless of severe alteration, some rock displayed major element composition broadly similar to the RMO. Alteration was evidenced by an increase in the content of SiO2 and MgO, and decrease in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O content. The most striking geochemical feature of altered volcanic rock was the discordance between texture and the degree of modification of TEs. Some samples showed decussate texture occupied by petal-like quartz with severe silicification, but no prominent disturbance of concentration and patterns of TEs were observed. In contrast, samples with well-preserved igneous porphyritic texture showed very low TE content and modification of TE patterns. These results suggest that the modification of texture and composition of TEs, as well as silicification, do not occur by a uniform process, but several processes. This may reflect the differences in temperature and the

  4. Deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Colman-Brochu, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a review of the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy, a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. The incidence of DVT in pregnancy varies widely, but it is a leading cause of maternal morbidity in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Risk factors during pregnancy include prolonged bed rest or immobility, pelvic or leg trauma, and obesity. Additional risk factors are preeclampsia, Cesarean section, instrument-assisted delivery, hemorrhage, multiparity, varicose veins, a previous history of a thromboembolic event, and hereditary or acquired thrombophilias such as Factor V Leiden. Heparin is the anticoagulant of choice to treat active thromboembolic disease or to administer for thromboprophylaxis, but low molecular-weight heparin is being used with increasing frequency in the pregnant woman. Perinatal nurses should be aware of the symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options available to manage active thrombosis during pregnancy and in the intrapartum and postpartum periods.

  5. [ENDOVENOUS LASER TREATMENT FOR VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Masahiro; Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao

    2015-05-01

    Varicose veins are a common condition attecting approximately 10 million patients in Japan. The main cause of varicose veins is reflux of the saphenous vein, and conventional treatment for several decades was stripping the affected saphenous vein and phlebectomy. Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) is a less-invasive treatment method in which the saphenous vein is ablated with a laser under local anesthesia. EVLT has been approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare since 2011, and we have performed EVLT on 5,160 legs with saphenous insufficiency with no severe complications including deep vein thrombosis except for one case of arteriovenous fistula. EVLT appears to be a safe, effective treatment option for varicose veins with saphenous insufficiency.

  6. Management of varicose veins and venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Allen

    2012-12-26

    Chronic venous disease, reviewed herein, is manifested by a spectrum of signs and symptoms, including cosmetic spider veins, asymptomatic varicosities, large painful varicose veins, edema, hyperpigmentation and lipodermatosclerosis of skin, and ulceration. However, there is no definitive stepwise progression from spider veins to ulcers and, in fact, severe skin complications of varicose veins, even when extensive, are not guaranteed. Treatment options range from conservative (eg, medications, compression stockings, lifestyle changes) to minimally invasive (eg, sclerotherapy or endoluminal ablation), invasive (surgical techniques), and hybrid (combination of ≥1 therapies). Ms L, a 68-year-old woman with varicose veins, is presented. She has had vein problems over the course of her life. Her varicose veins recurred after initial treatment, and she is now seeking guidance regarding her current treatment options.

  7. OH defects in quartz in granitic systems doped with spodumene, tourmaline and/or apatite: experimental investigations at 5-20 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigo, C.; Stalder, R.; Hauzenberger, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    The incorporation of OH defects in quartz as a function of Li content in the bulk system and pressures was investigated. Quartz crystals were grown in water-saturated granitic systems, containing various amounts Li, B and P, supplied as accessory phases such as spodumene, tourmaline or apatite in the starting mixtures. High pressure experiments were performed at temperatures between 900 and 1100 °C, and pressures between 5 and 20 kbar with a piston cylinder apparatus, and the synthesized quartz crystals were analyzed by IR spectroscopy, electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS spectroscopy. All IR absorption spectra revealed absorption features that can be assigned to AlOH (3313, 3379 and 3431 cm-1) and (4H)Si defects (3585 cm-1), whereas quartz grown in the Li and B systems exhibited two additional bands related, respectively, to LiOH (3483 cm-1) and BOH defects (3596 cm-1). It was further observed that LiOH incorporation increases with higher spodumene content in the starting material and decreases with pressure, until no LiOH defects are observed at pressure higher than 15 kbar. Specifically, the most pronounced reduction of LiOH defects occurs in a rather narrow pressure interval (10-15 kbar) close to the high-quartz/low-quartz transition. However, the link between the transition and the defect incorporation remains unclear. Li total concentrations always exceed the Li-coupled LiOH defects, suggesting the simultaneous presence of dry AlLi defects. Results of this study suggest that LiOH defects are detectable only in quartz crystals grown from middle and upper crustal sections (such as hydrothermal quartz) and not in quartz from deep roots of orogenic granitoids.

  8. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  9. Cody hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The hot springs of Colter's Hell are the surface manifestations of a much larger hydothermal system. That system has been studied to define its extent, maximum temperature, and mechanism of operation. The study area covers 2700 km/sup 2/ (1040 mi/sup 2/) in northwest Wyoming. Research and field work included locating and sampling the hot springs, geologic mapping, thermal logging of available wells, measuring thermal conductivities, analyzing over 200 oil and gas well bottom-hole temperatures, and compiling and analyzing hydrologic data. These data were used to generate a model for the hydrothermal system.

  10. Silicon isotope composition of diagenetic quartz: A record of Precambrian weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollington, A. D.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The genesis of quartz cements, which modify the porosity and permeability of many sedimentary rocks, is widely studied to determine the origin, flux, pathways and timing of water-rich fluids. Stable isotope ratios provide evidence of fluid/rock interactions. So called 'non-traditional stable isotope' ratios such as silicon may record processes such as chemical weathering, whereas aqueous fluid dominates the source of oxygen during precipitation. Silicon may be derived internally to a rock such as from pressure solution or recrystallization, or introduced by fluids. Silicon isotope ratios of diagenetic quartz reflect the source of dissolved chemical components; if δ30Si values of overgrowth quartz (OQ) and neighboring detrital quartz (DQ) are similar, the cations may be locally sourced from detrital grains. Alternatively, if the δ30Si of overgrowth quartz is significantly different than that of nearby detrital grains, then the silicon in those overgrowths is dominated by material derived from outside the formation. Here we present high-resolution in situ silicon isotope data, measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry from 10 μm spots, for the Mt Simon Sandstone, the basal Cambrian unit in the Midcontinent of North America. Silicon and oxygen isotope ratios have been measured in detrital quartz grains and quartz overgrowths from outcrops and deeply buried samples from drill core. Overgrowths from drill cores and most outcrops studied have δ30Si values close to 0‰ NBS-28, which is the same as values measured for adjacent detrital grains and δ18O values between 18 and 33‰ VSMOW, reflecting different temperatures of precipitation. However, in multiple samples from an outcrop on the Wisconsin Dome, adjacent to the Precambrian-Cambrian unconformity, quartz overgrowths have a wide range of δ30Si, with values as low as -5.4‰ and paired δ18O values as low as 18.5‰. Using the high spatial resolution afforded by SIMS analyses, we have measured isotopic

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems. Annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In the calculations we have assumed that all apatites are magmatic. The presence of chlorite and altered plagioclase within the granite and quartz-monzodiorite suggests that alteration may play a role in leading to erroneous estimates of initial melt Cl and F for 2 reasons: (1) the apatites may in fact not be magmatic in origin, but are hydrothermal, and (2) the halogen signature of magmatic apatite may be changed due to subsolidus exchange with a hydrothermal fluid. We are currently endeavoring to develop criteria for determining whether apatite composition represents earlier or later stages of magmatic-hydrothermal development.

  12. Hydrothermal alteration of sediments associated with surface emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Esquer P., I.; Elders, W.A.; Collier, P.C.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the mineralogical changes associated with these hydrothermal vents was initiated with the aim of developing possible exploration tools for geothermal resources. The Cerro Prieto reservoir has already been explored by extensive deep drilling so that relationships between surface manifestations and deeper hydrothermal processes could be established directly. Approximately 120 samples of surface sediments were collected both inside and outside of the vents. The mineralogy of the altered sediments studied appears to be controlled by the type of emission. A comparison between the changes in mineralogy due to low temperature hydrothermal activity in the reservoir, seen in samples from boreholes, and mineralogical changes in the surface emission samples shows similar general trends below 180 C: increase of quartz, feldspar and illite, with subsequent disappearance of kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite and dolomite. These mineral assemblages seem to be characteristic products of the discharge from high intensity geothermal fields.

  13. Millimeter And Submillimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits On Quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Mazed, Mohammad; Siegel, Peter; Smith, R. Peter

    1995-01-01

    Proposed Quartz substrate Upside-down Integrated Device (QUID) relies on UV-curable adhesive to bond semiconductor with quartz. Integrated circuits including planar GaAs Schottky diodes and passive circuit elements (such as bandpass filters) fabricated on quartz substrates. Circuits designed to operate as mixers in waveguide circuit at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Integrated circuits mechanically more robust, larger, and easier to handle than planar Schottky diode chips. Quartz substrate more suitable for waveguide circuits than GaAs substrate.

  14. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz crystallization and repeated fragmentation in the Rusey fault zone (Cornwall/UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tim I.; Blenkinsop, Tom; Duschl, Florian; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    Silicified fault rocks typically show structures resulting from various stages of fragmentation and quartz crystallization. Both processes interact episodically and result in complex structures on various scales, which require a wide spectrum of analysis tools. Based on field and microstructural data, the spatial-temporal connection between deformation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Rusey fault zone was investigated. The fault can be examined in detail in three dimensions on the north Cornwall coast, UK. It occurs within Carboniferous sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and slates of the Culm basin, and is likely to have had a long history. The fault rocks described here formed during the younger events, possibly due to Tertiary strike-slip reactivation. Frequent fragmentation, flow and crystallization events and their interaction led to various generations of complex-structured quartz units, among them quartz-mantled and partly silicified wall-rock fragments, microcrystalline quartz masses of different compositions and structures, and quartz vein patterns of various ages. Lobate boundaries of quartz masses indicate viscous flow. Fragments are separated by quartz infill, which contains cm-sized open pores, in which quartz crystals have pyramidal terminations. Based on frequent occurrence of feathery textures and the infill geometry, quartz crystallization from chalcedony appears likely, and an origin from silica gel is discussed. Fragmentation structures are generally fractal. This allows differentiation between various processes, such as corrosive wear, wear abrasion and hydraulic brecciation. Material transport along the brittle shear zone, and displacement of the wall-rocks, were at least partly governed by flow of mobile fluid-quartz-particle suspensions. The complex meso- to microstructures were generated by repeated processes of fragmentation, quartz precipitation and grain growth. In general, the brittle Rusey fault zone

  15. Hydrothermal Evolution of the Giant Cenozoic Kadjaran porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Tethyan metallogenic belt, Armenia, Lesser Caucasus: mineral paragenetic, cathodoluminescence and fluid inclusion constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Samvel; Moritz, Robert; Tayan, Rodrik; Rezeau, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    The Lesser Caucasus belongs to the Central segment of the Tethyan metallogenic belt and it is a key area to understand the metallogenic evolution between the Western & Central parts of the Tethyan belt and its extension into Iran. Zangezur is the most important mineral district in the southernmost Lesser Caucasus. It is a component of the South Armenian block, and it was generated during the convergence and collision of the southern margin of the Eurasian plate and the northern margin of the Arabian plate, and terranes of Gondwana origin (Moritz et al., in press). The Zangezur ore district consists of the Tertiary Meghri-Ordubad composite pluton, which is characterized by a long-lasting Eocene to Pliocene magmatic, tectonic and metallogenic evolution. It hosts major porphyries Cu-Mo and epithermal Au - polymetallic deposits and occurrences, including the giant world class Kadjaran porphyry Cu-Mo deposit (2244 Mt reserves, 0.3% Cu, 0.05% Mo and 0.02 g/t Au). The Kadjaran deposit is hosted by a monzonite intrusion (31.83±0.02Ma; Moritz et al., in press). Detailed field studies of the porphyry stockwork and veins of the different mineralization stages, their crosscutting and displacement relationships and the age relationship between different paragenetic mineral associations were the criteria for distinction of the main stages of porphyry mineralization at the Kadjaran deposit. The economic stages being: quartz- molybdenite, quartz-molybdenite-chalcopyrite, and quartz-chalcopyrite. The main paragenetic association of the Kadjaran porphyry deposit includes pyrite, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, bornite, chalcocite, pyrrhotite, covellite, sphalerite, and galena. Recent field observations in the Kadjaran open pit revealed the presence of epithermal veins with late vuggy silica and advanced argillic alteration in the north-eastern and eastern parts of the deposit. They are distributed as separate veins and have also been recognized in re-opened porphyry veins and in

  16. Distinguishing the Asian dust sources based on cathodoluminescence analysis of single quartz grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, K.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Tada, R.; Isozaki, Y.; Sun, Y.; Igarashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Numerous tracers, such as mineralogical component, strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and neodymium (eNd(0)) isotopes (Liu et al., 1994; Biscaye et al.,1997; Bory et al., 2002, 2003; Kanayama et al., 2002, 2005), rare earth element composition (e.g., Svensson et al., 2000), oxygen isotope (Mizota et al., 1992; Hou et al., 2003) and ESR intensity of quartz (Ono et al., 1998; Sun et al., 2007), have been investigated to discriminate source areas of Asian dust. However, these analyses need large volume of samples (mostly more than 10 mg) and the applications to the dust samples are limited. Then, here we developed a provenance-tracing method by using a cathodoluminescence (CL) spectral of “single” quartz grain for applying it to small volume of aeolian dust samples, such as aeolian dust in the ice cores and marine sediments with the location of long distance from the Asian deserts. CL is the emission from a material which is excited by electron beam. Since CL spectroscopy and microscopy provide information on the existence and distribution of defects and trace elements in minerals, CL analyses have potential to characterize dust-source areas. CL spectra of quartz have been demonstrated to show different patterns between the quartz from hydrothermal, plutonic, volcanic and metamorphic origins (e.g., Zinkernagel, 1978; Götze et al., 2001), suggesting the spectra reflect the condition of the quartz formation and the local environment. Then, here we conducted CL spectral analysis of silt size quartz in the surface samples from the major Asian deserts, such as the Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Desert in southern Mongolia (hereafter Mongolian Gobi). CL spectra were measured in the areas of approximately 4 micron square for each quartz grain by a Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) at the Okayama University of Science, a SEM (Jeol: JSM-5410) attached with a grating monochromator (Oxford Instruments: Mono CL2), where EDS system can be used in combination with SEM

  17. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1996-01-01

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

  18. New evidence for persistent impact-generated hydrothermal activity in the Miocene Ries impact structure, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, Gernot; Kolepka, Claudia; Simon, Klaus; Karius, Volker; Nolte, Nicole; Hansen, Bent T.

    2013-12-01

    The extent of impact-generated hydrothermal activity in the 24 km sized Ries impact structure has been controversially discussed. To date, mineralogical and isotopic investigations point to a restriction of hydrothermal activity to the impact-melt bearing breccias, specifically the crater-fill suevite. Here, we present new petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic data of postimpact carbonate deposits, which indicate a hydrothermal activity more extended than previously assumed. Specifically, carbonates of the Erbisberg, a spring mound located upon the inner crystalline ring of the crater, show travertine facies types not seen in any of the previously investigated sublacustrine soda lake spring mounds of the Ries basin. In particular, the streamer carbonates, which result from the encrustation of microbial filaments in subaerial spring effluents between 60 and 70 °C, are characteristic of a hydrothermal origin. While much of the primary geochemical and isotopic signatures in the mound carbonates have been obliterated by diagenesis, a postimpact calcite vein from brecciated gneiss of the subsurface crater floor revealed a flat rare earth element pattern with a clear positive Eu anomaly, indicating a hydrothermal fluid convection in the crater basement. Finally, the strontium isotope stratigraphic correlation of the travertine mound with the crater basin succession suggests a hydrothermal activity for about 250,000 yr after the impact, which would be much longer than previously assumed.

  19. Everted cervical vein for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Yu, A; Dardik, H; Wolodiger, F; Raccuia, J; Kapadia, I; Sussman, B; Kahn, M; Pecoraro, J P; Ibrahim, I M

    1990-11-01

    Because of the theoretic benefits of autologous vein we undertook an investigation to evaluate cervical veins (facial, external jugular) as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. A device that stimulated both circumferential fixation by sutures and radial tension exerted on in vivo patches was constructed to measure burst strength of tissue. Mean bursting pressure for groin saphenous vein (n = 10) was 94.5 +/- 15.1 pounds per square inch (psi), 75.5 +/- 8.9 psi for ankle saphenous vein (n = 10), 83.3 +/- 14.5 psi for everted (double layer) cervical vein (n = 5) and 10 +/- 3.3 psi for single layer cervical vein (n = 5). No significant differences between saphenous vein at any level and everted (double layer) cervical vein, but all were significantly different from single layer cervical vein (p less than 0.05). From June 1987 through November 1989, 19 patients underwent 21 carotid endarterectomies complemented with adjunctive everted cervical vein patch angioplasty. Indications for surgery were asymptomatic stenosis (53%), transient ischemic attack (29%), and cerebrovascular accident with recovery (18%). All patients were studied after surgery with duplex scanning. Asymptomatic recurrent stenosis was observed in one patient. Transient hypoglossal nerve dysfunction occurred in one other patient. One postoperative death occurred as a result of massive aspiration. These results indicate that everted cervical vein is comparable to the saphenous vein in resistance to bursting and can yield similar results as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. Accordingly, saphenous vein can be spared and lower extremity incisions avoided.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Characterization of Quartz and Feldspar Deformation in the Mid-crust: Insights from the Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, C. A.; Jessup, M. J.; Shaw, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation mechanisms within shear zones from various crustal levels must be characterized to develop accurate models of lithospheric rheology. The Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone (CBSZ) in the central Peruvian Andes records changes in temperature, microstructures, and deformation mechanisms that occurred during exhumation through the brittle-ductile-transition during normal-sense slip over the last ~5 m.y. The 100-500-m-thick mylonitic shear zone occupies the footwall of a 200-km-long normal detachment fault, marking the western boundary of the 8 Ma, leucogranodiorite Cordillera Blanca Batholith. Though local variations do occur, including recrystallized quartz veins and local, decimeter- to meter- scale shear zones, the CBSZ follows a general trend of increasing strain towards the detachment. Structurally lowest positions are weakly deformed and transition to protomylonite, mylonite, and ultramylonite at higher positions, truncating at a cataclasite nearest the detachment. We characterize strain using EBSD analyses of quartz lattice preferred orientations and deformation temperatures using quartz and feldspar textures and two-feldspar thermometry of asymmetric strain-induced myrmekite. At the deepest structural positions, feldspar grains record a complex history characterized by bulging recrystallization, myrmekite formation, and brittle fracture, while quartz exhibits dominant grain-boundary migration recrystallization (T> 500 °C) and prism slip. Intermediate samples exhibit more prevalent strain-induced myrmekite, brittle fracture in feldspar, and reaction-associated recrystallization of K-feldspar to mica; quartz records mainly subgrain-rotation recrystallization (400-500 °C) and dominant prism slip with a rhomb component. Shallower positions preserve fewer, smaller, and more rounded feldspar porphyroclasts with no myrmekite, and dominant bulging recrystallization (280-400 °C) in quartz that records prism , rhomb , and some basal slip.

  1. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    PubMed

    Vincent, R K

    1972-09-01

    Spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 degrees and 70 degrees is calculated by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width (Deltalambda approximately 1.5 microm) spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band (Deltalambda approximately 6microm) for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected mediumwidth filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  2. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  3. Oxygen isotope disequilibrium between quartz and sanidine from the Bandelier Tuff, New Mexico, consistent with a short residence time of phenocrysts in rhyolitic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, John A.; Balsley, Steven D.; Gregory, Robert T.

    2002-07-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses are reported from co-existing quartz and feldspar from the Bandelier Tuff and Cerro Toledo high-silica rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits erupted from the Valles caldera, New Mexico. Quartz shows little variation outside analytical error, but δ 18O in feldspar varies over >1‰. In most samples, 18O/ 16O fractionation between quartz and feldspar is significantly less than is predicted for equilibrium at temperatures appropriate for rhyolitic magma. In the Tshirege (upper) Member of the Bandelier Tuff, isotopic fractionation between mineral pairs is close to equilibrium in the later erupted ignimbrite, but non-equilibrium in the initial Plinian deposit. These relationships are interpreted in terms of a model where most phenocrysts are derived from a highly porphyritic carapace around the magma chamber that was disrupted by eruption, thus scattering crystals throughout the magma. Carapace quartz and feldspar are initially isotopically lighter than the bulk aphyric magma, due to chemical communication with low-δ 18O country rock in the meteoric/hydrothermal system surrounding the chamber. We assume that quartz and feldspar were initially in isotopic equilibrium. Diffusive re-equilibration of crystals begins when the carapace disintegrates and the minerals are immersed in the bulk magma just prior to and during eruption. Feldspar is isotopically lighter than quartz at equilibrium, but responds more rapidly than quartz to an external change, due to a higher diffusion coefficient for oxygen. Hence, immersion in the isotopically heavier bulk magma causes feldspar and quartz δ 18O values to initially converge over ˜10 2 years, and then diverge over 10 3-10 4 years as first feldspar, and then quartz, re-equilibrate with the new magma. Higher δ 18O variability of feldspar than quartz indicates that the shorter timescale applies to the Bandelier and Cerro Toledo rhyolites. Two important implications of this interpretation are (1) that the Bandelier

  4. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  5. Lattice dynamics and thermal expansion of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. B.

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of the thermal expansion and the α-β phase transition of quartz are jointly studied within the framework of a lattice-dynamical treatment using the pair-wise potential by Tsuneyuki et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 869 (1988)]. This shows that the essentially anomalous thermal expansion of quartz originates from the low-frequency phonon modes most of which have negative Grüeneisen coefficients. The main factor driving the α-phase structure variation at heating is the rotation of the SiO4 tetrahedra towards their β-phase positions. The volume variation follows this process thus keeping the static pressure small. The model reveals that at T>430 K a number of the phonons have imaginary quasiharmonic frequencies being governed by a double-well potential. This result does not suggest any large-scale lattice instability, and just indicates that the relevant vibrations are essentially anharmonic and that the actual crystal structure is of a dynamically averaged character. The contribution of such modes to the free energy has been included by the extension of the quasiharmonic theory proposed by Boyer and Hardy [Phys. Rev. B 24, 2577 (1981)]. Then the accurate free-energy optimization with respect to all the structural parameters provides the α-quartz structure at TTc~850 K, but it exists in the β phase at 850 Kquartz.

  6. An experimental investigation of the role of microfracture surfaces in controlling quartz precipitation rate: Applications to fault zone diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Randolph T.; Farver, John R.; Onasch, Charles M.; Winslow, Daniel F.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of quartz growth experiments, which were designed to assess the role of microfracture surfaces in controlling quartz-precipitation rates during fault-zone diagenesis. Experiments were run in hydrothermal cold-seal vessels at 300-450 °C and 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 1344 h. Microfractures routinely form at grain contacts during these experiments. Microfracture kinematic-aperture distributions indicate that microfractures form within the first 48 h of each experiment. Regardless of experimental temperature or duration, microfracture-sealing cements account for approximately the same amount of new quartz cement in each experiment. With increasing experimental duration, sealed microfractures were progressively overgrown by grain-boundary overgrowth cements. Spatial and temporal trends in the distribution of overgrowth- and microfracture-sealing cements indicate that precipitation rates on newly formed microfractures greatly exceed those on detrital-grain boundaries. This effect persists regardless of natural iron-oxide grain coatings present in a subset of our experiments. While our results agree with previous research that demonstrated increased growth rates on fracture surfaces in faults in fully lithified rock, fundamental differences in the nature of deformation in our experiments provide insight into quartz cementation in cataclastic deformation bands in faults offsetting high-porosity sandstones.

  7. Quartz-superconductor quantum electromechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Matt; Emzir, Muhammad; Milburn, Gerard; Jerger, Markus; Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Mike; Fedorov, Arkady

    Quartz bulk acoustic wave oscillators support mechanical modes with very high resonance frequencies and extremely high quality factors. As such, they provide an appealing platform for quantum optics experiments with phonons, gravitational wave detection, and tests of quantum mechanics. We propose to cool and measure the motion of a quartz oscillator using a transmon, with the coupling mediated by a tuneable superconducting LC circuit. The mechanical motion (~250MHz) is resonantly coupled to the LC circuit (~250MHz) by a piezoelectric interaction, the LC circuit is coupled to the transmon (~8GHz) via sideband transitions, and there is a smaller direct coupling between the quartz oscillator and the transmon. By driving the transmon on its red sideband, the mechanical and electrical oscillators may be cooled close to their quantum ground state. By observing the fluorescence of the qubit, the occupations of the oscillators may be determined via the motional sidebands they induce. A minimal model of this system consists of a qubit coupled to two oscillators, which are themselves mutually coupled. The steady-state of the system and the qubit fluorescence spectrum are evaluated analytically using a perturbative projection operator technique, and verified numerically.

  8. Hydrothermal palygorskite and ferromanganese mineralization at a central California margin fracture zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Hein, J.R.; Lewis, S.D.; McCulloch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxyhydroxide crusts and nodules associated with palygorskite were recovered from the Santa Lucia Escarpment where the Morro Fracture Zone intersects the central California continental margin. Palygorskite was found in pure, high-Mg, low-Al, boxwork-textured veins, and disseminated in poorly consolidated palygorskite-rich mudstone. The purity of the palygorskite boxwork blades and the boxwork structure suggest formation by direct precipitation rather than by diagenetic or detrital processes. Interaction of hydrothermal fluids with oceanic basalt and/or deeper ultramafic rocks produced a Mg-Si enriched fluid supersaturated with respect to palygorskite that precipitated directly from the fluid at or near the seafloor. The close association of Fe-Mn crusts and nodules with both the palygorskite-rich mudstone and boxwork-vein palygorskite suggests a genetic link between the three types of mineralization. Mixed origin hydrothermal-hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts, with up to 50% hydrothermal input, formed contemporaneously with and subsequent to palygorskite formation. Fe-Mn nodules collected in the same dredge are of combined hydrogenetic and diagenetic origin and appear to be unrelated to hydrothermal mineralization that produced the crusts and palygorskite. The thickness of the Fe-Mn crusts and rare diatom fragments within the mudstone suggest an age of formation between 13 and 5 Ma. ?? 1993.

  9. Instantaneous healing of micro-fractures during coseismic slip: evidence from microstructure and Ti in quartz geochemistry within an exhumed pseudotachylyte-bearing fault in tonalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Moustefaoui, Smail; Göken, Mathias; de Wall, Helga

    2016-04-01

    This study presents detailed microstructural and trace element (Ti) analysis of quartz deformation microstructures associated with seismic slip in order to constrain the complex deformation history during an earthquake event. Exhumed faults within the tonalitic Adamello pluton (Southern Alps) were seismic at depth as indicated by the presence of pseudotachylytes (solidified friction-induced melts). During cooling of tonalite, early-formed joints were first exploited by localized ductile shear zones associated with deposition of quartz veins (at ~500 °C), and later by pseudotachylyte-bearing cataclastic faults (at ~250-300 °C ambient temperature). Adjacent to pseudotachylytes, quartz of the host tonalite shows pervasive thin (1-10 μm wide) healed micro-fractures and ultra-fine (1-2 μm grain size) recrystallized aggregates along micro-shear zones. Under cathodoluminescence (CL) the healed micro-fractures have darker gray shade than the host "magmatic" quartz that reflects a change in Ti concentrations [Ti] as indicated by NanoSIMS measurements. [Ti] vary from 35-55 ppm of the CL-lighter host quartz to 11-15 ppm along the CL-darker healed micro-fractures. These [Ti] were inherited by overprinting recrystallization aggregates developed during the high temperature transient related to frictional seismic slip. Based on Ti-in-quartz thermometry, micro-fracture healing occurred at higher temperatures than the ambient temperatures of faulting (250-300 °C at 0.2 GPa). Micro-fracture healing can be ascribed to the stage of seismic slip of faulting on the basis of the observation that: (i) they are absent in the host rock surrounding earlier high-T quartz veins un-exploited by faults; (ii) they locally occur at the tip of pseudotachylyte injection veins filling new fractures developed during the propagation of the earthquake rupture tip. The relatively high [Ti] of micro-fractures are interpreted to reflect quartz healing by a fluid overheated during the initial stages of

  10. The mangazeya Ag-Pb-Zn vein deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, Sakha-Yakutia, Russia: Mineral assemblages, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes (C, O, S), and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikina, E. Yu.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Klubnikin, G. K.; Gamyanin, G. N.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The succession of mineral assemblages, chemistry of gangue and ore minerals, fluid inclusions, and stable isotopes (C, O, S) in minerals have been studied in the Mangazeya silver-base-metal deposit hosted in terrigenous rocks of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The deposit is localized in the junction zone of the Kuranakh Anticlinorium and the Sartanga Synclinorium at the steep eastern limb of the Endybal Anticline. The deposit is situated at the intersection of the regional Nyuektame and North Tirekhtyakh faults. Igneous rocks are represented by the Endybal massif of granodiorite porphyry 97.8 ± 0.9 Ma in age and dikes varying in composition. One preore and three types of ore mineralization separated in space are distinguished: quartz-pyrite-arsenopyrite (I), quartz-carbonate-sulfide (II), and silver-base-metal (III). Quartz and carbonate (siderite) are predominant in ore veins. Ore minerals are represented by arsenopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, fahlore, and less frequent sulfosalts. Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz differ in phase compositions: two- or three-phase aqueous-carbon dioxide (FI I), carbon dioxide gas (FI II), and two-phase (FI III) containing liquid and a gas bubble. The homogenization temperature and salinity fall within the ranges of 367-217°C and 13.8-2.6 wt % NaCl equiv in FI I; 336-126°C and 15.4-0.8 wt % NaCl equiv in FI III. Carbon dioxide in FI II was homogenized in gas at +30.2 to +15.3°C and at +27.2 to 29.0°C in liquid. The δ34S values for minerals of type I range from-1.8 to +4.7‰ (V-CDT); of type II, from-7.4 to +6.6‰; and of type III, from-5.6 to +7.1‰. δ13C and δ18O vary from-7.0 to-6.7‰ (V-PDB) and from +16.6 to +17.1 (V-SMOW) in siderite-I; from-9.1 to-6.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +18.9 (V-SMOW) in siderite-II; from-5.4 to-3.1‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +19.5 (V-SMOW) in ankerite; and from-4.2 to-2.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +13.5 to +16.8 (V-SMOW) in calcite. The data on mineral assemblages, fluid

  11. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the door or wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. The quartz for the diffuser plate is surface etched (to give the quartz diffusive qualities) in the furnace during a high intensity burn-in process.

  12. [Steam ablation of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Renate R; Malskat, Wendy S J; Neumann, H A M Martino

    2013-01-01

    In many western countries endovenous thermal ablation techniques have largely replaced classical surgery for the treatment of saphenous varicose veins as they are more effective and patient friendly. Because these treatments can be performed under local tumescent anaesthesia, patients can mobilize immediately after the procedure. A new method of thermal ablation is endovenous steam ablation, which is a fast and easy procedure. Steam ablation may cause less pain than laser ablation and it is also cheaper and more flexible than segmental radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23484513

  13. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy.

  14. Laser leg vein treatment: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victor; Domankevitz, Yacov

    2003-12-01

    Laser treatment of leg veins has been associated with a number of disadvantages, but the introduction of new devices has increased the role of lasers in the treatment of leg veins. This paper reviews the role of laser devices applied from the surface in the treatment of reticular and spider veins. Success is determined by the proper selection of wavelength, fluence, pulse duration, spot size, and number and frequency of treatments. PMID:14741827

  15. Amorphization of α-Quartz under Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillard, L.; Duraud, J. P.

    1996-12-01

    The course of radiation induced damage produced in α-quartz by neutrons, ions, electrons or photons — commonly known as metamictization — has been re-analyzed by careful comparison of available experimental data. Specific interest was devoted to confront experimental metamict state features with current structural models. It comes out that the metamict state of irradiated quartz should exhibit some structural characteristics of the modulated structure proposed for vitreous silica. The metamictization process is consistent with a structural relaxation process of a highly defective quartz matrix. According to this new point defect analysis, structural relaxation should be triggered by a critical concentration of oxygen vacancy point defects likely to significantly lower the connectivity of the SiO{2} network. Various experimental results are interpreted by incorporating the influence of the SiO{2} crystalline polymorph and the influence of the nature of the irradiating particle to the point defect model. Nous avons étudié les modifications de propriétés et de structures de monocristaux de quartz α, consécutives à une irradiation sévère par des neutrons, des ions, des électrons ou des photons. Ce phénomène d'altération du quartz sous irradiation porte le nom de métamictisation. Notre travail exploite les recoupements de travaux antérieurs. Une attention particulière a été portée à la confrontation entre les données structurales expérimentales disponibles sur l'état métamicte du quartz et les modèles structuraux proposés. L'état métamicte du quartz présente ainsi les caractéristiques structurales du modèle de structure modulée, avancé pour décrire la structure de la silice thermique. Le mécanisme de métamictisation procéderait par relaxation de la matrice cristalline fortement endommagée. Ce phénomène de relaxation serait initié par l'apparition de concentration critique de défauts ponctuels de type lacunes d

  16. The Black Pearl mine, Arizona - Wolframite veins and stockscheider pegmatite related to an albitic stock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Christopher; Burt, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    Wolframite-bearing quartz veins flanked by greisen alteration occur at and near the Black Pearl mine, Yavapai County, Arizona. The veins are genetically related to a small albitite stock, and cut a series of Proterozoic metasedimentary and intrusive rocks. The largest vein, the only one mined, is located at the apex of the stock. Field relations imply that this stock is a late-stage differentiate of time 1.4-Ga anorogenic Lawler Peak batholith, which crops out about 3 km to the south. The albitites are of igneous origin and have suffered only minor deuteric alteration. A thin (1 to 2 m) pegmatite unit ('stockscheider') occurs at the contact of the Black Pearl Albitite stock with the country rocks. Directional indicators and other evidence suggest that the pegmatite was formed in the presence of a volatile-rich fluid phase close to the time of magma emplacement. The sudden change from coarse-grained microcline-rich pegmatite to fine-grained, albite-rich albitite suggests pressure quenching, possibly due to escape of fluids up the Black Pearl vein. Stockscheider-like textures typically occur near the apical contacts of productive plutons. The presence or absence of this texture is a useful guide in prospecting for lithophile metal deposits.

  17. Exploration strategies for hydrothermal deposits.

    PubMed

    Horn, R A

    1996-01-01

    With unlimited money the most certain strategy for finding most hydrothermal metal deposits would be by drilling to 5000 m at 50 m spacing. However, the cost would far outweigh the benefit of the discoveries. Geological knowledge and exploration techniques may be used to obtain the greatest benefit for minimum cost, and to concentrate human and material resources in the most economic way in areas with the highest probability of discovery. This paper reviews the economic theory of exploration based on expected value, and the application of geological concepts and exploration techniques to exploration for hydrothermal deposits. Exploration techniques for hydrothermal-systems on Mars would include geochemistry and particularly passive geophysical methods.

  18. Tissue remodeling investigation in varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Khodaii, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Although the etiology of varicose veins remains unknown, recent studies have focused on endothelial cell integrity and function because the endothelium regulates vessel tone and synthesizes many pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence involving the endothelium in the development of varicose vein disease. In addition, tissue remodeling was investigated in varicose veins to determine the expression of different types of collagen. Tissue specimens of superficial varicose veins and control saphenous vein were used for immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscope (TEM). α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I, III, IV antibodies were applied for immunohistochemical investigation. Findings of this study showed alterations of the intima, such as focal intimal discontinuity and denudation of endothelium; and the media, such as irregular arrangements of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres in varicose veins. Our findings showed some changes in terms of distribution of types I, III and IV collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls compared with controls. These alterations to the media suggest that the pathological abnormality in varicose veins may be due to the loss of muscle tone as a result of the breakup of its regular structure by the collagen fibres. These findings only described some changes in terms of distribution of these types of collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls which may result in venous wall dysfunction in varicosis. PMID:24551759

  19. Sonographic Findings in Fetal Renal Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Rebecca E; Bromley, Bryann; Benson, Carol B; Frates, Mary C

    2015-08-01

    We present the sonographic findings of fetal renal vein thrombosis in a series of 6 patients. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31.2 weeks. Four cases were unilateral, and 2 were bilateral. The most common findings were renal enlargement and intrarenal vascular calcifications, followed by increased renal parenchymal echogenicity. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was found in 4 patients and common iliac vein thrombosis in 2. Fetal renal vein thrombosis is an uncommon diagnosis with characteristic sonographic findings. The presence of these findings should prompt Doppler interrogation of the renal vein and inferior vena cava to confirm the diagnosis.

  20. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  1. Model of the porphyry copper and polymetallic vein family of deposits - Applications in Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A tectonic model useful in estimating the occurrence of undiscovered porphyry copper and polymetallic vein systems has been developed. This model is based on the manner in which magmatic and hydrothermal fluids flow and are trapped in fault systems as far-field stress is released in tectonic strain features above subducting plates (e.g. strike-slip fault systems). The structural traps include preferred locations for stock emplacement and tensional-shear fault meshes within the step-overs that localize porphyry- and vein-style deposits. The application of the model is illustrated for the porphyry copper and polymetallic vein deposits in the Central Slovakian Volcanic Field, Slovakia; the Ma??tra Mountains, Hungary; and the Apuseni Mountains, Romania.

  2. Remodelling of the Superior Caval Vein After Angioplasty in an Infant with Superior Caval Vein Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Murat Saltik, Levent; Gunay, Ilhan

    2004-08-15

    An 8-month old girl was presented with superior caval vein syndrome early after cardiac surgery. Angiography showed severe stenosis of the superior caval vein with 50 mmHg pressure gradient. Following balloon angioplasty, the pressure gradient was reduced to 7 mmHg with some residual stenosis of the superior caval vein. When the patient was reevaluated 5 months after the procedure, angiography revealed a normal diameter of the superior caval vein without a pressure gradient.

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Varicose Veins? The signs and symptoms of varicose veins include: Large veins ... skin in the area around the varicose vein. Signs of telangiectasias are clusters of red veins that ...

  4. Tin-tungsten mineralizing processes in tungsten vein deposits: Panasqueira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, P.; Pinto, F.; Vieira, R.; Wälle, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten has a high heat resistance, density and hardness, which makes it widely applied in industry (e.g. steel, tungsten carbides). Tungsten deposits are typically magmatic-hydrothermal systems. Despite the economic significance of tungsten, there are no modern quantitative analytical studies of the fluids responsible for the formation of its highest-grade deposit type (tungsten vein deposits). Panasqueira (Portugal) is a tungsten vein deposit, one of the leading tungsten producers in Europe and one of the best geologically characterized tungsten vein deposits. In this study, compositions of the mineralizing fluids at Panasqueira have been determined through combination of detailed petrography, microthermometric measurements and LA-ICPMS analyses, and geochemical modeling has been used to determine the processes that lead to tungsten mineralization. We characterized the fluids related to the various mineralizing stages in the system: the oxide stage (tin and tungsten mineralization), the sulfide stage (chalcopyrite and sphalerite mineralization) and the carbonate stage. Thus, our results provide information on the properties of fluids related with specific paragenetic stages. Furthermore we used those fluid compositions in combination with host rock mineralogy and chemistry to evaluate which are the controlling factors in the mineralizing process. This study provides the first quantitative analytical data on fluid composition for tungsten vein deposits and evaluates the controlling mineralization processes helping to determine the mechanisms of formation of the Panasqueira tin-tungsten deposit and providing additional geochemical constraints on the local distribution of mineralization.

  5. Hydrothermal Chemotrophic Biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, F.; Campbell, K. A.; Gautret, P.; Bréhéret, J.; Foucher, F.; Vago, J.; Kminek, G.; Hubert, A.; Hickman-Lewis, K.; Cockell, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermal chemotrophic biosignatures (morphological and geo-organochemical) were common in shallow water on the anaerobic early Earth, preserved by silicification. They are representative also of shallow crustal biosignatures.

  6. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadel, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis Symptoms: Face engorgement • neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Hematology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow’s triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. Case Report: This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Conclusions: Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present

  7. Kinetics of the coesite to quartz transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosenfelder, J.L.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The survival of coesite in ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks has important implications for the exhumation of subducted crustal rocks. We have conducted experiments to study the mechanism and rate of the coesite ??? quartz transformation using polycrystalline coesite aggregates, fabricated by devitrifying silica glass cylinders containing 2850H/106 Si at 1000??C and 3.6 GPa for 24h. Conditions were adjusted following synthesis to transform the samples at 700-1000??C at pressures 190-410 MPa below the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary. Reaction proceeds via grain-boundary nucleation and interface-controlled growth, with characteristic reaction textures remarkably similar to those seen in natural UHP rocks. We infer that the experimental reaction mechanism is identical to that in nature, a prerequisite for reliable extrapolation of the rate data. Growth rates obtained by direct measurement differ by up to two orders of magnitude from those estimated by fitting a rate equation to the transformation-time data. Fitting the rates to Turnbull's equation for growth therefore yields two distinct sets of parameters with similar activation energies (242 or 269 kJ/mol) but significantly different pre-exponential constants. Extrapolation based on either set of growth rates suggests that coesite should not be preserved on geologic time scales if it reaches the quartz stability field at temperatures above 375-400??C. The survival of coesite has previously been linked to its inclusion in strong phases, such as garnet, that can sustain a high internal pressure during decompression. Other factors that may play a crucial role in preservation are low fluid availability - possibly even less than that of our nominally "dry" experiments - and the development of transformation stress, which inhibits nucleation and growth. These issues are discussed in the context of our experiments as well as recent observations from natural rocks. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Mineral potential tracts for polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits (phase V, deliverable 71): Chapter I in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-01-01

    In Mauritania, mineral occurrences of the polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposit type are found near the Florence-El Khdar shear zone in northeast Mauritania. The deposits visited were deemed representative of other similar occurrences and consist of quartz veins with trace sulfides. The low sulfide and Pb-Zn-Cu content in the quartz veins is unlike producing polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits, such that the veins are not considered to belong to this deposit type. Mineral potential tracts for polymetallic Pb-ZnCu veins are highly speculative considering the lack of known mineralization belonging to this deposit type. Mineral potential tracts for polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu veins are associated with and surround major shear zones in the Rgueïbat Shield and zones of complex faulting in the southern Mauritanides, at the exclusion of the imbricated thrust faults that are not considered favorable for this deposit type. No skarn and replacement deposits have been documented in Mauritania and the low mineral potential is indicated by lack of causative Mesozoic and Cenozoic mafic to felsic stocks.

  9. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  10. Quartz resonator instabilities under cryogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbe, Philippe; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Grop, Serge; Dubois, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    The phase noise of a quartz crystal resonator working at liquid helium temperatures is studied. Measurement methods and the device environment are explained. The phase noise is measured for different resonance modes, excitation levels, amount of operating time, device orientations in relation to the cryocooler vibration axis, and temperatures. Stability limits of a frequency source based on such devices are evaluated in the present measurement conditions. The sources of phase flicker and white noises are identified. Finally, the results are compared with previous works.

  11. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  12. Suspended polymer nanobridge on a quartz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Seongjae; Yim, Changyong; Jung, Namchul; Thundat, Thomas; Jeon, Sangmin

    2013-07-01

    A chemical vapor sensor based on a free-standing polystyrene (PS) nanofilm suspended between the tines of a quartz tuning fork (QTF) is demonstrated. Exposure to ethanol vapor decreased the modulus of the PS membrane, which resulted in a decrease in the resonance frequency of the QTF as a function of ethanol concentration. The suspended PS membrane structure on the QTF allowed gas molecules to diffuse into the membrane from both the top and bottom allowing faster response. The QTF response time was found to be 6.5 times faster than the response time of a conventional PS film-coated resonator sensor.

  13. Environmental sensitivities of quartz crystal oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Fred L.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency, amplitude, and noise of the output signal of a quartz crystal controlled oscillator is affected by a large number of environmental effects. The physical basis for the sensitivity of precision oscillators to temperature, humidity, pressure, vibration, magnetic field, electric field, load, and radiation is discussed. The sensitivity of crystal oscillators to radiation is a very complex topic and poorly understood. Therefore only a few general results are mentioned. The sensitivity to most external influences often varies significantly from one oscillator type to another and from one unit of given type to another. For a given unit, the sensitivity to one parameter often depends on the value of other parameters and history.

  14. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  15. Radiation resistance of quartz glass for VUV discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, A.; Kühn, B.; Arnold, E.; Schilling, F.-J.; Witzke, H.-D.

    2005-09-01

    Electrically-fused quartz glass, flame-fused quartz glass and plasma-fused quartz glass as well as synthetic fused silica samples were irradiated stepwise with a high energy Xe barrier discharge excimer lamp at 172 nm. VUV spectra were measured before and after every irradiation step. The results show that the VUV transmittance and the resistance against high energy radiation strongly depend on the quartz glass type, as well as on the thermal pretreatment of the quartz glass samples. In electrically-fused and plasma-fused quartz glass the VUV transmission decreases by the formation of oxygen deficiency and E' centres with absorption bands at 163 nm and 215 nm. Best irradiation resistance is found in synthetic fused silica and in thermally treated flame-fused quartz glass. Photoluminescence spectra measured under excitation with a KrF excimer laser before and after irradiation indicate fundamental differences in the SiO2 network structure of the different quartz glass types. Whereas a poor radiation resistance correlates with a blue photoluminescence band at 390 nm, the photoluminescence of flame-fused quartz glass changes from blue to green by a thermal treatment which is correlated with a significant improvement of radiation resistance. A simplified model is presented referring to hydride and oxygen deficiency centres as precursors to colour centre formation in different types of quartz glass.

  16. A new technique for complete portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Song, Sanghyun; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Shin, Milljae; Kim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Sanghoon; Moon, Hyung Hwan; Park, Jae Berm; Kim, Sung Joo; Joh, Jae-Won; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2014-02-01

    We describe a deceased-donor liver transplant recipient with grade 3 complete portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thromboses, which was successfully managed with an extensive thrombectomy through the venotomy site of superior mesenteric vein. In this case report, we suggest our method as an option for grade 3 portal vein thromboses, and discuss other options available for recipients with portal vein thromboses.

  17. Deformation of ⊥m single quartz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasner, P.; Holyoke, C. W., III; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The rheology of quartz deformed by dislocation creep is essential to understanding the strength of the mid to lower continental crust. Our current understanding of quartz rheology is derived primarily from studies of polycrystalline quartz and little is known about the temperature, strain rate, or water dependence of the individual quartz slip systems. In order to better understand the rheology of quartz slip systems, we have deformed synthetic quartz single crystals with the prism oriented at 45° to the compression direction (⊥m orientation). We converted the gel-type water found in synthetic quartz crystals to free water fluid inclusions, similar to water observed in milky quartz crystals, by annealing the crystals at 900°C/0.1 MPa for 24 hours. The single crystals were deformed at a confining pressure of 1.5 GPa with temperatures of 850 to 1000°C and strain rates of 10-6 to 10-4/s. FTIR measurements of water concentrations in the starting material, annealed synthetic crystals and deformed synthetic quartz crystals indicate that the water concentrations (125-300 H/106Si) are not affected by the annealing process or deformation. However, the spectra in the annealed and deformed samples are similar to those of natural milky quartz rather than those of synthetic quartz. Results of temperature and strain rate stepping experiments indicate that the strength of the crystals decreases with increasing temperature and/or decreasing strain rate. Undulatory extinction is the predominant microstructure observed in deformed samples, which is consistent with deformation by dislocation creep. The strength of the ⊥m oriented quartz crystals deformed in this study with free water is greater than those of the studies of synthetic quartz with gel type water (Linker and Kirby, 1981 and Muto et al., 2011).

  18. Improving the management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Lane, Tristan R A; Davies, Alun H

    2013-01-01

    Up to 30% of the UK population are affected by varicose veins. They are a manifestation of increased venous pressure in the lower limb caused by impaired venous return. Primary varicosities result from poor drainage from the superficial to the deep venous system. Secondary varicosities arise as a result of underlying pathology impeding venous drainage, such as deep venous thrombosis or increased intra-abdominal pressure caused by a mass, pregnancy or obesity. Patients with bleeding varicose veins should be referred to a vascular service immediately. Referral is also indicated in the following cases: symptomatic primary or recurrent varicose veins; lower limb skin changes thought to be caused by chronic venous insufficiency; superficial vein thrombosis and suspected venous incompetence; a venous leg ulcer or healed venous leg ulcer. Imaging is crucial in the assessment of the superficial and deep venous system to enable assessment of venous competence. The gold standard imaging technique is colour duplex ultrasonography. Duplex ultrasound should be used to confirm the diagnosis of varicose veins and the extent of truncal reflux, and to plan treatment for patients with suspected primary or recurrent varicose veins. Superficial vein ligation, phlebectomy and stripping have been the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, new techniques have been developed that are minimally invasive, enabling treatment of superficial venous incompetence with reduced morbidity. NICE recommends that endothermal ablation, in the form of radiofrequency or laser treatment, should be offered as treatment for patients with confirmed varicose veins and truncal reflux.

  19. Pancreatic pseudocyst rupture into the portal vein.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Brian C; Kasa, David; Mazer, Mark A

    2009-07-01

    A patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst rupture into the portal vein with a resultant noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome and subsequent portal vein thrombosis diagnosed by computed tomography and ultrasonography is reported. A review of the existing English literature on this rare complication is also provided. PMID:19561436

  20. Hydrothermal vents is Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Pflumio, C.; Castrec, M.

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 {degrees}C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza, active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO{sub 3}-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO{sub 3} thermal fluids form lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch of the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction of 219 and 179 {degrees}C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130{degrees}N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north-south major rift trend. The sources of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Element transport in veins during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Beard, J. S.; Caddick, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks has wide ranging implications for the petrology, rheology, and petrophysical properties of the oceanic lithosphere. During hydration of the peridotite, fluid-rock ratios and temperature control mineral formation in the veins. We studied a partly serpentinized peridotite from the Santa Elena ophiolite complex in Costa Rica and tracked element mobility during water-rock interaction. Serpentinization of the studied harzburgite is around 30 to 40%, with serpentinization of olivine being more advanced than serpentinization of orthopyroxene. Element mapping and point analyses show that the veins preserve characteristic element distributions within orthopyroxene and olivine, and with distance to orthopyroxene-hosted serpentine veins. With increasing distance from the orthopyroxene the following vein assemblages were observed in olivine: pure serpentine veins, serpentine + brucite veins, serpentine + brucite + magnetite veins. Veins are enriched in SiO2 in the proximity of orthopyroxene suggesting that a net transfer of SiO2 takes place from serpentinizing orthopyroxene to olivine. The magnetite-bearing serpentine veins mostly consist of Mg-rich serpentine (Mg# = 90 - 95) and Fe-rich brucite (Mg# = 70 - 75) finely intergrown. In contrast, the center of these veins contains a thin zone of high-Mg serpentine (Mg# 97), and high-Mg brucite (Mg# 92 - 94) next to magnetite. We infer from thermodynamic calculations that these mineral assemblages are controlled by H2O activity and low SiO2 activities. Within orthopyroxene, serpentine (Mg# = 84 - 89) with an elevated Al2O3 content (< 4.14wt.%) was detected, but talc was absent, indicating net loss of SiO2 from orthopyroxene during serpentinization. CaO and Al2O3 migrate from orthopyroxene, but occur only as trace components in serpentine at > 100 μm and > 200 μm, respectively, from the orthopyroxene. We infer that brucite is not stable in close proximity to orthopyroxene due to elevated SiO2

  2. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  3. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management.

  4. [Trapped popliteal vein and artery].

    PubMed

    Allal, J; Gallimard, J F; Goubbault, F; Lelong, J; Barbier, J; Barraine, R

    1986-03-01

    A report is made of 3 observations of vascular constrictions in the knee hollow of three young adults: two constrictions of the popliteal artery, one by abnormal insertion of a tendon of the gastrocnemius muscle and of the arterial passage, the other by a fibrous band surrounding the artery. In one observation, the disorder was revealed by acute ischemia of one limb. The third observation was of a sural phlebitis with secondary repetition at the constriction of the popliteal vein by Soleaire's arcade. In all cases examination using the Doppler effect, in baseline and especially dynamic position, gives a diagnosis and allows postoperative monitoring. Bilateral arteriography, both static and dynamic, allows a precise diagnosis to be given and reveals the extent of vascular lesions, which conditions the operative technique. Treatment is always surgical, with exploration of the contralateral side if a constriction is suspected, even if it is asymptomatic. PMID:3707018

  5. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199??C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The ??18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, ??-cristobalite, and ??-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8???. About one third of the silica 7samples have ??18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7???) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have ??18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9???) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with deposition

  6. Universal elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability in α-quartz and quartz homeotypes under pressure.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juncai; Zhu, Hailiang; Chen, Dongliang

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental property of pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) in ice and ice-like materials (notably α-quartz), the occurrence of mechanical instability can be related to violation of Born criteria for elasticity. The most outstanding elastic feature of α-quartz before PIA has been experimentally reported to be the linear softening of shear modulus C44, which was proposed to trigger the transition through Born criteria B3. However, by using density-functional theory, we surprisingly found that both C44 and C66 in α-quartz exhibit strong nonlinearity under compression and the Born criteria B3 vanishes dominated by stiffening of C14, instead of by decreasing of C44. Further studies of archetypal quartz homeotypes (GeO2 and AlPO4) repeatedly reproduced the same elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability, suggesting a universal feature of this family of crystals and challenging the long-standing idea that negative pressure derivatives of individual elastic moduli can be interpreted as the precursor effect to an intrinsic structural instability preceding PIA. The implications of this elastic anomaly in relation to the dispersive softening of the lowest acoustic branch and the possible transformation mechanism were also discussed. PMID:26099720

  7. Universal elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability in α-quartz and quartz homeotypes under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Juncai; Zhu, Hailiang; Chen, Dongliang

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental property of pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) in ice and ice-like materials (notably α-quartz), the occurrence of mechanical instability can be related to violation of Born criteria for elasticity. The most outstanding elastic feature of α-quartz before PIA has been experimentally reported to be the linear softening of shear modulus C44, which was proposed to trigger the transition through Born criteria B3. However, by using density-functional theory, we surprisingly found that both C44 and C66 in α-quartz exhibit strong nonlinearity under compression and the Born criteria B3 vanishes dominated by stiffening of C14, instead of by decreasing of C44. Further studies of archetypal quartz homeotypes (GeO2 and AlPO4) repeatedly reproduced the same elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability, suggesting a universal feature of this family of crystals and challenging the long-standing idea that negative pressure derivatives of individual elastic moduli can be interpreted as the precursor effect to an intrinsic structural instability preceding PIA. The implications of this elastic anomaly in relation to the dispersive softening of the lowest acoustic branch and the possible transformation mechanism were also discussed. PMID:26099720

  8. Universal elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability in α-quartz and quartz homeotypes under pressure.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juncai; Zhu, Hailiang; Chen, Dongliang

    2015-06-23

    As a fundamental property of pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) in ice and ice-like materials (notably α-quartz), the occurrence of mechanical instability can be related to violation of Born criteria for elasticity. The most outstanding elastic feature of α-quartz before PIA has been experimentally reported to be the linear softening of shear modulus C44, which was proposed to trigger the transition through Born criteria B3. However, by using density-functional theory, we surprisingly found that both C44 and C66 in α-quartz exhibit strong nonlinearity under compression and the Born criteria B3 vanishes dominated by stiffening of C14, instead of by decreasing of C44. Further studies of archetypal quartz homeotypes (GeO2 and AlPO4) repeatedly reproduced the same elastic-hardening-driven mechanical instability, suggesting a universal feature of this family of crystals and challenging the long-standing idea that negative pressure derivatives of individual elastic moduli can be interpreted as the precursor effect to an intrinsic structural instability preceding PIA. The implications of this elastic anomaly in relation to the dispersive softening of the lowest acoustic branch and the possible transformation mechanism were also discussed.

  9. [SUBFASCIAL ENDOSCOPIC PERFORATOR VEIN SURGERY IN THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Atsushi; Masaki, Hisao; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2015-05-01

    Surgical treatment of severe varicose veins (CEAP classification : C4b-C6) should involve not only interruption of incompetent superficial veins to prevent venous regurgitation due to valve incompetence but also interruption of incompetent perforator veins. Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS) is performed via a small skin incision and involves interruption of perforator veins by the insertion of an endoscope into the subfascial space. SEPS produces good surgical outcomes: it is accurate in detecting and transecting perforator veins; has a low frequency of surgical wound complications; prevents lipodermatosclerosis and formation of pigmented skin lesions; and is minimally invasive compared with Linton's operation. Thus, SEPS is an excellent procedure for patients with incompetent perforator veins. SEPS has been covered by the Japanese national health insurance system since April 2014, and it is expected that SEPS will be further developed and become more widespread in use. PMID:26281656

  10. Shock characterization of quartz phenolic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Goal was to obtain dynamic mechanical property data on a quartz phenolic (abbreviated QP) composite. Shock loading and shock release measurements have been conducted using impact techniques utilizing both a light-gas gun and a powder gun at impact pressures up to 20 GPa. The primary diagnostic tool used was a velocity interferometer. The data analysis includes Hugoniot measurements to give both pressure-particle velocity and shock velocity-particle velocity relationships; spall measurements to determine the fracture stress at which the material spells; and attenuation measurements to determine the shock attenuation with material thickness. The QP Hugoniot relationship was found to be significantly different than that of a phenolic without a filler material indicating that the impedance of the QP used in this investigation was higher. The spall strength was measured to be {approximately}0.075 GPa, similar to nonfilled phenolic, which indicated that the presence of quartz fibers was not contributing to the fracture strength. The material was found to attenuate an imposed shock of approximately 6.3 GPa pressure and 0.18 {mu}s to 50% of the initial impact value after a propagation distance of 7mm.

  11. Insitu Calibration of Quartz Crystal Microbalances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, Keith; Burns, Dewit

    2006-01-01

    Computer models that predict the rate at which molecular contamination will deposit on optical surfaces typically use outgassing source terms, measured with quartz crystal microbalances, as a basis for the prediction. The American Society of Testing and Materials, Standard Test Method for Contamination Outgassing Characteristics of Spacecraft Materials (Method E-1559), is probably the best know technique used by the aerospace community to measure the outgassing rates or source terms of materials. A simple method for the insitu calibration of quartz crystal microbalances, based on the heat of enthalphy of Adipic Acid, has been developed and demonstrated by the Marshall Space Flight Center, Environmental Effects Group. The calibration has been demonstrated over a sample temperature range of 25 to 66 degrees Celsius and deposition rates of 7 x 10 (exp -11) grams/cm(sup 2)-s and greater, for several measurement system configurations. This calibration technique is fully compatible with the American Society for Testing and Materials, Method E-1559, as well as other methodology. The calibration requires no modification of outgassing facilities employing an effusion cell and does not degrade the performance or function of typical vacuum systems.

  12. Geology and uranium evaluation of the precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Needle Mountains, Southwest Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.; Tyler, N.; Gross, A.S.; Campo, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Needle Mountains of southwest Colorado are present in the Vallecito Conglomerate and the basal conglomerate of Uncompahgre Formation. Three conglomerates have lithologic, sedimentologic and mineralogic characteristics that are similar to those of the Precambrian uranium-bearing fossil placer deposits of the Witwatersrand in South Africa and the Blind River Elliot Lake district in Ontario, Canada. However, the Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates of Colorado do not contain the key indicator minerals of primary detrital pyrite, uraninite, and other uranium mineral species. The absence of these minerals and the structural and stratigraphic relations of these two formations suggest that they were deposited between 1780 and 1460 million years ago. These formations are, therefore, not old enough to have been deposited under the reducing atmospheric conditions thought to be necessary for the formation of placer uranium deposits. The average uranium content of the Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates sampled is 2.9 ppM based on analyses of 502 rock samples. Maximum values for uranium (total by neutron activation are 11 ppM for the Vallecito Conglomerate and 5.0 ppM for the basal part of the Uncompahgre Formation. The Vallecito Conglomerate contains on the average 1.2 ppM total uranium and the Uncompahgre Formation contains 1.2 ppM total uranium. These low values further indicate the low potential of these quartz-pebble conglomerates as fossil-placer uranium deposit. Uranium contents of up to 330 ppM were found in dark slates of the Uncompahgre Formation; however, these units were not closely associated with the pebble conglomerates. Some potential uranium targets of vein type and in black pelitic units are found in the Uncompahgre Formation, but these are not the fossil-placer quartz-pebble conglomerate type of deposits.

  13. Cyclic development of igneous features and their relationship to high-temperature hydrothermal features in the Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carten, R.B.; Geraghty, E.P.; Walker, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit was formed by the superposition of coupled alteration and mineralization events, of varying intensity and size, that were associated with each of at least 11 intrusions. Deposition of molybdenite was accompanied by time-equivalent silicic and potassic alteration. High-temperature alteration and mineralization are spatially and temporally linked to the crystallization of compositionally zoned magma in the apex of stocks. Differences in hydrothermal features associated with each intrusion (e.g., mass of ore, orientation and type of veins, density of veins, and intensity of alteration) correlate with differences in primary igneous features (e.g., composition, texture, morphology, and size). The systematic relations between hydrothermal and magmatic features suggest that primary magma compositions, including volatile contents, largely control the geometry, volume, level of emplacement, and mechanisms of crystallization of stocks. These elements in turn govern the orientations and densities of fractures, which ultimately determine the distribution patterns of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. -from Authors

  14. Conditions for veining in the Barrandian Basin (Lower Palaeozoic), Czech Republic: evidence from fluid inclusion and apatite fission track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchy, V.; Dobes, P.; Filip, J.; Stejskal, M.; Zeman, A.

    2002-04-01

    The interplay between fracture propagation and fluid composition and circulation has been examined by deciphering vein sequences in Silurian and Devonian limestones and shales at Kosov quarry in the Barrandian Basin. Three successive vein generations were recognised that can be attributed to different stages of a basinal cycle. Almost all generations of fracture cements host abundant liquid hydrocarbon inclusions that indicate repeated episodes of petroleum migration through the strata during burial, tectonic compression and uplift. The earliest veins that propagated prior to folding were displacive fibrous "beef" calcite veins occurring parallel to the bedding of some shale beds. Hydrocarbon inclusions within calcite possess homogenisation temperatures between 58 and 68 °C and show that the "beef" calcites originated in the deeper burial environment, during early petroleum migration from overpressured shales. E-W-striking extension veins that postdate "beef" calcite formed in response to Variscan orogenic deformations. Based on apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) data and other geological evidence, the veins probably formed 380-315 Ma ago, roughly coinciding with peak burial heating of the strata, folding and the intrusion of Variscan synorogenic granites. The veins that crosscut diagenetic cements and low-amplitude stylolites in host limestones are oriented semi-vertically to the bedding plane and are filled with cloudy, twinned calcite, idiomorphic smoky quartz and residues of hardened bitumen. Calcite and quartz cements contain abundant blue and blue-green-fluorescing primary inclusions of liquid hydrocarbons that homogenise between 50 and 110 °C. Geochemical characteristics of the fluids as revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, particularly the presence of olefins and parent aromatic hydrocarbons (phenonthrene), suggest that the oil entrapped in the inclusions experienced intense but geologically fast heating that resulted in thermal pyrolysis

  15. Fluid inclusions in microstructures of shocked quartz from the Keurusselkä impact site, Central Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutiainen, Matti; Heikkilä, Pasi

    2013-06-01

    Granitoid rock samples from the assumed center of the Keurusselkä impact site were subjected to a systematic study of fluid-inclusion compositions and densities in various microstructures of the shocked quartz. The results are consistent with the following impact-induced model of formation. After cessation of all major regional tectonic activity and advanced erosional uplift of the Fennoscandian shield, a meteorite impact (approximately 1.1 Ga) caused the formation of planar fractures (PFs) and planar deformation features (PDFs) and the migration of shock-liberated metamorphic fluid (CO2 ± H2O) to the glass in the PDFs. Postimpact annealing of the PDFs led to the formation of CO2 (±H2O) fluid-inclusion decorated PDFs. The scarce fluid-inclusion implosion textures (IPs) suggest a shock pressure of 7.6-10 GPa. The postimpact pressure release and associated heating initiated hydrothermal activity that caused re-opening of some PFs and their partial filling by moderate-salinity/high temperature (>200 °C) H2O (+ chlorite + quartz) and moderate-density CO2. The youngest postimpact endogenic sub- and nonplanar microfractures (MFs) are characterized by low-density CO2 and low-salinity/low-temperature (<200 °C) H2O.

  16. Hydrothermal fluids responsible for the formation of precious minerals in the Nigerian Younger Granite Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaa, S. I.

    1991-04-01

    Preliminary investigations in the Younger Granite Province of Nigeria have revealed that precious and semi-precious minerals like rubies, sapphires, emeralds, aquamarine, zircon and fluorite can be found in the region. The gem minerals are shown to have been produced either by direct deposition along fissures, veins and greisens by hydrothermal fluids or as a result of hydrothermal fluids reacting with wall-rocks. These wall rocks are either biotite granites from which the hydrothermal fluids originated or basement rocks or any other rocks which the biotite granites intrude and their residual hydrothermal fluids have invaded. The hydrothermal fluids appear to have been rich in alkalis (Na+, K+, etc.), rare elements (Be, Zr, F, REE, etc.) and siliceous. As these fluids rose through fractures and channel ways through the rocks, they either deposited the gem minerals in the fractures at the appropriate stability conditions or reacted with the wall-rocks producing the gem minerals at the expense of elements like Ca and A1 in the minerals of these rocks.

  17. Fluid source and pressure temperature conditions of high-salinity fluids in syn-tectonic veins from the Northeastern Apuan Alps (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Carosi, Rodolfo; Dini, Andrea; Genovesi, Marianna

    Structural studies on syn-tectonic veins cropping out in the northeastern sector of the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex (Northern Apennines, Italy) revealed two sets of veins: (1) type A fibrous veins within the “Scisti sericitici Formation”, related to a late-D1 tectonic phase; (2) B-veins, within the “Diaspri Formation” that developed between late-D1 and D2 tectonic phases. The mineralogy of the A (quartz, chlorite, hematite with minor amounts of apatite, allanite-(Ce), thorite and synchysite) and B-veins (quartz only) reflects the mineralogical composition of the host-rocks: quartz, chlorite, white mica and accessory minerals (apatite, zircon, titanite) occur in the “Scisti sericitici Formation”, while quartz is the main phase in the “Diaspri Formation”. The study of fluid inclusions trapped in quartz crystals of the syn-tectonic veins shows that the inclusions are always oversaturated in NaCl at room temperature and their salinities range from 29.5 to 37 wt.% NaCl equiv. The isochore of the earliest trapped fluid inclusions (type IA; primary inclusions in fiber quartz of A veins), coupled with mineralogical geothermometric data, constrains the pressure-temperature conditions to around 325-300 MPa and 370-380 °C during the late-D1 phase. Subsequent trapping of inclusion types IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB and VB in the two vein sets probably occurred during a pressure-temperature decrease (down to 220-245 MPa and 260-270 °C) at a lithostatic thermal gradient of 30 °C/km. Type IVB inclusions, on the other hand, were probably trapped at lower pressure (between lithostatic and hydrostatic conditions) during a transient pressure drop resulting from fault-valve action. SEM/EDS analyses on salts precipitated within opened inclusions confirmed the NaCl-rich compositions of the trapped fluids and also revealed the presence of minor amounts of Ca, K and Mn in the salts. A fluid circulation model, based on mineralogical and fluid inclusion data, was proposed for

  18. Active feedback cooling of massive electromechanical quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, Junghoon; Lee, Manhee; Stambaugh, Corey; Bak, Wan; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-08-15

    We present a general active feedback cooling scheme for massive electromechanical quartz resonators. We cool down two kinds of macrosized quartz tuning forks and find several characteristic constants for this massive quartz-resonator feedback cooling, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. When combined with conventional cryogenic techniques and low-noise devices, one may reach the quantum sensitivity for macroscopic sensors. This may be useful for high sensitivity measurements and for quantum information studies.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: cultured quartz crystal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article presents information on cultured quartz crystals, a mineral used in mobile phones, computers, clocks and other devices controlled by digital circuits. Cultured quartz, which is synthetically produced in large pressurized vessels known as autoclaves, is useful in electronic circuits for precise filtration, frequency control and timing for consumer and military use. Several ingredients are used in producing cultured quartz, including seed crystals, lascas, a solution of sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate, lithium salts and deionized water.

  20. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1996-11-19

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer is disclosed comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. 5 figs.

  1. Cathodoluminescence of shocked quartz at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Michael R.; Anders, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    Empirical studies have documented an association between rock type and the cathodoluminescence color of constituent quartz grains. Quartz from extrusive igneous sources luminesces uniform pale blue. Quartz from intrusive igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks generally luminesces darker purple-blue, whereas quartz recrystallized under low-grade metamorphic conditions luminesces reddish-brown. Quartz grains in most sandstones luminesce a heterogeneous mixture of these colors because the grains were derived from a variety of ultimate source rocks. If shocked quartz found at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary is volcanic in origin, its cathodoluminescence should be predominantly pale blue. Alternatively, quartz grains derived from bolide impact upon, and ejection of, mixed igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks should luminesce a variety of colors. Grain mounts of sand collected at the K-T boundary horizon from the Clear Creek North site in the Raton Basin, Colorado were examined. Shocked quartz luminesced a variety of colors and very few grains luminesced the pale blue color that is typical of volcanic quartz. It was concluded that the shocked quartz was derived from a petrologically diverse source region without substantial volcanic contribution. Most shocked grains apparently were derived from low-grade metamorphic rocks, with a slightly smaller contribution from high-grade metamorphic and intrusive igneous rocks. Rare quartz grains with brown-luminescing rims reflect a minor addition from detrital sedimentary sources. The apparent relative abundances of intrusive (and rare extrusive) igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary ultimate source rocks suggested by CL colors of shock-deformed quartz at the K-T boundary is consistent with a crustal/supracrustal origin for the grains.

  2. Mineralogy, paragenesis and textures associated with metasomatic- hydrothermal processes, Qatruyeh area, Sanandaj- Sirjan zone, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, S.; Rajabzadeh, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Qatruyeh area is located at about 40 Km northeastern of Neyriz region, in the eastern edge of the high P- Low T metamorphic Zagros orogenic belt. The studied area principally includes outcrops of green schist facies metamorphic rocks that are thrusted over the Neotethyan ophiolites. Hydrothermal activities occurred episodically in the Mesozoic era . The textural relationships, mineral assemblages and X- Ray diffractions have recognized two different stages of hydrothermal alteration during mineralization. The Mineralization was largely controlled by striking faults and host rock layers. Three different types of magnetite are distinguished in microscopic investigation. The First is euhedral to subhedral, partly replacement by martite with exsolved ilmenites. The Second reveals myrmekite like textures and the last type includes layered magnetite. All of the types are related to replacement textures such as psedomorphism, widening of a fracture filling, irregulare or vermicular intergrowths, islands of unreplaced host rock, cusp or caries, nonmatching walls or borders of a fracture and rims of one mineral penetrating another along its crystallographic direction. X- Ray analyses indicate oxide minerals (Magnetite, Hematite, Maghemite, Specularite, Goethite, Limonite and Ilmenite), Silicate minerals (Tourmaline-shorl and dravite-, Epidote, Chlorite, Actinolite, Titanite, Paragonite, Talc, Muscovite and Quartz), Carbonate minerals (Siderite and Malachite) and Sulfide minerals (Pyrite and Chalcopyrite-minor-) as major phases. The mineral paragenesis and textures show two different stages of metasomatic- hydrothermal alteration. The first stage alteration (Sodic- Calsic) accompanying with mineral paragenesis of Magnetite+ Tourmaline+ Titanite+ Paragonite and the second stage of alteration (Solfidation- Oxidation) follows with Magnetite+ Hematite+ Quartz

  3. Adularia in epithermal veins, Queensland: morphology, structural state and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G.; Morrison, G. W.

    1995-02-01

    Four types of adularia (i.e. sub-rhombic, rhombic, tabular and pseudo-acicular) are recognised from examination of samples from ten epithermal vein deposits and prospects in Queensland, based on morphology of the individual crystals. Further investigation of the structural state of adularia reveals that each group has some specific features in terms of the degree of Al/Si disordering, which can be related to various crystallisation conditions and the thermal history. Sub-rhombic adularia is commonly 2 4 mm in size and subhedral with more or less rhombic outlines, and has a relatively ordered Al/Si distribution (2t1 > 0.84), reflecting slow crystallisation conditions. Adularia of this type, in association with coarse-grained quartz, is predominant at deep levels of epithermal systems where boiling is initiated in an environment of low permeability and the fluid is slightly supersaturated with respect to adularia and quartz. Tabular adularia, characterised by its lath-shape and disordered structure (2t1 values ranging from 0.64 to 0.74), is likely to have formed when the fluid moves up to a more permeable environment and starts boiling violently. Relatively high temperatures and rapidly changing conditions account for its special morphology and disordered structure. Rhombic adularia, showing very small crystal size (< 0.2 mm) with euhedral rhombic form, has an intermediate degree of Al/Si ordering. Pseudo-acicular adularia is interpreted as pseudomorphs after carbonate, and its high Al/Si ordered structure is attributed to the presence of a carbonate precursor. These two types of adularia commonly occur within crustiform and colloform bands in association with high grade ore, and chalcedony or fine-grained quartz which often displays various recrystallisation textures. It is most likely that adularias of these two types are formed when extensive boiling is protracted. Microprobe analyses indicate the composition of all adularia types close to pure KAlSi3O8. Sericite

  4. Contributed Review: Quartz force sensing probes for micro-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamians, Jean-Ochin; Pham Van, Laurent; Régnier, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    As self-sensing and self-exciting probes, quartz sensors present many advantages over silicon cantilevers for microscopy, micro-robotics, and other micro-applications. Their development and use is further bolstered by the fact that they can be manufactured from common quartz components. This paper therefore reviews applications of the increasingly popular quartz tuning fork probes as force sensors in the literature and examines the options for higher-frequency quartz probes using the other available types of flexional, thickness-shear or length-extensional resonators.

  5. Contributed Review: Quartz force sensing probes for micro-applications.

    PubMed

    Abrahamians, Jean-Ochin; Pham Van, Laurent; Régnier, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    As self-sensing and self-exciting probes, quartz sensors present many advantages over silicon cantilevers for microscopy, micro-robotics, and other micro-applications. Their development and use is further bolstered by the fact that they can be manufactured from common quartz components. This paper therefore reviews applications of the increasingly popular quartz tuning fork probes as force sensors in the literature and examines the options for higher-frequency quartz probes using the other available types of flexional, thickness-shear or length-extensional resonators. PMID:27475541

  6. Pervasive, high temperature hydrothermal alteration in the RN-17B drill core, Reykjanes Geothermal System-Iceland Deep Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Marks, N. E.; Reed, M. H.; Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2010-12-01

    In November 2008, 9.5 m of core were recovered from Reykjanes production well RN-17B at a depth of 2800m. The core consists mainly of hyaloclastite breccias, hetrolithic breccias with clasts of crystalline basalt, and volcaniclastic sandstones/siltstones. Much of the material appears to have been transported and redeposited, but homolithic breccias and hyaloclastites, some with upright flow lobes of basalt with quenched rims, are interpreted to have erupted in situ. Fine-scale features (glass rims, quench crystals, vesicles, phenocrysts) are well preserved, but all lithologies are pervasively hydrothermally altered such that primary clinopyroxene is ubiquitously uralitized and primary plagioclase (An42-80) is replaced by albite and/or more calcic plagioclase. In contrast, cuttings of similar lithologies, recovered by rotary drilling in intervals immediately above and below the core, exhibit much lesser degrees of hydrothermal alteration and commonly contain igneous plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Vitric clasts in the core are recrystallized into aggregates of chlorite and actinolite. In some breccias, cm-scale metadomains are composed of patchy albite or actinolite/magnesiohornblende giving the core a green and white spotted appearance. Minor amounts (<1%) of disseminated pyrite occur throughout the core, but two intervals with more abundant sulfide contain chalcopyrite and sphalerite in addition to pyrite. Amygdales and vugs in the breccias, initially filled with chlorite, actinolite, epidote, and/or albite, have been partly overprinted with hornblende and anorthite. The core is cut in places by < 1 cm- wide veins composed of early epidote + actinolite + titanite and later anorthite + magnesiohornblende/pargasite. Quartz is not present in any alteration domains observed in the core, although it is reported from virtually all of the cutting intervals above and below the cored section. Seawater-basalt reaction calculations suggest that albite formed during early

  7. Hydrothermally prepared inorganic siliceous wastes: Hydrothermal reaction of calcareous and steatite ceramic tile wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Maenami, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takeyuki; Ishida, Hideki

    1996-12-31

    Possibility of solidification of various ceramic wastes by hydrothermal processing was investigated. The starting materials were feldspathic porcelain tile waste, steatite ceramic tile waste, and calcareous ceramic tile waste. These were mixed with CaO so as to obtain a Ca/Si molar ratio of 0.5. After forming, they were cured for 2 to 20 h under the saturated steam pressure at 200{degrees}C. Although the SiO{sub 2} content of these ceramic wastes was about 70 mass% and they contain various alkaline ions and alkaline earth ions, solidified specimens with flexural strength up to 35MPa were obtained. This is within the range of strengths when quartz or fused silica is used as pure SiO{sub 2} sources. Formation of tobermorite, which was detected in all systems after 2 h of curing, was considered to affect the increase of the strength. It was found that there is a possibility of aluminum and alkali ions being included in the structure of the formed tobermorite. In the case of using steatite ceramic tile waste containing Mg, magnesium silicate hydrates were also formed. The modal pore diameter shifted to 0.01 {mu} m with the formation of these hydrates and there was correlation between the flexural strength and the pore size distribution.

  8. Multi-surface Earthquake Rupture Recorded in Pseudotachylyte Vein Geometries, Norumbega Shear Zone, southern Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C.; Rowe, C. D.; Pollock, S. G.; Swanson, M.; Tarling, M.; Backeberg, N. R.; Coulson, S.; Barshi, N.; Bate, C.; Dascher-Cousineau, K.; Scibek, J.; Harrichhausen, N.; Timofeev, A.; Rakoczy, P.; Nisbet, H.; Castro, A.; Smith, H.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture surfaces are typically treated as single rupture planes. However, the observation of four linked, non-parallel to sub-parallel slip surfaces on a mining induced earthquake in 2004 shows that rupture geometries may be more complicated (Heesakkers et al., 2011). Multiple pseudotachylyte-bearing fault surfaces are exposed within a 1.1 km wide mylonite zone of the Paleozoic Norumbega fault system. The pseudotachylytes are present in two juxtaposed mylonite zones: the Ray Corner mylonite and a mylonite derived from Scarboro Formation metavolcanics. The Ray Corner mylonite crosscuts pelitic schists of the Cape Elizabeth Formation, at upper greenschist-facies conditions (quartz + feldspar + chlorite + muscovite ± titanite ± pyrite). The pseudotachylyte veins formed late in the deformational history, during a period of predominantly brittle dextral offset. The pseudotachylytes are cryptocrystalline and have rounded porphyroclasts of quartz and feldspar. Microstructural observations show evidence for static and dynamic recrystallization overprinting the primary quench textures, suggesting that previous generations of rupture surfaces have been recycled into the mylonitic fabric (Price et al., 2012). Many of the pseudotachylyte veins have a sharp boundary on one side and are poorly defined on the other, providing insight to the propagation direction. This confirms that the paleo-earthquake ruptures occurred at conditions where quartz and feldspar were able to deform plastically, near the base of the seismogenic zone. Using differential GPS, we mapped the geometry of pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins, and slip surface intersections. At Ray Corner, there are 7 layer-parallel pseudotachylytes in a 4 m wide zone with linking and subsequent oblique pseudotachylytes. Some intersections between pseudotachylytes are dilational, depending on the intersection angle and relative displacement on the two faults. At these sites, pseudotachylyte melt sourced

  9. Personal authentication through dorsal hand vein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Bin; Hao, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Jen-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Biometric identification is an emerging technology that can solve security problems in our networked society. A reliable and robust personal verification approach using dorsal hand vein patterns is proposed in this paper. The characteristic of the approach needs less computational and memory requirements and has a higher recognition accuracy. In our work, the near-infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is adopted as an input device for capturing dorsal hand vein images, it has the advantages of the low-cost and noncontact imaging. In the proposed approach, two finger-peaks are automatically selected as the datum points to define the region of interest (ROI) in the dorsal hand vein images. The modified two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis, which performs an alternate two-dimensional PCA (2DPCA) in the column direction of images in the 2DPCA subspace, is proposed to exploit the correlation of vein features inside the ROI between images. The major advantage of the proposed method is that it requires fewer coefficients for efficient dorsal hand vein image representation and recognition. The experimental results on our large dorsal hand vein database show that the presented schema achieves promising performance (false reject rate: 0.97% and false acceptance rate: 0.05%) and is feasible for dorsal hand vein recognition.

  10. Preduodenal portal vein in the adult.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, T; Papaziogas, B; Paraskevas, G; Lazaridis, C; Patsas, A

    2000-09-01

    We present three cases of preduodenal portal vein in adult people, which were diagnosed in our department. All of them were identified during elective operation for cholelithiasis, caused some technical difficulties to the performance of the operation, but led to no major intraoperative or postoperative complications. None of them had any preoperative symptoms, which could be related to this anomaly. The preduodenal portal vein is a rare congenital anomaly, which is usually discovered in infants or children due to the obstruction of the duodenum. In adults, it is often asymptomatic, and is usually discovered as an accidental finding during laparotomy for other reason. The postcontrast CT can set the diagnosis, when this anomaly is suspected. Despite its rarity, this anomaly is of great surgical importance, because it can predispose to intraoperative complications including hemorrhage from the abnormal vein, or damage to the biliary tract or the distented duodenum. The anterior position of the portal vein results from the persistence of the ventral anastomosis between the two vitelline veins and the distal portion of the right vitelline vein, with subsequent atrophy of the cranial part of the left vitelline and dorsal anastomotic vein.

  11. Radiological features of azygous vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Moore, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mediastinal masses are most commonly associated with malignancy. Azygous vein aneurysm is a very rare differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass. We report here three cases of azygous vein aneurysm including children and adult patients. In the pediatric patient it was further complicated by thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism. We describe the radiological features on CXR, MRI, CT, PET-CT, US and angiogram and their differential diagnosis. Imaging findings of continuity with azygous vein, layering of contrast medium on enhanced CT and dynamic MRA showing filling of the mass at the same time as the azygous vein without prior enhancement will be strongly suggestive of azygous vein aneurysm with transtracheal ultrasound being the definitive test in these patients. It is important to keep a vascular origin mass in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. Also, in young healthy patients with pulmonary embolism, a vascular etiology such as azygous vein aneurysm should be carefully evaluated. This article will help the clinicians to learn about the imaging features of azygous vein aneurysm on different imaging modalities.

  12. A tectonic model for the spatial occurrence of porphyry copper and polymetallic vein deposits - applications to Central Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, Lawrence J.

    2006-01-01

    A structural-tectonic model, which was developed to assess the occurrence of undiscovered porphyry copper deposits and associated polymetallic vein systems for the Matra Mountains, Hungary, has been expanded here and applied to other parts of central Europe. The model explains how granitoid stocks are emplaced and hydrothermal fluids flow within local strain features (duplexes) within strike-slip fault systems that develop in continental crust above subducting plates. Areas of extension that lack shear at the corners and along the edges of the fault duplexes are structural traps for the granitoid stocks associated with porphyry copper deposits. By contrast, polymetallic vein deposits are emplaced where shear and extension are prevalent in the interior of the duplexes. This model was applied to the Late Cretaceous-age porphyry copper and polymetallic vein deposits in the Banat-Timok-Srednogorie region of Romania-Serbia-Bulgaria and the middle Miocene-age deposits in Romania and Slovakia. In the first area, porphyry copper deposits are most commonly located at the corners, and occasionally along the edges, of strike-slip fault duplexes, and the few polymetallic vein deposits identified are located at interior sites of the duplexes. In the second area, the model accounts for the preferred sites of porphyry copper and polymetallic vein deposits in the Apuseni Mountains (Romania) and central Slovakian volcanic field (Slovakia).

  13. Hand vein recognition based on orientation of LBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Wei; Wu, Xiangqian; Gao, Enying

    2012-06-01

    Vein recognition is becoming an effective method for personal recognition. Vein patterns lie under the skin surface of human body, and hence provide higher reliability than other biometric traits and hard to be damaged or faked. This paper proposes a novel vein feature representation method call orientation of local binary pattern (OLBP) which is an extension of local binary pattern (LBP). OLBP can represent the orientation information of the vein pixel which is an important characteristic of vein patterns. Moreover, the OLBP can also indicate on which side of the vein centerline the pixel locates. The OLBP feature maps are encoded by 4-bit binary values and an orientation distance is developed for efficient feature matching. Based on OLBP feature representation, we construct a hand vein recognition system employing multiple hand vein patterns include palm vein, dorsal vein, and three finger veins (index, middle, and ring finger). The experimental results on a large database demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.