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Sample records for hydroxamic acid inhibition

  1. Hydroxamic Acids in Asymmetric Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst’s center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Due to their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation, which uses titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:23157425

  2. QSAR studies of PC-3 cell line inhibition activity of TSA and SAHA-like hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di-Fei; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul; Lan-Hargest, Hsuan-Yin; Wiech, Norbert L

    2004-02-09

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for a series of new trichostatin A (TSA)-like hydroxamic acids for the inhibition of cell proliferation of the PC-3 cell line have been developed using molecular descriptors from Qikprop and electronic structure calculations. The best regression model shows that the PM3 atomic charge on the carbonyl carbon in the CONHOH moiety(Qco), globularity (Glob), and the hydrophilic component of the solvent-accessible surface area (FISA) describe the IC(50) of 19 inhibitors of the PC-3 cell line with activities ranging over five orders of magnitude with an R(2)=0.92 and F=59.2. This information will be helpful in the further design of novel anticancer drugs for treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases affected by HDAC inhibition.

  3. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  4. Inhibition of potato lipoxygenase by linoleyl hydroxamic acid: kinetic and EPR spectral evidence for a two-step reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A; Reddy, C Channa

    2002-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of an electrophoretically pure potato tuber lipoxygenase (ptLOX) was studied by EPR spectroscopy. An EPR spectrum of the 'native' ptLOX recorded at 4.5+/-0.5 K showed signals of a high-spin (pseudo) axial Fe(3+) with a g-value of approx. 6.3+/-0.1 with a shoulder at g=5.9+/-0.1, and a rhombic Fe(3+) signal at g=4.35+/-0.05. When the enzyme was treated with a 2-fold molar excess of 13(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid [13(S)-HPODE], a 3-fold increase in the integral intensity of the g=6.3 signal was observed, indicating that 25% of the native ptLOX iron was in ferrous state. The positional isomer 9(S)-HPODE caused similar spectral changes. Therefore the catalytic centre of ptLOX appears to accommodate both positional isomers of linoleic acid hydroperoxides in a manner that ensures proper alignment of their hydroperoxy groups with the iron centre of the enzyme. Treatment of the Fe(3+)-ptLOX form with a 3-fold molar excess of linoleyl hydroxamic acid (LHA) completely quenched the g=6.3 signal. Concurrently, a dramatic increase in the signal at g=4.35 was detected, which was attributed to a newly formed LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. The spectral characteristics of the complex are similar to those of a 4-nitrocatechol-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. From these observations, we conclude that LHA did not reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), but rather formed a LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. Formation of such a complex may be responsible for the inhibitory activity of LHA, at least in the initial stages of enzyme inhibition. A prolonged 15 min incubation of the complex at 23+/-1 degrees C led to the partial quenching of the g=4.35 signal. The quenching is attributed to the reduction of Fe(3+)-ptLOX by LHA, with concomitant formation of its oxidation product(s). A kinetic scheme for the inhibition is proposed. PMID:11985498

  5. Solvent extraction of metals with hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Vernon, F; Khorassani, J H

    1978-07-01

    Solvent extraction with hydroxamic acids has been investigated. with comparison of aliphatic and aromatic reagents for the extraction of iron, copper, cobalt and nickel. Caprylohydroxamic acid has been evaluated for use in extraction systems for titanium, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and uranium, both in terms of acidity of aqueous phase and oxidation state of the metal. It has been established that caprylohydroxamic acid in 1-hexanol is a suitable extractant for the removal of titanium(IV), vanadium(V), chromium(VI), molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from 6M hydrochloric acid.

  6. Structural Requirements of HDAC Inhibitors: SAHA Analogs Functionalized Adjacent to the Hydroxamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bieliauskas, Anton V.; Weerasinghe, Sujith V. W.; Pflum, Mary Kay H.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) have emerged as effective therapeutic anti-cancer agents. To better understand the structural requirements of HDAC inhibitors, a small molecule library with a variety of substituents attached adjacent to the metal binding hydroxamic acid of SAHA was synthesized. The presence of a substituent adjacent to the hydroxamic acid led to an 800 to 5000-fold decrease in inhibition compared to SAHA. The observed results have implications for drug design, suggesting that HDAC inhibitors with substituents near the metal binding moiety will have inhibitory activities in the μM rather than nM range. PMID:17307359

  7. New hydroxamic acid derivatives of fluoroquinolones: synthesis and evaluation of antibacterial and anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Rajulu, Gavara Govinda; Bhojya Naik, Halehatty Seephya; Viswanadhan, Abhilash; Thiruvengadam, Jayaraman; Rajesh, Kondodiyil; Ganesh, Sambasivam; Jagadheshan, Hiriyan; Kesavan, Poonimangadu Koppolu

    2014-01-01

    A series of new hydroxamic acid derivatives (6a-f) at C-3 position of fluoroquinolones were designed and synthesized through multistep synthesis. The design concept involved replacement of the 3-carboxylic acid in fluoquinolones with hydroxamic acid as an acid mimicking group. The synthetic work employed in this work provides a good example for the synthesis of pure hydroxamic acid based fluoroquinolones. The synthesized compounds were characterized by (1)H-NMR, electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and IR. The new compounds were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial and anti-proliferative activity. Out of the six derivatives, compound 6e exhibited moderate antibacterial activity by inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MIC: 4.00-8.00 µg/mL). Compounds 6b and 6f displayed good growth inhibition against A549 Lung adenocarcinoma and HCT-116 Colon carcinoma cell lines.

  8. Chemical basis for the phytotoxicity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Héctor R; Villarroel, Elisa; Copaja, Sylvia V; Argandoña, Victor H

    2008-01-01

    Germination inhibition activity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues was measured on lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa). Lipophilicity of the compounds was determined by HPLC. A correlation between lipophilicity values and percentage of germination inhibition was established. A model mechanism of action for auxin was used for analyzing the effect of the substituent at the alpha carbon atom (Ca) on the polarization of hydroxamic and amide functions in relation to the germination inhibition activity observed. Results suggest that the lipophilic and acidic properties play an important role in the phytotoxicity of the compounds. A test with the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was used to evaluate the potential herbicide activity of the hydroxamic acids and acetanilides.

  9. Hydroxamic acid – A novel molecule for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Saha, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxamic acid is a potent moiety not only in the field of cancer therapy but also as a mutagenic agent. Among the various derivatives of hydroxamic acid, SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) is considered as a potent anticancer agent. Scientists from the different corner synthesized different hydroxamic acid moieties with some straight chain oxazole, thiadiazole, biphenyl moieties in the terminal position. Acetylation and deacetylation of histones of the core proteins of nucleosomes in chromatin play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The level of acetylation of histones is established and maintained by two classes of enzymes, histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylases, which have been identified as transcriptional coactivators and transcriptional corepressors, respectively. There is increasing evidence that aberrant histone acetylation has been linked to various malignant diseases. Great efforts are currently underway for the design of more potent and less toxic candidates for the treatment of cancer. In recent years, hydroxamic acid derivatives have attracted increasing attention for their potential as highly efficacious in combating various etiological factors associated with cancer. Our main intention to draw an attention is that this single functional moiety has not only fit in the receptor but also create a diversified activity. PMID:22837956

  10. Copper extraction by fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives synthesized based on palm kernel oil.

    PubMed

    Haron, Jelas; Jahangirian, Hossein; Silong, Sidik; Yusof, Nor Azah; Kassim, Anuar; Moghaddam, Roshanak Rafiee; Peyda, Mazyar; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Amin, Jamileh; Gharayebi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives based on palm kernel oil which are phenyl fatty hydroxamic acids (PFHAs), methyl fatty hydroxamic acids (MFHAs), isopropyl fatty hydroxamic acids (IPFHAs) and benzyl fatty hydroxamic acids (BFHAs) were applied as chelating agent for copper liquid-liquid extraction. The extraction of copper from aqueous solution by MFHAs, PFHAs, BFHAs or IPFHAs were carried out in hexane as an organic phase through the formation of copper methyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-MFHs), copper phenyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-PFHs), copper benzyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-BFHs) and copper isopropyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-IPFHs). The results showed that the fatty hydroxamic acid derivatives could extract copper at pH 6.2 effectively with high percentage of extraction (the percentages of copper extraction by MFHAs, PFHAs, IPFHs and BFHAs were found to be 99.3, 87.5, 82.3 and 90.2%, respectively). The extracted copper could be quantitatively stripped back into sulphuric acid (3M) aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that the copper recovery percentages from Cu-MFHs, Cu-PFHs, Cu-BFHs and Cu-IPFHs are 99.1, 99.4, 99.6 and 99.9 respectively. The copper extraction was not affected by the presence of a large amount of Mg (II), Ni (II), Al (III), Mn (II) and Co (II) ions in the aqueous solution.

  11. Discovery, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of spiropiperidine hydroxamic acid based derivatives as structurally novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Varasi, Mario; Thaler, Florian; Abate, Agnese; Bigogno, Chiara; Boggio, Roberto; Carenzi, Giacomo; Cataudella, Tiziana; Dal Zuffo, Roberto; Fulco, Maria Carmela; Rozio, Marco Giulio; Mai, Antonello; Dondio, Giulio; Minucci, Saverio; Mercurio, Ciro

    2011-04-28

    New spiro[chromane-2,4'-piperidine] and spiro[benzofuran-2,4'-piperidine] hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDAC inhibitors have been identified by combining privileged structures with a hydroxamic acid moiety as zinc binding group. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit nuclear extract HDACs and for their in vitro antiproliferative activity on different tumor cell lines. This work resulted in the discovery of spirocycle 30d that shows good oral bioavailability and tumor growth inhibition in an HCT-116 murine xenograft model.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of fatty hydroxamic acids from triacylglycerides.

    PubMed

    Hoidy, Wisam H; Ahmad, Mansor B; Al-Mulla, Emad A Jaffar; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor azowa Bt

    2010-01-01

    In this study, fatty haydroxamic acids (FHAs), which have biological activities as antibiotics and antifungal, have been synthesized via refluxing of triacylglycrides, palm olein, palm stearin or corn oil with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The products were characterized using the complex formation test of hydroxamic acid group with zinc(I), copper(II) and iron(III), various technique methods including nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Parameters that may affect the conversion of oils to FHAs including the effect of reaction time, effect of organic solvent and effect of hydro/oil molar issue were also investigated in this study. Results of characterization indicate that FHAs were successfully produced from triacylglycrides. The conversion percentages of palm stearin, palm olein and corn oil into their fatty hydroxamic acids are 82, 81 and 78, respectively. Results also showed that hexane is the best organic solvent to produce the FHAs from the three oils used in this study. The optimum reaction time to achieve the maximum conversion percentage of the oils to FHAs was found to be 10 hours for all the three oils, while the optimum molar ration of hydro/to oil was found to be 7:1 for all the different three oils.

  13. Interaction of imidazole containing hydroxamic acids with Fe(III): hydroxamate versus imidazole coordination of the ligands.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Etelka; Bátka, Dávid; Csóka, Hajnalka; Nagy, Nóra V

    2007-01-01

    Solution equilibrium studies on Fe(III) complexes formed with imidazole-4-carbohydroxamic acid (Im-4-Cha), N-Me-imidazole-4-carbohydroxamic acid (N-Me-Im-4-Cha), imidazole-4-acetohydroxamic acid (Im-4-Aha), and histidinehydroxamic acid (Hisha) have been performed by using pH-potentiometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, EPR, ESI-MS, and H1-NMR methods. All of the obtained results demonstrate that the imidazole moiety is able to play an important role very often in the interaction with Fe(III), even if this metal ion prefers the hydroxamate chelates very much. If the imidazole moiety is in alpha-position to the hydroxamic one (Im-4-Cha and N-Me-Im-4-Cha) its coordination to the metal ion is indicated unambiguously by our results. Interestingly, parallel formation of (Nimidazole, Ohydroxamate), and (Ohydroxamate, Ohydroxamate) type chelates seems probable with N-Me-Im-4-Cha. The imidazole is in beta-position to the hydroxamic moiety in Im-4-Aha and an intermolecular noncovalent (mainly H-bonding) interaction seems to organize the intermediate-protonated molecules in this system. Following the formation of mono- and bishydroxamato mononuclear complexes, only EPR silent species exists in the Fe(III)-Hisha system above pH 4, what suggests the rather significant "assembler activity" of the imidazole (perhaps together with the ammonium moiety).

  14. Defining the role of histone deacetylases in the inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis by dietary energy restriction (DER): effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and DER in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N; Thompson, Henry J

    2013-04-01

    Dietary energy restriction (DER) inhibits experimentally induced mammary cancer, an effect accompanied by elevated levels of silent information regulator 2 (SIRT1), a class III histone deacetylase (HDAC). However, the effect of DER on targets of other classes of HDACs has not been reported, a highly relevant issue given evidence that HDAC induction favors the development of cancer and tumor growth. Experiments were carried out to determine whether suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor with broad activity, would affect the anti-cancer activity of DER. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 30/group) were injected with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (50 mg/kg) at 21 days of age and 7 days thereafter were randomized to groups fed: (i) control diet (AIN-93G), (ii) 0.1% SAHA (w/w), (iii) 40% DER, or (iv) 0.1% SAHA + 40% DER. An additional group was fed 0.1% SAHA + 40%DER for 5 weeks and released to control diet for 3 weeks. DER significantly reduced mammary cancer incidence, multiplicity, and cancer burden and prolonged cancer latency (P < 0.01). Cancer inhibition was maintained in SAHA + DER, despite evidence that histone (H2A(Lys9), H2B(Lys5), and H4(Lys5/8/12/16), but not H3(Lys9); P < 0.001) and non-histone protein deacetylation (p53(Lys373) and p53(Lys382); P < 0.001) induced by DER was reversed by SAHA. This indicates that the inhibition of DER of cancer is not dependent on HDAC induction. After releasing rats from DER + SAHA, cancer multiplicity remained lower than control (P < 0.05), consistent with apoptosis-mediated cell deletion. These findings support further investigation of the hypothesis that HDAC induction by DER blunts its anti-carcinogenic impact.

  15. CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR analysis on hydroxamic acid derivatives as urease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer-; Wadood, Abdul; Uddin, Reaz

    2009-02-01

    Urease (EC 3.5.1.5) serves as a virulence factor in pathogens that are responsible for the development of many diseases in humans and animals. Urease allows soil microorganisms to use urea as a source of nitrogen and aid in the rapid break down of urea-based fertilizers resulting in phytopathicity. It has been well established that hydroxamic acids are the potent inhibitors of urease activity. The 3D-QSAR studies on thirty five hydroxamic acid derivatives as known urease inhibitors were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods to determine the factors required for the activity of these compounds. The CoMFA model produced statistically significant results with cross-validated (q(2)) 0.532 and conventional (r(2)) correlation coefficients 0.969.The model indicated that the steric field (70.0%) has greater influence on hydroxamic acid inhibitors than the electrostatic field (30.0%). Furthermore, five different fields: steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, H-bond donor and H-bond acceptor assumed to generate the CoMSIA model, which gave q(2) 0.665 and r(2) 0.976.This model showed that steric (43.0%), electrostatic (26.4%) and hydrophobic (20.3%) properties played a major role in urease inhibition. The analysis of CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided insight into the possible modification of the hydroxamic acid derivatives for improved activity.

  16. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site.

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel hydroxamic acids bearing artemisinin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ha, Vu Thi; Kien, Vu Tuan; Binh, Le Huy; Tien, Vu Dinh; My, Nguyen Thi Thuy; Nam, Nguyen Hai; Baltas, Michael; Hahn, Hyunggu; Han, Byung Woo; Thao, Do Thi; Vu, Tran Khac

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydroxamic acids bearing artemisinin skeleton was designed and synthesized. Some compounds in this series exhibited moderate inhibition against the whole cell HDAC enzymes. Especially, compound 6g displayed potent cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines, including HepG2 (liver cancer), MCF-7 (breast cancer) and HL-60 (leukemia cancer), with IC50 values of 2.50, 2.62 and 1.28μg/mL, respectively. Docking studies performed with two potent compounds 6a and 6g using Autodock Vina showed that both compounds bound to HDAC2 with relatively high binding affinities from -7.1 to 7.0kcal/mol compared to SAHA (-7.4kcal/mol). It was found in this research that most of the target compounds seemed to be more cytotoxic toward blood cancer cells (HL-60) than liver (HepG2), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells.

  18. Synthesis of new glycyrrhetinic acid derived ring A azepanone, 29-urea and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gaware, Rawindra; Khunt, Rupesh; Czollner, Laszlo; Stanetty, Christian; Da Cunha, Thierry; Kratschmar, Denise V; Odermatt, Alex; Kosma, Paul; Jordis, Ulrich; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. Recently, we published a series of hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid showing high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1. Starting from the lead compounds glycyrrhetinic acid and the hydroxamic acid derivatives, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Here we describe novel 29-urea- and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as well as derivatives with the Beckman rearrangement of the 3-oxime to a seven-membered ring, and the rearrangement of the C-ring from 11-keto-12-ene to 12-keto-9(11)-ene. The combination of modifications on different positions led to compounds comprising further improved selective inhibition of 11β-HSD2 in the lower nanomolar range with up to 3600-fold selectivity.

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  20. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of N-Aryl Hydroxamic Acids via Insertion of Arynes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanlan; Geng, Yu; Jin, Zhong

    2016-05-06

    An efficient and transition-metal-free N-arylation of amides via the insertion of arynes into the N-H bonds in the N-alkoxy amides is described. A variety of the reactive functional groups including the reactive aldehyde carbonyl group, furan ring, carbon-carbon double bonds, and free N-H bond of indole are found to be compatible with this process. In particular, the protocol is applicable in the synthesis of structurally diverse N-aryl hydroxamates and hydroxamic acids derived from N-protecting amino acids and peptides. In the presence of multiple amide N-H bonds, the N-arylation reaction can proceed selectively in the N-H bonds of terminal N-OBn amides giving rise to the desired N-aryl hydroxamates.

  1. Preparation of bifunctional isocyanate hydroxamate linkers: Synthesis of carbamate and urea tethered polyhydroxamic acid chelators

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Rasika; Shirley, Jonathan M.; Torres, Emilio; Jacobs, Hollie K.; Gopalan, Aravamudan S.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel bifunctional N-methylhydroxamate-isocyanate linkers 20 and 21 were prepared in good yield and high purity from the corresponding amine salts using a biphasic reaction with phosgene. The facile ring opening reaction of N-Boc lactams using the anion of O-benzylhydroxylamine gave the protected amino hydroxamates 6a and 6c in good yields. The selective methylation of the hydroxamate nitrogen in the presence of the N-Boc group in these intermediates could be readily accomplished. The utility of the linkers was clearly demonstrated by the synthesis of the carbamate-tethered trishydroxamic acid 27 and the urea-tethered 29 PMID:23162172

  2. Salinomycin Hydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structure, and Biological Activity of Polyether Ionophore Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Chygorin, Eduard; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2016-06-09

    The polyether ionophore salinomycin has recently gained attention due to its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cancer stem cells within a number of cancer cell lines. Efficient single step strategies for the preparation of hydroxamic acid hybrids of this compound varying in N- and O-alkylation are presented. The parent hydroxamic acid, salinomycin-NHOH, forms both inclusion complexes and well-defined electroneutral complexes with potassium and sodium cations via 1,3-coordination by the hydroxamic acid moiety to the metal ion. A crystal structure of an cationic sodium complex with a noncoordinating anion corroborates this finding and, moreover, reveals a novel type of hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the head-to-tail conformation that encapsulates the cation analogously to the native structure. The hydroxamic acid derivatives display down to single digit micromolar activity against cancer cells but unlike salinomycin selective reduction of ALDH(+) cells, a phenotype associated with cancer stem cells was not observed. Mechanistic implications are discussed.

  3. Adsorption and self-assembly of octyl hydroxamic acid at a fluorite surface as revealed by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuming; Liu, Jin; Miller, Jan D

    2008-09-15

    In the study described here, the surface structure of a self-assembly octyl hydroxamic acid at a calcium fluoride (CaF(2)) surface is evaluated using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS). Of particular significance are the results that show octyl hydroxamic acid adsorbs at the fluorite surface from octanol solution and has more ordering and molecular conformation than the octyl hydroxamic acid adsorbed from solution. At the fluorite/0.1 M octyl hydroxamic acid octanol solution interface a bilayer-like structure consisting of an octyl hydroxamic acid layer in contact with fluorite and a tilted alcohol layer was observed by SFVS. The alcohol molecules are oriented with respect to the hydroxamic acid monolayer with the OH groups directed towards the bulk alcohol phase and the terminal CH(3) group oriented to face the alkyl chains of the hydroxamic acid monolayer.

  4. Promotion of Germination Using Hydroxamic Acid Inhibitors of 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Sajjad Z.; Chandler, Jake O.; Harrison, Peter J.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Thompson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination and the regulation of ABA biosynthesis has a role in maintenance of seed dormancy. The key rate-limiting step in ABA biosynthesis is catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). Two hydroxamic acid inhibitors of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), D4 and D7, previously found to inhibit CCD and NCED in vitro, are shown to have the novel property of decreasing mean germination time of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds constitutively overexpressing LeNCED1. Post-germination, D4 exhibited no negative effects on tomato seedling growth in terms of height, dry weight, and fresh weight. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seeds containing a tetracycline-inducible LeNCED1 transgene were used to show that germination could be negatively and positively controlled through the chemical induction of gene expression and the chemical inhibition of the NCED protein: application of tetracycline increased mean germination time and delayed hypocotyl emergence in a similar manner to that observed when exogenous ABA was applied and this was reversed by D4 when NCED expression was induced at intermediate levels. D4 also improved germination in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds under thermoinhibitory temperatures and in tomato seeds imbibed in high osmolarity solutions of polyethylene glycol. D4 reduced ABA and dihydrophaseic acid accumulation in tomato seeds overexpressing LeNCED1 and reduced ABA accumulation in wild type tomato seeds imbibed on polyethylene glycol. The evidence supports a mode of action of D4 through NCED inhibition, and this molecule provides a lead compound for the design of NCED inhibitors with greater specificity and potency. PMID:28373878

  5. Synthesis and characterization of two new hydroxamic acids derivatives and their metal complexes. An investigation on the keto/enol, E/Z and hydroxamate/hydroximate forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiguzel, Ekrem; Yilmaz, Fatih; Emirik, Mustafa; Ozil, Musa

    2017-01-01

    2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-acetohydroxamic acid (HL1), 2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-butanohydroxamic acid (HL2) and Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The results of NMR spectra and theoretical calculations showed that the hydroxamic acids were in the keto-E and keto-Z conformations. The elemental analysis and thermal analysis indicated that M:L ratio of the complexes are 1:1 and the spectral analysis confirmed that hydroxamate groups are keto form in the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-butanohydroxamic acid and enol form in the other complexes.

  6. A strategy for the solution-phase parallel synthesis of N-(pyrrolidinylmethyl)hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, M; Flessner, T; Wong, C H

    2000-06-16

    Both five- and six-membered iminocyclitols have proven to be useful transition-state analogue inhibitors of glycosidases. They also mimic the transition-state sugar moiety of the nucleoside phosphate sugar in glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions. Described here is the development of a general strategy toward the parallel synthesis of a five-membered iminocyclitol linked to a hydroxamic acid group designed to mimic the transition state of GDP-fucose complexed with Mn(II) in fucosyltransferase reactions. The iminocyclitol 8 containing a protected hydroxylamine unit was prepared from D-mannitol. The hydroxamic acid moiety was introduced via the reaction of 8 with various acid chlorides. The strategy is generally applicable to the construction of libraries for identification of glycosyltransferase inhibitors.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)-mediated correction of α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bouchecareilh, Marion; Hutt, Darren M; Szajner, Patricia; Flotte, Terence R; Balch, William E

    2012-11-02

    α1-Antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency (α1ATD) is a consequence of defective folding, trafficking, and secretion of α1AT in response to a defect in its interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis machineries. The most common and severe form of α1ATD is caused by the Z-variant and is characterized by the accumulation of α1AT polymers in the endoplasmic reticulum of the liver leading to a severe reduction (>85%) of α1AT in the serum and its anti-protease activity in the lung. In this organ α1AT is critical for ensuring tissue integrity by inhibiting neutrophil elastase, a protease that degrades elastin. Given the limited therapeutic options in α1ATD, a more detailed understanding of the folding and trafficking biology governing α1AT biogenesis and its response to small molecule regulators is required. Herein we report the correction of Z-α1AT secretion in response to treatment with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), acting in part through HDAC7 silencing and involving a calnexin-sensitive mechanism. SAHA-mediated correction restores Z-α1AT secretion and serpin activity to a level 50% that observed for wild-type α1AT. These data suggest that HDAC activity can influence Z-α1AT protein traffic and that SAHA may represent a potential therapeutic approach for α1ATD and other protein misfolding diseases.

  8. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) at subtoxic concentrations increases the adhesivity of human leukemic cells to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Brodská, Barbora; Otevrelová, Petra; Elknerová, Klára; Grebenová, Dana; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2010-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) which is being introduced into clinic for the treatment of hematological diseases. We studied the effect of this compound on six human hematopoietic cell lines (JURL-MK1, K562, CML-T1, Karpas-299, HL-60, and ML-2) as well as on normal human lymphocytes and on leukemic primary cells. SAHA induced dose-dependent and cell type-dependent cell death which displayed apoptotic features (caspase-3 activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation) in most cell types including the normal lymphocytes. At subtoxic concentrations (0.5-1 microM), SAHA increased the cell adhesivity to fibronectin (FN) in all leukemia/lymphoma-derived cell lines but not in normal lymphocytes. This increase was accompanied by an enhanced expression of integrin beta1 and paxillin, an essential constituent of focal adhesion complexes, both at the protein and mRNA level. On the other hand, the inhibition of ROCK protein, an important regulator of cytoskeleton structure, had no consistent effect on SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity. The promotion of cell adhesivity to FN seems to be specific for SAHA as we observed no such effects with other HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A and sodium butyrate).

  9. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, protects dopaminergic neurons from neurotoxin-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, SH; Wu, HM; Ossola, B; Schendzielorz, N; Wilson, BC; Chu, CH; Chen, SL; Wang, Q; Zhang, D; Qian, L; Li, X; Hong, JS; Lu, RB

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Prevention or disease-modifying therapies are critical for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. However, no such intervention is currently available. Growing evidence has demonstrated that administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors ameliorates a wide range of neurologic and psychiatric disorders in experimental models. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) was the first HDAC inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the sole use of cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential new indications of SAHA for therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in in vitro Parkinson's disease models. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mesencephalic neuron–glia cultures and reconstituted cultures were used to investigate neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of SAHA. We measured toxicity in dopaminergic neurons, using dopamine uptake assay and morphological analysis and expression of neurotrophic substances by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time RT PCR. KEY RESULTS In mesencephalic neuron–glia cultures, SAHA displayed dose- and time-dependent prolongation of the survival and protection against neurotoxin-induced neuronal death of dopaminergic neurons. Mechanistic studies revealed that the neuroprotective effects of SAHA were mediated in part by promoting release of neurotrophic factors from astroglia through inhibition of histone deacetylation. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The novel neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of SAHA demonstrated in this study suggest that further study of this HDAC inhibitor could provide a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21726209

  10. Efficient Route to Highly Water-Soluble Aromatic Cyclic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-06

    2-Hydroxyisoquinolin-1-one (1,2-HOIQO) is a new member of the important class of aromatic cyclic hydroxamic acid ligands which are widely used in metal sequestering applications and metal chelating therapy. The first general approach for the introduction of substituents at the aromatic ring of the chelating moiety is presented. As a useful derivative, the highly water-soluble sulfonic acid has been synthesized by an efficient route that allows general access to 1,2-HOQIO 3-carboxlic acid amides, which are the most relevant for applications.

  11. The variable hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440.

    PubMed

    Ejje, Najwa; Soe, Cho Zin; Gu, Jiesi; Codd, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440 revealed a high frequency of gene clusters which code for the biosynthesis of known and novel secondary metabolites. Of these metabolites, bioinformatics analysis predicted that S. tropica CNB-440 could potentially biosynthesize, as high affinity Fe(iii) ligands, siderophores from the hydroxamic acid desferrioxamine class (sid1 gene cluster) and the phenolate-thia(oxa)zoli(di)ne class (sid2 and sid4 gene clusters). In this work, we have used Ni(ii)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) to pre-fractionate the hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of S. tropica CNB-440 from the secondary metabolome, to reveal low abundance siderophores. LC-MS measurements and electronic absorption spectra from purified extracts incubated with exogenous Fe(iii) revealed eight siderophores from the desferrioxamine class (DFOA2, DFOA1a, DFOA1b, DFOB, DFON, DFOD2, DFOE, DFOD1), which included two constitutional isomers (DFOA1a, DFOA1b), and one new siderophore (DFON), the latter which would require assembly from a combination of 1,5-diaminopentane and 1,6-diaminohexane as diamine substrates. Three additional species (m/zobs 496.14, 792.34 and 804.34) with electronic absorption spectra characteristic of complexes formed between Fe(iii) and hydroxamic acid-type siderophores were evident under some conditions. The signal at m/zobs 792.34 eluted in the hydrophobic region of the reverse-phase LC and correlated with a DFOD1 analogue with a C-terminal branched chain fatty acid ([M + K(+)](+)m/zcalc 792.35), which has been previously identified from marine sediment dwelling Micrococcus luteus KLE1011. The S. tropica CNB-440 hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome was modulated by culture conditions (pH 7, 22 °C; pH 7, 28 °C; pH 9, 28 °C) designed to simulate the variable marine environment. An increase in temperature at constant pH value showed increased levels of DFOA2 and DFOA1, and

  12. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for human breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototype of the newly developed, second-generation, hybrid polar compounds. It is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with high potency for inducing cell differentiation of cultured murine erythroleukemia cells. Studies with SAHA have primarily been performed with hematopoietic tumor cells. Here we extent these studies with SAHA to human breast cancer cell lines in an attempt to find better therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435, as well as normal cells, including the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, and fibroblasts, were treated with SAHA. Cells assayed for cell survival by using trypan blue exclusion assay, colony formation assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. The effects of SAHA on cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins were examined by Western blots analysis. The identification of additional target genes was carried out by differential display (DD) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: SAHA inhibited clonogenic growth of MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These cells were more sensitive to SAHA-mediated cytotoxic effects than normal breast epithelial cells and fibroblasts. The cytotoxic effects of SAHA on breast cancer cells were manifested by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. The pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, blocked SAHA-induced cell death, DNA laddering, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of caspases in SAHA-mediated apoptosis. In addition, SAHA modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins. For example, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were induced, and retinoblastoma protein pRb was hypophosphorylated. Moreover, SAHA induced several genes associated with differentiation and/ or growth inhibition. These genes encode gelsolin

  13. A novel hydroxamic acid-containing antibiotic produced by a Saharan soil-living Streptomyces strain.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, A; Meklat, A; Bijani, C; Toumatia, O; Errakhi, R; Lebrihi, A; Mathieu, F; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N

    2015-06-01

    During screening for potentially antimicrobial actinobacteria, a highly antagonistic strain, designated WAB9, was isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria. A polyphasic approach characterized the strain taxonomically as a member of the genus Streptomyces. The strain WAB9 exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity toward various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. A PCR-based assay of genomic potential for producing bioactive metabolites revealed the presence of PKS-II gene. After 6 days of strain fermentation, one bioactive compound was extracted from the remaining aqueous phase and then purified by HPLC. The chemical structure of the compound was determined by spectroscopic (UV-visible, and (1)H and (13)C NMR) and spectrometric analysis. The compound was identified to be 2-amino-N-(2-amino-3-phenylpropanoyl)-N-hydroxy-3-phenylpropanamide, a novel hydroxamic acid-containing molecule. The pure molecule showed appreciable minimum inhibitory concentration values against a selection of drug-resistant bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. Significance and impact of the study: This study presents the isolation of a Streptomyces strain, named WAB9, from a Saharan soil in Algeria. This strain was found to produce a new hydroxamic acid-containing molecule with interesting antimicrobial activities towards various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Although hydroxamic acid-containing molecules are known to exhibit low toxicities in general, only real evaluations of the toxicity levels could decide on the applications for which this new molecule is potentially most appropriate. Thus, this article provides a new framework of research.

  14. A new approach to cyclic hydroxamic acids: Intramolecular cyclization of N-benzyloxy carbamates with carbon nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Jacobs, Hollie K.

    2011-01-01

    N-Alkyl-N-benzyloxy carbamates, 2, undergo facile intramolecular cyclization with a variety of carbon nucleophiles to give functionalized 5- and 6-membered protected cyclic hydroxamic acids, 3, in good to excellent yields. This method can be extended to prepare seven-membered cyclic hydroxamic acids in moderate yields. The sulfone intermediates 3 from this study can be alkylated while the corresponding phosphonates have been shown to undergo HWE reaction. The α,β-unsaturated synthon, 8, prepared by thermal elimination of sulfoxide 3m, undergoes Michael addition with secondary amines. The usefulness of this approach to prepare polydentate chelators has been demonstrated by the synthesis of bis cyclic hydroxamic acids 12, 14, and 15. PMID:21499514

  15. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Saturated N-Heterocycles by Enantioselective Amidation with Chiral Hydroxamic Acids.

    PubMed

    Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-12-20

    The preparation of enantioenriched chiral compounds by kinetic resolution dates back to the laboratories of Louis Pasteur in the middle of the 19th century. Unlike asymmetric synthesis, this process can always deliver enantiopure material (ee > 99%) if the reactions are allowed to proceed to sufficient conversion and the selectivity of the process is not unity (s > 1). One of the most appealing and practical variants is acylative kinetic resolution, which affords easily separable reaction products, and several highly efficient enzymatic and small molecule catalysts are available. Unfortunately, this method is applicable to limited substrate classes such as alcohols and primary benzylamines. This Account focuses on our work in catalytic acylative kinetic resolution of saturated N-heterocycles, a class of molecules that has been notoriously difficult to access via asymmetric synthesis. We document the development of hydroxamic acids as suitable catalysts for enantioselective acylation of amines through relay catalysis. Alongside catalyst optimization and reaction development, we present mechanistic studies and theoretical calculation accounting for the origins of selectivity and revealing the concerted nature of many amide-bond forming reactions. Immobilization of the hydroxamic acid to form a polymer supported reagent allows simplification of the experimental setup, improvement in product purification, and extension of the substrate scope. The kinetic resolutions are operationally straight forward: reactions proceed at room temperature and open to air conditions, without generation of difficult-to-remove side products. This was utilized to achieve decagram scale resolution of antimalarial drug mefloquine to prepare more than 50 g of (+)-erythro-meflqouine (er > 99:1) from the racemate. The immobilized quasienantiomeric acyl hydroxamic acid reagents were also exploited for a rare practical implementation of parallel kinetic resolution that affords both enantiomers of

  16. Betulinic acid derived hydroxamates and betulin derived carbamates are interesting scaffolds for the synthesis of novel cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wiemann, Jana; Heller, Lucie; Perl, Vincent; Kluge, Ralph; Ströhl, Dieter; Csuk, René

    2015-12-01

    The betulinic acid-derived hydroxamates 5-18, the amides 19-24, and betulin-derived bis-carbamates 25-28 as well as the carbamates 31-40 and 44-48 were prepared and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity in a photometric sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay against several human cancer cell lines and nonmalignant mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3). While for 3-O-acetyl hydroxamic acid 5 EC50 values as low as EC50 = 1.3 μM were found, N,O-bis-alkyl substituted hydroxamates showed lowered cytotoxicity (EC50 = 16-20 μM). In general, hydroxamic acid derivatives showed only reduced selectivity for tumor cells, except for allyl substituted compound 13 (EC50 = 5.9 μM for A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells and EC50 > 30 μM for nonmalignant mouse fibroblasts). The cytotoxicity of betulinic acid derived amides 19-24 and of betulin derived bis-carbamates 25-28 was low, except for N-ethyl substituted 25. Hexyl substituted 39 showed EC50 = 5.6 μM (518A2 cells) while for mouse fibroblasts EC50 > 30 was determined.

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acids bearing urea/thiourea unit as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengqing; Bi, Yanjing; He, Yujun; Huang, WenYuan; Liu, Lifei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Sihan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Niefang

    2013-12-01

    A novel class of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acid derivatives containing urea or thiourea unit was designed, synthesized and evaluated as HDAC inhibitors. All tested compounds demonstrated significant HDAC inhibitory activities and anti-proliferative effects against diverse human tumor cell lines. Among them, 7l exhibited most potent pan-HDAC inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 130 nM. It also showed strong cellular inhibition against diverse cell lines including HCT-116, MCF-7, MDB-MB-435 and NCI-460, with GI50 values of 0.35, 0.22, 0.51 and 0.48 μM, respectively.

  18. Production of l-Arginine by Arginine Hydroxamate-Resistant Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kisumi, Masahiko; Kato, Jyoji; Sugiura, Masaki; Chibata, Ichiro

    1971-01-01

    l-Arginine hydroxamate inhibited the growth of various bacteria, and the inhibition was readily reversed by arginine. l-Arginine hydroxamate (10−3m) completely inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis. This inhibitory effect was prevented by 2.5 × 10−4ml-arginine, which was the most effective of all the natural amino acids in reversing the inhibition. l-Arginine hydroxamate-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated and found to excrete l-arginine in relatively high yields. One of the mutants, strain AHr-5, produced 4.5 mg of l-arginine per ml in shaken culture in 3 days. PMID:5002904

  19. Benzothiazole-containing hydroxamic acids as histone deacetylase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Oanh, Dao Thi Kim; Hai, Hoang Van; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Sook; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Hue, Van Thi My; Nam, Nguyen-Hai

    2011-12-15

    Data from clinical studies indicate that inhibitors of Class I and Class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes show great promise for the treatment of cancer. Zolinza (SAHA, Zolinza) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of the cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. As a part of our ongoing effort to identify novel small molecules to target these important enzymes, we have prepared two series of benzothiazole-containing analogues of SAHA. It was found that several compounds with 6C-bridge linking benzothiazole moiety and hydroxamic functional groups showed good inhibition against HDAC3 and 4 at as low as 1 μg/ml and exhibited potent cytotoxicity against five cancer cell lines with average IC(50) values of as low as 0.81 μg/ml, almost equipotent to SAHA.

  20. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  1. Metabolic changes in rat serum after administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and discriminated by SVM.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wu, H; Lin, Z; Su, K; Zhang, J; Sun, F; Wang, X; Wen, C; Cao, H; Hu, L

    2017-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) exerts marked anticancer effects via promotion of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and prevention of oncogene expression. In this study, serum metabolomics and artificial intelligence recognition were used to investigate SAHA toxicity. Forty rats (220 ± 20 g) were randomly divided into control and three SAHA groups (low, medium, and high); the experimental groups were treated with 12.3, 24.5, or 49.0 mg kg(-1) SAHA once a day via intragastric administration. After 7 days, blood samples from the four groups were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and pathological changes in the liver were examined using microscopy. The results showed that increased levels of urea, oleic acid, and glutaconic acid were the most significant indicators of toxicity. Octadecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, glycerol, propanoic acid, and uric acid levels were lower in the high SAHA group. Microscopic observation revealed no obvious damage to the liver. Based on these data, a support vector machine (SVM) discrimination model was established that recognized the metabolic changes in the three SAHA groups and the control group with 100% accuracy. In conclusion, the main toxicity caused by SAHA was due to excessive metabolism of saturated fatty acids, which could be recognized by an SVM model.

  2. Hydroxamic acid derivatives: a promising scaffold for rational compound optimization in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Dayanne da Rocha; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; Rodrigues, Giseli Capaci; de Souza Pereira, Mirian Claudia; Almeida, Igor Rodrigues; de Aguiar, Alcino Palermo; Supuran, Claudiu T; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the antitrypanocidal activity of two hydroxamic acid derivatives containing o-ethoxy (HAD1) and p-ethoxy (HAD2) as substituent in the aromatic ring linked to the isoxazoline ring. HAD1 and HAD2 induced a significant reduction in the number of intracellular parasites and consequently showed activity on the multiplication of the parasite. Treatment of cardiomyocytes and macrophages with the compounds revealed no significant loss in cell viability. Ultrastructural alterations after treatment of cardiomyocytes or macrophages infected by Trypanosoma cruzi with the IC50 value of HAD1 revealed alterations to amastigotes, showing initial damage seen as swelling of the kinetoplast. This gave a good indication of the ability of the drug to permeate through the host cell membrane as well as its selectivity to the parasite target. Both compounds HAD1 and 2 were able to reduce the cysteine peptidases and decrease the activity of metallopeptidases.

  3. Copper (II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution onto fatty hydroxamic acid - Immobilized zeolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhsinun, Sugita, Purwantiningsih; Purwaningsih, Henny

    2017-01-01

    Separation of Cu (II) ion from a mixture containing Zn (II) ion was conducted by solid-liquid extraction method through column chromatography. The column was filled with FHA-ZEO resin. This resin is the result of immobilized fatty hydroxamic acid (FHA) into activated natural zeolite (ZEO) involving as solid phase. Parameters becoming variable were resin mass to concentration ratio and pH of Cu (II) ion solution. The research result shows that optimum condition of Cu (II) ion adsorption was 1 gram resin mass FHA-ZEO to ion Cu (II) solution concentration of 100 ppm with pH value of 5. This Cu (II) ion separation from its mixture containing Zn (II) ion gives Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity of 162.39 mg/g FHA-ZEO in that optimum condition, 4 times higher than Zn (II) ion adsorption with Cu (II) ion recovery of 93,88%.

  4. Sorption of Pb(ll) by poly(hydroxamic acid) grafted oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Haron, M J; Tiansin, M; Ibrahim, N A; Kassim, A; Wan Yunus, W M Z; Talebi, S M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the sorption of Pb(ll) from aqueous solution. Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber was first grafted with poly(methylacrylate) and then treated with hydroxylammonium chloride in alkaline medium to produce hydroxamic acid (PHA) grafted OPEFB. Sorption of Pb(ll) by PHA-OPEFB was maximum at pH 5. The sorption followed the Langmuir model with maximum capacityof 125.0 mg g-1 at 25 degrees C. The sorption process was exothermic, as shown by the negative value of enthalpy change, Delta H0. The free energy change (DeltaG0) for the sorption was negative, showing that the sorption process was spontaneous. A kinetic study showed that the Pb(ll) sorption followed a second order kinetic model.

  5. Clinical experience with the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in patients with relapsed lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, O A

    2006-01-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or SAHA) inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, increases acetylated histones H2a, H2b, H3, and H4, and thereby induces differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of tumour cell lines, including murine erythroleukaemia, human bladder transitional cell carcinoma, and human breast adenocarcinoma. On the basis of these favourable preclinical findings, vorinostat has been selected as a candidate for clinical development with the potential to treat patients with selected malignances, including Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Phase I clinical trials in patients with haematological malignances and solid tumours showed that both intravenous (i.v.) and oral formulations of vorinostat are well tolerated, can inhibit HDAC activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumour tissue biopsies, and produce objective tumour regression and symptomatic improvement with little clinical toxicity. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of i.v. vorinostat were primarily haematologic and were rapidly reversible within 4–5 days of therapy cessation. In contrast, the DLT for oral vorinostat were primarily non-haematologic (including dehydration, anorexia, diarrhoea, fatigue) and were also rapidly reversible, usually within 3 days. Further research is warranted to optimise the dosing schedule for vorinostat, particularly with respect to dose, timing of administration, and duration of therapy, and to fully delineate the mechanism(s) of antitumour effect of vorinostat in various types of malignances. Several phase II studies are currently ongoing in patients with haematological malignances and solid tumours.

  6. Structure of 'linkerless' hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket.

    PubMed

    Tabackman, Alexa A; Frankson, Rochelle; Marsan, Eric S; Perry, Kay; Cole, Kathryn E

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylated lysine side chains in histone and non-histone proteins, and play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. Aberrant HDAC activity is associated with cancer, making these enzymes important targets for drug design. In general, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis, and comprise some of the leading therapies in cancer treatments. To date, four HDACi have been FDA approved for the treatment of cancers: suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, Vorinostat, Zolinza®), romidepsin (FK228, Istodax®), belinostat (Beleodaq®), and panobinostat (Farydak®). Most current inhibitors are pan-HDACi, and non-selectively target a number of HDAC isoforms. Six previously reported HDACi were rationally designed, however, to target a unique sub-pocket found only in HDAC8. While these inhibitors were indeed potent against HDAC8, and even demonstrated specificity for HDAC8 over HDACs 1 and 6, there were no structural data to confirm the mode of binding. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Compound 6 complexed with HDAC8 to 1.98Å resolution. We also describe the use of molecular docking studies to explore the binding interactions of the other 5 related HDACi. Our studies confirm that the HDACi induce the formation of and bind in the HDAC8-specific subpocket, offering insights into isoform-specific inhibition.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of thienopyrimidine hydroxamic acid based derivatives as structurally novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Su, Mingbo; Li, Tingting; Gao, Anhui; Yang, Wei; Sheng, Li; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-10

    New thienopyrimidine hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACs inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated. All compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit recombinant human HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC6 isoforms and in vitro anti-proliferative activity on tumor cell lines RMPI 8226 and HCT 116. Most of these compounds displayed good to excellent inhibitory activities against HDACs. The IC50 values of compound 9m against HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC6 was 29.81 ± 0.52 nM, 24.71 ± 1.16 nM, and 21.29 ± 0.32 nM. Most of these compounds showed strong anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines including RMPI 8226 and HCT 116. The IC50 values of compound 9m against RPMI 8226 and HCT 116 proliferation were 0.97 ± 0.072 μM and 1.01 ± 0.033 μM, respectively. In addition, compound 9m noticeably up-regulated the level of histone H3 acetylation at the low concentration of 0.3 μM.

  8. Probing the "additive effect" in the proline and proline hydroxamic acid catalyzed asymmetric addition of nitroalkanes to cyclic enones.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Govindan, Subramaniyan; Warrier, Jayakumar S

    2005-11-01

    The effect of chirality and steric bulk of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines as additives in the conjugate addition of 2-nitropropane to cyclohexenone, catalyzed by l-proline, was investigated. Neither chirality nor steric bulk affects the enantioselectivity of addition, which gives 86-93% ee in the presence of achiral and chiral nonracemic 2,5-disubstituted piperazines. Proline hydroxamic acid is shown for the first time to be an effective organocatalyst in the same Michael reaction.

  9. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  10. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  11. Synthesis of novel 3-amino and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanetty, Christian; Czollner, Laszlo; Koller, Iris; Shah, Priti; Gaware, Rawindra; Cunha, Thierry Da; Odermatt, Alex; Jordis, Ulrich; Kosma, Paul; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2010-11-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. So far, no selective 11β-HSD2 inhibitor has been developed and neither animal studies nor clinical trials have been reported based on 11β-HSD2 inhibition. Starting from the lead compound glycyrrhetinic acid, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Several hydroxamic acid derivatives showed high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1.

  12. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA)-Induced Dynamics of a Human Histone Deacetylase Protein Interaction Network*

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Smith, Karen T.; Groppe, Brad D.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Saraf, Anita; Egidy, Rhonda; Peak, Allison; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L.; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are targets for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an HDAC inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the Sin3/HDAC complex in cancer, we extended its protein–protein interaction network and identified a mutually exclusive pair within the complex. We then assessed the effects of SAHA on the disruption of the complex network through six homologous baits. SAHA perturbs multiple protein interactions and therefore compromises the composition of large parts of the Sin3/HDAC network. A comparison of the effect of SAHA treatment on gene expression in breast cancer cells to a knockdown of the ING2 subunit indicated that a portion of the anticancer effects of SAHA may be attributed to the disruption of ING2's association with the complex. Our dynamic protein interaction network resource provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of SAHA action and demonstrates the potential for drugs to rewire networks. PMID:25073741

  13. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-induced HeLa cell death is closely correlated with oxidative stress and thioredoxin 1 levels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which has anticancer effects. We evaluated the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA on HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC(50) of approximately 10 µM at 24 h, and induced apoptosis which was accompanied by the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 activation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψ(m)). All the tested caspase inhibitors prevented HeLa cell death induced by SAHA whereas TNF-α intensified apoptotic cell death in SAHA-treated HeLa cells. With respect to ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels, SAHA increased ROS levels, especially mitochondrial O(2)•- in HeLa cells and also induced GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors reduced the levels of ROS and GSH depletion in SAHA-treated HeLa cells whereas TNF-α enhanced the levels in these cells. The well-known antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) attenuated cell death and an increase in ROS levels was caused by SAHA. Moreover, SAHA decreased the levels of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) in HeLa cells. While the downregulation of Trx1 enhanced cell death and ROS levels in SAHA-treated HeLa cells, the overexpression of Trx1 attenuated the levels in these cells. In conclusion, SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cell via caspase-dependent apoptosis, which was influenced by the mitochondrial O(2)•- and Trx1 levels.

  14. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Alleviates Salinity Stress in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Patanun, Onsaya; Ueda, Minoru; Itouga, Misao; Kato, Yukari; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Utsumi, Chikako; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Minoru; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) demand has been rising because of its various applications. High salinity stress is a major environmental factor that interferes with normal plant growth and limits crop productivity. As well as genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance, the use of small molecules is considered as an alternative methodology to modify plants with desired traits. The effectiveness of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for increasing tolerance to salinity stress has recently been reported. Here we use the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to enhance tolerance to high salinity in cassava. Immunoblotting analysis reveals that SAHA treatment induces strong hyper-acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in roots, suggesting that SAHA functions as the HDAC inhibitor in cassava. Consistent with increased tolerance to salt stress under SAHA treatment, reduced Na+ content and increased K+/Na+ ratio were detected in SAHA-treated plants. Transcriptome analysis to discover mechanisms underlying salinity stress tolerance mediated through SAHA treatment reveals that SAHA enhances the expression of 421 genes in roots under normal condition, and 745 genes at 2 h and 268 genes at 24 h under both SAHA and NaCl treatment. The mRNA expression of genes, involved in phytohormone [abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and gibberellin] biosynthesis pathways, is up-regulated after high salinity treatment in SAHA-pretreated roots. Among them, an allene oxide cyclase (MeAOC4) involved in a crucial step of JA biosynthesis is strongly up-regulated by SAHA treatment under salinity stress conditions, implying that JA pathway might contribute to increasing salinity tolerance by SAHA treatment. Our results suggest that epigenetic manipulation might enhance tolerance to high salinity stress in cassava. PMID:28119717

  15. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of Jay Amin hydroxamic acid (JAHA), a ferrocene-based class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, on triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Librizzi, Mariangela; Longo, Alessandra; Chiarelli, Roberto; Amin, Jahanghir; Spencer, John; Luparello, Claudio

    2012-11-19

    The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a class of chemically heterogeneous anticancer agents of which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototypical member. SAHA derivatives may be obtained by three-dimensional manipulation of SAHA aryl cap, such as the incorporation of a ferrocene unit like that present in Jay Amin hydroxamic acid (JAHA) and homo-JAHA [ Spencer , et al. ( 2011 ) ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2 , 358 - 362 ]. These metal-based SAHA analogues have been tested for their cytotoxic activity toward triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. The results obtained indicate that of the two compounds tested, only JAHA was prominently active on breast cancer cells with an IC(50) of 8.45 μM at 72 h of treatment. Biological assays showed that exposure of MDA-MB231 cells to the HDACi resulted in cell cycle perturbation with an alteration of S phase entry and a delay at G(2)/M transition and in an early reactive oxygen species production followed by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation and autophagy inhibition. No annexin binding was observed after short- (5 h) and longer (24 and 48 h) term incubation with JAHA, thereby excluding the promotion of apoptosis by the HDACi. Although caution must be exercised in extrapolation of in vitro results to the in vivo situation for which research on animals and human trials are needed, nevertheless JAHA treatment possesses the potential for its development as an agent for prevention and/or therapy of "aggressive" breast carcinoma, thus prompting us to get more insight into the molecular basis of its antibreast cancer activity.

  17. Ultra-fast photo-patterning of hydroxamic acid layers adsorbed on TiAlN: The challenge of modeling thermally induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemgesberg, Maximilian; Schütz, Simon; Müller, Christine; Schlörholz, Matthias; Latzel, Harald; Sun, Yu; Ziegler, Christiane; Thiel, Werner R.

    2012-10-01

    Long-chain n-alkyl terminated hydroxamic acids (HA) are used for the modification of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) surfaces. HA coatings improve the hydrophobicity of this wear resistant and industrially relevant ceramic. Therefore, HAs with different structural properties are evaluated with respect to their wear resistance and their thermal desorption properties. In order to find new coatings for rewritable offset printing plates, the changes in the surface polarity, composition, and morphology are analyzed by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning force microscopy (SFM), respectively. The results are referenced to the strongly bonding molecule n-dodecyl phosphonate (PO11M), which has been used for surface hydrophobization before but proved difficult to remove due to the high laser outputs required for thermal desorption. It is found that for certain HAs, an equally good hydrophobization compared to PO11M can be achieved. Contact angles obtained for different hydroxamic acid coatings can be correlated to their modes of adsorption. Only for selected HA species, resistance to mechanical wear is sufficient for further investigations. Photo-patterning of these hydroxamic acid layers is achieved using a high energy IR laser beam at different energy inputs. Fitting of the obtained data and further evaluation using finite element analysis (FEM) calculations reveal significantly reduced energy consumption of about 20% for the removal of a specific hydroxamic acid coating from the ceramic surface compared to PO11M.

  18. Pretreatment with anti-oxidants sensitizes oxidatively stressed human cancer cells to growth inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)

    PubMed Central

    Mahlum, Amy; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J.; Guo, Song; Peters, Noel R.; Wilding, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Most prostate, colon and breast cancer cells are resistant to growth inhibitory effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We have examined whether the high oxidative stress in these cells causes a loss of SAHA activity and if so, whether pretreatment with an anti-oxidant can sensitize these cells to SAHA. Methods A DNA-Hoechst dye fluorescence measured cell growth and dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCF-DA) dye fluorescence measured reactive oxygen species (ROS). Growth inhibitory and ROS-generating activities of SAHA in androgen-treated or untreated LNCaP cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, HT-29 and HCT-115 colon cancer cells, MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells with or without pretreatment with an anti-oxidant Vitamin E was determined. SAHA activity against LNCaP cells treated with another anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was also determined. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to determine intracellular SAHA level. Results SAHA treatment markedly inhibits LNCaP cell growth, when the cells are at a low ROS level. SAHA is, however, inactive against the same cell line, when the cells are at a high ROS level. A significant decrease in SAHA level was observed in LNCaP cells with high ROS after 24-and 72-h treatment when compared to cells with low ROS. Vitamin E pretreatment that reduces cellular ROS, synergistically sensitizes oxidatively stressed LNCaP, PC-3, HT-29, HCT-115 and MDA-MB231 cells, but not the A-549 and NCI-H460 cells with low ROS to SAHA. NAC treatment also sensitized androgen-treated LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA. Conclusion Response to SAHA could be improved by combining anti-oxidants such as Vitamin E with SAHA for the treatment of oxidatively stressed human malignancies that are otherwise resistant to SAHA. PMID:20512578

  19. Benzyl and Methyl Fatty Hydroxamic Acids Based on Palm Kernel Oil as Chelating Agent for Liquid-Liquid Iron(III) Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Haron, Md Jelas; Jahangirian, Hossein; Silong, Sidik; Yusof, Nor Azah; Kassim, Anuar; Rafiee-Moghaddam, Roshanak; Mahdavi, Behnam; Peyda, Mazyar; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Amin, Jamileh

    2012-01-01

    Liquid-liquid iron(III) extraction was investigated using benzyl fatty hydroxamic acids (BFHAs) and methyl fatty hydroxamic acids (MFHAs) as chelating agents through the formation of iron(III) methyl fatty hydroxamate (Fe-MFHs) or iron(III) benzyl fatty hydroxamate (Fe-BFHs) in the organic phase. The results obtained under optimized conditions, showed that the chelating agents in hexane extract iron(III) at pH 1.9 were realized effectively with a high percentage of extraction (97.2% and 98.1% for MFHAs and BFHAs, respectively). The presence of a large amount of Mg(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Mn(II) and Co(II) ions did affect the iron(III) extraction. Finally stripping studies for recovering iron(III) from organic phase (Fe-MFHs or Fe-BFHs dissolved in hexane) were carried out at various concentrations of HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4. The results showed that the desired acid for recovery of iron(III) was 5 M HCl and quantitative recovery of iron(III) was achieved from Fe(III)-MFHs and Fe(III)-BFHs solutions in hexane containing 5 mg/L of Fe(III). PMID:22408444

  20. Utilization of Boron Compounds for the Modification of Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid as Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase Class II Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Ridla; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Satriyanto, Cipta Prio; Kerami, Djati; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a critical function in regulating gene expression. The inhibition of HDAC has developed as an interesting anticancer research area that targets biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. In this study, an HDAC inhibitor that is available commercially, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has been modified to improve its efficacy and reduce the side effects of the compound. Hydrophobic cap and zinc-binding group of these compounds were substituted with boron-based compounds, whereas the linker region was substituted with p-aminobenzoic acid. The molecular docking analysis resulted in 8 ligands with ΔGbinding value more negative than the standards, SAHA and trichostatin A (TSA). That ligands were analyzed based on the nature of QSAR, pharmacological properties, and ADME-Tox. It is conducted to obtain a potent inhibitor of HDAC class II Homo sapiens. The screening process result gave one best ligand, Nova2 (513246-99-6), which was then further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25214833

  1. Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket

    SciTech Connect

    Tabackman, Alexa A.; Frankson, Rochelle; Marsan, Eric S.; Perry, Kay; Cole, Kathryn E.

    2016-11-04

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylated lysine side chains in histone and non-histone proteins, and play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. Aberrant HDAC activity is associated with cancer, making these enzymes important targets for drug design. In general, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis, and comprise some of the leading therapies in cancer treatments. To date, four HDACi have been FDA approved for the treatment of cancers: suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, Vorinostat, Zolinza®), romidepsin (FK228, Istodax®), belinostat (Beleodaq®), and panobinostat (Farydak®). Most current inhibitors are pan-HDACi, and non-selectively target a number of HDAC isoforms. Six previously reported HDACi were rationally designed, however, to target a unique sub-pocket found only in HDAC8. While these inhibitors were indeed potent against HDAC8, and even demonstrated specificity for HDAC8 over HDACs 1 and 6, there were no structural data to confirm the mode of binding. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Compound 6 complexed with HDAC8 to 1.98 Å resolution. We also describe the use of molecular docking studies to explore the binding interactions of the other 5 related HDACi. Our studies confirm that the HDACi induce the formation of and bind in the HDAC8-specific subpocket, offering insights into isoform-specific inhibition.

  2. Hydroxamic acid interactions with solvated cerium hydroxides in the flotation of monazite and bastnäsite-Experiments and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, A.; Azizi, D.; Larachi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments were performed to clarify the interaction mechanisms between hydroxamic acid collectors and cerium hydroxides during the flotation of bastnäsite and monazite minerals. These minerals showed considerable floatability at moderately alkaline pH which was related to the adsorption of hydroxamic acids on their surfaces as confirmed by vibrational spectroscopic and zeta potential measurements. DFT simulations showed that at moderately alkaline pH, the interactions between solvated Ce(OH)2+ and Ce(OH)2+ and heptyl-hydroxamic acid (HHA) anions resulted in the formation of, respectively, [Ce(OH)(HHA)x(H2O)y]2-x (x[y = ] = 1[6],2[3],3[1]) and [Ce(OH)2(HHA)x(H2O)y]1-x (x[y = ] = 1[5],2[1],3[0]) complexes. The collector anions were found to interact directly through formation of two covalent bonds between their two polar-head oxygen atoms and cerium in the hydroxide complexes. However, formation of such new bonds resulted in breakage of a few covalent/electrostatic bonds between cerium and water molecules initially present in the first hydration shell of the rare-earth metal cation. Building up in the electric double layer of the semi-soluble minerals, these complexes, and by extension, those from other rare-earth elements belonging to monazite and bastnäsite, are speculated to play a role in the interactions between rare-earth minerals and hydroxamic acid collectors.

  3. Exploration of the labeling of [11C]Tubastatin A at the hydroxamic acid site with [11C]carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuiyu; Zhang, Yi; Kalin, Jay; Cai, Lisheng; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pike, Victor W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to label tubastatin A (1) with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) in the hydroxamic acid site to provide a potential radiotracer for imaging histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Initial attempts at a one-pot Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and hydroxylamine gave low radiochemical yields (< 5%) of [11C]1. Labeling was achieved in useful radiochemical yields (16.1 ± 5.6%, n = 4) through a two-step process based on Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and p-nitrophenol to give the [11C]p-nitrophenyl ester ([11C]5), followed by ultrasound-assisted hydroxyaminolysis of the activated ester with excess hydroxylamine in DMSO/THF mixture in the presence of a strong phosphazene base P1-t-Bu. However, the success in labeling the hydroxamic acid group of [11C]tubastatin A was not transferable to the labeling of three other model hydroxamic acids. PMID:26647018

  4. Synthesis and Anti-tumor Activities of Novel Phenyl Substituted Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Derivatives Against Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Shi, Jinghua; Qu, Yue; Tang, Pingwah; Wu, Xinying; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    A facile and atom-economical boric acid catalyzed direct amidation without any coupling agents for the preparation of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) and SAHA-based inhibitors targeting anti-proliferation of cancer cells is described. It is applicable to the preparation of SAHA-based inhibitors having an unprotected hydroxyl group in the phenyl ring without the need of the protection. The in-vitro assays data indicate that the nature and the position of the substituents (activating and/or deactivating) in the capping group (phenyl ring) of SAHA-based inhibitors synthesized in this study have a vital impact on the potency of anti-proliferative activity against cancer cells. With low toxicity toward the normal cells, a number of synthesized SAHA-based inhibitors with two substituents in the phenyl ring possess higher antiproliferative activity than SAHA and Cisplatin toward six studied cancer cell lines: A375 human skin cancer cells, A549 human lung cancer cells, MGC80-3 human gastric cancer cells, H460 human lung cancer cells, H1299 human lung cancer cells, and HepG2 human liver cancer cells. Cisplatin is a common chemotherapeutic drug with high cytotoxicity for a variety of cancer treatments. The inhibitors provided in this study might signify future therapeutic drugs for cancer treatment.

  5. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid suppresses hepatic stellate cells activation by HMGB1 dependent reduction of NF-κB1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Yan, Min; Ji, Qiuhong; Lu, Jinbiao; Ji, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation is essential to the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Exploring drugs targeting HSC activation is a promising anti-fibrotic strategy. In the present study, we found suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, prominently suppressed the activation phenotype of a human hepatic stellate cell line—LX2. The production of collagen type I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) as well as the proliferation and migration of LX2 cells were significantly reduced by SAHA treatment. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this suppression, genome wild gene regulation by SAHA was determined by Affymetrix 1.0 human cDNA array. Upon SAHA treatment, the abundance of 331 genes was up-regulated and 173 genes was down-regulated in LX2 cells. Bioinformatic analyses of these altered genes highlighted the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) pathway was one of the most relevant pathways that contributed to SAHA induced suppression of HSCs activation. Further studies demonstrated the increased acetylation of intracellular HMGB1 in SAHA treated HSCs, and this increasing is most likely to be responsible for SAHA induced down-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B1 (NF-κB1) and is one of the main underlying mechanisms for the therapeutic effect of SAHA for liver fibrosis. PMID:26557438

  6. LBH589, A Hydroxamic Acid-Derived HDAC Inhibitor, is Neuroprotective in Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Khanna, Prarthana; Paganetti, Paolo; Kuhn, Rainer; Young, Anne B.; Kazantsev, Aleksey G.; Hersch, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modulation of gene transcription by HDAC inhibitors has been shown repeatedly to be neuroprotective in cellular, invertebrate, and rodent models of Huntington’s disease (HD). It has been difficult to translate these treatments to the clinic, however, because existing compounds have limited potency or brain bioavailability. Objective: In the present study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of LBH589, an orally bioavailable hydroxamic acid-derived nonselective HDAC inhibitor in mouse models of HD. Method: The efficacy of LBH589 is tested in two HD mouse models using various biochemical, behavioral and neuropathological outcome measures. Results: We show that LBH589 crosses the blood brain barrier; induces histone hyperacetylation and prevents striatal neuronal shrinkage in R6/2 HD mice. In full-length knock-in HD mice LBH589-treatment improves motor performance and reduces neuronal atrophy. Conclusions: Our efficacious results of LBH589 in fragment and full-length mouse models of HD suggest that LBH589 is a promising candidate for clinical assessment in HD patients and provides confirmation that non-selective HDAC inhibitors can be viable clinical candidates. PMID:27983565

  7. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos.

  8. Unexpected formation of a copper(II) 12-metallacrown-4 with (S)-glutamic-gamma-hydroxamic acid: a thermodynamic and spectroscopic study in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tegoni, Matteo; Dallavalle, Francesco; Belosi, Barbara; Remelli, Maurizio

    2004-05-07

    The equilibria of copper(II) with (S)-glutamic-gamma-hydroxamic acid (H2L) were investigated in aqueous solution by different techniques: glass electrode potentiometry; calorimetry; VIS and CD spectrophotometry; and ES-MS. An unexpected pentacopper(II) 12-metallacrown-4 [Cu5L4H(-4)](2-) was detected, analogous to those well known formed by alpha- and beta-aminohydroxamic acids, but of lower stability. Another five species were found: [CuLH]+; [CuL2H2]; [Cu2L2]; [CuL2H]-; and [CuL2]2-. Their structures are proposed based on both spectroscopic and calorimetric data.

  9. Synergistic antineoplastic effect of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), on prostate and liver cancer cells: perspectives for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Yang, Xu-Yu; Popescu, Nicholas C

    2010-04-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes is a major contributing alteration in the initiation or progression of cancer. The human tumor suppressor gene DLC1 (deleted in liver cancer 1) is frequently downregulated or silenced in multiple cancers, predominantly by epigenetic mechanisms. With the current considerable interest and progress in epigenetic therapy, a number of promising antineoplastic agents, particularly histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have been developed and used successfully in clinical trials. Both DLC1 and HDAC inhibitors exert antineoplastic functions, and their combined action could be exploited for a more effective cancer therapy. To evaluate the potential benefits of this approach, we examined the antineoplastic effects of adenoviral (Ad)-DLC1-mediated transduction and exposure to suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a powerful HDAC inhibitor, in two human cancer cell lines that lack intrinsic DLC1 expression, 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells and 7703K human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Consistent with the oncosuppressive function of DLC1 in several cancers, including prostate and liver cancer, transduction of 22Rv1 and 7703K cells with an Ad-DLC1 expression vector resulted in alterations of cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. A low concentration of SAHA (5 microM) efficiently restored the expression of DLC1 in 22Rv1 cells that lack DLC1 expression due to histone deacetylation but had a minimal effect in 7703K cells in which silencing of the DLC1 gene is due mainly to promoter hypermethylation. Regardless of the epigenetic mechanism of DLC1 inactivation, SAHA treatment of DLC1-transduced cells had a synergistic inhibitory effect on tumor cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in both cell lines. In 22Rv1 cells, this combination regimen nearly abolished the formation of colonies in semisolid media as a measure of tumorigenicity in vitro. Current in vitro

  10. A novel suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid histone deacetylase inhibitor derivative, N25, exhibiting improved antitumor activity in both human U251 and H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Huang, Wei-Bin; Wu, Li; Wang, Lai-You; Ye, Lian-Bao; Feng, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    N1- (2, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (N25) is a novel SAHA cap derivative of HDACi, with a patent (No. CN 103159646). This invention is a hydroxamic acid compound with a structural formula of RNHCO(CH2)6CONHOH (wherein R=2, 5dimethoxyaniline), a pharmaceutically acceptable salt which is soluble. In the present study, we investigated the effects of N25 with regard to drug distribution and molecular docking, and anti-proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycling, and LD50. First, we designed a molecular approach for modeling selected SAHA derivatives based on available structural information regarding human HDAC8 in complex with SAHA (PDB code 1T69). N25 was found to be stabilized by direct interaction with the HDAC8. Anti-proliferative activity was observed in human glioma U251, U87, T98G cells and human lung cancer H460, A549, H1299 cells at moderate concentrations (0.5-30 μM). Compared with SAHA, N25 displayed an increased antitumor activity in U251 and H460 cells. We further analyzed cell death mechanisms activated by N25 in U251 and H460 cells. N25 significantly increased acetylation of Histone 3 and inhibited HDAC4. On RT-PCR analysis, N25 increased the mRNA levels of p21, however, decreased the levels of p53. These resulted in promotion of apoptosis, inducing G0/G1 arrest in U251 cells and G2/M arrest in H460 cells in a time-dependent and dose- dependent manner. In addition, N25 was able to distribute to brain tissue through the blood-brain barrier of mice (LD50: 240.840 mg/kg). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that N25 will provide an invaluable tool to investigate the molecular mechanism with potential chemotherapeutic value in several malignancies, especially human glioma.

  11. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (5(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  12. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (δ(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  13. Wortmannilactones I-L, new NADH-fumarate reductase inhibitors, induced by adding suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid to the culture medium of Talaromyces wortmannii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Yi-Yu; Liu, Jun-Hui; Ke, Ai-Bing; Zheng, Zhi-Hui; Lu, Xin-Hua; Luan, Yu-Shi; Xiu, Zhi-Long; Dong, Yue-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of finding more potential inhibitors against NADH-fumarate reductase (specific target for treating helminthiasis and cancer) from natural resources, Talaromyces wortmannii was treated with the epigenome regulatory agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which resulted in the isolation of four new wortmannilactones derivatives (wortmannilactones I-L, 1-4). The structures of these new compounds were elucidated based on IR, HRESIMS and NMR spectroscopic data analyses. These four new compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against NADH-fumarate reductase with the IC50 values ranging from 0.84 to 1.35μM.

  14. Tetrahydrofuranyl and Tetrahydropyranyl Protection of Amino Acid Side-Chains Enables Synthesis of a Hydroxamate-Containing Aminoacylated tRNA†

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Lester J.; Miller, Marvin J.; Huber, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to specifically engineer metal binding sites into target proteins has far-reaching consequences ranging from the development of new biocatalysts and imaging reagents to the production of proteins with increased stability. We report the efficient tRNA-mediated incorporation of the hydroxamate containing amino acid, Nε-acetyl-Nε-hydroxy-l-lysine, into a transcription factor (TFIIIA). Because this amino acid is compact, hydrophilic, and uncharged at physiological pH, it should have little or no effect on protein folding or solubility. The Nε-hydroxy group of the hydroxamate is refractory to photodeprotection and required the identification of reagents for O-protection that are compatible with the synthesis of acylated tRNA. Tetrahydrofuranyl and tetrahydropyranyl O-protecting groups can be removed using mild acid conditions and allowed for an orthogonal protection strategy in which deprotection of the amino acid side chain precedes ligation of an acylated dinucleotide to a truncated suppressor tRNA. These protecting groups will provide a valuable alternative for O-protection, especially in cases where photodeprotection cannot be used. PMID:25562392

  15. New benzothiazole/thiazole-containing hydroxamic acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Tung, Truong Thanh; Oanh, Dao Thi Kim; Dung, Phan Thi Phuong; Hue, Van Thi My; Park, Sang Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Nam, Nguyen-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Results from clinical studies have demonstrated that inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes possess promise for the treatment of several types of cancer. Zolinza(®) (widely known as SAHA) has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma. As a continuity of our ongoing research to find novel small molecules to target these important enzymes, we synthesized a series of benzothiazole-containing analogues of SAHA and found several compounds with very potent anticancer cytotoxicity. In this study, three more compounds of this type, including N(1)-(6-chlorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (3a), N(1)-[6-(trifluoromethyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl]-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (3b) and N(1)-(thiazol-2-yl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (6) were synthesized and evaluated for HDAC inhibition and cytotoxic activities. All three compounds showed very potent HDAC inhibitory effects. Docking revealed that both two compounds 3a, 3b showed higher affinities towards HDAC(8) compared to SAHA. In vitro, compound 3a exhibited cytotoxicity equipotent to SAHA against five human cancer cell lines. In term of in vivo activity, compound 3a demonstrated equivalent efficacy to SAHA in mouse xenograft model.

  16. Cardiomyogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Follicle-derived Stem Cells by Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid and Their In Vivo Homing Property

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Iel-Yong; Son, Han-Na; Ullah, Imran; Bharti, Dinesh; Park, Ju-Mi; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Byun, June-Ho; Kang, Young-Hoon; Sung, Su-Jin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of human dental follicle-derived stem cells (DFCs) under the influence of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor family, and analyze the in vivo homing capacity of induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs) when transplanted systemically. DFCs from extracted wisdom teeth showed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics such as plate adherent growing, expression of MSC markers (CD44, CD90, and CD105), and mesenchymal lineage-specific differentiation potential. Adding SAHA to the culture medium induced the successful in vitro differentiation of DFCs into cardiomyocytes. These iCMs expressed cardiomyogenic markers, including alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), cardiac muscle troponin T (TNNT2), Desmin, and cardiac muscle alpha actin (ACTC1), at both the mRNA and protein level. For the assessment of homing capacity, PKH26 labeled iCMs were intraperitoneally injected (1×106 cells in 100 µL of PBS) into the experimental mice, and the ratios of PKH26 positive cells to the total number of injected cells, in multiple organs were determined. The calculated homing ratios, 14 days after systemic cell transplantation, were 5.6 ± 1.0%, 3.6 ± 1.1%, and 11.6 ± 2.7% in heart, liver, and kidney respectively. There was no difference in the serum levels of interleukin-2 and interleukin-10 at 14 days after transplantation, between the experimental (iCM injected) and control (no injection or PBS injection) groups. These results demonstrate that DFCs can be an excellent source for cardiomyocyte differentiation and regeneration. Moreover, the iCMs can be delivered into heart muscle via systemic administration without eliciting inflammatory or immune response. This can serve as the pilot study for further investigations into the in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of DFCs under the influence of SAHA and the in vivo homing capacity

  17. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  18. Fate of labeled hydroxamates during iron transport from hydroxamate-ion chelates.

    PubMed

    Arceneaux, J E; Davis, W B; Downer, D N; Haydon, A H; Byers, B R

    1973-09-01

    The fate of the hydroxamic acid-iron transport cofactors during iron uptake from the (59)Fe(3+) chelates of the (3)H-labeled hydroxamates schizokinen and aerobactin was studied by assay of simultaneous incorporation of both (59)Fe(3+) and (3)H. In the schizokinen-producing organism Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213 transport of (59)Fe(3+) from the (3)H-schizokinen-(59)Fe(3+) chelate at 37 C was accompanied by rapid uptake and release (within 2 min) of (3)H-schizokinen, although (3)H-schizokinen discharge was temperature-dependent and did not occur at 0 C. In the schizokinen-requiring strain B. megaterium SK11 similar release of (3)H-schizokinen occurred only at elevated concentrations of the double-labeled chelate; at lower chelate concentrations, (3)H-schizokinen remained cell-associated. Temperature-dependent uptake of deferri (iron-free) (3)H-schizokinen to levels equivalent to those incorporated from the chelate form was noted in strain SK11, but strain ATCC 19213 showed only temperature-independent binding of low concentrations of deferri (3)H-schizokinen. These results indicate an initial temperature-independent binding of the ferric hydroxamate which is followed rapidly by temperature-dependent transport of the chelate into the cell and an enzyme catalyzed separation of iron from the chelate. The resulting deferri hydroxamate is discharged from the cell only when a characteristic intracellular concentration of the hydroxamate is exceeded, which happens in the schizokinen-requiring strain only at elevated concentrations of the chelate. This strain also appears to draw the deferri hydroxamate into the cell by a temperature-dependent mechanism. The aerobactin-producing organism Aerobacter aerogenes 62-1 also demonstrated rapid initial uptake and temperature-dependent discharge of (3)H-aerobactin during iron transport from (3)H-aerobactin-(59)Fe(3+), suggesting a similar ferric hydroxamate transport system in this organism.

  19. Speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation, preconcentration, transport and ICP-AES determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI) with calix-crown hydroxamic acid in high purity grade materials and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y K; Sharma, K R

    2005-07-15

    A new functionalized calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid is reported for the speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation and trace determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI). Chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) are extracted at pH 4.5, 1.5M HCl and 6.0M HCl, respectively with calixcrown hydroxamic acid (37,38,39,40,41,42-hexahydroxy7,25,31-calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid) in chloroform in presence of large number of cations and anions. The extraction mechanism is investigated. The various extraction parameters, appropriate pH/M HCl, choice of solvent, effect of the reagent concentration, temperature and distribution constant have been studied. The speciation, preconcentration and kinetic of transport has been investigated. The maximum transport is observed 35, 45 and 30min for chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(IV), respectively. For trace determination the extracts were directly inserted into the plasma for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, ICP-AES, measurements of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten which increase the sensitivity by 30-fold, with detection limits of 3ngml(-1). The method is applied for the determination of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten in high purity grade ores, biological and environmental samples. The chromium was recovered from the effluent of electroplating industries.

  20. Γ-aminobutyric acid(C) (GABAC) selective antagonists derived from the bioisosteric modification of 4-aminocyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid: amides and hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Locock, Katherine E S; Yamamoto, Izumi; Tran, Priscilla; Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary; Johnston, Graham A R; Allan, Robin D

    2013-07-11

    Series of compounds were generated via the bioisosteric replacement of the carboxylate of 4-ACPCA (2) with hydroxamate or amide groups. All compounds from this study exhibited increased selectivity for GABAC, the most potent being 4-ACPHA (10a, IC50 = 13 μM) and 4-ACPAM (11a, IC50 = 10 μM). This provides evidence that a zwitterionic structure is not essential for GABAC antagonists, rather the emphasis lies in appropriate heteroatoms to participate in hydrogen bonding.

  1. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Treatment Reveals Crosstalks among Proteome, Ubiquitylome and Acetylome in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level. PMID:25825284

  2. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment reveals crosstalks among proteome, ubiquitylome and acetylome in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-03-31

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level.

  3. Molecular octopus: octa functionalized calix[4]resorcinarene-hydroxamic acid [C4RAHA] for selective extraction, separation and preconcentration of U(VI).

    PubMed

    Jain, Vinod K; Pillai, Shibu G; Pandya, Rujul A; Agrawal, Yaduvendra K; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2005-01-30

    A solvent extraction separation of uranium, in the presence of thorium, cerium and lanthanides with a new calix[4]resorcinarene bearing eight hydroxamic acid groups (C4RAHA) is described. Quantitative extraction of uranium is possible in ethyl acetate solution of C4RAHA at pH 8.0. The lambda(max) and molar absorptivity (varepsilon) for uranium is 356nm and 8352Lmol(-1)cm(-1). The Binding ratio of uranium with C4RAHA as evaluated by Job's method is 4:1. The system obeys Beer's law over the range 0.075-6.0mugml(-1) of uranium with Sandell sensitivity 0.0284mugcm(-2). A preconcentration factor of 142 was achieved by directly aspirating the extract for GF-AAS measurements. The two-phase stability constant evaluated at 25 degrees C for uranium is 15.91. The complexation is characterized by favorable enthalpy and entropy changes. A liquid membrane transport study of uranium was carried out from source to the receiving phase under controlled conditions and a mechanism of transport is proposed. Uranium has been determined in standard and environmental samples.

  4. A quantum chemical study of molecular properties and QSPR modeling of oximes, amidoximes and hydroxamic acids with nucleophilic activity against toxic organophosphorus agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar Filho, Edilson B.; Santos, Aline A.; Oliveira, Boaz G.

    2017-04-01

    The proposal of this work includes the use of quantum chemical methods and cheminformatics strategies in order to understand the structural profile and reactivity of α-nucleophiles compounds such as oximes, amidoximes and hydroxamic acids, related to hydrolysis rate of organophosphates. Theoretical conformational study of 41 compounds were carried out through the PM3 semiempirical Hamiltonian, followed by the geometry optimization at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, complemented by Polarized Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate the aqueous environment. In line with the experimental hypothesis about hydrolytic power, the strength of the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds (IHBs) at light of the Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) is related to the preferential conformations of α-nucleophiles. A set of E-Dragon descriptors (1,666) were submitted to a variable selection through Ordered Predictor Selection (OPS) algorithm. Five descriptors, including atomic charges obtained from the Natural Bond Orbitals (NBO) protocol jointly with a fragment index associated to the presence/absence of IHBs, provided a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) model via Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). This model showed good validation parameters (R2 = 0.80, Qloo2 = 0.67 and Qext2 = 0.81) and allowed the identification of significant physicochemical features on the molecular scaffold in order to design compounds potentially more active against organophosphorus poisoning.

  5. The histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induces a cell-death pathway characterized by cleavage of Bid and production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Astrid A.; Ausserlechner, Michael J.; Bernhard, David; Sutton, Vivien R.; Tainton, Kellie M.; Kofler, Reinhard; Smyth, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2001-01-01

    Many chemotherapeutic agents induce mitochondrial-membrane disruption to initiate apoptosis. However, the upstream events leading to drug-induced mitochondrial perturbation have remained poorly defined. We have used a variety of physiological and pharmacological inhibitors of distinct apoptotic pathways to analyze the manner by which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a chemotherapeutic agent and histone deacetylase inhibitor, induces cell death. We demonstrate that SAHA initiates cell death by inducing mitochondria-mediated death pathways characterized by cytochrome c release and the production of reactive oxygen species, and does not require the activation of key caspases such as caspase-8 or -3. We provide evidence that mitochondrial disruption is achieved by means of the cleavage of the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bid. SAHA-induced Bid cleavage was not blocked by caspase inhibitors or the overexpression of Bcl-2 but did require the transcriptional regulatory activity of SAHA. These data provide evidence of a mechanism of cell death mediated by transcriptional events that result in the cleavage of Bid, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane, and production of reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. PMID:11535817

  6. In vivo efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with radiotherapy in a malignant rhabdoid tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors are promising new substances in cancer therapy and have also been shown to sensitize different tumor cells to irradiation (XRT). We explored the effect as well as the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in vivo in a malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) mouse model. Methods and material Potential radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in MRT xenografts by analysis of tumor growth delay, necrosis (HE), apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (ki-67) and γH2AX expression as well as dynamic 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG -PET) after treatment with either SAHA alone, single-dose (10 Gy) or fractionated XRT (3 × 3Gy) solely as well as in combination with SAHA compared to controls. Results SAHA only had no significant effect on tumor growth. Combination of SAHA for 8 days with single-dose XRT resulted in a higher number of complete remissions, but failed to prove a significant growth delay compared to XRT only. In contrast fractionated XRT plus SAHA for 3 weeks did induce significant tumor growth delay in MRT-xenografts. The histological examination showed a significant effect of XRT in tumor necrosis, expression of Ki-67, γH2AX and apoptosis. SAHA only had no significant effect in the histological examination. Comparison of xenografts treated with XRT and XRT plus SAHA revealed a significantly increased γH2AX expression and apoptosis induction in the mice tumors after combination treatment with single-dose as well as fractionated XRT. The combination of SAHA with XRT showed a tendency to increased necrosis and decrease of proliferation compared to XRT only, which, however, was not significant. The 18F-FDG-PET results showed no significant differences in the standard uptake value or glucose transport kinetics after either treatment. Conclusion SAHA did not have a significant effect alone, but proved to enhance the effect of XRT in our MRT in vivo model. PMID:22458853

  7. The Effects of Molecular Hydrogen and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid on Paraquat-Induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and TNF-α in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaoyang; Wu, Xizi; Chen, Yao; Zeng, Renqing; Zhao, Yangzi; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Danna; Zhao, Qianwen; Deng, Yunlei; Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B; Chong, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on paraquat (PQ)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in macrophages. First, the PQ optimal concentration was determined in RAW264.7 macrophage by treating serum-starved cells with PQ at 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mM. We evaluated at 1, 2 and 8 h (1) cell viability (by means of trypan blue exclusion method), (2) intracellular ROS levels (with a fluorescent DCFH-DA probe), and (3) TNF-α level in the culture media (determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA). Subsequently, mouse RAW267.4 macrophages were treated with PQ in combination with SAHA and/or H2 for 8 h. PQ exerted a significant stimulatory but nontoxic effect on RAW267.4 macrophages at 0.1 mM. This PQ concentration was used in the subsequent experiments. H2 and H2 combined with SAHA evoked a greater reduction in PQ-induced ROS production than SAHA alone, especially at 2 and 8 h. At 1 and 2 h, treatments involving H2 caused a greater decrease in PQ-induced production of TNF-α than the corresponding treatments without H2. However, at 8 h, treatment with SAHA evoked more pronounced effects on TNF-α than treatment without SAHA. H2 decreases PQ-induced ROS production and attenuates early PQ-induced TNF-α production whereas SAHA reduces the late phase of the PQ-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. The effects are enhanced by the combination of H2 and SAHA.

  8. Palladium(II)-catalyzed enantioselective C(sp³)-H activation using a chiral hydroxamic acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kai-Jiong; Lin, David W; Miura, Motofumi; Zhu, Ru-Yi; Gong, Wei; Wasa, Masayuki; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2014-06-04

    An enantioselective method for Pd(II)-catalyzed cross-coupling of methylene β-C(sp(3))-H bonds in cyclobutanecarboxylic acid derivatives with arylboron reagents is described. High yields and enantioselectivities were achieved through the development of chiral mono-N-protected α-amino-O-methylhydroxamic acid (MPAHA) ligands, which form a chiral complex with the Pd(II) center. This reaction provides an alternative approach to the enantioselective synthesis of cyclobutanecarboxylates containing α-chiral quaternary stereocenters. This new class of chiral catalysts also show promises for enantioselective β-C(sp(3))-H activation of acyclic amides.

  9. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  10. Phosphanilic Acid Inhibits Dihydropteroate Synthase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    dihydropteroate synthases of P. aeruginosa and E . coli were about equally susceptible to inhibition by PA. These results suggest that cells of P. aeruginosa...are more permeable to PA than cells of E . coli . Although a weak inhibitor, PA acted on dihydropteroate synthase in the same manner as the sulfonamides...with which PA is structurally related. Inhibition of E . coli by PA in a basal salts-glucose medium was prevented by p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). However

  11. Forward and reverse (retro) iron(III) or gallium(III) desferrioxamine E and ring-expanded analogues prepared using metal-templated synthesis from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers.

    PubMed

    Lifa, Tulip; Tieu, William; Hocking, Rosalie K; Codd, Rachel

    2015-04-06

    A metal-templated synthesis (MTS) approach was used to preorganize the forward endo-hydroxamic acid monomer 4-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-PBH) about iron(III) in a 1:3 metal/ligand ratio to furnish the iron(III) siderophore for-[Fe(DFOE)] (ferrioxamine E) following peptide coupling. Substitution of for-PBH with the reverse (retro) hydroxamic acid analogue 3-(6-amino-N-hydroxyhexanamido)propanoic acid (ret-PBH) furnished ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (ret-ferrioxamine E). As isomers, for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] gave identical mass spectrometry signals ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 654.3, m/zobs 654.3), yet for-[Fe(DFOE)] eluted in a more polar window (tR = 23.44 min) than ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (tR = 28.13 min) on a C18 reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) column. for-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 22.99 min) and ret-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 28.11 min) were prepared using gallium(III) as the metal-ion template and showed the same trend for the retention time. Ring-expanded analogues of for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] were prepared from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers with one additional methylene unit in the amine-containing region, 4-[(6-aminohexyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-HBH) or 3-(7-amino-N-hydroxyheptanamido)propanoic acid (ret-HBH), to give the corresponding tris(homoferrioxamine E) macrocycles, for-[Fe(HHDFOE)] or ret-[Fe(HHDFOE)] ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 696.3, m/zobs 696.4). The MTS reaction using a constitutional isomer of for-HBH that transposed the methylene unit to the carboxylic acid containing region, 5-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-5-oxopentanoic acid (for-PPH), gave the macrocycle for-[Fe(HPDFOE)] in a yield significantly less than that for for-[Fe(HHDFOE)], with the gallium(III) analogue for-[Ga(HPDFOE)] unable to be detected. The work demonstrates the utility and limits of MTS for the assembly of macrocyclic siderophores from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers. Indirect measures (RP-HPLC order of elution, c log P values

  12. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  13. Chemical Characterization, Crossfeeding and Uptake Studies on Hydroxamate Siderophore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B; Meyer, J M; Kale, S P

    2011-06-01

    We report the production of two types of siderophores namely catecholate and hydroxamate in modified succinic acid medium (SM) from Alcaligenes faecalis. Two fractions of siderophores were purified on amberlite XAD, major fraction was hydroxamate type having a λ(max) at 224 nm and minor fraction appeared as catecholate with a λ(max) of 264 nm. The recovery yield obtained from major and minor fractions was 297 and 50 mg ml(-1) respectively. The IEF pattern of XAD-4 purified siderophore suggested the pI value of 6.5. Cross feeding studies revealed that A. faecalis accepts heterologous as well as self (hydroxamate) siderophore in both free and iron complexed forms however; the rate of siderophore uptake was more in case of siderophores complexed to iron. Siderophore iron uptake studies indicated the differences between hydroxamate siderophore of A. faecalis and Alc E, a siderophore of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

  14. Effects of hydroxamate metalloendoprotease inhibitors on botulinum neurotoxin A poisoned mouse neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Potian, Joseph G.; Garcia, Carmen C.; Hognason, Kormakur; Čapková, Kateřina; Moe, Scott T.; Jacobson, Alan R.; Janda, Kim D.; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Currently the only therapy for botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) poisoning is antitoxin. Antidotes that are effective after BoNT/A has entered the motor nerve terminals would dramatically benefit BoNT/A therapy. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of BoNT/A light chain by metalloendoprotease inhibitors (MEIs) is under development. We tested the effects of MEIs on in vitro as well as in vivo BoNT/A poisoned mouse nerve muscle preparations (NMPs). The Ki for inhibition of BoNT/A metalloendoprotease was 0.40 and 0.36 μM, respectively, for 2, 4 – dichlorocinnamic acid hydroxamate (DCH) and its methyl derivative, ABS 130. Acute treatment of nerve muscle preparations with 10 pM BoNT/A inhibited nerve evoked muscle twitches, reduced mean quantal content, and induced failures of endplate currents (EPCs). Bath application of 10 μM DCH or 5 μM ABS 130 reduced failures, increased the quantal content of EPCs, and partially restored muscle twitches after a delay of 40 to 90 min. The restorative effects of DCH and ABS 130, as well as 3,4 diaminopyridine (DAP) on twitch tension were greater at 22 °C compared to 37 °C. Unlike DAP, neither DCH nor ABS 130 increased Ca2+ levels in cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. Injection of MEIs into mouse hind limbs before or after BoNT/A injection neither prevented the toe spread reflex inhibition nor improved muscle functions. We suggest that hydroxamate MEIs partially restore neurotransmission of acutely BoNT/A poisoned nerve muscle preparations in vitro in a temperature dependent manner without increasing the Ca2+ levels within motor nerve endings. PMID:20211192

  15. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as Novel Zinc Binding Group for Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H.; Kornacki, James R.; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative non-hydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 nM and 3675 nM respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. PMID:23547652

  16. Antimalarial activity of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Chen, Yufeng; Andrews, Katherine T; Caridha, Diana; Gerena, Lucia; Gettayacamin, Montip; Johnson, Jacob; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Obaldia, Nicanor; Tran, Thanh N; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) was evaluated. In in vitro growth inhibition assays approximately 50 analogs were evaluated against four drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The range of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) was 0.0005 to >1 microM. Five analogs exhibited IC(50)s of <3 nM, and three of these exhibited selectivity indices of >600. The most potent compound, WR301801 (YC-2-88) was shown to cause hyperacetylation of P. falciparum histones, which is a marker for HDAC inhibition in eukaryotic cells. The compound also inhibited malarial and mammalian HDAC activity in functional assays at low nanomolar concentrations. WR301801 did not exhibit cures in P. berghei-infected mice at oral doses as high as 640 mg/kg/day for 3 days or in P. falciparum-infected Aotus lemurinus lemurinus monkeys at oral doses of 32 mg/kg/day for 3 days, despite high relative bioavailability. The failure of monotherapy in mice may be due to a short half-life, since the compound was rapidly hydrolyzed to an inactive acid metabolite by loss of its hydroxamate group in vitro (half-life of 11 min in mouse microsomes) and in vivo (half-life in mice of 3.5 h after a single oral dose of 50 mg/kg). However, WR301801 exhibited cures in P. berghei-infected mice when combined at doses of 52 mg/kg/day orally with subcurative doses of chloroquine. Next-generation HDACIs with greater metabolic stability than WR301801 may be useful as antimalarials if combined appropriately with conventional antimalarial drugs.

  17. Iron chelating active packaging: Influence of competing ions and pH value on effectiveness of soluble and immobilized hydroxamate chelators.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Yoshiko; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-04-01

    Many packaged foods utilize synthetic chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) to inhibit iron-promoted oxidation or microbial growth which would result in quality loss. To address consumer demands for all natural products, we have previously developed a non-migratory iron chelating active packaging material by covalent immobilization of polyhydroxamate and demonstrated its efficacy in delaying lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of this hydroxamate-functionalized iron chelating active packaging to retain iron chelating capacity; even in the presence of competing ions common in food. Both immobilized and soluble hydroxamate chelators retained iron chelating capacity in the presence of calcium, magnesium, and sodium competing ions, although at pH 5.0 the presence of calcium reduced immobilized hydroxamate iron chelation. A strong correlation was found between colorimetric and mass spectral analysis of iron chelation by the chelating packaging material. Such chelating active packaging may support reducing additive use in product formulations, while retaining quality and shelf life.

  18. The HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid exhibit multiple modalities of benefit for the vascular pathobiology of sickle transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Pace, Betty S.; Solovey, Anna N.; Kollander, Rahn; Abanonu, Chine F.; Nguyen, Julia; Vineyard, Julie V.; Belcher, John D.; Abdulla, Fuad; Osifuye, Shadé; Eaton, John W.; Kelm, Robert J.; Slungaard, Arne

    2010-01-01

    The vascular pathobiology of sickle cell anemia involves inflammation, coagulation, vascular stasis, reperfusion injury, iron-based oxidative biochemistry, deficient nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and red cell sickling. These disparate pathobiologies intersect and overlap, so it is probable that multimodality therapy will be necessary for this disease. We have, therefore, tested a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), for efficacy in reducing endothelial activation. We found that pulmonary vascular endothelial VCAM-1 and tissue factor (TF) expression (both are indicators of endothelial activation) are powerfully and significantly inhibited by TSA. This is seen both with pretreatment before the inducing stress of hypoxia/reoxygenation (NY1DD sickle transgenic mouse), and upon longer-term therapy after endothelial activation has already occurred (hBERK1 sickle mouse at ambient air). In addition, TSA prevented vascular stasis in sickle mice, it exhibited activity as an iron chelator, and it induced expression of the antisickling hemoglobin, hemoglobin F. Notably, the TSA analog SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxaminc acid) that is already approved for human clinical use exhibits the same spectrum of biologic effects as TSA. We suggest that SAHA possibly could provide true, multimodality, salubrious effects for prevention and treatment of the chronic vasculopathy of sickle cell anemia. PMID:20053759

  19. The HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid exhibit multiple modalities of benefit for the vascular pathobiology of sickle transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hebbel, Robert P; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Pace, Betty S; Solovey, Anna N; Kollander, Rahn; Abanonu, Chine F; Nguyen, Julia; Vineyard, Julie V; Belcher, John D; Abdulla, Fuad; Osifuye, Shadé; Eaton, John W; Kelm, Robert J; Slungaard, Arne

    2010-03-25

    The vascular pathobiology of sickle cell anemia involves inflammation, coagulation, vascular stasis, reperfusion injury, iron-based oxidative biochemistry, deficient nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and red cell sickling. These disparate pathobiologies intersect and overlap, so it is probable that multimodality therapy will be necessary for this disease. We have, therefore, tested a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), for efficacy in reducing endothelial activation. We found that pulmonary vascular endothelial VCAM-1 and tissue factor (TF) expression (both are indicators of endothelial activation) are powerfully and significantly inhibited by TSA. This is seen both with pretreatment before the inducing stress of hypoxia/reoxygenation (NY1DD sickle transgenic mouse), and upon longer-term therapy after endothelial activation has already occurred (hBERK1 sickle mouse at ambient air). In addition, TSA prevented vascular stasis in sickle mice, it exhibited activity as an iron chelator, and it induced expression of the antisickling hemoglobin, hemoglobin F. Notably, the TSA analog SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxaminc acid) that is already approved for human clinical use exhibits the same spectrum of biologic effects as TSA. We suggest that SAHA possibly could provide true, multimodality, salubrious effects for prevention and treatment of the chronic vasculopathy of sickle cell anemia.

  20. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  1. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  2. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  3. Discovery and Characterization of New Hydroxamate Siderophores, Baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Penwell, William F; DeGrace, Nancy; Tentarelli, Sharon; Gauthier, Lise; Gilbert, Catherine M; Arivett, Brock A; Miller, Alita A; Durand-Reville, Thomas F; Joubran, Camil; Actis, Luis A

    2015-07-27

    Acinetobacter baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin but grows under iron limitation. Accordingly, analyses of AYE iron-restricted culture supernatants resulted in the isolation of two fractions, which contained only hydroxamates and showed siderophore activity. Structural analyses identified baumannoferrin A and baumannoferrin B, which differ only by a double bond. These siderophores are composed of citrate, 1,3-diaminopropane, 2,4-diaminobutyrate, decenoic acid, and α-ketoglutarate. Analysis of the AYE genome showed the presence of a 12-gene cluster coding for proteins similar to those involved in the production and utilization of the hydroxamate siderophores acinetoferrin and achromobactin. As A. baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin and harbors only one gene cluster encoding the production and utilization of a siderophore, this strain's growth under iron limitation depends on baumannoferrin, a novel hydroxamate that could play a role in its virulence.

  4. Effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) administration on the residual virus pool in a model of combination antiretroviral therapy-mediated suppression in SIVmac239-infected indian rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Quiñones, Octavio A; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I; Wai, John S; Tan, Christopher M; Alvord, W Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2014-11-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4(+) T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches.

  5. Inhibition of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cell malignant transformation through restoring dysregulated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yichen; Gong, Zhihong; Olson, James R; Xu, Peilin; Buck, Michael J; Ren, Xuefeng

    2013-10-04

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its high toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), are able to induce malignant transformation of human cells. Chronic exposure to these chemicals is associated with an increased risk of developing multiple cancers in human. However, the mechanisms contributing to iAs/MMA(III)-induced cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis are not fully elucidated. We recently showed that iAs/MMA(III) exposure to human cells led to a decreased level of histone acetylation globally, which was associated with an increased sensitivity to arsenic cytotoxicity. In the current study, it demonstrated that prolonged exposure to low-level MMA(III) in human urothelial cells significantly increased the expression and activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with an associated reduction of histone acetylation levels both globally and lysine specifically. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), at 4 weeks after the initial MMA(III) treatment inhibited the MMA(III)-mediated up-regulation of the expression and activities of HDACs, leading to increase histone acetylation and prevention of MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation. These new findings suggest that histone acetylation dysregulation may be a key mechanism in MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation and carcinogenesis, and that HDAC inhibitors could be targeted to prevent or treat iAs-related cancers.

  6. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Megan E.; Hammer, Sandra S.; McCollum, Gary W.; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27966642

  7. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  8. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  9. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, Laura R; Royce, Liam A; Liu, Ping

    2013-09-03

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance.

  10. Synthesis and Biological Investigation of Oxazole Hydroxamates as Highly Selective Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Senger, Johanna; Melesina, Jelena; Marek, Martin; Romier, Christophe; Oehme, Ina; Witt, Olaf; Sippl, Wolfgang; Jung, Manfred

    2016-02-25

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) catalyzes the removal of an acetyl group from lysine residues of several non-histone proteins. Here we report the preparation of thiazole-, oxazole-, and oxadiazole-containing biarylhydroxamic acids by a short synthetic procedure. We identified them as selective HDAC6 inhibitors by investigating the inhibition of recombinant HDAC enzymes and the protein acetylation in cells by Western blotting (tubulin vs histone acetylation). The most active compounds exhibited nanomolar potency and high selectivity for HDAC6. For example, an oxazole hydroxamate inhibits HDAC6 with an IC50 of 59 nM and has a selectivity index of >200 against HDAC1 and HDAC8. This is the first report showing that the nature of a heterocycle directly connected to a zinc binding group (ZBG) can be used to modulate subtype selectivity and potency for HDAC6 inhibitors to such an extent. We rationalize the high potency and selectivity of the oxazoles by molecular modeling and docking.

  11. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as novel zinc binding group for selective histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H; Kornacki, James R; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2013-05-09

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative nonhydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 and 3675 nM, respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines.

  12. Hydroxamate-based colorimetric method for direct screening of transglutaminase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bourneow, Chaiwut; Benjakul, Soottawat; H-Kittikun, Aran

    2012-05-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) is a commercial enzyme that has been applied to many protein containing foods to improve their textural property. The screening of MTGase-producing microorganisms from various sources might lead to the discovery of a new MTGase with different characteristics. This report demonstrates the use of a direct detection method for MTGase-producing bacteria grown on an agar plate by filter paper disc (FPD) assay. The principle of the assay is the formation of a red burgundy color by the hydroxamate-ferric complex. The color developed intensity was linearly correlated by the concentration of hydroxamic acid in the range of 0.1-0.8 μM and was visually scored at 4 levels: 0, 1, 2 and 3. Streptoverticillium mobaraense DSM 40847, a positive MTGase-producer, was chosen for the verification and improving of the proposed method. The colonies grown on the nutrient agar plate at 37°C for 24 h were covered with FPDs and 30 μl of substrates (CBZ-Gln-Gly and hydroxylamine). After incubation, 10 μl of the ferric-TCA-HCl solution was placed on the FPD. The optimal time taken to catalyze the formation of CBZ-Gln-Gly-hydroxamic acid by the MTGase and the time taken for the hydroxamate-ferric complex to form color were 180 and 60 min, respectively. Using this assay, 30 of 189 colonies isolated from wastewater and floating-floc samples showed MTGase-positive colonies which were well correlated to the quantitative screening of MTGase activity (R(2) = 0.9758). The results revealed that the FPD assay could be used for the qualitative screening of MTGase-producing bacteria.

  13. Hydroxamate siderophore-promoted reactions between iron(II) and nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Duckworth, Owen W.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies show that ferrous iron (Fe II), which is often abundant in anaerobic soil and groundwater, is capable of abiotically reducing many subsurface contaminants. However, studies also demonstrate that Fe II redox reactivity in geochemical systems is heavily dependent upon metal speciation. This contribution examines the influence of hydroxamate ligands, including the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), on Fe II reactions with nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants (NACs). Experimental results demonstrate that ring-substituted NACs are reduced to the corresponding aniline products in aqueous solutions containing Fe II complexes with DFOB and two monohydroxamate ligands (acetohydroxamic acid and salicylhydroxamic acid). Reaction rates are heavily dependent upon solution conditions and the identities of both the Fe II-complexing hydroxamate ligand and the target NAC. Trends in the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene ( kobs, s -1) are quantitatively linked to the formation of Fe II species with standard one-electron reduction potentials, EH0 (Fe III/Fe II), below -0.3 V. Linear free energy relationships correlate reaction rates with the EH0 (Fe III/Fe II) values of different electron-donating Fe II complexes and with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of different electron-accepting NACs, EH1'(ArNO 2). Experiments describing a redox auto-decomposition mechanism for Fe II-DFOB complexes that occurs at neutral pH and has implications for the stability of hydroxamate siderophores in anaerobic environments are also presented. Results from this study indicate that hydroxamates and other Fe III-stabilizing organic ligands can form highly redox-active Fe II complexes that may contribute to the natural attenuation and remediation of subsurface contaminants.

  14. Design and synthesis of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamate derivative (ZYJ-34v), an oral active histone deacetylase inhibitor with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Chunxi; Chou, C James; Wang, Xuejian; Jia, Yuping; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, we developed a novel series of tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase inhibitors (Bioorg Med Chem, 2010, 18, 1761-1772; J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 2823-2838), among which, compound ZYJ-34c (1) was identified and validated as the most potent one with marked in vitro and in vivo antitumor potency (J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 5532-5539.). Herein, further modification in 1 afforded another oral active analog ZYJ-34v (2) with simplified structure and lower molecular weight. Biological evaluation of compound 2 showed efficacious inhibition against histone deacetylase 1, 2, 3, and 6, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis results. Most importantly, compound 2 exhibited similar even more potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities relative to the approved histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA.

  15. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-03-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae.

  16. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  17. Tandem mass spectrometry of coprogen and deferoxamine hydroxamic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Simionato, Ana V C; de Souza, Gezimar D; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of fragmentation of hydroxamic siderophores are proposed comparing deuterated and nondeuterated samples. Standard siderophores (e.g. deferoxamine and coprogen) were directly injected into both ion trap and linear quadrupole mass spectrometers with electrospray ionization (ESI). Four and two fragmentation steps were carried out for deferoxamine and coprogen (analyzed by positive and negative ESI, respectively). Deferoxamine cleavages occurred in both peptide and hydroxamic bonds while the coprogen fragmentation pattern is more elaborate, since it contains Fe(III) in its structure.

  18. Polymers containing hydroxamate groups: nanoreactors for hydrolysis of phosphoryl esters.

    PubMed

    Mello, Renata S; Orth, Elisa S; Loh, Watson; Fiedler, Haidi D; Nome, Faruk

    2011-12-20

    A polyhydroxamicalkanoate (PHA) polymer containing the functional groups hydroxamic acid and carboxylic acid with the ability to accelerate dephosphorylation reactions is proposed. The methodology used to prepare this polymer favored the position of the two functional groups next to each other, which allows for the cooperativity between these groups. This cooperative effect has an important role when one wants to mimic enzymes. The catalytic effect promoted by the polymer was evaluated on the cleavage of the bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate (BDNPP) and diethyl 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate (DEDNPP) esters. Indeed, PHA was very efficient and promiscuous because it increased the rate of both reactions by a factor of up to 10(6)-fold. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed that the presence of PHA aids the formation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles. Thus, the effect of the cationic surfactant CTABr on the dephosphorylation of BDNPP by PHA was also investigated, and it was observed that, when CTABr is added to PHA, the reaction is ca. 15-fold faster compared to the reaction when only PHA is present.

  19. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    PubMed

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%.

  20. Inhibition of in vitro cholesterol synthesis by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Endo, A

    1976-01-18

    Inhibitory effect of 44 species of fatty acids on cholesterol synthesis has been examined with a rat liver enzyme system. In the case of saturated fatty acids, the inhibitory activity increased with chain length to a maximum at 11 to 14 carbons, after which activity decreased rapidly. The inhibition increased with the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids. Introduction of a hydroxy group at the alpha-position of fatty acids abolished the inhibition, while the inhibition was enhanced by the presence of a hydroxy group located in an intermediate position of the chain. Branched chain fatty acids having a methyl group at the terminal showed much higher activity than the corresponding saturated straight chain fatty acids with the same number of carbons. With respect to the mechanism for inhibition, tridecanoate was found to inhibit acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase specifically without affecting the other reaction steps in the cholesterol synthetic pathway. The highly unsaturated fatty acids, arachidonate and linoleate, were specific inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA synthase. On the other hand, ricinoleate (hydroxy acid) and phytanate (branched-chain acid) diminished the conversion of mevalonate to sterols by inhibiting a step or steps between squalene and lanosterol.

  1. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  2. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  3. Synthesis, siderophore activity and iron(III) chelation chemistry of a novel mono-hydroxamate, bis-catecholate siderophore mimic: N(alpha),-N(epsilon)-Bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl]-l-lysyl-(gamma-N-methyl-N-hydroxyamido)-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Mies, Kassy A; Gebhardt, Peter; Möllmann, Ute; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel tripodal mono-hydroxamate, bis catecholate siderophore mimic, N(alpha),-N(epsilon)-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl]-l-lysyl-(gamma-N-methyl-N-hydroxyamido)-l-glutamic acid (H(6)L), is described. The structure of H(6)L was established by 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. The chelation chemistry of H(6)L with respect to iron(III) is characterized in aqueous solution through determination of ligand pK(a) values and iron(III) binding constants using spectrophotometric and potentiometric titration techniques. Proton dependent iron(III)-ligand equilibrium constants were determined using a model based on the sequential protonation of the iron(III)-siderophore complex. These results were used to calculate the pH dependent speciation, the overall formation constant logbeta(110) (31.4) and pM value (18.3) for H(6)L with iron(III). The ability of H(6)L to deliver the essential nutrient iron to living cells is determined through growth promotion assays using various bacterial strains.

  4. Novel hydroxamates potentiated in vitro activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Hariharan, Periasamy; Bharani, Thirunavukkarasu; Franklyne, Jonathan S.; Selvakumar, Thangapazham; Bharathimohan, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Chenniappan Vinoth; Kachhadia, Virendra; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Balasubramanian, Gopalan

    2017-01-01

    A set of 12 novel hydroxamate compounds (NHCs), structurally designed as inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme, were synthesized at our facility. These were adamantane derivatives with N-hydroxyacetamide as pharmacophore, and each of these compounds was tested for potentiating activity on fluconazole. The concentration of fluconazole which completely inhibited (concentration of complete inhibition [CCI]) the growth of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550 was determined by micro-dilution method in the absence and presence of NHCs. The CCI of fluconazole without the NHC combination was 64 μg/ml and 1024 μg/ml against C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550, respectively. The majority of the NHCs potentiated the fluconazole activity markedly as CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 90028 reduced to 0.25 μg/ml. Similarly, CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 64550 reduced to 4–8 μg/ml in combination with majority of NHCs while the best activity was displayed by the compound 1 with a reduction of CCI to 0.5 μg/ml. The study results revealed the potential usage of hydroxamate derivatives, structurally designed as HDAC inhibitors to enhance the activity of fluconazole against C. albicans. PMID:28250687

  5. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  6. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  7. Molecular docking studies of a group of hydroxamate inhibitors with gelatinase-A by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xiaojie

    2002-01-01

    We have performed docking and molecular dynamics simulations of hydroxamates complexed with human gelatinase-A (MMP-2) to gain insight into the structural and energetic preferences of these inhibitors. The study was conducted on a selected set of eleven compounds with variation in structure and activity. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed at 300 K for 100 ps with equilibration for 50 ps. The structural analyses of the trajectories indicate that the coordinate bond interactions, the hydrogen bond interactions, the van der Waals interactions as well as the hydrophobic interactions between ligand and receptor are responsible simultaneously for the preference of inhibition and potency. The ligand hydroxamate group is coordinated to the catalytic zinc ion and form stable hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen of Gly 162. The P1' group makes extensive van der Waals and hydrophobic contacts with the nonpolar side chains of several residues in the S1' subsite, including Leu 197, Val 198, Leu 218 and Tyr 223. Moreover, four to eight hydrogen bonds between hydroxamates and MMP-2 are formed to stabilize the inhibitors in the active site. Compared with the P2' and P3' groups, the P1' groups of inhibitors are oriented regularly, which is produced by the restrain of the S1' subsite. From the relationship between the length of the nonpolar P1' group and the biological activity, we confirm that MMP-2 has a pocket-like S1' subsite, not a channel-like S1' subsite proposed by Kiyama (Kiyama, R. et al., J. Med. Chem. 42 (1999), 1723). The energetic analyses show that the experimental binding free energies can be well correlated with the interactions between the inhibitors and their environments, which could be used as a simple score function to evaluate the binding affinities for other similar hydroxamates. The validity of the force field parameters and the MD simulations can be fully testified by the satisfactory agreements between the experimental structure

  8. Ionic liquid containing hydroxamate and N-alkyl sulfamate ions

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2016-03-15

    Embodiments of the invention are related to ionic liquids and more specifically to ionic liquids used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the ionic liquid includes a cation and an anion selected from hydroxamate and/or N-alkyl sulfamate anions.

  9. Proton pump inhibition--the ultimate control of acid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Zdon, M.J.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Schafer, D.E.; Tyshkov, M.; Cambria, R.P.; Modlin, I.M.

    1986-04-01

    The cellular mechanisms of acid secretion by the parietal cell (PC) include stimulation of membrane receptors, increases in cytosolic cyclic AMP levels, and activation of protein kinase systems. These events culminate in stimulation of a membrane-based proton pump. This consists of a non-electrogenic H+-K+-ATPase which transports H+ ions into the secretory canaliculus of the PC in exchange for the cation K+. It has been proposed that blockade of this proton pump would result in inhibition of acid secretion by all classes of acid secretagogues. Thus, the effects of membrane receptor agonists as well as any agents which augment cellular cAMP levels should be inhibited. Substituted benzimidazoles are weak bases which prevent acid secretion by blocking the H+-K+-ATPase system. In order to test the above hypothesis, we investigated the effects of the substituted benzimidazole H168/68 and cimetidine (C) on histamine (H) and 8B-stimulated acid secretion. The rabbit isolated gastric gland (IGG) model was used and acid secretion assessed by the accumulation of /sup 14/C-labeled weak base aminopyrine (AP) within the IGG in response to secretagogue stimulation. H168/68 and C both inhibited H (5 X 10(-5) M)-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (P less than 0.05). H168/68 inhibited both H- and 8B-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05), while C inhibited only H-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05). H168/68 suppressed (/sup 14/C)AP below even unstimulated levels of (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation. These results support the hypothesis that H168/68 inhibits the PC distal to cAMP stimulation.

  10. Mechanism of acid corrosion inhibition using magnetic nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Jauhari, Smita; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition effect of magnetic nanofluid on carbon steel in acid solutions was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic and SEM measurement. The inhibition efficiency increases up to 95% and 75% for 51.7 mM concentration, respectively, in 1 M HCl and 1 M H2SO4 medium. The adsorption of nanoparticles to the steel surface forms a barrier between the metal and the aggressive environment, which is responsible for observed inhibition action. The adsorption of nanoparticles on steel surface is supported by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm and surface morphology scanned through SEM.

  11. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  12. Relieving Mipafox Inhibition in Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase by Rational Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    variant proteins. For each, an Escherichia coli DH5 culture containing one of the plasmids was grown at 37C in 1L of Luria -Bertani (LB) broth...inhibition constant LB Luria -Bertani (broth) OPPA organophosphorus acid anhydrolase SDS-PAGE sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  13. Phosphatidic acid inhibits ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Presa, Natalia; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gangoiti, Patricia; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-12-15

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) was recently demonstrated to potently induce cell migration. This action could only be observed when C1P was applied exogenously to cells in culture, and was inhibited by pertussis toxin. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. In this work, we found that phosphatidic acid (PA), which is structurally related to C1P, displaced radiolabeled C1P from its membrane-binding site and inhibited C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. This effect was independent of the saturated fatty acid chain length or the presence of a double bond in each of the fatty acyl chains of PA. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with exogenous phospholipase D (PLD), an enzyme that produces PA from membrane phospholipids, also inhibited C1P-stimulated cell migration. Likewise, PA or exogenous PLD inhibited C1P-stimulated extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation, leading to inhibition of cell migration. However, PA did not inhibit C1P-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. It is concluded that PA is a physiological regulator of C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. These actions of PA may have important implications in the control of pathophysiological functions that are regulated by C1P, including inflammation and various cellular processes associated with cell migration such as organogenesis or tumor metastasis.

  14. Boric acid inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2004-12-08

    The role of boron in biology includes coordinated regulation of gene expression in mixed bacterial populations and the growth and proliferation of higher plants and lower animals. Here we report that boric acid, the dominant form of boron in plasma, inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCaP, in a dose-dependent manner. Non-tumorigenic prostate cell lines, PWR-1E and RWPE-1, and the cancer line PC-3 were also inhibited, but required concentrations higher than observed human blood levels. Studies using DU-145 cells showed that boric acid induced a cell death-independent proliferative inhibition, with little effect on cell cycle stage distribution and mitochondrial function.

  15. 2-Alkynoic fatty acids inhibit topoisomerase IB from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, Néstor M; Cartagena, Michelle; Sanabria, David; Tasdemir, Deniz; Prada, Christopher F; Reguera, Rosa M; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    2-Alkynoic fatty acids display antimycobacterial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities but their antiprotozoal activity has received little attention. In this work we synthesized the 2-octadecynoic acid (2-ODA), 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA), and 2-tetradecynoic acid (2-TDA) and show that 2-ODA is the best inhibitor of the Leishmania donovani DNA topoisomerase IB enzyme (LdTopIB) with an EC(50)=5.3±0.7μM. The potency of LdTopIB inhibition follows the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA, indicating that the effectiveness of inhibition depends on the fatty acid carbon chain length. All of the studied 2-alkynoic fatty acids were less potent inhibitors of the human topoisomerase IB enzyme (hTopIB) as compared to LdTopIB. 2-ODA also displayed in vitro activity against Leishmania donovani (IC(50)=11.0μM), but it was less effective against other protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi (IC(50)=48.1μM) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC(50)=64.5μM). The antiprotozoal activity of the 2-alkynoic fatty acids, in general, followed the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA. The experimental information gathered so far indicates that 2-ODA is a promising antileishmanial compound.

  16. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  17. Monochloramine potently inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yohko; Ikeda, Mai; Sakuma, Satoru

    2006-05-26

    In the present study, the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), monochloramine (NH(2)Cl), glutamine-chloramine (Glu-Cl) and taurine-chloramine (Tau-Cl) on the formation of 12-lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolite, 12-HETE, and cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites, TXB(2), and 12-HHT, from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in rat platelets were examined. Rat platelets (4x10(8)/ml) were preincubated with drugs for 5min at 37 degrees C prior to the incubation with AA (40microM) for 2min at 37 degrees C. HOCl (50-250microM) showed an inhibition on the formation of LOX metabolite (12-HETE, 5-67% inhibition) and COX metabolites (TXB(2), 33-73% inhibition; 12-HHT, 27-74% inhibition). Although Tau-Cl and Glu-Cl up to 100microM were without effect on the formation of 12-HETE, TXB(2) and 12-HTT, NH(2)Cl showed a strong inhibition on the formation of all three metabolites (10-100microM NH(2)Cl, 12-HETE, 21-92% inhibition; TXB(2), 58-94% inhibition; 12-HHT, 36-92% inhibition). Methionine reversed a reduction of formation of LOX and COX metabolites induced by NH(2)Cl, and taurine restoring that induced by both NH(2)Cl and HOCl. These results suggest that NH(2)Cl is a more potent inhibitor of COX and LOX pathways in platelets than HOCl, and taurine and methionine can be modulators of NH(2)Cl-induced alterations in the COX and LOX pathways in vivo.

  18. Chemistry, biology, and QSAR studies of substituted biaryl hydroxamates and mercaptoacetamides as HDAC inhibitors-nanomolar-potency inhibitors of pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Chen, Yufeng; Gaysin, Arsen M; Savoy, Doris N; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2008-03-01

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) are able to regulate gene expression, and inhibitors of the HDACs (HDACIs) hold promise in the treatment of cancer as well as a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the potential for isoform selectivity in the inhibition of HDACs, we prepared a small series of 2,4'-diaminobiphenyl ligands functionalized at the para-amino group with an appendage containing either a hydroxamate or a mercaptoacetamide group and coupled to an amino acid residue at the ortho-amino group. A smaller series of substituted phenylthiazoles was also explored. Some of these newly synthesized ligands show low-nanomolar potency in HDAC inhibition assays and display micromolar to low-nanomolar IC(50) values in tests against five pancreatic cancer cell lines. The isoform selectivity of these ligands for class I HDACs (HDAC1-3 and 8) and class IIb HDACs (HDAC6 and 10) together with QSAR studies of their correlation with lipophilicity are presented. Of particular interest is the selectivity of the mercaptoacetamides for HDAC6.

  19. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  20. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  1. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  2. Inhibition studies of soybean (Glycine max) urease with heavy metals, sodium salts of mineral acids, boric acid, and boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2010-10-01

    Various inhibitors were tested for their inhibitory effects on soybean urease. The K(i) values for boric acid, 4-bromophenylboronic acid, butylboronic acid, and phenylboronic acid were 0.20 +/- 0.05 mM, 0.22 +/- 0.04 mM, 1.50 +/- 0.10 mM, and 2.00 +/- 0.11 mM, respectively. The inhibition was competitive type with boric acid and boronic acids. Heavy metal ions including Ag(+), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+) showed strong inhibition on soybean urease, with the silver ion being a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 2.3 x 10(-8) mM). Time-dependent inhibition studies exhibited biphasic kinetics with all heavy metal ions. Furthermore, inhibition studies with sodium salts of mineral acids (NaF, NaCl, NaNO(3), and Na(2)SO(4)) showed that only F(-) inhibited soybean urease significantly (IC(50) = 2.9 mM). Competitive type of inhibition was observed for this anion with a K(i) value of 1.30 mM.

  3. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  4. A comparative 2D QSAR study on a series of hydroxamic acid-based histone deacetylase inhibitors vis-à-vis comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA).

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anubha; Agarwal, Neeraj; Gupta, Satya P

    2014-06-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was performed on a series of indole amide analogues reported by Dai et al. [Bioorg Med Chem Lett (2003), 13, 1897-1901] to act as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. The multiple regression analysis (MRA) revealed a model showing the significant dependence of the activity on molar refractivity (MR) and global topological charge index (GTCI) of the compounds, suggesting that inhibition of the HDAC by this series of compounds might involve the dispersion interaction with the receptor, where charge transfer between pairs of atoms might greatly help to polarize the molecule. The MRA results were then compared with those obtained by Guo et al. [Bioorg Med Chem (2005), 13, 5424-5434] by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). It was found that MRA gave as good results and had as good predictive ability as CoMFA and CoMSIA. Besides, MRA was also able to throw the light on the physicochemical properties of the molecules that were involved in drug-receptor interactions, while CoMFA and CoMSIA could not. The dispersion interaction between the molecule and the active site of the receptor is suggested to be the main interaction.

  5. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  6. Combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid inhibits tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Katsunori; Sato, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shinjiro; Morinaga, Tetsuo; Hirano, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Placental extract contains several biologically active compounds, and pharmacological induction of placental extract has therapeutic effects, such as improving liver function in patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis. Here, we searched for novel molecules with an anti-tumor activity in placental extracts. Active molecules were separated by chromatographic analysis, and their antiproliferative activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. We identified aspartic acid and glutamic acid to possess the antiproliferative activity against human hepatoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid exhibited enhanced antiproliferative activity, and inhibited Akt phosphorylation. We also examined in vivo tumor inhibition activity using the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The treatment mixture (emulsion of the amino acids with Lipiodol) administered by hepatic artery injection inhibited tumor cell growth of the rabbit VX2 liver. These results suggest that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid may be useful for induction of tumor cell death, and has the potential for clinical use as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  7. Inhibition of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J.M.; Agee, K.; Sidow, S.; McNally, K.; Lindsey, K.; Borke, J.; Elsalanty, M.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to extracellular collagen matrix degradation in hybrid layers following adhesive dentin bonding procedures. Endodontic irrigants, including chlorhexidine (CHX) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) may help protect the hybrid layer from this process. The objective of the present study was to determine the exposure time necessary for EDTA to inactivate endogenous MMP activity in human dentin. Methods Dentin beams (2×1×3 mm) were prepared from mid-coronal dentin of extracted third molars. The beams were demineralized in 10 wt% phosphoric acid which also activated endogenous MMPs, and were divided into four experimental groups based on exposure time to 17% EDTA (0, 1, 2 or 5 min). A generic colorimetric MMP assay measured MMP activity via absorbance at 412 nm. Data were evaluated by Kruskal Wallis ANOVA, followed by Dunn’s pair-wise comparisons at α = 0.05. Results All exposure times resulted in significant inhibition (P<0.001) compared to unexposed controls. Specifically, percent inhibition for 1-, 2-, and 5-minute exposure times were 55.1±21.5%, 72.8±11.7%, and 74.7±19.7%, respectively. Conclusions 17% EDTA significantly inhibits endogenous MMP activity of human dentin within 1–2 min. This may minimize hybrid layer degradation following resin bonding procedures in the root canal space. PMID:22152622

  8. Pyridone Methylsulfone Hydroxamate LpxC Inhibitors for the Treatment of Serious Gram-Negative Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Justin I.; Brown, Matthew F.; Reilly, Usa; Price, Loren M.; Abramite, Joseph A.; Arcari, Joel; Barham, Rose; Che, Ye; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Chung, Seung Won; Collantes, Elizabeth M.; Desbonnet, Charlene; Doroski, Matthew; Doty, Jonathan; Engtrakul, Juntyma J.; Harris, Thomas M.; Huband, Michael; Knafels, John D.; Leach, Karen L.; Liu, Shenping; Marfat, Anthony; McAllister, Laura; McElroy, Eric; Menard, Carol A.; Mitton-Fry, Mark; Mullins, Lisa; Noe, Mark C.; O’Donnell, John; Oliver, Robert; Penzien, Joseph; Plummer, Mark; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Thoma, Christy; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Uccello, Daniel P.; Vaz, Alfin; Wishka, Donn G.

    2012-11-09

    The synthesis and biological activity of a new series of LpxC inhibitors represented by pyridone methylsulfone hydroxamate 2a is presented. Members of this series have improved solubility and free fraction when compared to compounds in the previously described biphenyl methylsulfone hydroxamate series, and they maintain superior Gram-negative antibacterial activity to comparator agents.

  9. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  10. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  11. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  12. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    PubMed

    Wang, L L; Johnson, E A

    1992-02-01

    Fatty acids and monoglycerides were evaluated in brain heart infusion broth and in milk for antimicrobial activity against the Scott A strain of Listeria monocytogenes. C12:0, C18:3, and glyceryl monolaurate (monolaurin) had the strongest activity in brain heart infusion broth and were bactericidal at 10 to 20 micrograms/ml, whereas potassium (K)-conjugated linoleic acids and C18:2 were bactericidal at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml. C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, glyceryl monomyristate, and glyceryl monopalmitate were not inhibitory at 200 micrograms/ml. The bactericidal activity in brain heart infusion broth was higher at pH 5 than at pH 6. In whole milk and skim milk, K-conjugated linoleic acid was bacteriostatic and prolonged the lag phase especially at 4 degrees C. Monolaurin inactivated L. monocytogenes in skim milk at 4 degrees C, but was less inhibitory at 23 degrees C. Monolaurin did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in whole milk because of the higher fat content. Other fatty acids tested were not effective in whole or skim milk. Our results suggest that K-conjugated linoleic acids or monolaurin could be used as an inhibitory agent against L. monocytogenes in dairy foods.

  13. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  14. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Stephan M.; Cheah, Sing-Foong; Zapf, Rita; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Sposito, Garrison

    1998-08-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. In this paper, we report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D1, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) mu-mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 mu M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 mu-mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 mu-M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH > 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  15. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.; Cheah, S.F.; Zapf, R.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N.; Sposito, G.

    1999-10-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. The authors report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D{sub 1}, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) {micro}mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 {micro}mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH {gt} 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  16. Azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and inhibits retinoic acid-mediated biological responses.

    PubMed

    Thoh, Maikho; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Raghavendra, Pongali B; Sureshkumar, Chitta; Manna, Sunil K

    2011-02-11

    Considering the role of retinoids in regulation of more than 500 genes involved in cell cycle and growth arrest, a detailed understanding of the mechanism and its regulation is useful for therapy. The extract of the medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica) is used against several ailments especially for anti-inflammatory, anti-itching, spermicidal, anticancer, and insecticidal activities. In this report we prove the detailed mechanism on the regulation of retinoic acid-mediated cell signaling by azadirachtin, active components of neem extract. Azadirachtin repressed all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-mediated nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation, not the DNA binding but the NF-κB-dependent gene expression. It did not inhibit IκBα degradation, IκBα kinase activity, or p65 phosphorylation and its nuclear translocation but inhibited NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Azadirachtin inhibited TRAF6-mediated, but not TRAF2-mediated NF-κB activation. It inhibited ATRA-induced Sp1 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) DNA binding. Azadirachtin inhibited ATRA binding with retinoid receptors, which is supported by biochemical and in silico evidences. Azadirachtin showed strong interaction with retinoid receptors. It suppressed ATRA-mediated removal of retinoid receptors, bound with DNA by inhibiting ATRA binding to its receptors. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and suppresses ATRA binding, inhibits falling off the receptors, and activates transcription factors like CREB, Sp1, NF-κB, etc. Thus, azadirachtin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-metastatic responses by a novel pathway that would be beneficial for further anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies.

  17. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  18. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  19. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  20. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  1. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug. PMID:25228885

  2. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug.

  3. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  4. Synthesis and cholinesterase inhibition of cativic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alza, Natalia P; Richmond, Victoria; Baier, Carlos J; Freire, Eleonora; Baggio, Ricardo; Murray, Ana Paula

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with memory impairment and cognitive deficit. Most of the drugs currently available for the treatment of AD are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In a preliminary study, significant AChE inhibition was observed for the ethanolic extract of Grindelia ventanensis (IC₅₀=0.79 mg/mL). This result prompted us to isolate the active constituent, a normal labdane diterpenoid identified as 17-hydroxycativic acid (1), through a bioassay guided fractionation. Taking into account that 1 showed moderate inhibition of AChE (IC₅₀=21.1 μM), selectivity over butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) (IC₅₀=171.1 μM) and that it was easily obtained from the plant extract in a very good yield (0.15% w/w), we decided to prepare semisynthetic derivatives of this natural diterpenoid through simple structural modifications. A set of twenty new cativic acid derivatives (3-6) was prepared from 1 through transformations on the carboxylic group at C-15, introducing a C2-C6 linker and a tertiary amine group. They were tested for their inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE and some structure-activity relationships were outlined. The most active derivative was compound 3c, with an IC₅₀ value of 3.2 μM for AChE. Enzyme kinetic studies and docking modeling revealed that this inhibitor targeted both the catalytic active site and the peripheral anionic site of this enzyme. Furthermore, 3c showed significant inhibition of AChE activity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, and was non-cytotoxic.

  5. Inhibition of Ileal Water Absorption by Intraluminal Fatty Acids INFLUENCE OF CHAIN LENGTH, HYDROXYLATION, AND CONJUGATION OF FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, Helmut V.; Phillips, Sidney F.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of fatty acids on ileal absorption of water, electrolytes, glucose, and taurocholate was examined in Thirty-Vella fistulas in five mongrel dogs. Fatty acid absorption also was measured. Segments of terminal ileum were perfused at steady state with isotonic electrolyte solutions containing 11.2 mM glucose, 4.5 mM taurocholate, and 0.1-5.0 mM fatty acid. Three C18 fatty acids, oleic acid, 10(9)-hydroxystearic acid, and ricinoleic acid, completely inhibited water absorption at 5 mM. Sodium, chloride, and potassium absorptions were inhibited in parallel with absorption of water. Differences between the potencies of C18 fatty acids were apparent when lesser concentrations were perfused. Dodecanoic and decanoic acids were as effective as C18 fatty acids at 5 mM but octanoic and hexanoic acids were ineffective. The polar group of C18 fatty acids was modified by conjugating oleic and ricinoleic acids with taurine. When these compounds and a substituted C18 fatty acid, p-n-decylbenzenesulfonate, were perfused, water absorption was also inhibited. Short-chain fatty acids (C3 and C4) and their hydroxylated derivatives were ineffective at 5 mM. When water absorption was inhibited, absorption of glucose and taurocholate was decreased. We speculate that the phenomenon of inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption by fatty acids may be relevant to steatorrhea and diarrhea in man. Images PMID:4808636

  6. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia.

  7. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: a suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor alpha=0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor beta=0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  8. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  9. Zinc cross-linked hydroxamated alginates for pulsed drug release

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha S; Deshmukh, Prasad R; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alginates can be tailored chemically to improve solubility, physicochemical, and biological properties and its complexation with metal ion is useful for controlling the drug release. Materials And Methods: Synthesized N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were subsequently complexed with zinc to form beads. Hydroxamation of sodium alginate was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The synthesized polymeric material exhibited reduced aqueous, HCl and NaOH solubility. The hydroxamated derivatives demonstrated pulsed release where change in pH of the dissolution medium stimulated the atenolol release. Conclusion: Atenolol loaded Zn cross-linked polymeric beads demonstrated the sustained the plasma drug levels with increased half-life. Although the synthesized derivatives greatly altered the aqueous solubility of sodium alginate, no significant differences in in vitro and in vivo atenolol release behavior amongst the N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were observed. PMID:24350039

  10. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  11. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  12. Salvianolic acid B inhibits autophagy and protects starving cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Liu, Jian-xun; Li, Xin-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective or lethal role of autophagy and the effects of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on autophagy in starving myocytes. Methods: Cardiac myocytes were incubated under starvation conditions (GD) for 0, 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Autophagic flux in starving cells was measured via chloroquine (3 μmol/L). After myocytes were treated with Sal B (50 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of chloroquine (3 μmol/L) under GD 3 h, the amount of LC3-II, the abundance of LC3-positive fluorescent dots in cells, cell viability and cellular ATP levels were determined using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, MTT assay and luminometer, respectively. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) and immunofluorescent duel labeling of LC3 and Caspase-8 were used to examine the characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis. Results: Immunoblot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II in starving cells increased in a time-dependent manner accompanied by increased LC3-positive fluorescence and decreased cell viability and ATP content. Sal B (50 μmol/L) inhibited the increase in LC3-II, reduced the abundance of LC3 immunofluorescence and intensity of Caspase-8 fluorescence, and enhanced cellular viability and ATP levels in myocytes under GD 3 h, regardless of whether chloroquine was present. Conclusion: Autophagy induced by starvation for 3 h led to cell injury. Sal B protected starving cells by blocking the early stage of autophagic flux and inhibiting apoptosis that occurred during autophagy. PMID:21113177

  13. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  14. Boric acid inhibition of steam generator materials corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wootten, M.J.; Wolfe, C.R.; Hermer, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In 1974, Westinghouse recommended a change from phosphate water chemistry control for nuclear steam generators to one in which no solids are intentionally added, called all volatile treatment (AVT). The reason for the recommended change in water chemistry control was the occurrence of phosphate thinning of the Alloy 600 heat transfer tubes in some operating plants. Since the change over to AVT, other types of corrosion from impurities in the water have been observed of the materials of construction of nuclear steam generators. Initially, several plants observed denting, which is caused by the corrosion of the carbon steel tube support plates. After 8 yr of usage as a denting inhibitor in nuclear plants, no detrimental effects have been identified as due to boric acid. It is believed that boric acid will inhibit denting-type corrosion and caustic attack of Alloy 600; however, it must be stressed that it is not a substitute for good chemistry practices and all levels and disciplines within the operating plant should recognize the importance of rigorous, long-term chemistry control.

  15. Gastric acid inhibition in the treatment of peptic ulcer hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Kovacs, Thomas O G; Jensen, Dennis M

    2009-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease is a common clinical event, resulting in considerable patient morbidity and significant health care costs. Inhibiting gastric acid secretion is a key component in improving clinical outcomes, including reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and surgery. Raising intragastric pH promotes clot stability and reduces the influences of gastric acid and pepsin. Patients with high-risk stigmata for ulcer bleeding (arterial bleeding, nonbleeding visible vessels, and adherent clots) benefit significantly from and should receive high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after successful endoscopic hemostasis. For patients with low-risk stigmata (flat spots or clean ulcer base), oral PPI therapy alone is sufficient. For oozing bleeding (an intermediate risk finding), successful endoscopic hemostasis and oral PPI are recommended. Using intravenous PPIs before endoscopy appears to reduce the frequency of finding high-risk stigmata on later endoscopy, but has not been shown to improve clinical outcomes. High-dose oral PPIs may be as effective as intravenous infusion in achieving positive clinical outcomes, but this has not been documented by randomized studies and its cost-effectiveness is unclear.

  16. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Francis P. Kuhajda, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis DAMD17-96-1-6235 Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S...5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) This grant proposed to study the effect of fatty acid synthesis inhibition in human breast cancer xenografts

  17. Tumor Selective Cytotoxic Action of a Thiomorpholin Hydroxamate Inhibitor (TMI-1) in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Lynda; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Cabaud, Olivier; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Combes, Sébastien; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Viens, Patrice; Collette, Yves; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeted therapies, associated with standard chemotherapies, have improved breast cancer care. However, primary and acquired resistances are frequently observed and the development of new concepts is needed. High-throughput approaches to identify new active and safe molecules with or without an “a priori” are currently developed. Also, repositioning already-approved drugs in cancer therapy is of growing interest. The thiomorpholine hydroxamate compound TMI-1 has been previously designed to inhibit metalloproteinase activity for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We present here the repositioning of TMI-1 drug in breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effect of TMI-1 on luminal, basal and ERBB2-overexpressing breast tumor cell lines and on MMTV-ERBB2/neu tumor evolution. We measured the effects on i) cell survival, ii) cell cycle, iii) extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, iv) association with doxorubicin, docetaxel and lapatinib, v) cancer stem cells compartment. In contrast with conventional cytotoxic drugs, TMI-1 was highly selective for tumor cells and cancer stem cells at submicromolar range. All non-malignant cells tested were resistant even at high concentration. TMI-1 was active on triple negative (TN) and ERBB2-overexpressing breast tumor cell lines, and was also highly efficient on human and murine “primary” ERBB2-overexpressing cells. Treatment of transgenic MMTV-ERBB2/neu mice with 100 mg/kg/day TMI-1 alone induced tumor apoptosis, inhibiting mammary gland tumor occurrence and development. No adverse effects were noticed during the treatment. This compound had a strong synergistic effect in association with docetaxel, doxorubicin and lapatinib. We showed that TMI-1 mediates its selective effects by caspase-dependent apoptosis. TMI-1 was efficient in 34/40 tumor cell lines of various origins (ED50: 0.6 µM to 12.5 µM). Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration of the tumor selective

  18. Amino acids inhibit kynurenic acid formation via suppression of kynurenine uptake or kynurenic acid synthesis in rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Okamoto, Misaki; Kanatani, Yuka; Sano, Mitsue; Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increase of brain KYNA levels is involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. KYNA-producing enzymes have broad substrate specificity for amino acids, and brain uptake of kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is via large neutral amino acid transporters (LAT). In the present study, to find out amino acids with the potential to suppress KYNA production, we comprehensively investigated the effects of proteinogenic amino acids on KYNA formation and KYN uptake in rat brain in vitro. Cortical slices of rat brain were incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer buffer containing a physiological concentration of KYN with individual amino acids. Ten out of 19 amino acids (specifically, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine, alanine, cysteine, glutamine, glutamate, and aspartate) significantly reduced KYNA formation at 1 mmol/L. These amino acids showed inhibitory effects in a dose-dependent manner, and partially inhibited KYNA production at physiological concentrations. Leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, all LAT substrates, also reduced tissue KYN concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, with their inhibitory rates for KYN uptake significantly correlated with KYNA formation. These results suggest that five LAT substrates inhibit KYNA formation via blockade of KYN transport, while the other amino acids act via blockade of the KYNA synthesis reaction in brain. Amino acids can be a good tool to modulate brain function by manipulation of KYNA formation in the brain. This approach may be useful in the treatment and prevention of neurological and psychiatric diseases associated with increased KYNA levels.

  19. Ethacrynic acid inhibits multiple steps in the NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Yusheng; Englert, Joshua A; Delude, Russell L; Fink, Mitchell P

    2005-01-01

    Ethacrynic acid has been used as a safe and effective diuretic for more than 30 years. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ethacrynic acid is also an anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits signaling by the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB. We showed that ethacrynic acid inhibited luciferase expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells transfected with an NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase reporter vector and also inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (electrophoretic mobility shift assay). Ethacrynic acid inhibited degradation of IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Ethacrynic acid impaired DNA binding of wild-type p65 subunits of NF-kappaB in cells. However, DNA binding of a Cys--> Ser p65 mutant was not inhibited by ethacrynic acid, suggesting that ethacrynic acid inhibits DNA binding by alkylating p65 at Cys. In a cell-free system, binding of p50 homodimers to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence was inhibited by ethacrynic acid at concentrations from 10 to 100 microM, indicating that ethacrynic acid probably also covalently modifies the p50 subunit. These data indicate that ethacrynic acid inhibits activation of the NF-kappaB pathway at multiple points and suggest that this well-studied drug warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic for various conditions that are associated with excessive inflammation.

  20. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D.; Wang, Xuming; Li, Minhua

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  1. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  2. Inhibition of Sporulation by Cerulenin and Its Reversion by Exogenous Fatty Acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Tadao; Awaya, Juichi; Ōmura, Satoshi

    1976-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae G2-2 was inhibited by the antibiotic cerulenin which is known to be a specific inhibitor of fatty acid and sterol synthesis. This inhibition was reversed by various fatty acids, especially by oleic acid (C18:1) and pentadecanoic acid (C15:0). Ergosterol showed only slight reversibility of this inhibition. When cerulenin was added to the sporulation medium later than 12 h after the start of incubation, the marked inhibition disappeared. When the fatty acid fraction extracted from the sporulated yeasts was added to the cells pretreated with cerulenin for more than 6 h, sporulation became evident 6 h after the fatty acid fraction addition. Therefore, sufficient synthesis of fatty acids required for sporulation was assumed to occur during the first 6 h in phase I of yeast sporulation. PMID:769672

  3. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Luana T; Moreira, Daniel C; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-15

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  4. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  5. Direct inhibition of retinoic acid catabolism by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Uhlemann, Ria; Regen, Francesca; Heuser, Isabella; Otte, Christian; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence from animal and human studies suggests neuroprotective effects of the SSRI fluoxetine, e.g., in the aftermath of stroke. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Because of its effects on the cytochrome P450 system (CYP450), we hypothesized that neuroprotection by fluoxetine is related to altered metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), whose CYP450-mediated degradation in brain tissue constitutes an important step in the regulation of its site-specific auto- and paracrine actions. Using traditional pharmacological in vitro assays, the effects of fluoxetine on RA degradation were probed in crude synaptosomes from rat brain and human-derived SH-SY5Y cells, and in cultures of neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, retinoid-dependent effects of fluoxetine on neuronal survival following glutamate exposure were investigated in rat primary neurons cells using specific retinoid receptor antagonists. Experiments revealed dose-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal RA degradation by fluoxetine along with dose-dependent increases in RA levels in cell cultures. Furthermore, fluoxetine's neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in rat primary neurons were demonstrated to partially depend on RA signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that the potent, pleiotropic antidepressant fluoxetine directly interacts with RA homeostasis in brain tissue, thereby exerting its neuroprotective effects.

  6. Inhibition of carnitine biosynthesis by valproic acid in rats--the biochemical mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farkas, V; Bock, I; Cseko, J; Sandor, A

    1996-11-08

    The anticonvulsive drug, valproic acid (VPA), inhibits the biosynthesis of carnitine, and may contribute in this way to carnitine deficiency associated with VPA therapy. The conversion of [3H]-butyrobetaine into [3H]-carnitine was determined 60 min following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.2 mmol/kg VPA in rats. The fraction of radioactivity found in [3H]-carnitine in the liver decreased from 63.2 +/- 1.50% to 39.2 +/- 1.11% (mean +/- SEM). Total carnitine in the liver also decreased, whereas the precursor butyrobetaine increased from 5.01 +/- 0.71 nmol/g to 8.22 +/- 0.82 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). VPA also exhibited a dramatic effect on the conversion of an unlabeled loading amount of butyrobetaine. The increment in total carnitine caused by butyrobetaine in liver was reduced from 161 +/- 15.4 nmol/g to 53.2 +/- 5.11 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). These data prove that VPA reduces the flux through butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.1.). The drug in vitro, however, did not inhibit the enzyme directly. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that VPA decreased the level of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; a cofactor of butyrobetaine hydroxylase) from 73.5 +/- 2.90 nmol/g to 52.9 +/- 2.2 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM) in the liver. The level of 1-glutamate showed a rather dramatic decrease in the liver. Moreover, alpha-KG proved to have a protective role against VPA in the [3H]-butyrobetaine conversion experiment.

  7. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  8. New hydroxamate inhibitors of neurotensin-degrading enzymes. Synthesis and enzyme active-site recognition.

    PubMed

    Bourdel, E; Doulut, S; Jarretou, G; Labbe-Jullie, C; Fehrentz, J A; Doumbia, O; Kitabgi, P; Martinez, J

    1996-08-01

    Selective and mixed inhibitors of the three zinc metallopeptidases that degrade neurotensin (NT), e.g. endopeptidase 24-16 (EC 3.4.24.16), endopeptidase 24-11 (EC 3.4.24.11 or neutral endopeptidase, NEP) and endopeptidase 24-15 (EC 3.4.24.15), and leucine-aminopeptidase (type IV-S), that degrades the NT-related peptides, Neuromedin N (NN), are of great interest. On the structural basis of compound JMV 390-1 (N-[3-[(hydroxyamino)carbonyl]-1-oxo-2(R)-benzylpropyl]-L- isoleucyl-L-leucine), which was a full inhibitor of the major NT degrading enzymes, several hydroxamate inhibitors corresponding to the general formula HONHCO-CH2-CH(CH2-C6H5)CO-X-Y-OH (with X-Y = dipeptide) have been synthesized. Compound 7a (X-Y = Ile-Ala) was nearly 40-times more potent in inhibiting EC 24-16 than NEP and more than 800-times more potent than EC 24-15, with an IC50 (12 nM) almost equivalent to that of compound JMV 390-1. Therefore, this compound is an interesting selective inhibitor of EC 24-16, and should be an interesting probe to explore the physiological involvement of EC 24-16 in the metabolism of neurotensin.

  9. Inhibition and Mechanism of HDAC8 Revisited

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have found intense interest as drug targets for a variety of diseases, but there is disagreement about basic aspects of the inhibition and mechanism of HDACs. QM/MM calculations of HDAC8 including a large QM region provide a model that is consistent with the available crystal structures and structure–activity relationships of different HDAC inhibitors. The calculations support a spontaneous proton transfer from a hydroxamic acid to an active site histidine upon binding to the zinc. The role of the H142/D176 catalytic dyad as the general base of the reaction is elucidated. The reasons for the disagreements between previous proposals are discussed. The results provide detailed insights into the unique mechanism of HDACs, including the role of the two catalytic dyads and function of the potassium near the active site. They also have important implications for the design of novel inhibitors for a number of HDACs such as the class IIa HDACs. PMID:25060069

  10. Cellobionic acid inhibition of cellobiohydrolase I and cellobiose dehydrogenase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose is a rate-limiting factor in cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. While cellobiose and glucose inhibition have been extensively investigated, cellobionate inhibition has been minimally studied despite the discovery that accessory proteins such as cello...

  11. The corrosion inhibition of iron and aluminum by various naturally occurring biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hansen, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Biological polymers that exhibit a strong affinity for metal surfaces are increasingly becoming the focus of research toward the development of environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors. This paper deals with the use of various naturally occurring organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors for iron or aluminum. Among the organic molecules considered are catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores isolated from bacteria, the adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L, and caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. FTIR analysis, anodic polarization curves, and AC impedance measurements were used to determine the adsorption and effectiveness of the various organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors. Parabactin, a catecholate siderophore, was effective in inhibiting both the corrosion of iron in hydrochloric acid and the pitting of aluminum in 0.1 M sodium chloride. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel was also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  12. Gene quantification by the NanoGene assay is resistant to inhibition by humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gha-Young; Wang, Xiaofang; Ahn, Hosang; Son, Ahjeong

    2011-10-15

    NanoGene assay is a magnetic bead and quantum dot nanoparticles based gene quantification assay. It relies on a set of probe and signaling probe DNAs to capture the target DNA via hybridization. We have demonstrated the inhibition resistance of the NanoGene assay using humic acids laden genomic DNA (gDNA). At 1 μg of humic acid per mL, quantitiative PCR (qPCR) was inhibited to 0% of its quantification capability whereas NanoGene assay was able to maintain more than 60% of its quantification capability. To further increase the inhibition resistance of NanoGene assay at high concentration of humic acids, we have identified the specific mechanisms that are responsible for the inhibition. We examined five potential mechanisms with which the humic acids can partially inhibit our NanoGene assay. The mechanisms examined were (1) adsorption of humic acids on the particle surface; (2) particle aggregation induced by humic acids; (3) fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by humic acids during hybridization; (4) humic acids mimicking of target DNA; and (5) nonspecific binding between humic acids and target gDNA. The investigation showed that no adsorption of humic acids onto the particles' surface was observed for the humic acids' concentration. Particle aggregation and fluorescence quenching were also negligible. Humic acids also did not mimic the target gDNA except 1000 μg of humic acids per mL and hence should not contribute to the partial inhibition. Four of the above mechanisms were not related to the inhibition effect of humic acids particularly at the environmentally relevant concentrations (<100 μg/mL). However, a substantial amount of nonspecific binding was observed between the humic acids and target gDNA. This possibly results in lesser amount of target gDNA being captured by the probe and signaling DNA.

  13. Polyunsaturated fatty acid inhibition of fatty acid synthase transcription is independent of PPAR activation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Turini, M; Jump, D B; Abraham, S; Reedy, M

    1998-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the (n-6) and (n-3) families inhibit the rate of gene transcription for a number of hepatic lipogenic and glycolytic genes, e.g., fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast, saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids have no inhibitory capability. The suppression of gene transcription resulting from the addition of PUFA to a high carbohydrate diet: occurs quickly (< 3 h) after its addition to a high glucose diet; can be recreated with hepatocytes cultured in a serum-free medium containing insulin and glucocorticoids; can be demonstrated in diabetic rats fed fructose; and is independent of glucagon. While the nature of the intracellular PUFA inhibitor is unclear, it appears that delta-6 desaturation is a required step in the process. Recently, the fatty acid activated nuclear factor, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) was suggested to be the PUFA-response factor. However, the potent PPAR activators ETYA and Wy-14643 did not suppress hepatic expression of FAS, but did induce the PPAR-responsive gene, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX). Similarly, treating rat hepatocytes with 20:4 (n-6) suppressed FAS expression but had no effect on AOX. Thus, it appears that the PUFA regulation of gene transcription involves a PUFA-response factor that is independent from PPAR.

  14. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by chlorogenic acid in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Jia-Da; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet. Recently, it is demonstrated to have potent antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying CGA analgesia. Here, we have found that CGA can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. First, CGA decreased the peak amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Second, CGA shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 41.76 ± 8.65% in the maximum current response to protons but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Third, CGA altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral administered CGA attenuated nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. ASICs are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Our findings CGA inhibition of native ASICs indicated that CGA may exert analgesic action by modulating ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which revealed a novel cellular and molecular mechanism underlying CGA analgesia.

  15. Ethacrynic Acid Inhibits Sphingosylphosphorylcholine-Induced Keratin 8 Phosphorylation and Reorganization via Transglutaminase-2 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Byun, Hyun Jung; Kang, Kyung Jin; Park, Mi Kyung; Lee, Hye Ja; Kang, June Hee; Lee, Eun Ji; Kim, You Ri; Kim, Hyun Ji; Kim, Young Woo; Jung, Kyung Chae; Kim, Soo Youl; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2013-09-30

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is significantly increased in the malicious ascites of tumor patients and induces perinuclear reorganization of keratin 8 (K8) filaments in PANC-1 cells. The reorganization contributes to the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells resulting in increased migration. Recently, we reported that transglutaminase-2 (Tgase-2) is involved in SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization. However, effects of Tgase-2 inhibitors on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization were not clearly studied. We found that ethacrynic acid (ECA) concentration-dependently inhibited Tgase-2. Therefore, we examined the effects of ECA on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization. ECA concentration-dependently suppressed the SPC-induced phosphorylation and perinuclear reorganization of K8. ECA also suppressed the SPC-induced migration and invasion. SPC induced JNK activation through Tgase-2 expression and ECA suppressed the activation and expression of JNK in PANC-1 cells. These results suggested that ECA might be useful to control Tgase-2 dependent metastasis of cancer cells such as pancreatic cancer and lung cancers.

  16. Intracellular dehydroascorbic acid inhibits SVCT2-dependent transport of ascorbic acid in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Cerioni, Liana; Scotti, Maddalena; Cantoni, Orazio

    2015-09-01

    Exposure of U937 cells to low concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (AA) is associated with a prompt cellular uptake and a further mitochondrial accumulation of the vitamin. Under the same conditions, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) uptake was followed by rapid reduction and accumulation of identical intracellular levels of AA, however, in the absence of significant mitochondrial uptake. This event was instead observed after exposure to remarkably greater concentrations of DHA. Furthermore, experiments performed in isolated mitochondria revealed that DHA transport through hexose transporters and Na(+) -dependent transport of AA were very similar. These results suggest that the different subcellular compartmentalization of the vitamin is mediated by events promoting inhibition of mitochondrial AA transport, possibly triggered by low levels of DHA. We obtained results in line with this notion in intact cells, and more direct evidence in isolated mitochondria. This inhibitory effect was promptly reversible after DHA removal and comparable with that mediated by established inhibitors, as quercetin. The results presented collectively indicate that low intracellular concentrations of DHA, because of its rapid reduction back to AA, are a poor substrate for direct mitochondrial uptake. DHA concentrations, however, appear sufficiently high to mediate inhibition of mitochondrial transport of AA/DHA-derived AA.

  17. Antimalarial action of hydroxamate-based iron chelators and potentiation of desferrioxamine action by reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, J; Tsafack, A; Amichai, Y; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based chelators of iron are potent inhibitors of in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Two types of such chelators, the natural desferrioxamine and the synthetic reversed siderophore RSFileum2, are prototypes of antimalarial agents whose action spectra differ in the speed of action, stage dependence, and degree of reversibility of effects. This work explores the possibility of improving the antimalarial efficacy of these agents by using them in various combinations on in vitro cultures of P. falciparum. Growth assessment was based both on total nucleic acid synthesis and on parasitemia. The results indicate that the synthetic reversed siderophore more than complements the antimalarial action of desferrioxamine when applied during either ring, trophozoite, or mixed stages. The combined drug effects were significantly higher than the additive effect of the individual drugs. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for both reversible effects and irreversible (i.e., sustained) effects. Following an 8-h window of exposure the combined drug treatment caused parasite growth arrest and prevented its recovery, even 3 days after the treatment. The fact that such a combination of iron chelators displays a wider action spectrum than either drug alone has implications for the design of chemotherapy regimens. PMID:7695330

  18. Inhibition of N-acetylneuraminate lyase by N-acetyl-4-oxo-D-neuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Gross, H J; Brossmer, R

    1988-05-09

    We show that the 4-oxo analogue of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid strongly inhibits N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NeuAc aldolase, EC 4.1.3.3) from Clostridum perfringens (Ki = 0.025 mM) and Escherichia coli (Ki = 0.15 mM). In each case the inhibition was competitive. N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid; N-Acetylneuraminate lyase; N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid analog; 5-Acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-beta-D-manno-non-2,4-diulosonic acid; 2-Deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetyl-4-oxo-neuraminic acid; Competitive inhibitor.

  19. Structure of malonic acid-based inhibitors bound to human neutrophil collagenase. A new binding mode explains apparently anomalous data.

    PubMed Central

    Brandstetter, H.; Engh, R. A.; Von Roedern, E. G.; Moroder, L.; Huber, R.; Bode, W.; Grams, F.

    1998-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc endopeptidases, which have been implicated in various disease processes. Various classes of MMP inhibitors, including hydroxamic acids, phosphinic acids, and thiols, have been previously described. Most of these mimic peptides, and most likely bind analogous to the corresponding peptide substrates. Among the hydroxamic acids, malonic acid derivatives have been used as MMP inhibitors, although optimization of their inhibition potency was not successful. Here we report the design of malonic acid-based inhibitors using the X-ray structure of a collagenase/inhibitor complex, which revealed a nonsubstrate-like binding mode. The proposed beta-type turn-like conformation for the improved inhibitors was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The observation of nonsubstrate-like binding confirms the original strategy for structure-based modeling of improved malonic acid inhibitors, and explains kinetic data that are inconsistent with substrate-like binding. Detailed interactions for the improved inhibitors seen in the crystal structure also suggest possibilities for further modifications in cycles of structure based drug design. Indeed, we have designed nonpeptidic inhibitors with approximately 500-fold improved inhibition based on these structures. PMID:9655333

  20. Talarolide A, a Cyclic Heptapeptide Hydroxamate from an Australian Marine Tunicate-Associated Fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB-TU011).

    PubMed

    Dewapriya, Pradeep; Prasad, Pritesh; Damodar, Rakesh; Salim, Angela A; Capon, Robert J

    2017-04-06

    A miniaturized 24-well plate microbioreactor approach was used to explore secondary metabolite media dependence in an Australian marine tunicate-associated fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB TU011). Detailed chemical investigations of an antifungal M1-saline cultivation yielded talarolide A (1), only the second reported natural cyclic peptide hydroxamate, and the first from a fungus. The antifungal properties of the M1-saline extract were attributed to the known diterpene glycoside sordarin (2). Structure elucidation of 1 and 2 was achieved by detailed spectroscopic analysis, with amino acid configurations in 1 assigned by the C3 and C18 Marfey's methods, and l-Ala and d-Ala regiochemistry by the recently reported 2D C3 Marfey's method.

  1. Mechanism of specific inhibition of phototropism by phenylacetic acid in corn seedling

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-05-01

    Using geotropism as a control for phototropism, compounds similar to phenylacetic acid that phototreact with flavins and/or have auxin-like activity were examined for their ability to specifically inhibit phototropism in corn seedlings using geotropism as a control. Results using indole-3-acetic acid, napthalene-1-acetic acid, naphthalene-2-acetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and ..beta..-phenylpyruvic acid suggest that such compounds will specifically inhibit phototropism primarily because of their photoreactivity with flavins and not their auxin activity. In addition, the in vivo concentration of phenylacetic acid required to induce specificity was well below that required to stimulate coleoptile growth. Estimates of the percentage of photoreceptor pigment inactivated by phenylacetic acid (>10%) suggest that phenylacetic acid could be used to photoaffinity label the flavoprotein involved in corn seedling phototropism.

  2. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  3. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the Ki values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10.

  4. Ascorbic acid participates in a general mechanism for concerted glucose transport inhibition and lactate transport stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maite A; Angulo, Constanza; Brauchi, Sebastián; Nualart, Francisco; Concha, Ilona I

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel function for ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is an important water-soluble antioxidant and cofactor in various enzyme systems. We have previously demonstrated that an increase in neuronal intracellular ascorbic acid is able to inhibit glucose transport in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Because of the presence of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, ascorbic acid is highly concentrated in brain, testis, lung, and adrenal glands. In this work, we explored how ascorbic acid affects glucose and lactate uptake in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Using immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, the expression of glucose and ascorbic acid transporters in non-neuronal cells was studied. Like neurons, HEK293 cells expressed GLUT1, GLUT3, and SVCT2. With radioisotope-based methods, only intracellular ascorbic acid, but not extracellular, inhibits 2-deoxyglucose transport in HEK293 cells. As monocarboxylates such as pyruvate and lactate, are important metabolic sources, we analyzed the ascorbic acid effect on lactate transport in cultured neurons and HEK293 cells. Intracellular ascorbic acid was able to stimulate lactate transport in both cell types. Extracellular ascorbic acid did not affect this transport. Our data show that ascorbic acid inhibits glucose transport and stimulates lactate transport in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Mammalian cells frequently present functional glucose and monocarboxylate transporters, and we describe here a general effect in which ascorbic acid functions like a glucose/monocarboxylate uptake switch in tissues expressing ascorbic acid transporters.

  5. Pyrazinoic acid and its n-propyl ester inhibit fatty acid synthase type I in replicating tubercle bacilli.

    PubMed

    Zimhony, Oren; Vilchèze, Catherine; Arai, Masayoshi; Welch, John T; Jacobs, William R

    2007-02-01

    The activity of different analogs of pyrazinamide on Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid synthase type I (FASI) in replicating bacilli was studied. Palmitic acid biosynthesis was diminished by 96% in bacilli treated with n-propyl pyrazinoate, 94% in bacilli treated with 5-chloro-pyrazinamide, and 97% in bacilli treated with pyrazinoic acid, the pharmacologically active agent of pyrazinamide. We conclude that the minimal structure of pyrazine ring with an acyl group is sufficient for FASI inhibition and antimycobacterial activity.

  6. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed.

  7. Why Hydroxamates May Not Be the Best Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors--What Some May Have Forgotten or Would Rather Forget?

    PubMed

    Shen, Sida; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-01-05

    Hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been approved as therapeutic agents by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in oncology applications. While the potential utility of such HDACIs in other areas of medicinal chemistry is tremendous, there are significant concerns that "pan-HDAC inhibitors" may be too broadly acting and/or toxic for clinical use beyond oncology. In addition to the isozyme selectivity challenge, the potential mutagenicity of hydroxamate-containing HDAC inhibitors represents a major hindrance in their application to other therapeutic areas. Herein we report on the mutagenicity of known hydroxamates, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their genotoxicity, and review some of the current alternatives to hydroxamates. We conclude that the hydroxamate group, while providing high-potency HDACIs, is not necessarily the best zinc-binding group for HDACI drug discovery.

  8. Why Hydroxamates May Not Be the Best Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors—What Some May Have Forgotten or Would Rather Forget?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Sida

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been approved as therapeutic agents by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in oncology applications. While the potential utility of such HDACIs in other areas of medicinal chemistry is tremendous, there are significant concerns that “pan-HDAC inhibitors” may be too broadly acting and/or toxic for clinical use beyond oncology. In addition to the isozyme selectivity challenge, the potential mutagenicity of hydroxamate-containing HDAC inhibitors represents a major hindrance in their application to other therapeutic areas. Herein we report on the mutagenicity of known hydroxamates, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their genotoxicity, and review some of the current alternatives to hydroxamates. We conclude that the hydroxamate group, while providing high-potency HDACIs, is not necessarily the best zinc-binding group for HDACI drug discovery. PMID:26603496

  9. Vanadate monomers and dimers both inhibit the human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Crans, D C; Simone, C M; Saha, A K; Glew, R H

    1989-11-30

    A combination of enzyme kinetics and 51V NMR spectroscopy was used to identify the species of vanadate that inhibits acid phosphatases. Monomeric vanadate was shown to inhibit wheat germ and potato acid phosphatases. At pH 5.5, the vanadate dimer inhibits the human prostatic acid phosphatase whereas at pH 7.0 it is the vanadate monomer that inhibits this enzyme. The pH-dependent shift in the affinity of the prostatic phosphatase for vanadate is presumably due to deprotonation of an amino acid side chain in or near the binding site resulting in a conformational change in the protein. pH may be a subtle effector of the insulin-like vanadate activity in biological systems and may explain some of the differences in selectivity observed with the protein phosphatases.

  10. Inhibition of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenicity and DNA methylation by ellagic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, R; Gold, B

    1986-01-01

    Ellagic acid, a naturally occurring plant phenol, inhibits the activity of the direct-acting mutagen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNU) in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Ellagic acid at 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mM inhibited the mutagenicity of MeNU (0.40 mM) by 3%, 13%, 45%, and 60%, respectively. Ellagic acid (3 mM) also inhibited the mutagenic activity of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (25-200 mM) in the presence of pyrazole-induced rat liver fraction S-9. The effect of ellagic acid on DNA methylation was studied by incubating 0, 0.72, 1.32, 2.64, and 6.60 mM ellagic acid with DNA (0.9 mM nucleotide) and [3H]MeNU (0.66 mM). HPLC analysis of DNA hydrolysates showed that ellagic acid caused a dose-dependent 36-84% decrease in O6-methylguanine but only a 20% decrease in the 7-methylguanine adduct. Under conditions where methylation at the O6 position of guanine in double-stranded DNA was inhibited 65% by ellagic acid, no significant inhibition of either O6- or 7-methylguanine formation was detected in single-stranded DNA. Affinity-binding studies revealed that [3H]ellagic acid binds equally to double-stranded or single-stranded DNA but that poly(dA X dT) binds 1.5 times as much ellagic acid as does poly(dG X dC). The binding of ellagic acid to DNA is dependent on the concentration of both ellagic acid and DNA. The specific inhibition of O6-methylguanine formation only in double-stranded DNA and the relatively low inhibition of 7-methylguanine formation rule out the possibility that ellagic acid prevents DNA alkylation by scavenging the electrophilic intermediate generated in the hydrolysis of MeNU. The results suggest that ellagic acid inhibition of MeNU-induced mutagenicity is due to specific inhibition of methylation at the O6 position of guanine through an ellagic acid-duplex DNA affinity-binding mechanism. PMID:3464940

  11. Substrate-selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygeanse-2 by Fenamic Acid Derivatives Is Dependent on Peroxide Tone.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-07-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzes the oxygenation of arachidonic acid (AA) and endocannabinoid substrates, placing the enzyme at a unique junction between the eicosanoid and endocannabinoid signaling pathways. COX-2 is a sequence homodimer, but the enzyme displays half-of-site reactivity, such that only one monomer of the dimer is active at a given time. Certain rapid reversible, competitive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to inhibit COX-2 in a substrate-selective manner, with the binding of inhibitor to a single monomer sufficient to inhibit the oxygenation of endocannabinoids but not arachidonic acid. The underlying mechanism responsible for substrate-selective inhibition has remained elusive. We utilized structural and biophysical methods to evaluate flufenamic acid, meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid for their ability to act as substrate-selective inhibitors. Crystal structures of each drug in complex with human COX-2 revealed that the inhibitor binds within the cyclooxygenase channel in an inverted orientation, with the carboxylate group interacting with Tyr-385 and Ser-530 at the top of the channel. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching, continuous-wave electron spin resonance, and UV-visible spectroscopy demonstrate that flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid are substrate-selective inhibitors that bind rapidly to COX-2, quench tyrosyl radicals, and reduce higher oxidation states of the heme moiety. Substrate-selective inhibition was attenuated by the addition of the lipid peroxide 15-hydroperoxyeicosatertaenoic acid. Collectively, these studies implicate peroxide tone as an important mechanistic component of substrate-selective inhibition by flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid.

  12. Synergistic inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in vitro through the combination of octanoic acid and acidic calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Alex L; Castillo, Alejandro; Harris, Kerri B; Keeton, Jimmy T; Hardin, Margaret D; Taylor, T Matthew

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that inhibition of foodborne pathogens can be enhanced by using antimicrobials in combination. A broth dilution assay was devised to determine whether inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to the combination of the fatty acid octanoic acid (OCT) and the organic acid-containing antimicrobial acidic calcium sulfate (ACS) was enhanced compared with the inhibition of the pathogen exposed to either antimicrobial applied singly. MICs for OCT and ACS were 25.00 μg/g and 1.56 ml/liter, respectively, for all strains of the pathogen tested. Fractional inhibitory concentrations (FICs) from the combination exposures were calculated for use in characterizing the antimicrobial interaction as antagonistic, additive indifferent, or synergistic with respect to L. monocytogenes inhibition. Combining OCT and ACS resulted in observed synergistic inhibition of L. monocytogenes; isobolograms for all strains curved toward the origin, and FIC indices (FIC(I)s) were <1.0. Future investigations of the antimicrobial combination should focus on determining the mechanism of action of combined antimicrobials and the levels of antimicrobials required for pathogen inhibition on the surfaces of ready-to-eat meats.

  13. Inhibition of rat liver microsomal fatty acid chain elongation by gemfibrozil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R M; Viñals, M; Alegret, M; Vázquez, M; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Laguna, J C

    1992-03-23

    Gemfibrozil, a hypolipidemic drug mainly used in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemic states, strongly inhibits the rat hepatic microsomal fatty acid chain elongation system in vitro. The inhibition is independent on the reducing cofactor used in the assay. Furthermore, gemfibrozil seems to act by inhibiting the rate-limiting step of the elongation process, the condensing reaction, without discriminating among the proposed three different condensing enzymes, devoted to condensation of saturated, mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated acyl-CoA substrates.

  14. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  15. Microencapsulation of tannic acid for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Iyer, Vidya; Flores, Floirendo P; Donhowe, Erik; Kong, Fanbin

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity is rapidly rising worldwide. Recently, there is increasing evidence that phytochemicals such as polyphenols in our diet could directly inhibit the activities of key digestive enzymes, representing a novel method of controlling and preventing diabetes mellitus and obesity. More research is required to determine how to effectively utilize phytochemicals within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to obtain maximum inhibition of digestive enzymes. This study investigated the inhibition efficiency of tannic acid (TA) on α-amylase as compared with other potential inhibitors using an in vitro method. The inhibition mode and kinetics were studied. The results showed that tannic acid (TA) is more effective in inhibiting α-amylase than a commercial starch blocker (Phase 2 Starch Blocker), and some selected flavonoids and polyphenols including quercetin, rutin, and polyphenon from green tea. It is also found that inhibition of α-amylase by TA in the GI tract is difficult if administered orally due to the non-specific and reversible noncompetitive interaction between tannic acid and α-amylase or other proteins. Accordingly, a pH-sensitive delivery system using calcium-alginate microspheres encapsulating tannic acid was successfully developed for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the GI tract. The encapsulated TA in calcium-alginate microspheres could be protected from the proteins in the stomach, and sustain release and inhibit α-amylase activity in the small intestine.

  16. Inhibition of Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. by fatty acids and their monoglycerides.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Clelia; Cardillo, Daniela; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2007-05-01

    The antifungal activity of three fatty acids (lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids) and their monoglycerides (monolaurin, monomyristic acid, and palmitin, respectively) against Aspergillus and Penicillium species in a model system was investigated. Data were modeled through a reparameterized Gompertz equation. The maximum colony diameter attained within the experimental time (30 days), the maximal radial growth rate, the lag time (i.e., the number of days before the beginning of radial fungal growth), and the minimum detection time (MDT; the number of days needed to attain 1 cm colony diameter) were evaluated. Fatty acids and their monoglycerides inhibited mold growth by increasing MDT and lag times. The effectiveness of the active compounds seemed to be strain and genus dependent. Palmitic acid was the most effective chemical against aspergilli, whereas penicilli were strongly inhibited by myristic acid. Aspergilli also were more susceptible to fatty acids than were penicilli, as indicated by the longer MDT.

  17. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  18. A ROLE FOR AMPK IN THE INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as β-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:19646964

  19. Destabilization, oligomerization and inhibition of the mitogenic activity of acidic fibroblast-growth factor by aurintricarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lozano, R M; Rivas, G; Giménez-Gallego, G

    1997-08-15

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid has been used to inhibit angiogenesis, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and cell transformation, an effect that has been attributed to its relatively nonspecific inhibitory activity of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Here, we show that this compound binds to acidic fibroblast growth factor, a prototypic member of a family of protein mitogens activated by heparin, altering its physicochemical properties and decreasing its mitogenic activity. Counteraction of the effects of aurintricarboxylic acid by heparin shows that the two compounds have opposite and reversible effects on acidic fibroblast growth factor structure and biological activity. The studies reported here may contribute to a deeper understanding of the inhibition of fibroblast-growth-factor-dependent mitogenesis of relevance to future pharmacologic developments.

  20. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks.

  1. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula.

  2. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hermer, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied via crevice flushing, low power soaks, on-line, or using a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and how it should be correctly applied. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. This document has been prepared to be a comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. 49 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. MYB76 Inhibits Seed Fatty Acid Accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shaowei; Jin, Changyu; Li, Dong; Gao, Chenhao; Qi, Shuanghui; Liu, Kaige; Hai, Jiangbo; Ma, Haoli; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    The MYB family of transcription factors is important in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. However, their role in regulating fatty acid accumulation in seeds is still largely unclear. Here, we found that MYB76, localized in the nucleus, was predominantly expressed in developing seeds during maturation. The myb76 mutation caused a significant increase in the amounts of total fatty acids and several major fatty acid compositions in mature seeds, suggesting that MYB76 functioned as an important repressor during seed oil biosynthesis. RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed remarkable alteration of numerous genes involved in photosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, modification, and degradation, and oil body formation in myb76 seeds at 12 days after pollination. These results help us to understand the novel function of MYB76 and provide new insights into the regulatory network of MYB transcriptional factors controlling seed oil accumulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:28270825

  4. Salicylic acid inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) by competitively inhibiting polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Lin; Wu, Yanwen; Fan, Junfeng; Ouyang, Jie

    2015-03-15

    The inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of salicylic acid (SA) on the browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut were investigated. Shelled and sliced chestnuts were immersed in different concentrations of an SA solution, and the browning of the chestnut surface and interior were inhibited. The activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) extracted from chestnuts were measured in the presence and absence of SA. SA at concentrations higher than 0.3g/L delayed chestnut browning by significantly inhibiting the PPO activity (P<0.01), and the POD activity was not significantly affected (P>0.05). The binding and inhibition modes of SA with PPO and POD, determined by AUTODOCK 4.2 and Lineweaver-Burk plots, respectively, established SA as a competitive inhibitor of PPO.

  5. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  6. recA gene product is responsible for inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Trgovcević, Z; Petranović, D; Petranović, M; Salaj-Smic, E

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation was studied in wild-type, uvrA, recB, recA recB, and recA Escherichia coli strains. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, which occurs almost immediately after exposing the cells to ultraviolet radiation, depends on the functional gene recA. PMID:6997276

  7. Inhibition of the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Manole, Gheorghe; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly inhibited by weak acids although the mechanism by which these compounds act is not completely understood. A series of substituted benzoic acids, nipecotic acid, ortho- and para-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid were investigated as inhibitors of three β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from this pathogen, mtCA 1 (Rv1284), mtCA 2 (Rv3588c) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). All three enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the submicromolar to the micromolar one, depending on the scaffold present in the carboxylic acid. mtCA 3 was the isoform mostly inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s in the range of 0.11-0.97 µM); followed by mtCA 2 (K(I)s in the range of 0.59-8.10 µM), whereas against mtCA 1, these carboxylic acids showed inhibition constants in the range of 2.25-7.13 µM. This class of relatively underexplored β-CA inhibitors warrant further in vivo studies, as they may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug or extensive multi-drug resistance.

  8. DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN NORMAL HEPATOCYTES OF MALE F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA} inhibits proliferation and apoptosis in nonnal hepatocytes of
    male F344 rats.

    Large segments of the population are chronically exposed to dichloroacetic acid (DCA}: DCA is a by product of the chlorine disinfection of drinking water, a metab...

  9. Photodegradation of lipopolysaccharides and the inhibition of macrophage activation by anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Miura, Takuya; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-07

    Target-selective photodegradation of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulopyranosonic acid (KDO) was achieved without additives and under neutral conditions using a designed anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrid and long wavelength UV light irradiation. The hybrid can photodegrade lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and inhibit macrophage activation induced by LPS.

  10. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight.

  11. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  12. Selective inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ synthesis in human neutrophils by ethacrynic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.H.

    1986-05-29

    Addition of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors, ethyacrynic acid (ET), caffeic acid (CA), and ferulic acid (FA) to human neutrophils led to inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ (LTC/sub 4/) synthesis induced by calcium ionophore A23187. ET is the most specific of these inhibitors for it had little effect on LTB/sub 4/, PGE/sub 2/, and 5-HETE synthesis. The inhibition of LTC/sub 4/ was irreversible and time dependent. ET also had little effect on /sup 3/H-AA release from A23187-stimulated neutrophils.

  13. Zoledronic acid inhibits aromatase activity and phosphorylation: potential mechanism for additive zoledronic acid and letrozole drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Schech, Amanda J; Nemieboka, Brandon E; Brodie, Angela H

    2012-11-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate originally indicated for use in osteoporosis, has been reported to exert a direct effect on breast cancer cells, although the mechanism of this effect is currently unknown. Data from the ABCSG-12 and ZO-FAST clinical trials suggest that treatment with the combination of ZA and aromatase inhibitors (AI) result in increased disease free survival in breast cancer patients over AI alone. To determine whether the mechanism of this combination involved inhibition of aromatase, AC-1 cells (MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with an aromatase construct) were treated simultaneously with combinations of ZA and AI letrozole. This combination significantly increased inhibition of aromatase activity of AC-1 cells when compared to letrozole alone. Treatment of 1 nM letrozole in combination with 1 μM or 10 μM ZA resulted in an additive drug interaction on inhibition of cell viability, as measured by MTT assay. Treatment with ZA was found to inhibit phosphorylation of aromatase on serine residues. Zoledronic acid was also shown to be more effective in inhibiting cell viability in aromatase transfected AC-1 cells when compared to inhibition of cell viability observed in non-transfected MCF-7. Estradiol was able to partially rescue the effect of 1 μM and 10 μM ZA on cell viability following treatment for 72 h, as shown by a shift to the right in the estradiol dose-response curve. In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of ZA and letrozole results in an additive inhibition of cell viability. Furthermore, ZA alone can inhibit aromatase activity through inhibition of serine phosphorylation events important for aromatase enzymatic activity and contributes to inhibition of cell viability.

  14. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  15. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O'Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-03-31

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001% (w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the S. aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01% (w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1% (w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters.

  16. alpha-Linolenic acid protects renal cells against palmitic acid lipotoxicity via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Katsoulieris, Elias; Mabley, Jon G; Samai, Mohamed; Green, Irene C; Chatterjee, Prabal K

    2009-11-25

    Unsaturated fatty acids may counteract the lipotoxicity associated with saturated fatty acids. Palmitic acid induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caused apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the renal proximal tubular cell line, NRK-52E. We investigated whether alpha-linolenic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, protected against ER stress and cell death induced by palmitic acid or by other non-nutrient ER stress generators. Incubation of NRK-52E cells for 24h with palmitic acid produced a significant increase in apoptosis and necrosis. Palmitic acid also increased levels of three indicators of ER stress - the phosphorylated form of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78). alpha-Linolenic acid dramatically reduced cell death and levels of all three indicators of ER stress brought about by palmitic acid. Tunicamycin, which induces ER stress by glycosylation of proteins, produced similar effects to those obtained using palmitic acid; its effects were partially reversed by alpha-linolenic acid. Salubrinal (a phosphatase inhibitor) causes increased levels of the phosphorylated form of eIF2alpha - this effect was partially reversed by alpha-linolenic acid. Palmitoleate, a monosaturated fatty acid, had similar effects to those of alpha-linolenic acid. These results suggest that part of the mechanism of protection of the kidney by unsaturated fatty acids is through inhibition of ER stress, eIF2alpha phosphorylation and consequential reduction of CHOP protein expression and apoptotic renal cell death.

  17. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  18. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  19. Inhibition of tubulin polymerization by hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kim, Shannon B; Hogan, Katherine M

    2011-04-15

    Protein thiol oxidation and modification by nitric oxide and glutathione are emerging as common mechanisms to regulate protein function and to modify protein structure. Also, thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. We assessed the effect of the oxidants hypochlorous acid and chloramines on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by the oxidants was monitored by labeling tubulin with the thiol-selective reagent 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein; by reaction with Ellman's reagent, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid); and by detecting interchain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Whereas HOCl induced both cysteine and methionine oxidation of tubulin, chloramines were predominantly cysteine oxidants. Cysteine oxidation of tubulin, rather than methionine oxidation, was associated with loss of microtubule polymerization activity, and treatment of oxidized tubulin with disulfide reducing agents restored a considerable portion of the polymerization activity that was lost after oxidation. By comparing the reactivity of hypochlorous acid and chloramines with the previously characterized oxidants, peroxynitrite and the nitroxyl donor Angeli's salt, we have identified tubulin thiol oxidation, not methionine oxidation or tyrosine nitration, as a common outcome responsible for decreased polymerization activity.

  20. Myrsinoic acid B inhibits the production of hydrogen sulfide by periodontal pathogens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satomi; Shimura, Susumu; Tanaka, Tomoko; Yaegaki, Ken

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we reported that myrsinoic acid B purified from Myrsine seguinii inhibited methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) production by Fusobacterium nucleatum JCM8532. Since hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is the main component of physiological halitosis, while CH(3)SH is involved in pathological oral halitosis, the objective of this study is to determine whether myrsinoic acid B inhibits H(2)S production by oral microorganisms. F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola were incubated with myrsinoic acid B and a substrate such as l-cysteine or l-methionine. H(2)S or CH(3)SH concentration in the headspace air, was determined using a gas chromatograph. The concentration of myrsinoic acid B inhibiting 50% (IC(50)) of H(2)S production by F. nucleatum was 0.142 µg ml(-1), and the IC(50) of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were 2.71 µg ml(-1) and 28.9 µg ml(-1), respectively. The presence of pyruvate, a by-product of H(2)S production, was determined. The IC(50) values of myrsinoic acid B for pyruvate production were 22.9 µg ml(-1) for F. nucleatum, 87.7 µg ml(-1) for P. gingivalis and 165 µg ml(-1) for T. denticola. We concluded that myrsinoic acid B inhibited the production of both H(2)S and pyruvate by periodontal pathogens.

  1. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  2. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  3. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-01-26

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor.

  4. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid correlates with the concentration of the free form.

    PubMed

    Kelmer-Bracht, A M; Bracht, A

    1993-05-01

    Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug, was measured in order to correlate the effect of the drug with the concentration of the free drug. The concentration of free drug was changed in two ways: (a) by changing the albumin concentration at a fixed total (free+bound) niflumic acid concentration; and, (b) by changing the drug concentration at a fixed albumin concentration. The degree of inhibition of gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid depends strictly on the concentration of the free drug, with half-maximal inhibition at 19.25 microM. This result is consistent with binding equilibrium in the extracellular space and with a flow-limited distribution between the extra- and intracellular spaces as proposed by our previous work.

  5. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  6. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  7. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Research. 56: 1189-1193, 1996. 19. Witters, L . and Kemp, B. Insulin activation of acetyl -CoA carboxylase accompanied by inhibition of the 5’-AMP...substrate for FAS, malonyl-CoA acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane to regulate fatty acid oxidation by inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1...compared to the xenograft, it has about 10 fold higher levels of acetyl -CoA, and higher levels of other CoA derivatives. These data indicate significant

  8. Tannic acid inhibits Staphylococcus aureus surface colonization in an IsaA-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Payne, David E; Martin, Nicholas R; Parzych, Katherine R; Rickard, Alex H; Underwood, Adam; Boles, Blaise R

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization.

  9. Tannic Acid Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Surface Colonization in an IsaA-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David E.; Martin, Nicholas R.; Parzych, Katherine R.; Rickard, Alex H.; Underwood, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization. PMID:23208606

  10. In vitro inhibition of OATP-mediated uptake of phalloidin using bile acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Vicens, Marta; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocyte uptake of phalloidin is carried out mainly by OATP1B1. We have used this compound as a prototypic substrate and assayed the ability to inhibit OATP-mediated phalloidin transport of four bile acid derivatives (BALU-1, BALU-2, BALU-3 and BALU-4) that showed positive results in preliminary screening. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes for heterologous expression of transporters, BALUs were found to inhibit taurocholic acid (TCA) transport by OATP1B1 (but not OATP1B3) as well as by rat Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4 and Oatp1b2. The study of their ability to inhibit sodium-dependent bile acid transporters revealed that the four BALUs induced an inhibition of rat Asbt-mediated TCA transport, which was similar to TCA-induced self-inhibition. Regarding human NTCP and rat Ntcp, BALU-1 differs from the other three BALUS in its lack of effect on TCA transport by these proteins. Using HPLC-MS/MS and CHO cells stably expressing OATP1B1 the ability of BALU-1 to inhibit the uptake of phalloidin itself by this transporter was confirmed. Kinetic analysis using X. laevis oocytes revealed that BALU-1-induced inhibition of OATP1B1 was mainly due to a competitive mechanism (Ki = 8 {mu}M). In conclusion, BALU-1 may be useful as a pharmacological tool to inhibit the uptake of compounds mainly taken up by OATP1B1 presumably without impairing bile acid uptake by the major carrier accounting for this process, i.e., NTCP.

  11. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  12. Inhibition of Yeast Growth by Octanoic and Decanoic Acids Produced during Ethanolic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Rosa, M. Fernanda; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Novais, Júlio M.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibition of growth by octanoic or decanoic acids, two subproducts of ethanolic fermentation, was evaluated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus in association with ethanol, the main product of fermentation. In both strains, octanoic and decanoic acids, at concentrations up to 16 and 8 mg/liter, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate and the biomass yield at 30°C as an exponential function of the fatty acid concentration and increased the duration of growth latency. These toxic effects increased with a decrease in pH in the range of 5.4 to 3.0, indicating that the undissociated form is the toxic molecule. Decanoic acid was more toxic than octanoic acid. The concentrations of octanoic and decanoic acids were determined during the ethanolic fermentation (30°C) of two laboratory media (mineral and complex) by S. cerevisiae and of Jerusalem artichoke juice by K. marxianus. Based on the concentrations detected (0.7 to 23 mg/liter) and the kinetics of growth inhibition, the presence of octanoic and decanoic acids cannot be ignored in the evaluation of the overall inhibition of ethanolic fermentation. PMID:16347826

  13. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  14. Crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of human fatty acid synthase inhibited by orlistat

    SciTech Connect

    Pemble,C.; Johnson, L.; Kridel, S.; Lowther, W.

    2007-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is uniquely expressed at high levels in many tumor types. Pharmacological inhibition of FAS therefore represents an important therapeutic opportunity. The drug Orlistat, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inhibits FAS, induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and inhibits the growth of prostate tumor xenografts. We determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of FAS inhibited by Orlistat. Orlistat was captured in the active sites of two thioesterase molecules as a stable acyl-enzyme intermediate and as the hydrolyzed product. The details of these interactions reveal the molecular basis for inhibition and suggest a mechanism for acyl-chain length discrimination during the FAS catalytic cycle. Our findings provide a foundation for the development of new cancer drugs that target FAS.

  15. Inhibition of cold insolubility of an IgA cryoglobulin by decanedicarboxylic acid and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Lalezari, P; Kumar, M; Kumar, K M; Lawrence, C

    1983-11-01

    Cold insolubility of a serum IgA cryoimmunoglobulin was found to be inhibited by the addition of 1.5 mM sodium decanedicarboxylate in vitro. The patient with the cryoglobulin had advanced multiple myeloma complicated by severe hyperviscosity that caused lethargy and episodic loss of consciousness. Decanedicarboxylic acid administered orally resulted in transient relief of symptoms and the loss of cryoprecipitability of the paraprotein. Further in vitro studies revealed that sodium salts of long-chain monocarboxylic acids with a minimum of eight carbons, and dicarboxylic acids with a minimum of 12 carbons inhibited cryoprecipitation. Salts of short-chain carboxylic acids, by contrast, enhanced cryoprecipitation. Sodium phenolate and sodium salts of benzoic acid, 2,4-DNP, phenylpropionic acid, and salicylic acid were also inhibitory. These latter compounds, which have a ring structure, did not cause precipitation at any concentration. It was demonstrated that the presence of a free carboxylic group was required for these activities; conversion of carboxylic acid to amide resulted in the loss of both the inhibitory and cryoprecipitation-enhancing effects. Normal plasma, or plasma from five other patients who had IgG, IgM, or mixed-type cryoglobulinemia, were not affected by any of these compounds. It is suggested that in selected cases of hyperviscosity syndrome associated with cryoglobulinemia, some of these compounds, especially monocarboxylic acids with appropriate chain lengths, or those with a ring structure, may have therapeutic applications.

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid protects colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosome formation.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tohru; Yui, Satoko; Hirai, Tadashi; Fujii, Takami; Okada, Sawami; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDC) requires prolonged (≥5 h) preincubation to exhibit effective protection of colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid (DC)-induced apoptosis. Although UDC diminished DC-mediated caspase-9 activation, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria was not inhibited, indicating that UDC acts on the steps of caspase-9 activation. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the effects of UDC on the factors involved in caspase-9 activation. We found that UDC had no significant effect on the expression of antiapoptotic XIAP. Furthermore, UDC did not affect the expression or release of proapoptotic Smac/DIABLO, or the association of XIAP and Smac/DIABLO. In contrast, association of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 stimulated by 500 μM DC was inhibited by UDC pretreatment. Although UDC caused remarkable activation of Akt/PKB, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor did not significantly reduce UDC-mediated cytoprotection. Furthermore, phosphorylation of threonine residues on caspase-9 after UDC pretreatment could not be detected. UDC-mediated cytoprotection was independent of the MAPK pathway, and cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogue did not inhibit DC-induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that UDC protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids, by inhibiting apoptosome formation independently of the survival signals mediated by the PI3K, MAPK, or cAMP pathways.

  17. External concentration of organic acid anions and pH: key independent variables for studying how organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C E; Broadbent, J R

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods are not fully understood, it is clear that intracellular accumulation of anions is a primary contributor to inhibition of bacterial growth. We hypothesize that intracellular accumulation of anions is driven by 2 factors, external anion concentration and external acidity. This hypothesis follows from basic chemistry principles that heretofore have not been fully applied to studies in the field, and it has led us to develop a novel approach for predicting internal anion concentration by controlling the external concentration of anions and pH. This approach overcomes critical flaws in contemporary experimental design that invariably target concentration of either protonated acid or total acid in the growth media thereby leaving anion concentration to vary depending on the pK(a) of the acids involved. Failure to control external concentration of anions has undoubtedly confounded results, and it has likely led to misleading conclusions regarding the antimicrobial action of organic acids. In summary, we advocate an approach for directing internal anion levels by controlling external concentration of anions and pH because it presents an additional opportunity to study the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit bacterial growth. Knowledge gained from such studies would have important application in the control of important foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, and may also facilitate efforts to promote the survival in foods or beverages of desirable probiotic bacteria.

  18. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  19. Volatile Fatty Acids and the Inhibition of Escherichia coli Growth by Rumen Fluid1

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Meyer J.

    1969-01-01

    Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) normally found in bovine rumen fluid inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in Antibiotic Medium 3. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids each produced growth inhibition which was markedly pH-dependent. Little inhibition was observed at pH 7.0, and inhibition increased with decreasing pH. A combination of 60 μmoles of acetate, 20 μmoles of propionate, and 15 μmoles of butyrate per ml gave 96, 69, and 2% inhibition at pH 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0, respectively. Rumen fluid (50%) gave 89 and 48% inhibition at pH 6.0 and 6.5, respectively, and growth stimulation (22%) at pH 7.0. Rumen fluid inhibitory activity was heat-stable, was not precipitated by 63% ethyl alcohol, and was lost by dialysis and by treatment with anion-exchange resins but not with cation-exchange resins. These results are consistent with the idea that VFA are the inhibitory substances in rumen fluid. Previous results which indicated that rumen fluid VFA did not inhibit E. coli growth were due to lack of careful control of the final pH of the growth medium. The E. coli strain used does not grow in rumen fluid alone at pH 7.0. PMID:4886864

  20. Visual and fluorogenic detection of a nerve agent simulant via a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate.

    PubMed

    Han, Shoufa; Xue, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhen; Wen, Ting Bin

    2010-11-28

    A visual and fluorogenic detection method for a nerve agent simulant was developed based on a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate, in the presence of diethyl chlorophosphate, under alkaline conditions.

  1. Non-specific SIRT inhibition as a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of ginkgolic acids and urushiols.

    PubMed

    Ryckewaert, Lucie; Sacconnay, Lionel; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia

    2014-09-02

    Ginkgolic acids and urushiols are natural alkylphenols known for their mutagenic, carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. However, the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds has not been thoroughly elucidated so far. Considering that the SIRT inhibitory potential of anacardic acids has been hypothesized by in silico techniques, we herein demonstrated through both in vitro and computational methods that structurally related compounds such as ginkgolic acids and urushiols are able to modulate SIRT activity. Moreover, their SIRT inhibitory profile and cytotoxicity were comparable to sirtinol, a non-specific SIRT inhibitor (SIRT1 and SIRT2), and different from EX-527, a SIRT1 specific inhibitor. This is the first report on the SIRT inhibition of ginkgolic acids and urushiols. The results reported here are in line with previously observed effects on the induction of apoptosis by this class of compounds, and the non-specific SIRT inhibition is suggested as a new mechanism for their in vitro cytotoxicity.

  2. Pharmacological characterization of histone deacetylase inhibitor and tumor cell-growth inhibition properties of new benzofuranone compounds.

    PubMed

    Blanquart, C; François, M; Charrier, C; Bertrand, P; Gregoire, M

    2011-10-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation or histone deacetylation, are early events in cell tumorigenesis. The consequences of these modifications are repression of gene transcription and, notably, of tumor suppressor gene transcription. New therapeutic strategies aim to 'normalize' the epigenetic status of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising effects against proliferation and resistance to apoptosis of a large number of cancer cells. Vorinostat (SAHA), a hydroxamate HDACi, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). However, HDACi are poorly specific, present toxicities and many have very low half-lives in the plasma. Thus, the development of new compounds is necessary in order to increase the potential of HDACi in cancer treatment. We designed an assay, based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology, to screen and characterize HDACi activity in living cells. Using our specific and reproducible BRET assay, we characterized the pharmacological properties of benzofuranone HDACi compounds for the induction of histone acetylation and performed a comparison with the properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA). We defined a benzofuranone HDACi compound that induced histone acetylation at nanomolar concentrations and showed an increased duration of histone acetylation. These properties correlated with the pharmacological properties of this HDACi for the growth inhibition of cancer cells. We, thus, demonstrated the applicability of BRET technology for the screening and characterization of new HDACi compounds in living cells, and identified an interesting benzofuranone HDACi.

  3. Bacteria and acid drainage from coal refuse: inhibition by sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, P.R.; Apel, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies have shown that the application of an aqueous solution of sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate to the surface of high-sulphur coal refuse inhibits the activity of iron- and sulphur-oxidising chemo-autotrophic bacteria and reduces the amount of acid drainage from the refuse. Further studies are recommended to assess the usefulness of this method for controlling formation of acid mine drainage in the field.

  4. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Van heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC50-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg−1. In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 605–611. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600056 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870544

  5. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Van Heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-02-12

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC(50)-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg(-1). In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action.

  6. Autoxidated linolenic acid inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus via oxylipin species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shijuan; Liang, Yating; Zhang, Jindan; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus species are among the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds in nature. Although it has been known for a long time that seeds with high oil content are more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis remains controversial. Here we demonstrate in A. flavus that both the saturated stearic acid (C18:0) and the polyunsaturated linolenic acid (C18:3) promoted aflatoxin production, while C18:3, but not C18:0, inhibited aflatoxin biosynthesis after exposure to air for several hours. Further experiments showed that autoxidated C18:3 promoted mycelial growth, sporulation, and kojic acid production, but inhibited the expression of genes in the AF biosynthetic gene cluster. Mass spectrometry analyses of autoxidated C18:3 fractions that were able to inhibit aflatoxin biosynthesis led to the identification of multiple oxylipin species. These results may help to clarify the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis, and may explain why controversial results have been obtained for fatty acids in the past.

  7. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, A. R.; Reddy, M. M.; Aiken, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO 3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (Ω = 4.5), P CO2 (10 -3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not.

  8. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Continuous or discontinuous tranexamic acid effectively inhibits fibrinolysis in children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Roland; Rubatti, Marina; Credico, Carmen; Louvain-Quintard, Virginie; Anerkian, Vregina; Doubine, Sylvie; Vasse, Marc; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas

    2014-04-01

    Tranexamic acid is given continuously or discontinuously as an anti-fibrinolytic therapy during cardiac surgery, but the effects on fibrinolysis parameters remain poorly investigated. We sought to assess the effects of continuous and discontinuous tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis parameters in children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Children requiring cardiac surgery or repeat surgery by sternotomy with CPB for congenital heart disease were randomized to receive either continuous or discontinuous tranexamic acid. Blood tranexamic acid, D-dimers, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), tPA-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (tPA-PAI1) complexes, fibrinogen and fibrin monomers were measured and compared to values obtained from children who did not receive tranexamic acid. Tranexamic acid inhibited the CPB-induced increase in D-dimers, with a similar potency between continuous and discontinuous regimens. Time courses for tPA, fibrin monomers, and fibrinogen were also similar for both regimen, and there was a significant difference in tPA-PAI1 complex concentrations at the end of surgery, which may be related to a significantly higher tranexamic acid concentration. Continuous and discontinuous regimen are suitable for an effective inhibition of fibrinolysis in children undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB, but the continuous regimen was previously shown to be more effective to maintain stable tranexamic acid concentrations.

  10. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D; Convertino, Marino; De Vivo, Marco

    2016-06-20

    The design of multitarget-directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget-directed ligand named ARN2508 (2-[3-fluoro-4-[3-(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2-arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti-inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX.

  11. Fatty acid synthesis is inhibited by inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids for glycerolipid assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Philip D.; Johnson, Sean R.; Cao, Xia; Li, Jia; Nam, Jeong-Won; Jaworski, Jan G.; Ohlrogge, John B.; Browse, John

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of unusual fatty acids through β-oxidation within transgenic plants has long been hypothesized as a major factor limiting the production of industrially useful unusual fatty acids in seed oils. Arabidopsis seeds expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase accumulate hydroxylated fatty acids up to 17% of total fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols; however, total seed oil is also reduced up to 50%. Investigations into the cause of the reduced oil phenotype through in vivo [14C]acetate and [3H]2O metabolic labeling of developing seeds surprisingly revealed that the rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis within the transgenic seeds was approximately half that of control seeds. RNAseq analysis indicated no changes in expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in hydroxylase-expressing plants. However, differential [14C]acetate and [14C]malonate metabolic labeling of hydroxylase-expressing seeds indicated the in vivo acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity was reduced to approximately half that of control seeds. Therefore, the reduction of oil content in the transgenic seeds is consistent with reduced de novo fatty acid synthesis in the plastid rather than fatty acid degradation. Intriguingly, the coexpression of triacylglycerol synthesis isozymes from castor along with the fatty acid hydroxylase alleviated the reduced acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity, restored the rate of fatty acid synthesis, and the accumulation of seed oil was substantially recovered. Together these results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism that detects inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids within the endoplasmic reticulum and activates an endogenous pathway for posttranslational reduction of fatty acid synthesis within the plastid. PMID:24398521

  12. Inhibition of Cervical Cancer by Promoting IGFBP7 Expression Using Ellagic Acid from Pomegranate Peel

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongjun; Zhang, Dongya; Fu, Qingrui

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism by which cervical cancer is inhibited by promoting IGFBP7 expression using ellagic acid from pomegranate peel extract. Material/Methods HeLa cells were divided into 6 groups: control group (NC), blank control group (BL), and IGFBP7 overexpression group (IGFBP7), and 2.5 uM, 5. 0 uM, and 10.0 uM ellagic acid-treated groups. The cell proliferation ability was detected and the degree of invasion in the 6 groups was measured by Transwell assay. The expression levels of IGFBP7 and AKT/mTOR in the 6 groups of cells were detected by RT-PCR technique. Results Compared with NC and BL groups, The IGFBP7 gene expressions of the IGFPB7 and ellagic acid-treated groups were significantly increased (P<0.05). There was a dose-effect dependence in the ellagic acid-treated groups. The invasion ability of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups was significantly lower than that of NC and BL groups in HeLa cells (P<0.05). The apoptosis rate of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the NC and BL groups in HeLa cells (P<0.05). AKT and mTOR mRNA and protein expressions of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups were significantly lower than that of the NC and BL groups (P<0.05). There was a dose-effect dependence in the ellagic acid-treated groups. Conclusions The ellagic acid in pomegranate peel extract can inhibit the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by enhancing the expression level of IGFBP7, which can inhibit the HeLa cells in cervical cancer. PMID:27941714

  13. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghu; Chen, Ren; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid's structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation.

  14. D‐amino acids do not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Mitchell; Gagnon, Patricia; Vogel, Joseph P.; Chole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a known biofilm‐forming organism, is an opportunistic pathogen that plays an important role in chronic otitis media, tracheitis, cholesteatoma, chronic wounds, and implant infections. Eradication of biofilm infections has been a challenge because the biofilm phenotype provides bacteria with a protective environment from the immune system and antibiotics; thus, there has been great interest in adjunctive molecules that may inhibit biofilm formation or cause biofilm dispersal. There are reports that D‐amino acids may inhibit biofilms. In this study, we test the ability of various D‐amino acids to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in vitro. Study Design We evaluated the effect of D‐alanine (10 mM), D‐leucine (10 mM), D‐methionine (10 mM), D‐tryptophan (10 mM), and D‐tyrosine (10 uM and 1 mM) on biofilm formation in two commonly studied laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa: PAO1 and PA14. Methods Biofilms were grown in 24‐well and 96‐well tissue culture plates, documented photographically and stained with 0.1% crystal violet and solubilized in 33% glacial acetic acid for quantification. Results In strains PAO1 and PA14, the addition of D‐amino acids did not result in an inhibitory effect on biofilm growth in 24‐well plates. Repeating the study in 96‐well plates confirmed our findings that D‐amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion We conclude that D‐amino acids only slow the production of biofilms rather than completely prevent biofilm formation; therefore, D‐amino acids represent a poor option for potential clinically therapeutic interventions. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:28286870

  15. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  16. Ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibit cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo via apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoguang; Meng, Xiaomei; Dong, Yaozhong

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a cause of cancer death, making it one of the most common causes of death among women globally. Previously, a variety of studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms by which cervical cancer develops. However, there are still limitations in treatment for cervical cancer. Ursolic acid is a naturally derived pentacyclic triterpene acid, exhibiting broad anticancer effects. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been known to better the bioavailability of drugs on intranasal administration compared with only drug solutions. Administration of ursolic acid nanoparticles is thought to be sufficient to lead to considerable suppression of cervical cancer progression. We loaded gold-ursolic acid into poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to cervical cancer cell lines due to the properties of ursolic acid in altering cellular processes and the easier absorbance of nanoparticles. In addition, in this study, ursolic acid nanoparticles were administered to cervical cancer cells to find effective treatments for cervical cancer inhibition. In the present study, ELISA, western blotting, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry assays were carried out to calculate the molecular mechanism by which ursolic acid nanoparticles modulated cervical cancer progression. Data indicated that ursolic acid nanoparticles, indeed, significantly suppress cervial cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration compared to the control group, and apoptosis was induced by ursolic acid nanoparticles in cervical cancer cells through activating caspases, p53 and suppressing anti-apoptosis-related signals. Furthermore, tumor size was reduced by treatment of ursolic acid nanoparticles in in vivo experiments. In conclusion, this study suggests that ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation via apoptosis induction, which could be a potential target for future therapeutic strategy clinically.

  17. Ascorbic acid and reactive oxygen species are involved in the inhibition of seed germination by abscisic acid in rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Zhang, Aying; Li, Yingxuan; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Jia, Liguo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. The possible links among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC), and GA during rice seed germination were investigated. Unlike in non-seed tissues where ROS production is increased by ABA, ABA reduced ROS production in imbibed rice seeds, especially in the embryo region. Such reduced ROS also led to an inhibition of ASC production. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, which was indicated by the inhibited expression of GA biosynthesis genes, amylase genes, and enzyme activity. Application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. It can be concluded that ABA regulates seed germination in multiple dimensions. ROS and ASC are involved in its inhibition of GA biosynthesis.

  18. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  19. Fish protein decreases serum cholesterol in rats by inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Arai, Hirofumi; Kanda, Seiji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2011-05-01

    Fish protein has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol content by inhibiting absorption of cholesterol and bile acid in laboratory animals, though the mechanism underlying this effect is not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption following fish protein intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 dietary groups of 7 rats each, 1 group receiving a diet consisting of 20% casein and the other receiving a diet consisting of 10% casein and 10% fish protein. Both experimental diets also contained 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% sodium cholate. After the rats had been on their respective diets for 4 wk, their serum and liver cholesterol contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion contents were measured. Fish protein consumption decreased serum and liver cholesterol content and increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion and simultaneously increased fecal nitrogen excretion. In addition, fish protein hydrolyzate prepared by in vitro digestion had lower micellar solubility of cholesterol and higher binding capacity for bile acids compared with casein hydrolyzate. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effect of fish protein is mediated by increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion, which is due to the digestion products of fish protein having reduced micellar solubility of cholesterol and increased bile acid binding capacity.

  20. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    PubMed

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations.

  1. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  2. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  3. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  4. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  5. Hydroxy-oleic acid, but not oleic acid, inhibits vascular responsiveness in isolated aortic tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oleic acid (OA) and other fatty acids can become abundant in circulation after air pollution exposure as endogenously released lipolysis byproducts or by entering the body as a component of air pollution. Vascular damage has been observed with OA infusion, but it is not yet estab...

  6. Uric Acid Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation and Inhibits Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Zhang; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Cang-Long; Tang, Yi-Xing; Wang, Fei; Fu, Qing-Ge

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of uric acid on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). The hBMSCs were isolated from bone marrow of six healthy donors. Cell morphology was observed by microscopy and cell surface markers (CD44 and CD34) of hBMSCs were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Cell morphology and immunofluorescence analysis showed that hBMSCs were successfully isolated from bone marrow. The number of hBMSCs in uric acid groups was higher than that in the control group on day 3, 4, and 5. Alizarin red staining showed that number of calcium nodules in uric acid groups was more than that of the control group. Oil red-O staining showed that the number of red fat vacuoles decreased with the increased concentration of uric acid. In summary, uric acid could promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs while inhibit adipogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  7. Inhibition of N2 fixation in soybean is associated with elevated ureides and amino acids.

    PubMed

    King, C Andy; Purcell, Larry C

    2005-04-01

    Decreased N2 fixation in soybean (Glycine max) L. Merr. during water deficits has been associated with increases in ureides and free amino acids in plant tissues, indicating a potential feedback inhibition by these compounds in response to drought. We evaluated concentrations of ureides and amino acids in leaf and nodule tissue and the concurrent change in N2 fixation in response to exogenous ureides and soil-water treatments for the cultivars Jackson and KS4895. Exogenous ureides applied to the soil and water-deficit treatments inhibited N2 fixation by 85% to 90%. Mn fertilization increased the apparent catabolism of ureides in leaves and hastened the recovery of N2 fixation following exogenous ureide application for both cultivars. Ureides and total free amino acids in leaves and nodules increased during water deficits and coincided with a decline in N2 fixation for both cultivars. N2 fixation recovered to 74% to 90% of control levels 2 d after rewatering drought-stressed plants, but leaf ureides and total nodule amino acids remained elevated in KS4895. Asparagine accounted for 82% of the increase in nodule amino acids relative to well-watered plants at 2 d after rewatering. These results indicate that leaf ureides and nodule asparagine do not feedback inhibit N2 fixation. Compounds whose increase and decrease in concentration mirrored the decline and recovery of N2 fixation included nodule ureides, nodule aspartate, and several amino acids in leaves, indicating that these are potential candidate molecules for feedback inhibition of N2 fixation.

  8. OleD Loki as a Catalyst for Tertiary Amine and Hydroxamate Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ryan R; Shaaban, Khaled A; Zhang, Jianjun; Cao, Hongnan; Phillips, George N; Thorson, Jon S

    2017-02-16

    We describe the ability of an engineered glycosyltransferase (OleD Loki) to catalyze the N-glycosylation of tertiary-amine-containing drugs and trichostatin hydroxamate glycosyl ester formation. As such, this study highlights the first bacterial model catalyst for tertiary-amine N-glycosylation and further expands the substrate scope and synthetic potential of engineered OleDs. In addition, this work could open the door to the discovery of similar capabilities among other permissive bacterial glycosyltransferases.

  9. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F.; Frank, Matthew W.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  10. Kainic acid inhibits protein amino acid incorporation in select rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Soriano, M A; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1994-11-21

    Regional incorporation of labelled methionine into proteins was studied with quantitative autoradiography in different regions of the rat brain 2.5 h following systemic kainic acid administration. Labelled protein concentration was found reduced to approximately 40% of control values in the pyramidal cell layer of hippocampus, piriform, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices, ventral lateral septum and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. These regions showed increased levels of label not incorporated into proteins, indicating that free labelled methionine was available for protein synthesis. Reduction of protein amino acid incorporation in those brain regions selectively affected by kainic acid may be involved in subsequent tissue damage.

  11. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channel currents by propofol in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Guizhi; Fei, Jianchun; Meng, Tao; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingya; Yu, Jingui; Li, Jingxin

    2014-04-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), part of the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family, are activated by extracellular protons. The ASICs play a significant role in the acidosis-mediated perception of pain. The anaesthetic agent propofol also exerts antinociceptive effects, but the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not clear. We used whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the effect of propofol on proton-gated currents in: (i) rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; and (ii) HEK293 cells transfected with either ASIC1a or ASIC3. Propofol inhibited the amplitude of proton-gated currents in DRG neurons, but did not change the sensitivity of ASICs to H(+). Notably, propofol altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. In addition, we demonstrated that propofol inhibited ASICs by directly binding with these channels in HEK293 cells. These results suggest that propofol inhibits proton-gated currents in DRG neurons and that inhibition of proton-gated currents explains, in part, the antinociceptive effects of propofol in primary afferent neurons.

  12. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibition Increases Reduction Potential in Neuronal Cells under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Stephen A.; Golovko, Svetlana A.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have reported a novel neuronal specific pathway for adaptation to hypoxia through increased fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis followed by esterification into lipids. However, the biological role of this pathway under hypoxia remains to be elucidated. In the presented study, we have tested our hypothesis that activation of FA synthesis maintains reduction potential and reduces lactoacidosis in neuronal cells under hypoxia. To address this hypothesis, we measured the effect of FA synthesis inhibition on NADH2+/NAD+ and NADPH2+/NADP+ ratios, and lactic acid levels in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells exposed to normoxic and hypoxic conditions. FA synthesis inhibitors, TOFA (inhibits Acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and cerulenin (inhibits FA synthase), increased NADH2+/NAD+ and NADPH2+/NADP+ ratios under hypoxia. Further, FA synthesis inhibition increased lactic acid under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and caused cytotoxicity under hypoxia but not normoxia. These results indicate that FA may serve as hydrogen acceptors under hypoxia, thus supporting oxidation reactions including anaerobic glycolysis. These findings may help to identify a radically different approach to attenuate hypoxia related pathophysiology in the nervous system including stroke. PMID:27965531

  13. Inhibition of stromelysin-1 by caffeic acid derivatives from a propolis sample from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Narimane; Magid, Abdulmagid Alabdul; Decarme, Martine; Rhouati, Salah; Lahouel, Mesbah; Antonicelli, Frank; Lavaud, Catherine; Hornebeck, William

    2011-07-01

    Stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase-3: MMP-3) occupies a central position in collagenolytic and elastolytic cascades, leading to cutaneous intrinsic and extrinsic aging. We screened extracts of a propolis sample from Algeria with the aim to isolate compounds able to selectively inhibit this enzyme. A butanolic extract (B (3)) of the investigated propolis sample was found to potently inhibit MMP-3 activity (IC (50) = 0.15 ± 0.03 µg/mL), with no or only weak activity on other MMPs. This fraction also inhibited plasmin amidolytic activity (IC (50) = 0.05 µg/mL) and impeded plasmin-mediated proMMP-3 activation. B (3) was fractionated by HPLC, and one compound, characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopy and not previously identified in propolis, i.e., (+)-chicoric acid, displayed potent IN VITRO MMP-3 inhibitory activity (IC (50) = 6.3 × 10 (-7) M). In addition, both caffeic acid and (+)-chicoric acid methyl ester present in fraction B (3) significantly inhibited UVA-mediated MMP-3 upregulation by fibroblasts.

  14. Diuresis by intravenous administration of xanthurenic acid in rats, and inhibition by probenecid.

    PubMed

    Uwai, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yuta; Honjo, Emi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Nabekura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    The conjugates with sulfate and glucoside of xanthurenic acid, a tryptophan metabolite, were reported to show natriuresis. Sulfotransferase for xanthurenic acid works in the renal proximal tubule to produce the sulfate of xanthurenic acid as well as the liver, and we recently found that xanthurenic acid is a substrate of renal organic anion transporter OAT1. The purpose of this study was to examine relationship between the transport by OAT1 and diuresis related with xanthurenic acid. Drug transport experiment using Xenopus laevis oocytes represented that probenecid inhibited xanthurenic acid uptake by rat OAT1 (rOAT1). Although no diuresis was recognized by the intravenous injection of xanthurenic acid as a bolus in rats, the addition of its infusion exhibited natriuresis. Simultaneous administration of probenecid significantly decreased the urine volume and excreted amounts of sodium into urine. These findings showed the diuresis by the xanthurenic acid administration, and it was probenecid-sensitive. The rOAT1-mediated transport of xanthurenic acid might, at least in part, contribute to its diuretic effect.

  15. Enhancement of taxol-induced apoptosis by inhibition of NF-κB with ursorlic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Taxol is known to inhibit cell growth and triggers significant apoptosis in various cancer cells, and activation of proliferation factor NF-κB during Taxol-induced apoptosis is regarded as a main reason resulting in tumor cells resistance to Taxol. It has been found that ursorlic acid can inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In order to study whether ursorlic acid can enhance the Taxol-induced apoptosis, we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to compare the difference of caspase-3 activation between Taxol alone and Taxol combined ursorlic acid. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that ursorlic acid, a nontoxic food component, sensitizes ASTC-a-1 cells more efficiently to Taxol-induced apoptosis by advanced activation of caspase 3. The result also suggests that there would be a synergistic effect between Taxol and ursorlic acid, and the more detailed mechanism of synergistic effect needs to be clarified further, such as the correlations among NF-κB, Akt, caspase 8, which leads to the advanced activation of caspase 3 during combined treatment of Taxol and ursorlic acid. Moreover, this may be a new way to improve Taxol-dependent tumor therapy.

  16. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus × domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars.

  17. Hop bitter acids inhibit tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Czech, Barbara; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-10-01

    Bitter acids (BAs) from the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. exhibit multiple beneficial biological properties with promising effects in cancer therapy and prevention, but information regarding the effects on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is missing. Here, we used two different hop bitter acid extracts enriched for either α-acids or β-acids to obtain insight into whether biological activity varies between these two groups of BAs. At a concentration of 25 µg/ml, only the β-acid rich started to induce aspartate transaminase (AST) release, and a significant increase was detected with 50 µg/ml of both extracts. Already at lower concentrations both extracts led to a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation, and migration was suppressed at a concentration as low as 5 µg/ml in HCC cells. The focus on different signaling pathways revealed an inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, downregulation of AP-1 activity and an alleviation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in HepG2 cells incubated with 5 µg/ml of both extracts, whereby the β-acid rich extract showed more pronounced effects. In conclusion, we identified ERK1/2, AP-1 and NFκB, which are important factors in tumor development and progression, as targets of hop BAs. Thus, these data suggest the potential use of BAs as functional nutrients for both prevention and treatment of HCC.

  18. Chemical inhibition of fatty acid absorption and cellular uptake limits lipotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ahowesso, Constance; Black, Paul N.; Saini, Nipun; Montefusco, David; Chekal, Jessica; Malosh, Chrysa; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic elevation of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels is commonly associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Experimental evidence indicates FFA and their metabolites contribute to disease development through lipotoxicity. Previously, we identified a specific fatty acid transport inhibitor CB16.2, a.k.a. Lipofermata, using high throughput screening methods. In this study, efficacy of transport inhibition was measured in four cell lines that are models for myocytes (mmC2C12), pancreatic ß-cells (rnINS-1E), intestinal epithelial cells (hsCaco-2), and hepatocytes (hsHepG2), as well as primary human adipocytes. The compound was effective in inhibiting uptake with IC50s between 3 and 6 µM for all cell lines except human adipocytes (39 µM). Inhibition was specific for long and very long chain fatty acids but had no effect on medium chain fatty acids (C6-C10), which are transported by passive diffusion. Derivatives of Lipofermata were evaluated to understand structural contributions to activity. Lipofermata prevented palmitate-mediated oxidative stress, induction of BiP and CHOP, and cell death in a dose-dependent manner in hsHepG2 and rnINS-1E cells, suggesting it will prevent induction of fatty acid-mediated cell death pathways and lipotoxic disease by channeling excess fatty acids to adipose tissue and away from liver and pancreas. Importantly, mice dosed orally with Lipofermata were not able to absorb 13C-oleate demonstrating utility as an inhibitor of fatty acid absorption from the gut. PMID:26394026

  19. Carnosol and carnosic acids from Salvia officinalis inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julia; Kuehnl, Susanne; Rollinger, Judith M; Scherer, Olga; Northoff, Hinnak; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Koeberle, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), the most relevant eicosanoid promoting inflammation and tumorigenesis, is formed by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and PGE(2) synthases from free arachidonic acid. Preparations of the leaves of Salvia officinalis are commonly used in folk medicine as an effective antiseptic and anti-inflammatory remedy and possess anticancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that a standard ethyl acetate extract of S. officinalis efficiently suppresses the formation of PGE(2) in a cell-free assay by direct interference with microsomal PGE(2) synthase (mPGES)-1. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract yielded closely related fractions that potently suppressed mPGES-1 with IC(50) values between 1.9 and 3.5 μg/ml. Component analysis of these fractions revealed the diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid as potential bioactive principles inhibiting mPGES-1 activity with IC(50) values of 5.0 μM. Using a human whole-blood assay as a robust cell-based model, carnosic acid, but not carnosol, blocked PGE(2) generation upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (IC(50) = 9.3 μM). Carnosic acid neither inhibited the concomitant biosynthesis of other prostanoids [6-keto PGF(1α), 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid, and thromboxane B(2)] in human whole blood nor affected the activities of COX-1/2 in a cell-free assay. Together, S. officinalis extracts and its ingredients carnosol and carnosic acid inhibit PGE(2) formation by selectively targeting mPGES-1. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of carnosic acid on PGE(2) formation, observed in the physiologically relevant whole-blood model, may critically contribute to the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of S. officinalis.

  20. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells.

  1. Gastrodin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Yang, Zhifan; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of proton-gated cation channels, are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. Gastrodin is a main bioactive constituent of the traditional herbal Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used in Oriental countries for centuries. As an analgesic, gastrodin has been used clinically to treat pain such as migraine and headache. However, the mechanisms underlying analgesic action of gastrodin are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that gastrodin inhibited the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Gastrodin dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. Gastrodin shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 36.92 ± 6.23% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, gastrodin altered acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied gastrodin relieved pain evoked by intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that gastrodin can inhibit the activity of ASICs in the primary sensory neurons, which provided a novel mechanism underlying analgesic action of gastrodin.

  2. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Mashek, Mara T.; Hendrickson, Anna M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:27351284

  3. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Becker, Jennifer R; Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Mashek, Mara T; Hendrickson, Anna M; Mullany, Lisa K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-26

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation.

  4. Omeprazole and SCH 28080 inhibit acid secretion by the turtle urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Graber, M L; Devine, P

    1993-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence that in addition to the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase, a gastric-type H+/K(+)-ATPase participates in acidification by the distal nephron. To determine whether a similar pump exists in the turtle bladder, we examined the dependence of acid secretion on mucosal K+, and the effects of supposedly specific inhibitors of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase, omeprazole and SCH 28080. In CO2-stimulated bladders both drugs produced dose-dependent inhibition of electrogenic H+ secretion measured as the reverse short-circuit current (RSCC). At the highest concentrations tested, H+ secretion decreased 45 +/- 16% with mucosal and 20 +/- 7% with serosal omeprazole (P < 0.01). SCH 28080 at 400 microM produced essentially complete inhibition of H+ secretion with either mucosal or serosal application. When H+ secretion was purposefully inhibited by DIDS or an adverse mucosal pH gradient, SCH 28080 had no effect on RSCC. Removing mucosal K+ (measured K+ < 50 microM), with or without mucosal barium, had no effect on RSCC. The inhibition of RSCC by omeprazole was reversed by mercaptoethanol. Finally, HCO3 secretion, as measured by either RSCC or pH-stat titration, increased significantly in response to 400 microM SCH 28080. The results demonstrate that these compounds inhibit acid secretion by the turtle bladder but stimulate the secretion of base. In view of the total independence of acid secretion on potassium, it is unlikely that any of the bladder's acid secretion is mediated by an H+/K(+)-ATPase. The most reasonable interpretation of the data is that omeprazole and SCH 28080, previously thought to be specific inhibitors of the H+/K(+)-ATPase, also inhibit the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase of the turtle bladder. The results also indicate that HCO3 secretion by the bladder employ a different mechanism of H+ transport than is used for acid secretion; there is no simple reversal of polarity in the acid- versus base-secreting cells.

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal l-glutamate (l-Glu) and 5′-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3− secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3− secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3− secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3− secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3− secretion

  6. Nitric oxide donors preferentially inhibit neuronally mediated rat gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, D; Calatayud, S; Esplugues, J; Whittle, B J; Moncada, S; Esplugues, J V

    1994-09-01

    Continuous i.v. infusion of the nitric oxide (NO) donors, S-nitroso-glutathione (10-50 micrograms kg-1 min-1) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (10 micrograms kg-1 min-1) inhibited neuronally mediated gastric acid secretion, as induced by gastric distension (20 cm water) or i.v. bolus administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (150 mg kg-1) in the anaesthetized rat. By contrast, gastric acid responses to i.v. infusion of submaximal doses of pentagastrin (8 micrograms kg-1 h-1) or histamine (1 mg kg-1 h-1) were not influenced by these NO donors. These findings suggest that NO does not directly influence acid secretion in vivo but could play an inhibitory modulator role in neuronally mediated acid responses.

  7. Ascorbic acid ameliorates seizures and brain damage in rats through inhibiting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Wang, Shengjun; Zhang, Tongxia; Zhao, Xiuhe; Liu, Xuewu; Cao, Lili; Chi, Zhaofu

    2013-10-16

    Oxidative stress is a mechanism of cell death induced by seizures. Antioxidant compounds have neuroprotective effects due to their ability to inhibit free radical production. Autophagy is a process in which cytoplasmic components such as organelles and proteins are delivered to the lysosomal compartment for degradation, and plays an essential role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The activity of autophagy is enhanced during oxidative stress. The objectives of this work were first to study the inhibitory action of antioxidant ascorbic acid on behavioral changes and brain damage induced by high doses of pilocarpine, then to study the effect of ascorbic acid on oxidative stress (MDA and SOD were used to estimate oxidative stress) and activated autophagy (beclin 1 was used to estimate autophagy) induced by seizures, aiming to further clarify the mechanism of action of this antioxidant compound. In order to determinate neuroprotective effects, we studied the effects of ascorbic acid (500 mg/kg, i.p.) on the behavior and brain lesions observed after seizures induced by pilocarpine (340 mg/kg, i.p., P340 model) in rats. Ascorbic acid injections prior to pilocarpine suppressed behavioral seizure episodes by increasing the latency to the first myoclonic, clonic and tonic seizure and decreasing the percentage of incidence of clonic and tonic seizures as well as the mortality rate. These findings suggested that oxidative stress can be produced and autophagy is increased during brain damage induced by seizures. In the P340 model, ascorbic acid significantly decreased cerebral damage, reduced oxidative stress and inhibited autophagy by reducing de novo synthesis of beclin 1. Antioxidant compound can exert neuroprotective effects associated with inhibition of free radical production and autophagy. These results highlighted the promising therapeutic potential of ascorbic acid in treatment for seizures.

  8. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the

  9. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Cheese Using Chitosan-Grafted Lactic Acid Packaging.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Laura N; López, Monserrat; Montes-Díaz, Elizabeth; Espadín, Andres; Tecante, Alberto; Gimeno, Miquel; Shirai, Keiko

    2016-04-08

    A chitosan from biologically obtained chitin was successfully grafted with d,l-lactic acid (LA) in aqueous media using p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalyst to obtain a non-toxic, biodegradable packaging material that was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, water vapor permeability, and relative humidity (RH) losses. Additionally, the grafting in chitosan with LA produced films with improved mechanical properties. This material successfully extended the shelf life of fresh cheese and inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during 14 days at 4 °C and 22% RH, whereby inoculated samples with chitosan-g-LA packaging presented full bacterial inhibition. The results were compared to control samples and commercial low-density polyethylene packaging.

  10. Phenylboronic acid selectively inhibits human prostate and breast cancer cell migration and decreases viability.

    PubMed

    Bradke, Tiffany M; Hall, Casey; Carper, Stephen W; Plopper, George E

    2008-01-01

    We compared the in vitro effect of boric acid (BA) versus phenylboronic acid (PBA) on the migration of prostate and breast cancer cell lines and non-tumorigenic cells from the same tissues. Treatment at 24 hours with BA (< or =500 microM) did not inhibit chemotaxis on fibronectin in any cell line. However, treatment over the same time course with concentrations of PBA as low as 1 muM significantly inhibited cancer cell migration without effecting non-tumorigenic cell lines. The compounds did not affect cell adhesion or viability at 24 hours but did alter morphology; both decreased cancer cell viability at eight days. These results suggest that PBA is more potent than BA in targeting the metastatic and proliferative properties of cancer cells.

  11. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  12. Boric acid inhibits stored Ca2+ release in DU-145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Kim, Danny H; Stella, Salvatore L; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2009-08-01

    Boron (B) is a developmental and reproductive toxin. It is also essential for some organisms. Plants use uptake and efflux transport proteins to maintain homeostasis, and in humans, boron has been reported to reduce prostate cancer. Ca2+ signaling is one of the primary mechanisms used by cells to respond to their environment. In this paper, we report that boric acid (BA) inhibits NAD+ and NADP+ as well as mechanically induced release of stored Ca2+ in growing DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Cell proliferation was inhibited by 30% at 100 microM, 60% at 250 microM, and 97% at 1,000 microM BA. NAD+-induced Ca2+ transients were partly inhibited at 250 microM BA and completely at 1,000 microM BA, whereas both NADP+ and mechanically induced transients were inhibited by 1,000 microM BA. Expression of CD38 protein increased in proportion to BA exposure (0-1,000 microM). In vitro mass spectrometry analysis showed that BA formed adducts with the CD38 products and Ca2+ channel agonists cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). Vesicles positive for the Ca2+ fluorophore fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester accumulated in cells exposed to 250 and 1,000 microM BA. The BA analog, methylboronic acid (MBA; 250 and 1,000 microM), did not inhibit cell proliferation or NAD+, NADP+, or mechanically stimulated Ca2+ store release. Nor did MBA increase CD38 expression or cause the formation of intracellular vesicles. Thus, mammalian cells can distinguish between BA and its synthetic analog MBA and exhibit graded concentration-dependent responses. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that toxicity of BA stems from the ability of high concentrations to impair Ca2+ signaling.

  13. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  14. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  15. Lipoxygenase inhibition by novel fatty acid ester from Annona squamosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat

    2008-12-01

    Studies on the seeds of Annona squamosa yielded a novel lipoxygenase inhibitor fatty acid ester, (+) - annonlipoxy (1). Compound 1 was screened for its enzyme inhibitory activity against lipoxygenase (E.C.1.14.18.1), exhibiting activity with IC(50) 69.05 +/- 5.06 microm. Baicalein (IC(50) 22.6 +/- 0.5 microm) was used as a positive control. Crude extracts of Annona squamosa fruit pulp and seeds were screened for its enzyme inhibitory activity against lipoxygenase and acetylcholinesterase. The crude ethanolic extract of fruit pulp and seeds of Annona squamosa also exhibited lipoxygenase activity with 22.2 and 26.7% inhibition, while the pet.ether extract of seeds of A. squamosa exhibited 52.7% inhibition at a concentration of 40 microg/200 ml. The crude ethanolic extract of seeds of Annona squamosa was also bioassayed for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and it was found inactive.

  16. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected.

  17. Anti-Cancer Effect of Lambertianic Acid by Inhibiting the AR in LNCaP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Lambertianic acid (LA) is known to have anti-allergic and antibacterial effects. However, the anticancer activities and mechanism of action of LA have not been investigated. Therefore, the anticancer effects and mechanism of LA are investigated in this study. LA decreased not only AR protein levels, but also cellular and secretory levels of PSA. Furthermore, LA inhibited nuclear translocation of the AR induced by mibolerone. LA suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 arrest, downregulating CDK4/6 and cyclin D1 and activating p53 and its downstream molecules, p21 and p27. LA induced apoptosis and the expression of related proteins, including cleaved caspase-9 and -3, c-PARP and BAX, and inhibited BCl-2. The role of AR in LA-induced apoptosis was assessed by using siRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that LA exerts the anticancer effect by inhibiting AR and is a valuable therapeutic agent in prostate cancer treatment. PMID:27399684

  18. Dopaminergic inhibition involved in the alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid-induced jumping behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1980-05-16

    alpha-Naphthoxyacetic acid (alpha-NOAA), one of the retching-inducers, elicited a dose-dependent jumping behavior shortly after i.p. administration in doses ranging from 250 to 700 mg/kg in ddY mice, the incidence of jumping being 97% at a dose of 700 mg/kg. alpha-NOAA also induced hypothermia, retching, head shaking, salivation and lacrimation. Phentolamine, reserpine, disulfiram, tranylcypromine, haloperidol, scopolamine, bicuculline, diazepam and lithium among the drugs tested inhibited to a certain degree but not markedly the alpha-NOAA-induced jumping behavior. However, the behavior was markedly inhibited by a dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and this inhibitory effect was significantly antagonized by a dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol (2 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that the jumping behavior elicited by alpha-NOAA may be due to the inhibition of dopaminergic neuron activity.

  19. Inhibition of mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus nomius vsc 23 by lactic acid bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; Arena, M.E.; Silva, J.; González, S.N.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different fermenting microorganisms on growth of a mycotoxin- producing Aspergillus nomius was assayed. Two lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of which are widely used in fermentation and preservation of food, were assayed on their fungus inhibitory properties. Assays were carried out by simultaneous inoculation of one of the possible inhibiting microorganisms and the fungus or subsequent inoculation of one of the microorganisms followed by the fungus. All three microorganisms assayed showed growth inhibition of the mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus strain. L. rhamnosus O236, isolated from sheep milk and selected for its technological properties, showed highest fungal inhibition of the microorganisms assayed. The use of antifungal LAB with excellent technological properties rather than chemical preservatives would enable the food industry to produce organic food without addition of chemical substances. PMID:24031582

  20. Morphine inhibits acid-sensing ion channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qi; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Yu-Min; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-03-20

    Extracellular acidosis is a common feature in pain-generating pathological conditions. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), pH sensors, are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Morphine exerts potent analgesic effects through the activation of opioid receptors for various pain conditions. A cross-talk between ASICs and opioid receptors in peripheral sensory neurons has not been shown so far. Here, we have found that morphine inhibits the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Morphine dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in the presence of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Morphine shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 51.4±3.8% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Another μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO induced a similar decrease in ASIC currents compared with morphine. The morphine inhibition of ASIC currents was blocked by naloxone, a specific opioid receptor antagonist. Pretreatment of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, or the addition of cAMP reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine. Moreover, morphine altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied morphine relieved pain evoked by intraplantar of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that morphine can inhibit the activity of ASICs via μ-opioid receptor and cAMP dependent signal pathway. These observations demonstrate a cross-talk between ASICs and opioid receptors in peripheral sensory neurons, which was a novel analgesic mechanism of morphine.

  1. Growth inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, N; Li, H Y; Zhang, X M

    2015-12-01

    Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, is caused by a cell-associated oncogenic herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MSB-1 is a MD-derived lymphoblastoid cell line and can induce tumors when inoculated into susceptible chickens. Betulinic acid, which is present as one of the major effective components in many traditional Chinese medicines, has recently been reported to inhibit growth of cancer cells and employed as a potential anticancer agent. Tripterine, a major active compound extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has now also shown anti-tumor activities in various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic growth-inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism. Viability of MSB-1 cells was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Cell apoptotic analysis was performed by fluorescence detection. NF-κB transcription activity was detected by measuring luciferase activity. Western blotting was used to analyze the expression of p65, IκB and Meq. Our results showed that the proliferation in the combination group was significantly decreased as compared with that of monotherapy using betulinic acid or tripterine, accompanied by an induction of apoptosis, inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity and its targeting oncogenic gene Meq. The results suggest that the combination of betulinic acid and tripterine at lower concentration may produce a synergistic inhibitive effect on MSB-1 cells that warrants further investigation for its potential clinical applications.

  2. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  3. In vitro inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by oleic acid albumin formulations from derivatized cotton wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Howley, Phyllis; Cohen, I Kelman

    2004-10-13

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is elevated in chronic wounds. Oleic acid albumin formulations that inhibit HNE may be applicable to treatment modalities for chronic wounds. Oleic acid/albumin formulations with mole ratios of 100:1, 50:1, and 25:1 (oleic acid to albumin) were prepared and found to have dose response inhibition properties against HNE. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations were 0.029-0.049 microM. Oleic acid/albumin (BSA) formulations were bound to positively and negatively charged cotton wound dressings and assessed for elastase inhibition using a fiber bound formulation in an assay designed to mimic HNE inhibition in the wound. Cotton derivatized with both carboxylate and amine functional groups were combined with oleic acid/albumin formulations at a maximum loading of 0.030 mg oleic acid + 0.14 mg BSA/mg fiber. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations bound to derivatized cotton were 0.26-0.42 microM. Release of the oleic acid/albumin formulation from the fiber was measured by measuring oleic acid levels with quantitative GC analysis. Approximately, 35-50% of the fiber bound formulation was released into solution within the first 15 min of incubation. Albumin was found to enhance the rate of elastase hydrolysis of the substrate within a concentration range of 0.3-50 g/L. The acceleration of HNE substrate hydrolysis by albumin required increased concentration of inhibitor in the formulation to obtain complete inhibition of HNE. Oleic acid formulations prepared with albumin enable transport, solubility and promote dose response inhibition of HNE from derivatized cotton fibers under aqueous conditions mimicking the chronic wound.

  4. Pharmacologic inhibition of fatty acid oxidation sensitizes human leukemia cells to apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Harmancey, Romain; Fiegl, Michael; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Korchin, Borys; Kaluarachchi, Kumar; Bornmann, William; Duvvuri, Seshagiri; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The traditional view is that cancer cells predominately produce ATP by glycolysis, rather than by oxidation of energy-providing substrates. Mitochondrial uncoupling — the continuing reduction of oxygen without ATP synthesis — has recently been shown in leukemia cells to circumvent the ability of oxygen to inhibit glycolysis, and may promote the metabolic preference for glycolysis by shifting from pyruvate oxidation to fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Here we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of FAO with etomoxir or ranolazine inhibited proliferation and sensitized human leukemia cells — cultured alone or on bone marrow stromal cells — to apoptosis induction by ABT-737, a molecule that releases proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins such as Bak from antiapoptotic family members. Likewise, treatment with the fatty acid synthase/lipolysis inhibitor orlistat also sensitized leukemia cells to ABT-737, which supports the notion that fatty acids promote cell survival. Mechanistically, we generated evidence suggesting that FAO regulates the activity of Bak-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, etomoxir decreased the number of quiescent leukemia progenitor cells in approximately 50% of primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples and, when combined with either ABT-737 or cytosine arabinoside, provided substantial therapeutic benefit in a murine model of leukemia. The results support the concept of FAO inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in hematological malignancies. PMID:20038799

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid synthesis from alpha-linolenic acid is inhibited by diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R A; Neumann, M A; Lien, E L; Boyd, K A; Tu, W C

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of the plant-derived omega-3 (n-3) α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) to the long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) can be increased by ALA sufficient diets compared to ALA deficient diets. Diets containing ALA above an optimal level result in no further increase in DHA levels in animals and humans. The present study evaluates means of maximizing plasma DHA accumulation by systematically varying both linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and ALA dietary level. Weanling rats were fed one of 54 diets for three weeks. The diets varied in the percentage of energy (en%) of LA (0.07-17.1 en%) and ALA (0.02-12.1 en%) by manipulating both the fat content and the balance of vegetable oils. The peak of plasma phospholipid DHA (>8% total fatty acids) was attained as a result of feeding a narrow dietary range of 1-3 en% ALA and 1-2 en% LA but was suppressed to basal levels (∼2% total fatty acids) at dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) above 3 en%. We conclude it is possible to enhance the DHA status of rats fed diets containing ALA as the only source of n-3 fatty acids but only when the level of dietary PUFA is low (<3 en%).

  6. Oleyl alcohol inhibits intestinal long-chain fatty acid absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Murota, K; Kawada, T; Matsui, N; Sakakibara, M; Takahashi, N; Fushiki, T

    2000-12-01

    Long-chain fatty acids are important nutrients, but obesity is the most common nutritional disorder in humans. In this study we investigated the effect of oleyl alcohol on the intestinal long-chain fatty acid absorption in rats. We administered [14C]oleic acid and oleyl alcohol as lipid emulsion intraduodenally in unanesthetized lymph-cannulated rats and measured the lymphatic output of oleic acid. Second, we orally administered lipid emulsion with a stomach tube and measured the luminal and mucosal oleic acid residues. Furthermore, rats were fed oleyl alcohol as a dietary component for 20 days, and fecal lipid and the weight of adipose tissues were measured. In lymph-cannulated rats, triglyceride and [14C]oleic acid output in the lymph were significantly lower in the presence of oleyl alcohol when compared with the absence of oleyl alcohol in a dose-dependent manner. The radioactivity remaining in the intestinal lumen was more strongly detected in rats that had been orally administered oleyl alcohol than in the controls. The feces of rats fed an oleyl-alcohol-added diet contained much higher amounts of lipids, and the weights of their adipose tissues were significantly lower than in the control group. These results suggest that oleyl alcohol inhibits the rat gastrointestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids in vivo.

  7. Inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by malonic acid produces an "excitotoxic" lesion in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Greene, J G; Porter, R H; Eller, R V; Greenamyre, J T

    1993-09-01

    Excitotoxicity and defects in neuronal energy metabolism have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. These two mechanisms may be linked through the NMDA receptor, activation of which is dependent on neuronal membrane potential. Because the ability to maintain membrane potential is dependent on neuronal energy metabolism, bioenergetic defects may affect NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. We now report that reversible inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme central to both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the electron transport chain, produces an "excitotoxic" lesion in rat striatum that can be blocked by the NMDA antagonist MK-801. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received intrastriatal stereotaxic injections of the SDH inhibitor malonic acid (1 or 2 mumol) in combination with intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or MK-801 (5 mg/kg) 30 min before and 210 min after malonic acid. Animals were killed 72 h after surgery, and brains were processed for histology, cytochrome oxidase activity, and [3H]MK-801 and [3H]AMPA autoradiography. The higher dose of malonic acid (2 mumol) produced large lesions that were markedly attenuated by treatment with MK-801 (28.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.6 mm3; p < 0.001). [3H]MK-801 and [3H]AMPA binding were reduced in the lesions by 60 and 63%, respectively. One micromole of malonic acid produced smaller lesions that were almost completely blocked by MK-801 treatment (9.6 +/- 1.3 vs. 0.06 +/- 0.04 mm3; p < 0.0001). The toxic effects of malonic acid were due specifically to inhibition of SDH inasmuch as coinjection of a threefold excess of succinate with the malonic acid blocked the striatal lesions (p < 0.002).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. D-Amino acids inhibit biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis strains from ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Peréz, Miriam L; Diaz-Cedillo, Francisco; Ibarra, J Antonio; Torales-Cardeña, Azael; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Cancino-Diaz, Mario E; Cancino-Diaz, Juan C

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm formation on medical and surgical devices is a major virulence determinant for Staphylococcus epidermidis. The bacterium S. epidermidis is able to produce biofilms on biotic and abiotic surfaces and is the cause of ocular infection (OI). Recent studies have shown that d-amino acids inhibit and disrupt biofilm formation in the prototype strains Bacillus subtilis NCBI3610 and Staphylococcus aureus SCO1. The effect of d-amino acids on S. epidermidis biofilm formation has yet to be tested for clinical or commensal isolates. S. epidermidis strains isolated from healthy skin (n = 3), conjunctiva (n = 9) and OI (n = 19) were treated with d-Leu, d-Tyr, d-Pro, d-Phe, d-Met or d-Ala and tested for biofilm formation. The presence of d-amino acids during biofilm formation resulted in a variety of patterns. Some strains were sensitive to all amino acids tested, while others were sensitive to one or more, and one strain was resistant to all of them when added individually; in this way d-Met inhibited most of the strains (26/31), followed by d-Phe (21/31). Additionally, the use of d-Met inhibited biofilm formation on a contact lens. The use of l-isomers caused no defect in biofilm formation in all strains tested. In contrast, when biofilms were already formed d-Met, d-Phe and d-Pro were able to disrupt it. In summary, here we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of d-amino acids on biofilm formation in S. epidermidis. Moreover, we showed, for the first time, that S. epidermidis clinical strains have a different sensitivity to these compounds during biofilm formation.

  9. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields.

  10. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  11. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibits Acute Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) inhibits toxin A-induced generation of colonic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and toxin A colitis in rats. Isolated colonic segments in anesthetized rats were treated intraluminally with toxin A for 3 hours with or without 30 minutes of pretreatment with either 5-ASA or sulfapyridine and then colonic tissue levels of LTB4 were measured and inflammation was assessed. Separately, sulfasalazine was administered to rats in their drinking water for 5 days, isolated colonic segments were then prepared, toxin A was administered, and inflammation was assessed as before. Pretreatment with 5-ASA inhibited toxin A-induced increased tissue LTB4 concentration in the colon. Sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not sulfapyridine significantly inhibited toxin A colitis. However, pretreatment with 5-ASA did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by capsaicin. Toxin A stimulated the release of substance P (SP), and this effect was also inhibited by sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not by sulfapyridine. Thus, toxin A stimulates colonic LTB4 resulting in activation of TRPV1, release of SP, and colitis. Inhibition of 5-LO by 5-ASA disrupts this pathway and supports the concept that LTB4 activation of TRPV1 plays a role in toxin A colitis. PMID:25045574

  12. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury.

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xueming; Chen, Aihua Yang, Pingzhen; Song, Xudong; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Li, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy.

  14. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Eisses, John F.; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R.; Orabi, Abrahim I.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W.; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A.; Lowe, Mark E.; Monga, Satdarshan P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations—that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury—we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  15. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibits Acute Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) inhibits toxin A-induced generation of colonic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and toxin A colitis in rats. Isolated colonic segments in anesthetized rats were treated intraluminally with toxin A for 3 hours with or without 30 minutes of pretreatment with either 5-ASA or sulfapyridine and then colonic tissue levels of LTB4 were measured and inflammation was assessed. Separately, sulfasalazine was administered to rats in their drinking water for 5 days, isolated colonic segments were then prepared, toxin A was administered, and inflammation was assessed as before. Pretreatment with 5-ASA inhibited toxin A-induced increased tissue LTB4 concentration in the colon. Sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not sulfapyridine significantly inhibited toxin A colitis. However, pretreatment with 5-ASA did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by capsaicin. Toxin A stimulated the release of substance P (SP), and this effect was also inhibited by sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not by sulfapyridine. Thus, toxin A stimulates colonic LTB4 resulting in activation of TRPV1, release of SP, and colitis. Inhibition of 5-LO by 5-ASA disrupts this pathway and supports the concept that LTB4 activation of TRPV1 plays a role in toxin A colitis.

  16. Nicotinic acid inhibits enterotoxin-induced jejunal secretion in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Kapitany, R A; Scoot, A

    1981-01-01

    The use of nicotinic acid for preventing intestinal secretion caused by cholera toxin and by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli has been investigated in the weanling pig. Secretory effects were measured in ligated jejunal loops of halothane-anesthetized pigs by dilution of a nonabsorbable marker added to the loop fluid. Different routes of administration and different initial pH values for nicotinate solutions were studied to determine optimal conditions for secretory inhibition. The neutral sodium salt of nicotinic acid had no significant antisecretory activity under any conditions used in these trials. Inhibition of secretion was most effective with partly neutralized nicotinic acid at pH 4.5 added directly to loops containing enterotoxin. Net fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin or heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli was prevented by this treatment. Reversal of secretion was not accompanied by any measurable changes in cyclic nucleotide concentration in intestinal mucosa. Nicotinic acid antagonism of a secretory step common to cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli but subsequent to cyclic nucleotide involvement is indicated by these data. PMID:7020893

  17. Clavulanic Acid: a Beta-Lactamase-Inhibiting Beta-Lactam from Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Reading, C.; Cole, M.

    1977-01-01

    A novel β-lactamase inhibitor has been isolated from Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and given the name clavulanic acid. Conditions for the cultivation of the organism and detection and isolation of clavulanic acid are described. This compound resembles the nucleus of a penicillin but differs in having no acylamino side chain, having oxygen instead of sulfur, and containing a β-hydroxyethylidine substituent in the oxazolidine ring. Clavulanic acid is a potent inhibitor of many β-lactamases, including those found in Escherichia coli (plasmid mediated), Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus, the inhibition being of a progressive type. The cephalosporinase type of β-lactamase found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae P99 and the chromosomally mediated β-lactamase of E. coli are less well inhibited. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and cephaloridine against β-lactamase-producing, penicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, K. aerogenes, P. mirabilis, and E. coli have been shown to be considerably reduced by the addition of low concentrations of clavulanic acid. Images PMID:879738

  18. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-α-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-α-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  19. Structural basis of the inhibition of class C acid phosphatases by adenosine 5;#8242;-phosphorothioate

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-20

    The inhibition of phosphatases by adenosine 5'-phosphorothioate (AMPS) was first reported in the late 1960s; however, the structural basis for the inhibition has remained unknown. Here, it is shown that AMPS is a submicromolar inhibitor of class C acid phosphatases, a group of bacterial outer membrane enzymes belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase structural superfamily. Furthermore, the 1.35-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the inhibited recombinant Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase was determined; this is the first structure of a phosphatase complexed with AMPS. The conformation of AMPS is identical to that of the substrate 5'-AMP, except that steric factors force a rotation of the thiophosphoryl out of the normal phosphoryl-binding pocket. This conformation is catalytically nonproductive, because the P atom is not positioned optimally for nucleophilic attack by Asp64, and the O atom of the scissile O-P bond is too far from the Asp (Asp66) that protonates the leaving group. The structure of 5'-AMP complexed with the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant enzyme was also determined at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. This mutation induces the substrate to adopt the same nonproductive binding mode that is observed in the AMPS complex. In this case, electrostatic considerations, rather than steric factors, underlie the movement of the phosphoryl. The structures not only provide an explanation for the inhibition by AMPS, but also highlight the precise steric and electrostatic requirements of phosphoryl recognition by class C acid phosphatases. Moreover, the structure of the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant illustrates how a seemingly innocuous mutation can cause an unexpected structural change.

  20. Inhibition of microbial xylitol production by acetic acid and its relation with fermentative parameters.

    PubMed

    Morita, T A; Silva, S S

    2000-01-01

    Precipitated sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing acetic acid was fermented by Candida guilliermondii FTI20037 under different operational conditions (pH 4.0 and 7.0, three aeration rates). At pH 7.0 and kLa of 10 (0.75 vvm) and 22.5/h (3.0 vvm) the acetic acid had not been consumed until the end of the fermentations, whereas at the same pH and kLa of 35/h (4.5 vvm) the acid was rapidly consumed and acetic acid inhibition was not important. On the other hand, fermentations at an initial pH of 4.0 and kLa of 22.5 and 35/h required less time for the acid uptake than fermentations at kLa of 10/h. The acetic acid assimilation by the yeast indicates the ability of this strain to ferment in partially detoxified medium, making possible the utilization of the sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate in this bio-process. The effects on xylitol yield and production are reported.

  1. Non-coding nucleotides and amino acids near the active site regulate peptide deformylase expression and inhibitor susceptibility in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Pachikara, Niseema D.; Oey, Christopher B.; Balakrishnan, Amit; Westblade, Lars F.; Tan, Ming; Chase, Theodore; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is a highly prevalent human pathogen. Hydroxamic-acid-based matrix metalloprotease inhibitors can effectively inhibit the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo, and have exhibited therapeutic potential. Here, we provide genome sequencing data indicating that peptide deformylase (PDF) is the sole target of the inhibitors in this organism. We further report molecular mechanisms that control chlamydial PDF (cPDF) expression and inhibition efficiency. In particular, we identify the σ66-dependent promoter that controls cPDF gene expression and demonstrate that point mutations in this promoter lead to resistance by increasing cPDF transcription. Furthermore, we show that substitution of two amino acids near the active site of the enzyme alters enzyme kinetics and protein stability. PMID:21719536

  2. 4-Coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids inhibit 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligases and modulate metabolic flux for 3-hydroxylation in monolignol biosynthesis of Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Liu, Jie; Loziuk, Philip; Song, Jina; Williams, Cranos; Muddiman, David C; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) can reduce lignin content in a number of plant species. In lignin precursor (monolignol) biosynthesis during stem wood formation in Populus trichocarpa, two enzymes, Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5, catalyze the coenzyme A (CoA) ligation of 4-coumaric acid to 4-coumaroyl-CoA and caffeic acid to caffeoyl-CoA. CoA ligation of 4-coumaric acid is essential for the 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaroyl shikimic acid. This hydroxylation results from sequential reactions of 4-hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimic acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferases (PtrHCT1 and PtrHCT6) and 4-coumaric acid 3-hydroxylase 3 (PtrC3H3). Alternatively, 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaric acid to caffeic acid may occur through an enzyme complex of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase 1 and 2 (PtrC4H1 and PtrC4H2) and PtrC3H3. We found that 4-coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids are inhibitors of Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5. 4-Coumaroyl shikimic acid strongly inhibits the formation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA and caffeoyl-CoA. Caffeoyl shikimic acid inhibits only the formation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA. 4-Coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids both act as competitive and uncompetitive inhibitors. Metabolic flux in wild-type and PtrC3H3 downregulated P. trichocarpa transgenics has been estimated by absolute protein and metabolite quantification based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, mass action kinetics, and inhibition equations. Inhibition by 4-coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids may play significant regulatory roles when these inhibitors accumulate.

  3. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed.

  4. Inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis by stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Henin, N; Vincent, M F; Gruber, H E; Van den Berghe, G

    1995-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is a multisubstrate protein kinase that, in liver, inactivates both acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. AICAR (5-amino 4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide, ZMP) was found to stimulate up to 10-fold rat liver AMP-activated protein kinase, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 5 mM. In accordance with previous observations, addition to suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes of 50-500 microM AICAriboside, the nucleoside corresponding to ZMP, resulted in the accumulation of millimolar concentrations of the latter. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent inactivation of both acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Addition of 50-500 microM AICAriboside to hepatocyte suspensions incubated in the presence of various substrates, including glucose and lactate/pyruvate, caused a parallel inhibition of both fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. With lactate/pyruvate (10/1 mM), half-maximal inhibition was obtained at approximately 100 microM, and near-complete inhibition at 500 microM AICAriboside. These findings open new perspectives for the simultaneous control of triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis by pharmacological stimulators of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  5. The very-long-chain fatty acid synthase is inhibited by chloroacetamides.

    PubMed

    Götz, Thomas; Böger, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The first elongation step to form very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) is catalyzed by the VLCFA-synthase. CoA-activated fatty acids react with malonyl-CoA to condense a C2-unit. As shown with recombinant enzyme this reaction is specifically inhibited by chloroacetamide herbicides. The inhibition is alleviated when the inhibitor (e.g. metazachlor) is incubated together with adequate concentrations of the substrate (e.g. oleoyl-CoA). Malonyl-CoA has no influence. However, once a chloroacetamide has been tightly bound to the synthase after an appropriate time it cannot be displaced anymore by the substrate. In contrast, oleoyl-CoA, is easily removed from the synthase by metazachlor. The irreversible binding of the chloroacetamides and their competition with the substrate explains the very low half-inhibition values of 10(-8) M and below. Chiral chloroacetamides like metolachlor or dimethenamid give identical results. However, only the (S)-enantiomers are active.

  6. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and “receptor for advanced glycation endproduct” (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  7. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and "receptor for advanced glycation endproduct" (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis.

  8. Inhibition effects of dilute-acid prehydrolysate of corn stover on enzymatic hydrolysis of Solka Floc.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Urvi D; Lee, Yoon Y

    2011-11-01

    Dilute-acid pretreatment liquor (PL) produced at NREL through a continuous screw-driven reactor was analyzed for sugars and other potential inhibitory components. Their inhibitory effects on enzymatic hydrolysis of Solka Floc were investigated. When the PL was mixed into the enzymatic hydrolysis reactor at 1:1 volume ratio, the glucan and xylan digestibility decreased by 63% and 90%, respectively. The tolerance level of the enzyme for each inhibitor was determined. Of the identified degradation components, acetic acid was found to be the strongest inhibitor for cellulase activity, as it decreased the glucan yield by 10% at 1 g/L. Among the sugars, cellobiose and glucose were found to be strong inhibitors to glucan hydrolysis, whereas xylose is a strong inhibitor to xylan hydrolysis. Xylo-oligomers inhibit xylan digestibility more strongly than the glucan digestibility. Inhibition by the PL was higher than that of the simulated mixture of the identifiable components. This indicates that some of the unidentified degradation components, originated mostly from lignin, are potent inhibitors to the cellulase enzyme. When the PL was added to a simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation using Escherichia coli KO11, the bioprocess was severely inhibited showing no ethanol formation or cell growth.

  9. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by crude and fractionated extract from lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wong, C-B; Khoo, B-Y; Sasidharan, S; Piyawattanametha, W; Kim, S H; Khemthongcharoen, N; Ang, M-Y; Chuah, L-O; Liong, M-T

    2015-03-01

    Increasing levels of antibiotic resistance by Staphylococcus aureus have posed a need to search for non-antibiotic alternatives. This study aimed to assess the inhibitory effects of crude and fractionated cell-free supernatants (CFS) of locally isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) against a clinical strain of S. aureus. A total of 42 LAB strains were isolated and identified from fresh vegetables, fresh fruits and fermented products prior to evaluation of inhibitory activities. CFS of LAB strains exhibiting a stronger inhibitive effect against S. aureus were fractionated into crude protein, polysaccharide and lipid fractions. Crude protein fractions showed greater inhibition against S. aureus compared to polysaccharide and lipid fractions, with a more prevalent effect from Lactobacillus plantarum 8513 and L. plantarum BT8513. Crude protein, polysaccharide and lipid fractions were also characterised with glycine, mannose and oleic acid being detected as the major component of each fraction, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed roughed and wrinkled membrane morphology of S. aureus upon treatment with crude protein fractions of LAB, suggesting an inhibitory effect via the destruction of cellular membrane. This research illustrated the potential application of fractionated extracts from LAB to inhibit S. aureus for use in the food and health industry.

  10. Inhibition of N-nitrosamine carcinogenesis and aflatoxin DNA damage by ellagic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal-Chaudhuri, S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ellagic acid (EA), on the tumorigenicity of N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine (NBMA) in the rat esophagus was investigated. Groups of 30 male F-344 rats were fed a semipurified diet containing EA for 27 weeks. N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine was administered subcutaneously, once a week for 18 weeks. Ellagic acid produced a significant inhibition in the average number of esophageal tumors at both 20 weeks and 27 weeks. To investigate the mechanism(s) of this inhibition, EA was tested for its effect on the metabolism, DNA-binding and DNA-adduct formation of NBMA in cultured explants of rat esophagus. Explants were incubated in medium containing EA at concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 {mu}M for 16 hours, followed by the addition of 1{mu}M ({sup 3}H)NBMA and EA for 12 hours. Explant DNA was isolated by phenol extraction and hydroxylapatite chromatography, and benzaldehyde formation was determined by h.p.l.c. analysis of the culture medium. Finally, EA was examined for its ability to inhibit DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) in cultured explants of rat trachea and esophagus, and human tracheobronchus.

  11. Vitamin C is a kinase inhibitor: dehydroascorbic acid inhibits IkappaBalpha kinase beta.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, Juan M; Pedraza, Alicia; Bórquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Zhang, Bing; Sanchez, Roberto; Golde, David W

    2004-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key intermediates in cellular signal transduction pathways whose function may be counterbalanced by antioxidants. Acting as an antioxidant, ascorbic acid (AA) donates two electrons and becomes oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). We discovered that DHA directly inhibits IkappaBalpha kinase beta (IKKbeta) and IKKalpha enzymatic activity in vitro, whereas AA did not have this effect. When cells were loaded with AA and induced to generate DHA by oxidative stress in cells expressing a constitutive active IKKbeta, NF-kappaB activation was inhibited. Our results identify a dual molecular action of vitamin C in signal transduction and provide a direct linkage between the redox state of vitamin C and NF-kappaB signaling events. AA quenches ROS intermediates involved in the activation of NF-kappaB and is oxidized to DHA, which directly inhibits IKKbeta and IKKalpha enzymatic activity. These findings define a function for vitamin C in signal transduction other than as an antioxidant and mechanistically illuminate how vitamin C down-modulates NF-kappaB signaling.

  12. Comparison of sodium acid sulfate to citric acid to inhibit browning of fresh-cut potatoes.

    PubMed

    Calder, Beth L; Kash, Emily A; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Bushway, Alfred A

    2011-04-01

    Sodium acid sulfate (SAS) dip treatments were evaluated against a distilled water control and citric acid (CA) to compare its effectiveness in reducing enzymatic browning of raw, French-fry cut potatoes. Two separate studies were conducted with dip concentrations ranging from 0%, 1%, and 3% in experiment 1 to 0%, 2%, and 2.5% in experiment 2 to determine optimal dip concentrations. Russet Burbank potatoes were peeled, sliced, and dipped for 1 min and stored at 3 °C. Color, texture, fry surface pH, and microbiological analyses were conducted on days 0, 7, and 14. The 3% SAS- and CA-treated samples had significantly (p<0.0001) lower pH levels on fry surfaces than all other treatments. Both acidulants had significantly (p≤0.05) lower aerobic plate counts compared to controls in both studies by day 7. However, SAS appeared to be the most effective at the 3% level in maintaining a light fry color up to day 14 and had the highest L-values than all other treatments. The 3% SAS-treated fry slices appeared to have the least change in textural properties over storage time, having a significantly (p=0.0002) higher force value (kg force [kgf]) than the other treatments during experiment 1, without any signs of case-hardening that appeared in the control and CA-treated samples. SAS was just as comparable to CA in reducing surface fry pH and also lowering microbial counts over storage time. According to the results, SAS may be another viable acidulant to be utilized in the fresh-cut fruit and vegetable industry.

  13. Potentiation of vasoconstrictor response and inhibition of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by gallic acid in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Fujiko; Miyaichi, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hisao

    2002-08-01

    In the isolated rat thoracic aorta, gallic acid potentiated the vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine. The potentiation produced by gallic acid was absent in endothelium-denuded arteries. The potentiation was abolished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, and slightly attenuated by an addition of L-arginine, while indomethacin or BQ610 had no effect. The potentiation of response to phenylephrine was not found for structural modifications of gallic acid, except for caffeic acid. Gallic acid also inhibited vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside or prostacyclin, especially that by acetylcholine. The effect on vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine was decreased by esterification of the carboxy group of gallic acid, and in the absence or by the methylation of the o-dihydroxy group. Caffeic acid inhibited the vasorelaxation, though the effect was smaller than that of gallic acid. These findings indicate that gallic acid produces a potentiation of contractile response and inhibition of vasorelaxant responses, probably through inactivation of nitric oxide (NO), in which endothelially produced NO is principally involved, and that the modification of functional groups of the gallic acid molecule abolishes the potentiation of contractile response and attenuates the inhibition of vasorelaxant responses.

  14. Identification and Characterization of fhuD1 and fhuD2, Two Genes Involved in Iron-Hydroxamate Uptake in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sebulsky, M. Tom; Heinrichs, David E.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can utilize several hydroxamate siderophores for growth under iron-restricted conditions. Previous findings have shown that S. aureus possesses a cytoplasmic membrane-associated traffic ATPase that is involved in the specific transport of iron(III)-hydroxamate complexes. In this study, we have identified two additional genes, termed fhuD1 and fhuD2, whose products are involved in this transport process in S. aureus. We have shown that fhuD2 codes for a posttranslationally modified lipoprotein that is anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane, while the deduced amino acid sequence predicts the same for fhuD1. The predicted FhuD1 and FhuD2 proteins share 41.0% identity and 56.4% total similarity with each other, 45.9 and 49.1% total similarity with the FhuD homolog in Bacillus subtilis, and 29.3 and 24.6% total similarity with the periplasmic FhuD protein from Escherichia coli. Insertional inactivation and gene replacement of both genes showed that while FhuD2 is involved in the transport of iron(III) in complex with ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, aerobactin, and coprogen, FhuD1 shows a more limited substrate range, capable of only iron(III)-ferrichrome and iron(III)-ferrioxamine B transport in S. aureus. Nucleotide sequences present upstream of both fhuD1 and fhuD2 predict the presence of consensus Fur binding sequences. In agreement, transcription of both genes was negatively regulated by exogenous iron levels through the activity of the S. aureus Fur protein. PMID:11489851

  15. Dual effects of acetylsalicylic acid on ERK signaling and Mitf transcription lead to inhibition of melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Takashi; Usami, Mai; Awaji, Mizuki; Shinohara, Sumire; Sato, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as an analgesic/antipyretic drug. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including preventative effects against heart attack and stroke, and the induction of apoptosis in various cancer cells. We previously found that ASA inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. However, the mechanisms of how ASA down-regulates melanin synthesis remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of ASA on melanogenic pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) transcription. ASA significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner without oxidative stress and cell death. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the inhibitory effect of ASA might be due to the inhibition of Mitf gene transcription. Interestingly, ASA also induced ERK phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with PD98059, a specific ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, abolished the anti-melanogenic effect of ASA. These results suggest that the depigmenting effect of ASA results from down-regulation of Mitf, which is induced by both the induction of ERK phosphorylation and the inhibition of Mitf transcription.

  16. Corosolic acid inhibits the proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells and protects against diabetic renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Qiang; Tian, Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Wen-Juan; Li, Ping; Xiao, Xiong; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore the effects of corosolic acid (CA) on the renal damage of DM and the mechanisms behind these effects. The renoprotective effect of CA was investigated in type 1 diabetic rats and db/db mice. The kidneys and glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) were used to study the proliferation of GMCs by immunostaining and MTT assay. Further immunoblotting, siRNA, qPCR analysis, and detecting of NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were performed to explore relevant molecular mechanisms. In CA-treated diabetic animals, diabetes-induced albuminuria, increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were significantly attenuated, and glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial expansion and fibrosis were ameliorated. Furthermore, CA significantly inhibited proliferation of GMCs and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in both diabetic animals and high glucose (HG)-induced GMCs. CA also normalized Δψm and inhibited HG-induced NADPH oxidase activity, ROS generation and NOX4, NOX2, p22phox and p47phox expression. More importantly, CA inhibited GMC proliferation mediated by NADPH/ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. These findings suggest that CA exert the protective effect on DN by anti-proliferation resulted from inhibition of p38 MAPK- and NADPH-mediated inactivation of ERK1/2. PMID:27229751

  17. Size Controlled Heparin Fragment-Deoxycholic Acid Conjugate Showed Anticancer Property by Inhibiting VEGF165.

    PubMed

    Park, Jooho; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Kim, Ji-Young; Byun, Youngro

    2015-05-20

    Heparin is a highly sulfated, long, and linear polysaccharide, which can inhibit tumor growth by interacting with growth factors such as bFGF and VEGF. Several researchers have shown the anti-angiogenic effect of heparin and its conjugates in relation to growth factor inhibition. For drug development and inhibition of growth factors using heparin conjugates, the molecular size of heparin may be crucial considering the size of the heparin binding site of growth factors. In this study, we synthesized heparin fragments and deoxycholic acid conjugated heparin fragments (HFD) to search for the optimal size-controlled conjugate that will inhibit the angiogenic effect of VEGF165. We have also shown that the HFDs could have an enhanced therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo consequent to the molecular size control. HFDs have significant anti-angiogenic effects by blocking the angiogenic activity of VEGF165 depending on its molecular size. Among them, HFD2 was a promising candidate for oral angiogenesis inhibitor. These results suggest that size-controlled synthesis is necessary for heparin-based drug development.

  18. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase by amentoflavone reduces coxsackievirus B3 replication.

    PubMed

    Wilsky, Steffi; Sobotta, Katharina; Wiesener, Nadine; Pilas, Johanna; Althof, Nadine; Munder, Thomas; Wutzler, Peter; Henke, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a human pathogen that causes acute and chronic infections, but an antiviral drug to treat these diseases has not yet been developed for clinical use. Several intracellular pathways are altered to assist viral transcription, RNA replication, and progeny release. Among these, fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression is increased. In order to test the potential of FAS inhibition as an anti-CVB3 strategy, several experiments were performed, including studies on the correlation of CVB3 replication and FAS expression in human Raji cells and an analysis of the time and dose dependence of the antiviral effect of FAS inhibition due to treatment with amentoflavone. The results demonstrate that CVB3 infection induces an up-regulation of FAS expression already at 1 h postinfection (p.i.). Incubation with increasing concentrations of amentoflavone inhibited CVB3 replication significantly up to 8 h p.i. In addition, suppression of p38 MAP kinase activity by treatment with SB239063 decreased FAS expression as well as viral replication. These data provide evidence that FAS inhibition via amentoflavone administration might present a target for anti-CVB3 therapy.

  20. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-06-09

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27278104

  2. Suppression of autophagy by mycophenolic acid contributes to inhibition of HCV replication in human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shoucai; Su, Jinming; Liang, Bingyu; Li, Xu; Li, Yu; Jiang, Junjun; Huang, Jiegang; Zhou, Bo; Ning, Chuanyi; Li, Jieliang; Ho, Wenzhe; Li, Yiping; Chen, Hui; Liang, Hao; Ye, Li

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mycophenolic acid (MPA) has an anti-HCV activity. However, the mechanism of MPA-mediated inhibition of HCV replication remains to be determined. This study investigated whether MPA has an effect on autophagy, a cellular machinery required for HCV replication, thereby, inhibits HCV replication in Huh7 cells. MPA treatment of Huh7 cells could suppress autophagy, evidenced by decreased LC3B-II level and conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, decreased autophagosome formation, and increased p62 level compared to MPA-untreated cells. Tunicamycin treatment or HCV infection could induce cellular autophagy, however, MPA also exhibited its inhibitory effect on tunicamycin- or HCV infection-induced autophagy. The expression of three autophagy-related genes, Atg3, Atg5, and Atg7 were identified to be inhibited by MPA treatment. Over-expression of these genes could partly recover HCV replication inhibited by MPA; however, silencing their expression by siRNAs could enhance the inhibitory effect of MPA on HCV. Collectively, these results reveal that suppression of autophagy by MPA plays a role in its anti-HCV activity. Down-regulating the expression of three autophagy-related genes by MPA involves in its antiviral mechanism. PMID:28276509

  3. Inhibition of creatine kinase activity from rat cerebral cortex by D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cleide G; Bueno, Ana Rúbia F; Schuck, Patrícia F; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Ribeiro, César A J; Rosa, Rafael B; Dutra Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir

    2004-01-01

    D-2-Hydroxyglutaric acid (DGA) is the biochemical hallmark of patients affected by the neurometabolic disorder known as D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (DHGA). Although this disease is predominantly characterized by severe neurological findings, the underlying mechanisms of brain injury are virtually unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DGA on total, cytosolic, and mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) activities from cerebral cortex of 30-day-old Wistar rats. Total CK activity (tCK) was measured in whole cell homogenates, whereas cytosolic and mitochondrial activities were measured in the cytosolic and mitochondrial preparations from cerebral cortex. We verified that CK activities were significantly inhibited by DGA (11-34% inhibition) at concentrations as low as 0.25 mM, being the mitochondrial fraction the most affected activity. Kinetic studies revealed that the inhibitory effect of DGA was non-competitive in relation to phosphocreatine. We also observed that this inhibition was fully prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of DGA on tCK activity is possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. Considering the importance of CK activity for brain metabolism homeostasis, our results suggest that inhibition of this enzyme by increased levels of DGA may be related to the neurodegeneration of patients affected by DHGA.

  4. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  5. Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C inhibition suppresses Th17 cells and induces thymic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Guntermann, Christine; Piaia, Alessandro; Hamel, Marie-Laure; Theil, Diethilde; Rubic-Schneider, Tina; del Rio-Espinola, Alberto; Dong, Linda; Billich, Andreas; Kaupmann, Klemens; Dawson, Janet; Hoegenauer, Klemens; Orain, David; Hintermann, Samuel; Stringer, Rowan; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Doelemeyer, Arno; Deurinck, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C (RORC) is a master regulator of Th17 cells, which are pathogenic in several autoimmune diseases. Genetic Rorc deficiency in mice, while preventing autoimmunity, causes early lethality due to metastatic thymic T cell lymphomas. We sought to determine whether pharmacological RORC inhibition could be an effective and safe therapy for autoimmune diseases by evaluating its effects on Th17 cell functions and intrathymic T cell development. RORC inhibitors effectively inhibited Th17 differentiation and IL-17A production, and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. In vitro, RORC inhibitors induced apoptosis, as well as Bcl2l1 and BCL2L1 mRNA downregulation, in mouse and nonhuman primate thymocytes, respectively. Chronic, 13-week RORC inhibitor treatment in rats caused progressive thymic alterations in all analyzed rats similar to those in Rorc-deficient mice prior to T cell lymphoma development. One rat developed thymic cortical hyperplasia with neoplastic features, including increased mitosis and reduced IKAROS expression, albeit without skewed T cell clonality. In summary, pharmacological inhibition of RORC not only blocks Th17 cell development and related cytokine production, but also recapitulates thymic aberrations seen in Rorc-deficient mice. While RORC inhibition may offer an effective therapeutic principle for Th17-mediated diseases, T cell lymphoma with chronic therapy remains an apparent risk. PMID:28289717

  6. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuguang; Vermeer, Mario A; Trautwein, Elke A

    2011-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida) is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA)) contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE) were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w) cholesterol (control) or the same diet supplemented with (i) 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii) 0.24% PSE, (iii) hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37%) plus PSE (0.24%) or (iv) OA/UA mixture (0.01%) for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA) enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  7. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase Reduces Blastocyst Hatching through Regulation of the AKT Pathway in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Cui, Xiang-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is an enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of long-chain fatty acids. During oncogenesis, FASN plays a role in growth and survival rather than acting within the energy storage pathways. Here, the function of FASN during early embryonic development was studied using its specific inhibitor, C75. We found that the presence of the inhibitor reduced blastocyst hatching. FASN inhibition decreased Cpt1 expression, leading to a reduction in mitochondria numbers and ATP content. This inhibition of FASN resulted in the down-regulation of the AKT pathway, thereby triggering apoptosis through the activation of the p53 pathway. Activation of the apoptotic pathway also leads to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and autophagy. In addition, the FASN inhibitor impaired cell proliferation, a parameter of blastocyst quality for outgrowth. The level of OCT4, an important factor in embryonic development, decreased after treatment with the FASN inhibitor. These results show that FASN exerts an effect on early embryonic development by regulating both fatty acid oxidation and the AKT pathway in pigs. PMID:28107461

  8. Pyrazinamide inhibits the eukaryotic-like fatty acid synthetase I (FASI) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zimhony, O; Cox, J S; Welch, J T; Vilchèze, C; Jacobs, W R

    2000-09-01

    Tuberculosis treatment is shortened to six months by the indispensable addition of pyrazinamide (PZA) to the drug regimen that includes isoniazid and rifampin. PZA is a pro-drug of pyrazinoic acid (POA) (ref. 3), whose target of action has never been identified. Although PZA is active only against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the PZA analog 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) displays a broader range of anti-mycobacterial activity. We have found that the eukaryotic-like fas1 gene (encoding fatty acid synthetase I, FASI) from M. avium, M. bovis BCG or M. tuberculosis confers resistance to 5-Cl-PZA when present on multi-copy vectors in M. smegmatis. 5-Cl-PZA and PZA markedly inhibited the activity of M. tuberculosis FASI, the biosynthesis of C16 to C24/C26 fatty acids from acetyl-CoA (ref. 6). Importantly, PZA inhibited FASI in M. tuberculosis in correlation with PZA susceptibility. These results indicate that FASI is a primary target of action for PZA in M. tuberculosis. Further characterization of FASI as a drug target for PZA may allow the development of new drugs to shorten the therapy against M. tuberculosis and may provide more options for treatment against M. bovis, M. avium and drug resistant M. tuberculosis.

  9. Food Polyphenol Apigenin Inhibits the Cytochrome P450 Monoxygenase Branch of the Arachidonic Acid Cascade.

    PubMed

    Steuck, Maryvonne; Hellhake, Stefan; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2016-11-30

    The product of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) ω-hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA), 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), is a potent vasoconstrictor. Utilizing microsomes as well as individual CYP4 isoforms we demonstrate here that flavonoids can block 20-HETE formation. Apigenin inhibits CYP4F2 with an IC50 value of 4.6 μM and 20-HETE formation in human liver and kidney microsomes at 2.4-9.8 μM. Interestingly, the structurally similar naringenin shows no relevant effect on the formation of 20-HETE. Based on these in vitro data, it is impossible to evaluate if a relevant blockade of 20-HETE formation can result in humans from intake of polyphenols with the diet. However, the potency of apigenin is comparable to those of P450 inhibitors such as ketoconazole. Moreover, an IC50 value in the micromolar range is also described for the inhibition of CYP-mediated drug metabolism leading to food-drug interactions. The modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade by food polyphenols therefore warrants further investigation.

  10. Inhibition of nocturnal acidity is important but not essential for duodenal ulcer healing.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi Porro, G; Parente, F; Sangaletti, O

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the relative importance of day and night time gastric acid inhibition for duodenal ulcer healing by comparing the anti-ulcer efficacy of a single morning with that of a single bedtime dose of ranitidine. One hundred and thirty patients with active duodenal ulcer were randomly assigned to a double-blind therapy with ranitidine 300 mg at 8 am or the same dose at 10 pm for up to eight weeks. The antisecretory effects of these regimens were also assessed by 24 h intragastric pH monitoring in 18 of these patients. At four weeks ulcers had healed in 41/61 (67%) of patients taking the morning dose and in 47/63 (75%) of those receiving the nocturnal dose (95% CI for the difference -0.09 +0.25; p ns). At eight weeks, the corresponding healing rates were 82% and 85.5%, respectively (95% CI for the difference -0.11 +0.17; p ns). Both treatments were significantly superior to placebo in raising 24 h intragastric pH, although the effects of the morning dose were of shorter duration than those of the nocturnal dose. These findings suggest that suppression of nocturnal acidity is important but not essential to promote healing of duodenal ulcers; a prolonged period of acid inhibition during the day (as obtained with a single large morning dose of H2-blockers) may be equally effective. PMID:2186980

  11. myo-Inositol 1-Phosphate Synthase Inhibition and Control of Uridine Diphosphate-d-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis in Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Loewus, Mary W.; Loewus, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Of the eight intermediates associated with the two pathways of UDP-d-glucuronic acid biosynthesis found in plants, only d-glucuronic acid inhibited myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (EC 5.5.1.4), formerly referred to as d-glucose 6-phosphate cycloaldolase. Inhibition was competitive. An attempt to demonstrate over-all reversibility of the synthase indicated that it was less than 5% reversible, if at all. PMID:16658890

  12. The amino acid sensor GCN2 controls gut inflammation by inhibiting inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I; Khan, Nooruddin; Ma, Hualing; Gama, Leonardo; Machiah, Deepa K; Lawson, Benton; Hakimpour, Paul; Wang, Yi-chong; Li, Shuzhao; Sharma, Prachi; Kaufman, Randal J; Martinez, Jennifer; Pulendran, Bali

    2016-01-01

    Summary The integrated stress response (ISR) is a homeostatic mechanism by which eukaryotic cells sense and respond to stress-inducing signals, such as amino acid starvation. General controlled nonrepressed (GCN2) kinase is a key orchestrator of the ISR, and modulates cellular metabolism in response to amino acid starvation. Here we demonstrate that GCN2 controls intestinal inflammation by suppressing inflammasome activation. Enhanced activation of ISR was observed in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells during amino acid starvation, or intestinal inflammation. Genetic deletion of GCN2 in CD11c+ APCs or intestinal epithelial cells resulted in enhanced intestinal inflammation and Th17 responses, due to enhanced inflammasome activation and IL-1β production. This was caused by reduced autophagy in GCN2−/− intestinal APCs and epithelial cells, leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), a potent activator of inflammasomes1. Thus, conditional ablation of Atg5 and Atg7 in intestinal APCs resulted in enhanced ROS and Th17 responses. Furthermore, in vivo blockade of ROS and IL-1β resulted in inhibition of Th17 responses and reduced inflammation in GCN2−/− mice. Importantly, acute amino acid starvation suppressed intestinal inflammation via a mechanism dependent on GCN2. These results reveal a mechanism that couples amino acid sensing with control of intestinal inflammation via GCN2. PMID:26982722

  13. Inhibition of acid formation by epidermal growth factor in the isolated rabbit gastric glands.

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, A; Drozdowicz, D; Gregory, H; Konturek, S J; Warzecha, Z

    1986-01-01

    The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on basal and stimulated (with histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, and high concentrations of K+) acid formation have been studied in isolated glands from the rabbit gastric mucosa. The changes in the accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine [14C]AP have been used as an indirect measurement of acid production in the glands. Unstimulated gastric glands accumulated [14C]AP indicating the existence of basal acid production in these glands, and EGF caused a small but significant reduction in basal [14C]AP uptake. A similar reduction of basal [14C]AP uptake was observed after exposure to omeprazole but not after ranitidine or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP and K+ caused a strong and dose-dependent stimulation of acid formation by the glands. EGF, like omeprazole, reduced dose-dependently the [14C]AP accumulation stimulated by both histamine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, while ranitidine and PGE2 reduced histamine- but not dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP-stimulated accumulation of [14C]AP. In the absence of other external stimuli, an increased K+ concentration enhanced [14C]AP accumulation to levels similar to those produced by histamine and this effect was not changed by EGF, ranitidine or PGE2 but was inhibited by omeprazole. We conclude that EGF interferes with the final steps of acid production between cyclic nucleotides and proton pump of the parietal cells. PMID:3025433

  14. INHIBITION OF FATTY ACID DESATURASES IN Drosophila melanogaster LARVAE BLOCKS FEEDING AND DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRESSION.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; da Cruz, Tina Correia; Pulfemuller, Alicia; Grégoire, Stéphane; Ferveur, Jean-François; Moussian, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Fatty acid desaturases are metabolic setscrews. To study their systemic impact on growth in Drosophila melanogaster, we inhibited fatty acid desaturases using the inhibitor CAY10566. As expected, the amount of desaturated lipids is reduced in larvae fed with CAY10566. These animals cease feeding soon after hatching, and their growth is strongly attenuated. A starvation program is not launched, but the expression of distinct metabolic genes is activated, possibly to mobilize storage material. Without attaining the normal size, inhibitor-fed larvae molt to the next stage indicating that the steroid hormone ecdysone triggers molting correctly. Nevertheless, after molting, expression of ecdysone-dependent regulators is not induced. While control larvae molt a second time, these larvae fail to do so and die after few days of straying. These effects are similar to those observed in experiments using larvae deficient for the fatty acid desaturase1 gene. Based on these data, we propose that the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids adjusts a sensor system that directs feeding behavior. We also hypothesize that loss of fatty acid desaturase activity leads to a block of the genetic program of development progression indirectly by switching on a metabolic compensation program.

  15. Boric acid inhibits germination and colonization of Saprolegnia spores in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegnia infections cause severe economic losses among freshwater fish and their eggs. The banning of malachite green increased the demand for finding effective alternative treatments to control the disease. In the present study, we investigated the ability of boric acid to control saprolegniosis in salmon eggs and yolk sac fry. Under in vitro conditions, boric acid was able to decrease Saprolegnia spore activity and mycelial growth in all tested concentrations above 0.2 g/L, while complete inhibition of germination and growth was observed at a concentration of 0.8 g/L. In in vivo experiments using Atlantic salmon eyed eggs, saprolegniosis was controlled by boric acid at concentrations ranging from 0.2-1.4 g/L during continuous exposure, and at 1.0-4.0 g/L during intermittent exposure. The same effect was observed on salmon yolk sac fry exposed continuously to 0.5 g/L boric acid during the natural outbreak of saprolegniosis. During the experiments no negative impact with regard to hatchability and viability was observed in either eggs or fry, which indicate safety of use at all tested concentrations. The high hatchability and survival rates recorded following the in vivo testing suggest that boric acid is a candidate for prophylaxis and control of saprolegniosis.

  16. Inhibition of natural killer cell activity by eicosapentaenoic acid in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, N.; Sugiyama, E.; Hamazaki, T.; Yano, S.

    1988-01-15

    To examine the effects of in vivo eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on natural killer (NK) cell activity, C3H/He mice each received a single intraperitoneal bolus of an emulsion of trieicosapentaenoyl-glycerol (EPA-TG). Spleen cells were tested for NK activity using /sup 51/Chromium-release assays against YAC-1 target cells. Forty eight hours after injection, NK activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. EPA-TG emulsion also inhibited the NK activity of NK-enriched effector cells. Decreased cytotoxicity was first noted 24 hr after injection; it resumed the baseline by 7 days. The addition of EPA-TG emulsion to a cytotoxicity assay system resulted in moderate depression of NK activity. These results demonstrate that EPA has significant immunomodulatory effects on NK activity.

  17. Inhibition of melanogenesis and oxidation by protocatechuic acid from Origanum vulgare (oregano).

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzung-Han; Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Lin, Rong-Jyh; Liang, Jing-Yao; Liang, Chia-Hua

    2010-11-29

    Antioxidant and antimelanogenesis activities of protocatechuic acid (1) from Origanum vulgare (oregano) were investigated. The antioxidative capacity of 1 was confirmed from its free-radical-scavenging activities, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and suppression of reactive oxygen species in H(2)O(2)-induced BNLCL2 cells. The inhibition by 1 of tyrosinase and DOPA oxidase activity and melanin production was possibly related to the down-regulation of melanocortin-1 receptor, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins-2, and tyrosinase-related proteins-1 expression in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced B16 cells. After a gel containing 1 was applied to mice, the values of L* slightly increased, and a* and erythema-melanin levels of skin were reduced by comparing the values of untreated control groups, indicating 1 can reduce melanin production. These results suggest that 1 may act as an effective quencher of oxidative attackers with antimelanogenesis properties.

  18. Inhibition kinetics of acid and alkaline phosphatases by atrazine and methomyl pesticides.

    PubMed

    El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Badawy, Mohamed E I

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the kinetic characteristics of acid and alkaline phosphatases isolated from different sources and to study the effects of the herbicide atrazine and insecticide methomyl on the activity and kinetic properties of the enzymes. Acid phosphatase (ACP) was isolated from the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. lycopersicum); alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was isolated from two sources, including mature earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) and larvae of the Egyptian cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). The specific activities of the enzymes were 33.31, 5.56 and 0.72 mmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milligram protein for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively. The inhibition kinetics indicated that atrazine and methomyl caused competitive-non-competitive inhibition of the enzymes. The relationships between estimates of K(m) and V(max) calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation have been explored. The extent of the inhibition was different, as estimated by the values of the inhibition constant Ki that were found to be 3.34 × 10(-3), 1.12 × 10(-2) and 1.07 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively, with methomyl. In the case of atrazine, K(i) were found to be 8.99 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-2) and 1.36 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits TNFα-induced IL-8 release from monocytes.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Aoife M; Lajczak, Natalia K; Keyes, Jennifer A; Ward, Joseph B; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes are critical to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as they infiltrate the mucosa and release cytokines that drive the inflammatory response. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid with anti-inflammatory actions, has been proposed as a potential new therapy for IBD. However, its effects on monocyte function are not yet known. Primary monocytes from healthy volunteers or cultured U937 monocytes were treated with either the proinflammatory cytokine, TNFα (5 ng/ml) or the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 μg/ml) for 24 h, in the absence or presence of UDCA (25-100 μM). IL-8 release into the supernatant was measured by ELISA. mRNA levels were quantified by qPCR and changes in cell signaling proteins were determined by Western blotting. Toxicity was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. UDCA treatment significantly attenuated TNFα-, but not LPS-driven, release of IL-8 from both primary and cultured monocytes. UDCA inhibition of TNFα-driven responses was associated with reduced IL-8 mRNA expression. Both TNFα and LPS stimulated NFκB activation in monocytes, while IL-8 release in response to both cytokines was attenuated by an NFκB inhibitor, BMS-345541. Interestingly, UDCA inhibited TNFα-, but not LPS-stimulated, NFκB activation. Finally, TNFα, but not LPS, induced phosphorylation of TNF receptor associated factor (TRAF2), while UDCA cotreatment attenuated this response. We conclude that UDCA specifically inhibits TNFα-induced IL-8 release from monocytes by inhibiting TRAF2 activation. Since such actions would serve to dampen mucosal immune responses in vivo, our data support the therapeutic potential of UDCA for IBD.

  20. The kinetics of process dependent ammonia inhibition of methanogenesis from acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher Allen; Novak, John; Takacs, Imre; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir

    2012-12-01

    Advanced anaerobic digestion processes aimed at improving the methanization of sewage sludge may be potentially impaired by the production of inhibitory compounds (e.g. free ammonia). The result of methanogenic inhibition is relatively high effluent concentrations of acetic acid and other soluble organics, as well as reduced methane yields. An extreme example of such an advanced process is the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment of sludge prior to high solids digestion (THD). Compared to a conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion process (MAD), THD operates in a state of constant inhibition driven by high free ammonia concentrations, and elevated pH values. As such, previous investigations of the kinetics of methanogenesis from acetic acid under uninhibited conditions do not necessarily apply well to the modeling of extreme processes such as THD. By conducting batch ammonia toxicity assays using biomass from THD and MAD reactors, we compared the response of these communities over a broad range of ammonia inhibition. For both processes, increased inhibitor concentrations resulted in a reduction of biomass growth rate (r(max) = μ(max)∙X) and a resulting decrease in the substrate half saturation coefficient (K(S)). These two parameters exhibited a high degree of correlation, suggesting that for a constant transport limited system, the K(S) was mostly a linear function of the growth rate. After correcting for reactor pH and temperature, we found that the THD and MAD biomass were both able to perform methanogenesis from acetate at high free ammonia concentrations (equivalent to 3-5 g/L total ammonia nitrogen), albeit at less than 30% of their respective maximum rates. The reduction in methane production was slightly less pronounced for the THD biomass than for MAD, suggesting that the long term exposure to ammonia had selected for a methanogenic pathway less dependent on those organisms most sensitive to ammonia inhibition (i.e. aceticlastic methanogens).

  1. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella by combinations of oriental mustard, malic acid, and EDTA.

    PubMed

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of oriental mustard extract alone or combined with malic acid and EDTA were investigated against Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes at different temperatures. Five strain Salmonella or L. monocytogenes cocktails were separately inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion broth containing 0.5% (w/v) aqueous oriental mustard extract and incubated at 4 °C to 21 °C for 21 d. For inhibitor combination tests, Salmonella Typhimurium 02:8423 and L. monocytogenes 2-243 were individually inoculated in Mueller Hinton broth containing the mustard extract with either or both 0.2% (w/v) malic acid and 0.2% (w/v) EDTA and incubated at 10 °C or 21 °C for 10 to 14 d. Mustard extract inhibited growth of the L. monocytogenes cocktail at 4 °C up to 21 d (2.3 log10 CFU/mL inhibition) or at 10 °C for 7 d (2.4 log10 CFU/mL inhibition). Salmonella spp. viability was slightly, but significantly reduced by mustard extract at 4 °C by 21 d. Although hydrolysis of sinigrin in mustard extract by both pathogens was 2 to 6 times higher at 21 °C than at 4 °C to 10 °C, mustard was not inhibitory at 21 °C, perhaps because of the instability of its hydrolysis product (allyl isothiocyanate). At 21 °C, additive inhibitory effects of mustard extract with EDTA or malic acid led to undetectable levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 7 d and 10 d, respectively. At 10 °C, S. Typhimurium was similarly susceptible, but combinations of antimicrobials were not more inhibitory to L. monocytogenes than the individual agents.

  2. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit phosphoinositide formation and chemotaxis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, R I; Benincaso, A I; Knoell, C T; Larkin, J K; Austen, K F; Robinson, D R

    1993-01-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation attenuates the chemotactic response of neutrophils and the generation of leukotriene (LT) B4 by neutrophils stimulated with calcium ionophore; however, the mechanisms and relationship of these effects were not examined. Neutrophils and monocytes from eight healthy individuals were examined before and after 3 and 10 wk of dietary supplementation with 20 g SuperEPA daily, which provides 9.4 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 5 g docosahexaenoic acid. The maximal neutrophil chemotactic response to LTB4, assessed in Boyden microchambers, decreased by 69% after 3 wk and by 93% after 10 wk from prediet values. The formation of [3H]inositol tris-phosphate (IP3) by [3H]inositol-labeled neutrophils stimulated by LTB4 decreased by 71% after 3 wk (0.033 +/- 0.013% [3H] release, mean +/- SEM) and by 90% after 10 wk (0.011 +/- 0.011%) from predict values (0.114 +/- 0.030%) as quantitated by beta-scintillation counting after resolution on HPLC. LTB4-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis and IP3 formation correlated significantly (P < 0.0001); each response correlated closely and negatively with the EPA content of the neutrophil phosphatidylinositol (PI) pool (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). Neither the affinities and densities of the high and low affinity LTB4 receptors on neutrophils nor LTB4-mediated diglyceride formation changed appreciably during the study. Similar results were observed in neutrophils activated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). The summed formation of LTB4 plus LTB5 was selectively inhibited in calcium ionophore-stimulated neutrophils and was also inhibited in zymosan-stimulated neutrophils. The inhibition of the summed formation of LTB4 plus LTB5 in calcium ionophore-stimulated neutrophils and in zymosan-stimulated neutrophils did not correlate significantly with the EPA content of the PI pool. The data indicate that dietary omega-3 PUFA

  3. Effects of inhibition gastric acid secretion on arterial acid-base status during digestion in the toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Johnnie B; Andrade, Denis V; Wang, Tobias

    2003-07-01

    Digestion affects acid-base status, because the net transfer of HCl from the blood to the stomach lumen leads to an increase in HCO3(-) levels in both extra- and intracellular compartments. The increase in plasma [HCO3(-)], the alkaline tide, is particularly pronounced in amphibians and reptiles, but is not associated with an increased arterial pH, because of a concomitant rise in arterial PCO2 caused by a relative hypoventilation. In this study, we investigate whether the postprandial increase in PaCO2 of the toad Bufo marinus represents a compensatory response to the increased plasma [HCO3(-)] or a state-dependent change in the control of pulmonary ventilation. To this end, we successfully prevented the alkaline tide, by inhibiting gastric acid secretion with omeprazole, and compared the response to that of untreated toads determined in our laboratory during the same period. In addition, we used vascular infusions of bicarbonate to mimic the alkaline tide in fasting animals. Omeprazole did not affect blood gases, acid-base and haematological parameters in fasting toads, but abolished the postprandial increase in plasma [HCO3(-)] and the rise in arterial PCO2 that normally peaks 48 h into the digestive period. Vascular infusion of HCO3(-), that mimicked the postprandial rise in plasma [HCO3(-)], led to a progressive respiratory compensation of arterial pH through increased arterial PCO2. Thus, irrespective of whether the metabolic alkalosis is caused by gastric acid secretion in response to a meal or experimental infusion of bicarbonate, arterial pH is being maintained by an increased arterial PCO2. It seems, therefore, that the elevated PCO2, occuring during the postprandial period, constitutes of a regulated response to maintain pH rather than a state-dependent change in ventilatory control.

  4. Indomethacin inhibits tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels at acidic pH in rat nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michiko; Jang, Il-Sung

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well-known inhibitors of cyclooxygenases (COXs) and are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory pain; however several NSAIDs display COX-independent analgesic action including the inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in primary afferent neurons. In the present study, we examined whether NSAIDs modulate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and if this modulation depends on the extracellular pH. The TTX-R Na(+) currents were recorded from small-sized trigeminal ganglion neurons by using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Among eight NSAIDs tested in this study, several drugs, including aspirin and ibuprofen, did not affect TTX-R Na(+) channels either at pH 7.4 or at pH 6.0. However, we found that indomethacin, and, to a lesser extent, ibuprofen and naproxen potently inhibited the peak amplitude of TTX-R Na(+) currents at pH 6.0. The indomethacin-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) channels was more potent at depolarized membrane potentials. Indomethacin significantly shifted both the voltage-activation and voltage-inactivation relationships to depolarizing potentials at pH 6.0. Indomethacin accelerated the development of inactivation and retarded the recovery from inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels at pH 6.0. Given that indomethacin and several other NSAIDs could further suppress local nociceptive signals by inhibiting TTX-R Na(+) channels at an acidic pH in addition to the classical COX inhibition, these drugs could be particularly useful for the treatment of inflammatory pain.

  5. Trypanocidal Effect of Isotretinoin through the Inhibition of Polyamine and Amino Acid Transporters in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Errasti, Andrea E; Avila, Carla C; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2017-03-01

    Polyamines are essential compounds to all living organisms and in the specific case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, they are exclusively obtained through transport processes since this parasite is auxotrophic for polyamines. Previous works reported that retinol acetate inhibits Leishmania growth and decreases its intracellular polyamine concentration. The present work describes a combined strategy of drug repositioning by virtual screening followed by in vitro assays to find drugs able to inhibit TcPAT12, the only polyamine transporter described in T. cruzi. After a screening of 3000 FDA-approved drugs, 7 retinoids with medical use were retrieved and used for molecular docking assays with TcPAT12. From the docked molecules, isotretinoin, a well-known drug used for acne treatment, showed the best interaction score with TcPAT12 and was selected for further in vitro studies. Isotretinoin inhibited the polyamine transport, as well as other amino acid transporters from the same protein family (TcAAAP), with calculated IC50 values in the range of 4.6-10.3 μM. It also showed a strong inhibition of trypomastigote burst from infected cells, with calculated IC50 of 130 nM (SI = 920) being significantly less effective on the epimastigote stage (IC50 = 30.6 μM). The effect of isotretinoin on the parasites plasma membrane permeability and on mammalian cell viability was tested, and no change was observed. Autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies were detected as part of the mechanisms of isotretinoin-induced death indicating that the inhibition of transporters by isotretinoin causes nutrient starvation that triggers autophagic and apoptotic processes. In conclusion, isotretinoin is a promising trypanocidal drug since it is a multi-target inhibitor of essential metabolites transporters, in addition to being an FDA-approved drug largely used in humans, which could reduce significantly the requirements for its possible application in the treatment of

  6. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated current (if) of rabbit SA node myocytes by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Accili, E A; DiFrancesco, D

    1996-03-01

    The effects of the amphiphilic substance niflumic acid (NFA) were examined in myocytes isolated from the sino-atrial node of the rabbit heart. NFA (50 and 500 microM), for 30-60 s, produced a reversible negative chronotropic effect by reducing the rate of diastolic depolarization, suggesting an inhibitory effect on the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current (if). NFA (from 0.05 to 500 microM) inhibited if by modifying the current kinetics, without alteration of the conductance. This was shown by evidence indicating that: (1) NFA inhibited if during hyperpolarizing pulses to the mid-point of if activation but not at fully activating voltages; (2) the slope and reversal potential of the fully activated current/voltage (I/V) relation were not altered by NFA, indicating no change in slope conductance or ion selectivity; and (3) hyperpolarizing ramp protocols confirmed the lack of action of 50 microM NFA on the fully activated current and a shift of approximately -8 mV. Although similar to inhibition by acetylcholine (ACh), inhibition by NFA was only partly additive with the action of ACh and was not altered by atropine or pertussis toxin, both of which eliminated the action of ACh. The effect of NFA was present after stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and after inhibition of phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX). In cell-attached patch measurements, NFA applied externally did not affect if measured in the patch. Finally, application of NFA to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches did not alter the current in the absence or presence of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). These results suggest an external, membrane-delimited action of NFA on if.

  7. Trypanocidal Effect of Isotretinoin through the Inhibition of Polyamine and Amino Acid Transporters in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, Chantal; Valera-Vera, Edward A.; Sayé, Melisa; Errasti, Andrea E.; Avila, Carla C.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines are essential compounds to all living organisms and in the specific case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, they are exclusively obtained through transport processes since this parasite is auxotrophic for polyamines. Previous works reported that retinol acetate inhibits Leishmania growth and decreases its intracellular polyamine concentration. The present work describes a combined strategy of drug repositioning by virtual screening followed by in vitro assays to find drugs able to inhibit TcPAT12, the only polyamine transporter described in T. cruzi. After a screening of 3000 FDA-approved drugs, 7 retinoids with medical use were retrieved and used for molecular docking assays with TcPAT12. From the docked molecules, isotretinoin, a well-known drug used for acne treatment, showed the best interaction score with TcPAT12 and was selected for further in vitro studies. Isotretinoin inhibited the polyamine transport, as well as other amino acid transporters from the same protein family (TcAAAP), with calculated IC50 values in the range of 4.6–10.3 μM. It also showed a strong inhibition of trypomastigote burst from infected cells, with calculated IC50 of 130 nM (SI = 920) being significantly less effective on the epimastigote stage (IC50 = 30.6 μM). The effect of isotretinoin on the parasites plasma membrane permeability and on mammalian cell viability was tested, and no change was observed. Autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies were detected as part of the mechanisms of isotretinoin-induced death indicating that the inhibition of transporters by isotretinoin causes nutrient starvation that triggers autophagic and apoptotic processes. In conclusion, isotretinoin is a promising trypanocidal drug since it is a multi-target inhibitor of essential metabolites transporters, in addition to being an FDA-approved drug largely used in humans, which could reduce significantly the requirements for its possible application in the treatment of

  8. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, zileuton, suppresses prostaglandin biosynthesis by inhibition of arachidonic acid release in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Pergola, C; Koeberle, A; Hoffmann, M; Dehm, F; Bramanti, P; Cuzzocrea, S; Werz, O; Sautebin, L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Zileuton is the only 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor marketed as a treatment for asthma, and is often utilized as a selective tool to evaluate the role of 5-LOX and leukotrienes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zileuton on prostaglandin (PG) production in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Peritoneal macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon γ (LPS/IFNγ), J774 macrophages and human whole blood stimulated with LPS were used as in vitro models and rat carrageenan-induced pleurisy as an in vivo model. KEY RESULTS Zileuton suppressed PG biosynthesis by interference with arachidonic acid (AA) release in macrophages. We found that zileuton significantly reduced PGE2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (PGF1α) levels in activated mouse peritoneal macrophages and in J774 macrophages. This effect was not related to 5-LOX inhibition, because it was also observed in macrophages from 5-LOX knockout mice. Notably, zileuton inhibited PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated human whole blood and suppressed PGE2 and 6-keto PGF1α pleural levels in rat carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Interestingly, zileuton failed to inhibit the activity of microsomal PGE2 synthase1 and of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and did not affect COX-2 expression. However, zileuton significantly decreased AA release in macrophages accompanied by inhibition of phospholipase A2 translocation to cellular membranes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION Zileuton inhibited PG production by interfering at the level of AA release. Its mechanism of action, as well as its use as a pharmacological tool, in experimental models of inflammation should be reassessed. PMID:20880396

  9. Some polyphenols inhibit the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical in the reaction mixture of linoleic acid hydroperoxide with ferrous ions.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-01-01

    Effects of some polyphenols and their related compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quinic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, o-dihydroxybenzene, m-dihydroxybenzene, and p-dihydroxybenzene) on the formation of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic (13-HPODE) acid-derived radicals (pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical) were examined. The ESR spin trapping showed that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and o-dihydroxybenzene inhibited the overall formation of 13-HPODE acid-derived radicals in the reaction mixture of 13-HPODE with ferrous ions. The ESR peak heights of alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/13-HPODE-derived radical adducts decreased to 46+/-4% (chlorogenic acid), 54+/-2% (caffeic acid), 49+/-2% (gallic acid), 55+/-1% [D-(+)-catechin], 60+/-3% [D-(-)-catechin], 42+/-1% (L-dopa), 30+/-2% (dopamine), 49+/-2% (L-adrenaline), 24+/-2% (L-noradrenaline), and 54+/-5% (o-dihydroxybenzene) of the control, respectively. The high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance (HPLC-ESR) and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometries (HPLC-ESR-MS) showed that caffeic acid inhibited the formation of octanoic acid radical and pentyl radical to 42+/-2% and 52+/-7% of the control, respectively. On the other hand, the polyphenols and their related compounds had few inhibitory effects on the radical formation in the presence of EDTA. Visible absorbance measurement revealed that all the polyphenols exhibiting the inhibitory effect chelate ferrous ions. Above results indicated that the chelation of ferrous ion is essential to the inhibitory effects of the polyphenols. PMID:10677343

  10. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development. PMID:27404291

  11. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development.

  12. Experimental and theoretical study for corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution by some new hydrazine carbodithioic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, K. F.

    2006-04-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solutions by some new hydrazine carbodithioic acid derivatives namely N'-furan-2-yl-methylene-hydrazine carbodithioic acid (A), N'-(4-dimethylamino-benzylidene)-hydrazine carbodithioic acid (B) and N'-(3-nitro-benzylidene)-hydrazine carbodithioic (C) was studied using chemical (weight loss) and electrochemical (potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS) measurements. These measurements show that the inhibition efficiency obtained by these compounds increased by increasing their concentration. The inhibition efficiency follow the order C > B > A. Polarization studies show that these compounds act as mixed type inhibitors in 0.5 M HCl solutions. These inhibitors function through adsorption following Langmuir isotherm. The electronic properties of these inhibitors, obtained using PM3 semi-empirical self-consistence field method, have been correlated with their experimental efficiencies using non-linear regression method.

  13. Ethacrynic acid and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 cooperatively inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Makishima, M; Honma, Y

    1996-09-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. In this study we found that the loop diuretic ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the differentiation of human leukemia cells induced by VD3. Ethacrynic acid alone inhibited the proliferation of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Ethacrynic acid effectively enhanced the growth-inhibiting action of VD3. In the presence of ethacrynic acid, VD3 increased the NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the CD11b expression of HL-60 cells more effectively than VD3 alone. Other loop diuretics, furosemide and bumetanide, also enhanced the differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3, but to a lesser extent than ethacrynic acid. The differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide or phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid with increasing NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the expression of CD11b or CD14 surface antigen. Morphologically, ethacrynic acid enhanced the monocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3 and phorbol ester and the granulocytic differentiation by retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfoxide. Other human myelomonocytic leukemia ML-1, U937, P39/TSU and P31/FUJ cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid. The long-term culture of HL-60 cells showed that ethacrynic acid plus VD3 induced the complete growth arrest of HL-60 cells. Therefore ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the proliferation-inhibiting and differentiation-inducing activities of VD3 and the combination of ethacrynic acid and VD3 may be useful in therapy for myeloid leukemia.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Belmiro; Reis, Flávio; Cerejo, Raquel; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Xavier-Cunha, Maria; Neto, Paula; Mota, Alfredo; Figueiredo, Arnaldo; Teixeira, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids have been tested on prevention and treatment of several cancer types, but the efficacy on “in vivo” bladder cancer has not been analyzed yet. This study aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mixture in an animal model of bladder cancer. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups during a 20-week protocol: control; carcinogen—N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN); ω-3 (DHA + EPA); and ω-3 + BBN. BBN and ω-3 were given during the initial 8 weeks. At week 20 blood and bladder were collected and checked for the presence of urothelium lesions and tumors, markers of inflammation, proliferation, and redox status. Incidence of bladder carcinoma was, control (0%), ω-3 (0%), BBN (65%), and ω-3 + BBN (62.5%). The ω-3 + BBN group had no infiltrative tumors or carcinoma in situ, and tumor volume was significantly reduced compared to the BBN (0.9 ± 0.1 mm3 versus 112.5 ± 6.4 mm3). Also, it showed a reduced MDA/TAS ratio and BBN-induced serum CRP, TGF-β1, and CD31 were prevented. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in a rat model of bladder cancer, which might be due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:23865049

  15. Betulinic acid protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal damage and inhibits leukocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ekşioğlu-Demiralp, Emel; Kardaş, E Riza; Ozgül, Seçkin; Yağci, Tayfur; Bilgin, Hüseyin; Sehirli, Ozer; Ercan, Feriha; Sener, Göksel

    2010-03-01

    The possible protective effect of betulinic acid on renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury was studied. Wistar Albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and subjected to 45 min of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 6 h of reperfusion. Betulinic acid (250 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline was administered at 30 min prior to ischemia and immediately before the reperfusion. Creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and TNF-alpha as well as the oxidative burst of neutrophil and leukocyte apoptosis were assayed in blood samples. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were determined in kidney tissue which was also analysed microscopically. I/R caused significant increases in blood creatinine, BUN, LDH and TNF-alpha. In the kidney samples of the I/R group, MDA levels and MPO activity were increased significantly, however, GSH levels and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity were decreased. Betulinic acid ameliorated the oxidative burst response to both formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimuli, normalized the apoptotic response and most of the biochemical indices as well as histopathological alterations induced by I/R. In conclusion, these data suggest that betulinic acid attenuates I/R-induced oxidant responses, improved microscopic damage and renal function by regulating the apoptotic function of leukocytes and inhibiting neutrophil infiltration.

  16. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  18. A model of in vitro UDP-glucuronosyltransferase inhibition by bile acids predicts possible metabolic disorders[S

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; He, Rong-Rong; Cao, Yun-Feng; Tanaka, Naoki; Jiang, Changtao; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Qi, Yunpeng; Dong, Pei-Pei; Ai, Chun-Zhi; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Ge, Guang-Bo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Ma, Xiao-Chi; Sun, Hong-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Increased levels of bile acids (BAs) due to the various hepatic diseases could interfere with the metabolism of xenobiotics, such as drugs, and endobiotics including steroid hormones. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are involved in the conjugation and elimination of many xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. The present study sought to investigate the potential for inhibition of UGT enzymes by BAs. The results showed that taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) exhibited the strongest inhibition toward UGTs, followed by lithocholic acid. Structure-UGT inhibition relationships of BAs were examined and in vitro-in vivo extrapolation performed by using in vitro inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki) in combination with calculated in vivo levels of TLCA. Substitution of a hydrogen with a hydroxyl group in the R1, R3, R4, R5 sites of BAs significantly weakens their inhibition ability toward most UGTs. The in vivo inhibition by TLCA toward UGT forms was determined with following orders of potency: UGT1A4 > UGT2B7 > UGT1A3 > UGT1A1 ∼ UGT1A7 ∼ UGT1A10 ∼ UGT2B15. In conclusion, these studies suggest that disrupted homeostasis of BAs, notably taurolithocholic acid, found in various diseases such as cholestasis, could lead to altered metabolism of xenobiotics and endobiotics through inhibition of UGT enzymes. PMID:24115227

  19. Diarylcoumarins inhibit mycolic acid biosynthesis and kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis by targeting FadD32

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Sarah A.; Kawate, Tomohiko; Iwase, Noriaki; Shimizu, Motohisa; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Kazyanskaya, Edward; Sacchettini, James C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Siddiqi, Noman A.; Minami, Shoko; Aquadro, John A.; Schmidt Grant, Sarah; Rubin, Eric J.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis imposes an enormous burden on global public health. New antibiotics are urgently needed to combat the global tuberculosis pandemic; however, the development of new small molecules is hindered by a lack of validated drug targets. Here, we describe the identification of a 4,6-diaryl-5,7-dimethyl coumarin series that kills M. tuberculosis by inhibiting fatty acid degradation protein D32 (FadD32), an enzyme that is required for biosynthesis of cell-wall mycolic acids. These substituted coumarin inhibitors directly inhibit the acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase activity of FadD32. They effectively block bacterial replication both in vitro and in animal models of tuberculosis, validating FadD32 as a target for antibiotic development that works in the same pathway as the established antibiotic isoniazid. Targeting new steps in well-validated biosynthetic pathways in antitubercular therapy is a powerful strategy that removes much of the usual uncertainty surrounding new targets and in vivo clinical efficacy, while circumventing existing resistance to established targets. PMID:23798446

  20. Inhibition of acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatases by novel vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, Craig C; Hooker, Jaqueline D; Jones, Marjorie A; Dymon, Zaneta; Backhus, Emily A; Greiner, Bradley A; Dorner, Nicole A; Youkhana, Mary A; Manus, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    In the course of our investigations of vanadium-containing complexes for use as insulin-enhancing agents, we have generated a series of novel vanadium coordination complexes with bidentate ligands. Specifically we have focused on two ligands: anthranilate (anc(-)), a natural metabolite of tryptophan, and imidizole-4-carboxylate (imc(-)), meant to mimic naturally occurring N-donor ligands. For each ligand, we have generated a series of complexes containing the V(III), V(IV), and V(V) oxidation states. Each complex was investigated using phosphatase inhibition studies of three different phosphatases (acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatase) as prima facia evidence for potential use as an insulin-enhancing agent. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as an artificial phosphatase substrate, the levels of inhibition were determined by measuring the absorbance of the product at 405nm using UV/vis spectroscopy. Under our experimental conditions, for instance, V(imc)(3) appears to be as potent an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase as sodium orthovanadate when comparing the K(cat)/K(m) term. VO(anc)(2) is as potent an inhibitor of acid phosphatase and tyrosine phosphatase as the Na(3)VO(4). Thus, use of these complexes can increase our mechanistic understanding of the effects of vanadium in vivo.

  1. Fermentation and alternative oxidase contribute to the action of amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Zabalza, Ana; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase inhibitors (ALS-inhibitors) and glyphosate (GLP) are two classes of herbicide that act by the specific inhibition of an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain or aromatic amino acids, respectively. The physiological effects that are detected after application of these two classes of herbicides are not fully understood in relation to the primary biochemical target inhibition, although they have been well documented. Interestingly, the two herbicides' toxicity includes some common physiological effects suggesting that they kill the treated plants by a similar pattern despite targeting different enzymes. The induction of aerobic ethanol fermentation and alternative oxidase (AOX) are two examples of these common effects. The objective of this work was to gain further insight into the role of fermentation and AOX induction in the toxic consequences of ALS-inhibitors and GLP. For this, Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1 and AOX1a were used. The results found in wild-type indicate that both GLP and ALS-inhibitors reduce ATP production by inducing fermentation and alternative respiration. The main physiological effects in the process of herbicide activity upon treated plants were accumulation of carbohydrates and total free amino acids. The effects of the herbicides on these parameters were less pronounced in mutants compared to wild-type plants. The role of fermentation and AOX regarding pyruvate availability is also discussed.

  2. The alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid-elicited retching involves dopaminergic inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, T; Yamada, K

    1980-05-01

    Alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid (alpha-NOAA), one of the jumping-inducers, elicited a dose-dependent retching behavior at doses ranging from 250 to 550 mg/kg in mice and vomiting at a dose of 550 mg/kg in pigeons. Protoveratrine-A (PV-A, 0.1 mg/kg), a veratrum alkaloid, also induced retching in mice and vomiting in pigeons, while apomorphine (2 mg/kg) produced neither retching in mice nor vomiting in pigeons though it induced feeding in pigeons. The retching elicited by alpha-NOAA or PV-A was not significantly affected by scopolamine, aminooxyacetic acid and gamma-butyrolactone, but was markedly inhibited by apomorphine (2 mg/kg), this inhibitory effect being antagonized without significance by haloperidol which did not itself augment the retching. These results imply that the retching elicited by alpha-NOAA or PV-A seems to involve at least in part an inhibition of dopaminergic neuron activity.

  3. Quercetin induces HepG2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, PENG; MAO, JUN-MIN; ZHANG, SHU-YUN; ZHOU, ZE-QUAN; TAN, YANG; ZHANG, YU

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as a ‘chemopreventer’. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, as well as its antioxidant functions. Quercetin can also reduce adipogenesis. Previous studies have shown that quercetin has potent inhibitory effects on animal fatty acid synthase (FASN). In the present study, activity of quercetin was evaluated in human liver cancer HepG2 cells. Intracellular FASN activity was calculated by measuring the absorption of NADPH via a spectrophotometer. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability, immunoblot analysis was performed to detect FASN expression levels and the apoptotic effect was detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In the present study, it was found that quercetin could induce apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells with overexpression of FASN. This apoptosis was accompanied by the reduction of intracellular FASN activity and could be rescued by 25 or 50 μM exogenous palmitic acids, the final product of FASN-catalyzed synthesis. These results suggested that the apoptosis induced by quercetin was via the inhibition of FASN. These findings suggested that quercetin may be useful for preventing human liver cancer. PMID:25009654

  4. Ethacrynic and alpha-lipoic acids inhibit vaccinia virus late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Spisakova, Martina; Cizek, Zdenek; Melkova, Zora

    2009-02-01

    Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980. However recently, the need of agents effective against poxvirus infection has emerged again. In this paper, we report an original finding that two redox-modulating agents, the ethacrynic and alpha-lipoic acids (EA, LA), inhibit growth of vaccinia virus (VACV) in vitro. The effect of EA and LA was compared with those of beta-mercaptoethanol, DTT and ascorbic acid, but these agents increased VACV growth in HeLa G cells. The inhibitory effects of EA and LA on the growth of VACV were further confirmed in several cell lines of different embryonic origin, in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages and T-lymphocytes. Finally, we have analyzed the mechanism of action of the two agents. They both decreased expression of VACV late genes, as demonstrated by western blot analysis and activity of luciferase expressed under control of different VACV promoters. In contrast, they did not inhibit virus entry into the cell, expression of VACV early genes or VACV DNA synthesis. The results suggest new directions in development of drugs effective against poxvirus infection.

  5. Quercetin induces HepG2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Mao, Jun-Min; Zhang, Shu-Yun; Zhou, Ze-Quan; Tan, Yang; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as a 'chemopreventer'. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, as well as its antioxidant functions. Quercetin can also reduce adipogenesis. Previous studies have shown that quercetin has potent inhibitory effects on animal fatty acid synthase (FASN). In the present study, activity of quercetin was evaluated in human liver cancer HepG2 cells. Intracellular FASN activity was calculated by measuring the absorption of NADPH via a spectrophotometer. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability, immunoblot analysis was performed to detect FASN expression levels and the apoptotic effect was detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In the present study, it was found that quercetin could induce apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells with overexpression of FASN. This apoptosis was accompanied by the reduction of intracellular FASN activity and could be rescued by 25 or 50 μM exogenous palmitic acids, the final product of FASN-catalyzed synthesis. These results suggested that the apoptosis induced by quercetin was via the inhibition of FASN. These findings suggested that quercetin may be useful for preventing human liver cancer.

  6. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-conjugated hyaluronic acid/protamine nanocomplexes for intracellular gene inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hyejung; Park, Ji Won; Park, Tae Gwan

    2007-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) was covalently conjugated to hyaluronic acid (HA) via a reducible disulfide linkage, and the HA-ODN conjugate was complexed with protamine to increase the extent of cellular uptake and enhance the gene inhibition efficiency of GFP expression. The HA-ODN conjugate formed more stable polyelectrolyte complexes with protamine as compared to naked ODN, probably because of its increased charge density. The higher cellular uptake of protamine/HA-ODN complexes than that of protamine/naked ODN complexes was attributed to the formation of more compact nanosized complexes (approximately 200 nm in diameter) in aqueous solution. Protamine/HA-ODN complexes also showed a comparable level of GFP gene inhibition to that of cytotoxic polyethylenimine (PEI)/ODN complexes. Since both HA and protamine are naturally occurring biocompatible materials, the current formulation based on a cleavable conjugation strategy of ODN to HA could be potentially applied as safe and effective nonviral carriers for ODN and siRNA nucleic acid therapeutics.

  7. Chlorogenic acid inhibits glioblastoma growth through repolarizating macrophage from M2 to M1 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Nina; Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Jin, Jing; Lai, Fangfang; Chen, Ju; Zhang, Mengtian; Jia, Jing; Yang, Huarong; Zhang, Jie; Li, Wenbin; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive tumor that is associated with distinctive infiltrating microglia/macrophages populations. Previous studies demonstrated that chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid, CHA), a phenolic compound with low molecular weight, has an anti-tumor effect in multiple malignant tumors. In the present study, we focused on the macrophage polarization to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-glioma response of CHA in vitro and in vivo. We found that CHA treatment increased the expression of M1 markers induced by LPS/IFNγ, including iNOS, MHC II (I-A/I-E subregions) and CD11c, and reduced the expression of M2 markers Arg and CD206 induced by IL-4, resulting in promoting the production of apoptotic-like cancer cells and inhibiting the growth of tumor cells by co-culture experiments. The activations of STAT1 and STAT6, which are two crucial signaling events in M1 and M2-polarization, were significantly promoted and suppressed by CHA in macrophages, respectively. Furthermore, In G422 xenograft mice, CHA increased the proportion of CD11c-positive M1 macrophages and decreased the distribution of CD206-positive M2 macrophages in tumor tissue, consistent with the reduction of tumor weight observed in CHA-treated mice. Overall these findings indicated CHA as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce glioma growth through promoting M1-polarized macrophage and inhibiting M2 phenotypic macrophage. PMID:28045028

  8. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    OMORI, AKINA; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; DEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; SUZUKI, KUNIAKI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1. PMID:26171153

  9. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  10. Okadaic acid-induced inhibition of B-50 dephosphorylation by presynaptic membrane-associated protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Han, Y F; Dokas, L A

    1991-10-01

    The neuronal tissue-specific protein kinase C (PKC) substrate B-50 can be dephosphorylated by endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs) in synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs). The present study characterizes membrane-associated B-50 phosphatase activity by using okadaic acid (OA) and purified 32P-labeled substrates. At a low concentration of [gamma-32P]ATP, PKC-mediated [32P]phosphate incorporation into B-50 in SPMs reached a maximal value at 30 s, followed by dephosphorylation. OA, added 30 s after the initiation of phosphorylation, partially prevented the dephosphorylation of B-50 at 2 nM, a dose that inhibits PP-2A. At the higher concentration of 1 microM, a dose of OA that inhibits PP-1 as well as PP-2A, a nearly complete blockade of B-50 dephosphorylation was seen. Heat-stable PP inhibitor-2 (I-2) also inhibited dephosphorylation of B-50. The effects of OA and I-2 on B-50 phosphatase activity were additive. Endogenous PP-1- and PP-2A-like activities in SPMs were also demonstrated by their capabilities of dephosphorylating [32P]phosphorylase a and [32P]casein. With these exogenous substrates, sensitivities of the membrane-bound phosphatases to OA and I-2 were found to be similar to those of purified forms of these enzymes. These results indicate that PP-1- and PP-2A-like enzymes are the major B-50 phosphatases in SPMs.

  11. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by kaempferol and related naturally occurring flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Thors, L; Belghiti, M; Fowler, C J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring isoflavone compounds genistein and daidzein inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the low micromolar concentration range. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this property is shared by flavonoids. Experimental approach: The hydrolysis of anandamide in homogenates and intact cells was measured using the substrate labelled in the ethanolamine part of the molecule. Key results: Twenty compounds were tested. Among the commonly occurring flavonoids, kaempferol was the most potent, inhibiting FAAH in a competitive manner with a Ki value of 5 μM. Among flavonoids with a more restricted distribution in nature, the two most active toward FAAH were 7-hydroxyflavone (IC50 value of 0.5–1 μM depending on the solvent used) and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone (IC50 value 2.2 μM). All three compounds reduced the FAAH-dependent uptake of anandamide and its metabolism by intact RBL2H3 basophilic leukaemia cells. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of FAAH is an additional in vitro biochemical property of flavonoids. Kaempferol, 7-hydroxyflavone and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone may be useful as templates for the synthesis of novel compounds, which target several systems that are involved in the control of inflammation and cancer. PMID:18552875

  12. Tributyltin and triphenyltin inhibit osteoclast differentiation through a retinoic acid receptor-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Ahn, Jae-Yong; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae; E-mail: jwoo@isc.chubu.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), have been widely used in agriculture and industry. Although these compounds are known to have many toxic effects, including endocrine-disrupting effects, their effects on bone resorption are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of organotin compounds, such as monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), TBT, and TPT, on osteoclast differentiation using mouse monocytic RAW264.7 cells. MBT and DBT had no effects, whereas TBT and TPT dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast differentiation at concentrations of 3-30 nM. Treatment with a retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-specific antagonist, Ro41-5253, restored the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by TBT and TPT. TBT and TPT reduced receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) induced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 expression, and the reduction in NFATc1 expression was recovered by Ro41-5253. Our results suggest that TBT and TPT suppress osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression via an RAR-dependent signaling pathway.

  13. Syringic Acid Extracted from Herba dendrobii Prevents Diabetic Cataract Pathogenesis by Inhibiting Aldose Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dan; Yi, Yanchun; Qi, Hui; Gao, Xinxin; Fang, Hua; Gu, Qiong; Wang, Ling; Gu, Lianquan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Effects of Syringic acid (SA) extracted from dendrobii on diabetic cataract (DC) pathogenesis were explored. Methods. Both in vitro and in vivo DC lens models were established using D-gal, and proliferation of HLEC exposed to SA was determined by MMT assay. After 60-day treatment with SA, rat lens transparency was observed by anatomical microscopy using a slit lamp. SA protein targets were extracted and isolated using 2-DE and MALDI TOF/TOF. AR gene expression was investigated using qRT-PCR. Interaction sites and binding characteristics were determined by molecule-docking techniques and dynamic models. Results. Targeting AR, SA provided protection from D-gal-induced damage by consistently maintaining lens transparency and delaying lens turbidity development. Inhibition of AR gene expression by SA was confirmed by qRT-PCR. IC50 of SA for inhibition of AR activity was 213.17 μg/mL. AR-SA binding sites were Trp111, His110, Tyr48, Trp20, Trp79, Leu300, and Phe122. The main binding modes involved hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. The stoichiometric ratio of non-covalent bonding between SA and AR was 1.0 to 13.3. Conclusion. SA acts to prevent DC in rat lenses by inhibiting AR activity and gene expression, which has potential to be developed into a novel drug for therapeutic management of DC. PMID:23365598

  14. The role of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in nicotine reward and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Pretal P.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Parsons, Loren H.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) exerts the majority of its effects at CB1 and CB2 receptors and is degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH KO mice and animals treated with FAAH inhibitors are impaired in their ability to hydrolyze AEA and other non-cannabinoid lipid signaling molecules, such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). AEA and these other substrates activate non- cannabinoid receptor systems, including TRPV1 and PPAR-α receptors. In this mini review, we describe the functional consequences of FAAH inhibition on nicotine reward and dependence as well as the underlying endocannabinoid and non-cannabinoid receptor systems mediating these effects. Interestingly, FAAH inhibition seems to mediate nicotine dependence differently in mice and rats. Indeed, pharmacological and genetic FAAH disruption in mice enhances nicotine reward and withdrawal. However, in rats, pharmacological blockade of FAAH significantly inhibits nicotine reward and has no effect in nicotine withdrawal. Studies suggest that non-cannabinoid mechanisms may play a role in these species differences. PMID:22705310

  15. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37 °C) and incubation times (24 and 48 h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8 mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37 °C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and at 25 °C for 48 h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products.

  16. Phenylbutyric acid inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Qin, Hou-Ying; Cao, Lin-Feng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-01-05

    A recent report showed that unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated during bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chemical chaperone that inhibits the UPR signaling. The present study investigated the effects of PBA on BLM-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and pulmonary fibrosis. For induction of pulmonary fibrosis, all mice except controls were intratracheally injected with a single dose of BLM (3.0mg/kg). In PBA+BLM group, mice were intraperitoneally injected with PBA (150mg/kg) daily. Three weeks after BLM injection, EMT was measured and pulmonary fibrosis was evaluated. BLM-induced pulmonary UPR activation was inhibited by PBA. Moreover, BLM-induced pulmonary nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 activation was blocked by PBA. In addition, BLM-induced up-regulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines was repressed by PBA. Further analysis showed that BLM-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for EMT, was significantly attenuated by PBA. Moreover, BLM-induced pulmonary collagen (Col1α1 and Col1α2) was obviously inhibited by PBA. Importantly, BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, as determined using Sirius red staining, was obviously alleviated by PBA. Taken together, these results suggest that PBA alleviates ER stress-mediated EMT in the pathogenesis of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Inhibition of sulfate-reducing bacteria by metal sulfide formation in bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Utgikar, Vivek P; Harmon, Stephen M; Chaudhary, Navendu; Tabak, Henry H; Govind, Rakesh; Haines, John R

    2002-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of sulfate and heavy metal ions can be treated by biological sulfate reduction. It has been reported that the effect of heavy metals on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can be stimulatory at lower concentrations and toxic/inhibitory at higher concentrations. The quantification of the toxic/inhibitory effect of dissolved heavy metals is critical for the design and operation of an effective AMD bioremediation process. Serum bottle and batch reactor studies on metal toxicity to SRB indicate that insoluble metal sulfides can inhibit the SRB activity as well. The mechanism of inhibition is postulated to be external to the bacterial cell. The experimental data indicate that the metal sulfides formed due to the reaction between the dissolved metal and biogenic sulfide act as barriers preventing the access of the reactants (sulfate, organic matter) to the necessary enzymes. Scanning electron micrographs of the SRB cultures exposed to copper and zinc provide supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The SRB cultures retained their ability to effect sulfate reduction indicating that the metal sulfides were not lethally toxic to the SRB. This phenomenon of metal sulfide inhibition of the SRB has to be taken into account while designing a sulfate-reducing bioreator, and subsequently an efficient biotreatment strategy for AMD. Any metal sulfide formed in the bioreactor needs to be removed immediately from the system to maintain the efficiency of the process of sulfate reduction.

  18. Biodegradable Kojic Acid-Based Polymers: Controlled Delivery of Bioactives for Melanogenesis Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Faig, Jonathan J; Moretti, Alysha; Joseph, Laurie B; Zhang, Yingyue; Nova, Mary Joy; Smith, Kervin; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2017-02-13

    Kojic acid (KA) is a naturally occurring fungal metabolite that is utilized as a skin-lightener and antibrowning agent owing to its potent tyrosinase inhibition activity. While efficacious, KA's inclination to undergo pH-mediated, thermal-, and photodegradation reduces its efficacy, necessitating stabilizing vehicles. To minimize degradation, poly(carbonate-esters) and polyesters comprised of KA and natural diacids were prepared via solution polymerization methods. In vitro hydrolytic degradation analyses revealed KA release was drastically influenced by polymer backbone composition (e.g., poly(carbonate-ester) vs polyester), linker molecule (aliphatic vs heteroatom-containing), and release conditions (physiological vs skin). Tyrosinase inhibition assays demonstrated that aliphatic KA dienols, the major degradation product under skin conditions, were more potent then KA itself. All dienols were found to be less toxic than KA at all tested concentrations. Additionally, the most lipophilic dienols were statistically more effective than KA at inhibiting melanin biosynthesis in cells. These KA-based polymer systems deliver KA analogues with improved efficacy and cytocompatible profiles, making them ideal candidates for sustained topical treatments in both medical and personal care products.

  19. Chicoric acid suppresses BAFF expression in B lymphocytes by inhibiting NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxi; Huang, Gang; Gao, Min; Shen, Xiaodong; Gong, Wei; Xu, Zhizhen; Zeng, Yijun; He, Fengtian

    2017-03-01

    B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The inhibition of BAFF expression is an emerging therapeutic approach for these disorders. Chicoric acid (CA), a bioactive phytochemical found in several widely used traditional medicinal plants, has significant anti-inflammatory activity and anti-arthritic effects. However, the role of CA in modulation of BAFF expression remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CA reduced BAFF expression in human B lymphocyte cell lines and decreased the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the BAFF promoter region. Furthermore, CA inhibited both the nuclear translocation of p65 (the subunit of NF-κB) and the phosphorylation of IκBα (inhibitor of NF-κB). These results suggest that CA suppresses BAFF expression by inhibiting NF-κB activity, and CA may serve as a novel therapeutic agent to down-regulate excessive BAFF expression in autoimmune diseases.

  20. Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases is Determined by a Single Amino Acid Residue in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Masahiro; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is an important enzyme for CO2 fixation and primary metabolism in photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria. The kinetics and allosteric regulation of PEPCs have been studied in many organisms, but the biochemical properties of PEPC in the unicellular, non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have not been clarified. In this study, biochemical analysis revealed that the optimum pH and temperature of Synechocystis 6803 PEPC proteins were 7.3 and 30 °C, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 PEPC was found to be tolerant to allosteric inhibition by several metabolic effectors such as malate, aspartate, and fumarate compared with other cyanobacterial PEPCs. Comparative sequence and biochemical analysis showed that substitution of the glutamate residue at position 954 with lysine altered the enzyme so that it was inhibited by malate, aspartate, and fumarate. PEPC of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was purified, and its activity was inhibited in the presence of malate. Substitution of the lysine at position 946 (equivalent to position 954 in Synechocystis 6803) with glutamate made Anabaena 7120 PEPC tolerant to malate. These results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of PEPC in cyanobacteria is determined by a single amino acid residue, a characteristic that is conserved in different orders. PMID:28117365

  1. Potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus by MDL 101028, a novel sulphonic acid polymer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D L; Brennan, T M; Bridges, C G; Mullins, M J; Tyms, A S; Jackson, R; Cardin, A D

    1995-10-01

    MDL 101028, a novel biphenyl disulphonic acid urea co-polymer was designed and synthesised as a heparin mimetic. This low molecular weight polymer showed potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a number of host-cell/virus systems, including primary clinical isolates of the virus cultured in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). When compared with the heterogeneous polysulphated molecules, heparin and dextran sulphate, this chemically defined compound showed equivalent antiviral activity with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the range 0.27-3.0 micrograms/ml in the host-cell/virus systems tested. MDL 101028 also inhibited the replication of HIV type 2 and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), as well as HIV-1 variants resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Virus growth was blocked when exposure of T-lymphocytes to MDL 101028 was restricted to the virus absorption stage, or even in whole blood conditions. MDL 101028 did not irreversibly inactivate virions, and in contrast to heparin, did not inhibit the attachment of radiolabelled HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells. MDL 101028 blocked HIV-induced cell-to-cell fusion and this activity appears to explain the mechanism of its antiviral action. The antiviral evaluation of discrete oligomer molecules of MDL 101028 showed that a polymer chain length of six repeating units had optimal potency. The lack of anticoagulant properties and significant antiviral activity in whole blood may allow the development of MDL 101028 as a treatment of HIV infections.

  2. Combination of intermittent calorie restriction and eicosapentaenoic acid for inhibition of mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Nancy K; Rogozina, Olga P; Seppanen, Christine M; Liao, D Joshua; Cleary, Margot P; Grossmann, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    There are a number of dietary interventions capable of inhibiting mammary tumorigenesis; however, the effectiveness of dietary combinations is largely unexplored. Here, we combined 2 interventions previously shown individually to inhibit mammary tumor development. The first was the use of the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and the second was the implementation of calorie restriction. MMTV-Her2/neu mice were used as a model for human breast cancers, which overexpress Her2/neu. Six groups of mice were enrolled. Half were fed a control (Con) diet with 10.1% fat calories from soy oil, whereas the other half consumed a diet with 72% fat calories from EPA. Within each diet, mice were further divided into ad libitum (AL), chronic calorie-restricted (CCR), or intermittent calorie-restricted (ICR) groups. Mammary tumor incidence was lowest in ICR-EPA (15%) and highest in AL-Con mice (87%), whereas AL-EPA, CCR-Con, CCR-EPA, and ICR-Con groups had mammary tumor incidence rates of 63%, 47%, 40%, and 59%, respectively. Survival was effected similarly by the interventions. Consumption of EPA dramatically reduced serum leptin (P < 0.02) and increased serum adiponectin in the AL-EPA mice compared with AL-Con mice (P < 0.001). Both CCR and ICR decreased serum leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) compared with AL mice but not compared with each other. These results illustrate that mammary tumor inhibition is significantly increased when ICR and EPA are combined as compared with either intervention alone. This response may be related to alterations in the balance of serum growth factors and adipokines.

  3. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  4. Iron-Binding Compounds from Agrobacterium spp.: Biological Control Strain Agrobacterium rhizogenes K84 Produces a Hydroxamate Siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Penyalver, Ramón; Oger, Philippe; López, María M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron-binding compounds were produced in various amounts in response to iron starvation by a collection of Agrobacterium strains belonging to the species A. tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, and A. vitis. The crown gall biocontrol agent A. rhizogenes strain K84 produced a hydroxamate iron chelator in large amounts. Production of this compound, and also of a previously described antibiotic-like substance called ALS84, occurred only in cultures of strain K84 grown in iron-deficient medium. Similarly, sensitivity to ALS84 was expressed only when susceptible cells were tested in low-iron media. Five independent Tn5-induced mutants of strain K84 affected in the production of the hydroxamate iron chelator showed a similar reduction in the production of ALS84. One of these mutants, M8-10, was completely deficient in the production of both agents and grew poorly compared to the wild type under iron-limiting conditions. Thus, the hydroxamate compound has siderophore activity. A 9.1-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 insertion from this mutant was cloned and marker exchanged into wild-type strain K84. The homogenote lost the ability to produce the hydroxamate siderophore and also ALS84. A cosmid clone was isolated from a genomic library of strain K84 that restored to strain M8-10 the ability to produce of the siderophore and ALS84, as well as growth in iron-deficient medium. This cosmid clone contained the region in which Tn5 was located in the mutant. Sequence analysis showed that the Tn5 insert in this mutant was located in an open reading frame coding for a protein that has similarity to those of the gramicidin S synthetase repeat superfamily. Some such proteins are required for synthesis of hydroxamate siderophores by other bacteria. Southern analysis revealed that the biosynthetic gene from strain K84 is present only in isolates of A. rhizogenes that produce hydroxamate-type compounds under low-iron conditions. Based on physiological and genetic analyses showing

  5. Obatoclax Inhibits Alphavirus Membrane Fusion by Neutralizing the Acidic Environment of Endocytic Compartments.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Finny S; Rausalu, Kai; Hakanen, Marika; Saul, Sirle; Kümmerer, Beate M; Susi, Petri; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero

    2017-03-01

    As new pathogenic viruses continue to emerge, it is paramount to have intervention strategies that target a common denominator in these pathogens. The fusion of viral and cellular membranes during viral entry is one such process that is used by many pathogenic viruses, including chikungunya virus, West Nile virus, and influenza virus. Obatoclax, a small-molecule antagonist of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, was previously determined to have activity against influenza A virus and also Sindbis virus. Here, we report it to be active against alphaviruses, like chikungunya virus (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.03 μM) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV; EC50 = 0.11 μM). Obatoclax inhibited viral entry processes in an SFV temperature-sensitive mutant entry assay. A neutral red retention assay revealed that obatoclax induces the rapid neutralization of the acidic environment of endolysosomal vesicles and thereby most likely inhibits viral fusion. Characterization of escape mutants revealed that the L369I mutation in the SFV E1 fusion protein was sufficient to confer partial resistance against obatoclax. Other inhibitors that target the Bcl-2 family of antiapoptotic proteins inhibited neither viral entry nor endolysosomal acidification, suggesting that the antiviral mechanism of obatoclax does not depend on its anticancer targets. Obatoclax inhibited the growth of flaviviruses, like Zika virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus, which require low pH for fusion, but not that of pH-independent picornaviruses, like coxsackievirus A9, echovirus 6, and echovirus 7. In conclusion, obatoclax is a novel inhibitor of endosomal acidification that prevents viral fusion and that could be pursued as a potential broad-spectrum antiviral candidate.

  6. Effects of salvianolic acid B on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing-An

    2012-01-01

    AIM To observe the effects of salvianolic acid B (SalB) on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma HXO-RB44 cells. METHODS The effects of SalB on the HXO-RB44 cells proliferation in vitro were observed by MTT colorimetric method. The morphological changes of apoptosis before and after the treatment of SalB were observed by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining method. Apoptosis rate and cell cycle changes of HXO-RB44 cells were detected by flow cytometer at 48 hours after treated by SalB. The expression changes of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells were detected by Western Blot. RESULTS SalB significantly inhibited the growth of HXO-RB44 cells, while the inhibition was in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The results of fluorescent staining method indicated that HXO-RB44 cells showed significant phenomenon of apoptosis including karyorrhexis, fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies, etc. after 24, 48 and 72 hours co-culturing of SalB and HXO-RB44 cells. The results of flow cytometer showed that the apoptosis rate and the proportion of cells in S phase were gradually increased at 48 hours and 72 hours after treated by different concentrations of SalB. Western Blot strip showed that the expression of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells was gradually increased with the increase of the concentration of SalB. CONCLUSION SalB can significantly affect on HXO-RB44 cells growth inhibition and apoptosis induction which may be achieved through the up-regulation of Caspase-3 expression and the induction of cell cycle arrest. PMID:22773971

  7. Gut Microbiota Conversion of Dietary Ellagic Acid into Bioactive Phytoceutical Urolithin A Inhibits Heme Peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Piu; Yeoh, Beng San; Singh, Rajbir; Chandrasekar, Bhargavi; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Vijay-Kumar, Matam; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies signify that diets rich in phytochemicals offer many beneficial functions specifically during pathologic conditions, yet their effects are often not uniform due to inter-individual variation. The host indigenous gut microbiota and their modifications of dietary phytochemicals have emerged as factors that greatly influence the efficacy of phytoceutical-based intervention. Here, we investigated the biological activities of one such active microbial metabolite, Urolithin A (UA or 3,8-dihydroxybenzo[c]chromen-6-one), which is derived from the ellagic acid (EA). Our study demonstrates that UA potently inhibits heme peroxidases i.e. myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) when compared to the parent compound EA. In addition, chrome azurol S (CAS) assay suggests that EA, but not UA, is capable of binding to Fe3+, due to its catechol-like structure, although its modest heme peroxidase inhibitory activity is abrogated upon Fe3+-binding. Interestingly, UA-mediated MPO and LPO inhibition can be prevented by innate immune protein human NGAL or its murine ortholog lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), implying the complex nature of host innate immunity-microbiota interactions. Spectral analysis indicates that UA inhibits heme peroxidase-catalyzed reaction by reverting the peroxidase back to its inactive native state. In support of these in vitro results, UA significantly reduced phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced superoxide generation in neutrophils, however, EA failed to block the superoxide generation. Treatment with UA significantly reduced PMA-induced mouse ear edema and MPO activity compared to EA treated mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that microbiota-mediated conversion of EA to UA is advantageous to both host and microbiota i.e. UA-mediated inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes reduce tissue inflammation, mitigate non-specific killing of gut bacteria, and abrogate iron-binding property of EA, thus providing a competitive edge to the microbiota in

  8. PGC-1β suppresses saturated fatty acid-induced macrophage inflammation by inhibiting TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Li, Di; Song, Jiayi; Xia, Min

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation of infiltrated macrophages in adipose tissue is a key contributor to the initiation of adipose insulin resistance. These macrophages are exposed to high local concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) and can be proinflammatory activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). However, the regulatory mechanisms on SFA-induced macrophage inflammation are still elusive. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1β (PGC-1β) is a member of the PGC-1 family of transcriptional coactivators and has been reported to play a key role in SFAs metabolism and in the regulation of inflammatory signaling. However, it remains unclear whether PGC-1β is involved in SFA-induced macrophage inflammation. In this study, we found that PGC-1β expression was significantly decreased in response to palmitic acid (PA) in macrophages in a dose dependent manner. PGC-1β inhibited PA induced TNFα, MCP-1, and IL-1β mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, PGC-1β significantly antagonized PA induced macrophage nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and JUN N-terminal kinase activation. Mechanistically, we revealed that TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its adaptor protein TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1) played a dominant role in the regulatory effects of PGC-1β. We confirmed that PGC-1β inhibited downstream inflammatory signals via binding with TAB1 and thus preventing TAB1/TAK1 binding and TAK1 activation. Finally, we showed that PGC-1β overexpression in PA treated macrophages improved adipocytes PI3K-Akt insulin signaling in a paracrine fashion. Collectively, our results uncovered a novel mechanism on how macrophage inflammation induced by SFAs was regulated and suggest a potential target in the treatment of obesity induced insulin resistance.

  9. Resistance of lung fatty acid synthesis to inhibition by dietary fat in the meal-fed rat.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Wilson, M D; Ibnoughazala, T

    1984-03-01

    One-half of the palmitate utilized by the lung for production of the surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, originates from de novo palmitate synthesis in the lung. In this report the lung was examined for the influence of dietary fat on the lung de novo fatty acid synthesis pathway. Lung lipogenesis was reduced by fasting and accelerated by carbohydrate refeeding or insulin injection. However, in general lung fatty acid synthesis was unaffected by dietary fat. Supplementing one meal (high glucose diet) with as much as 36% additional fat kilocalories did not suppress lung fatty acid synthesis. An inhibition of fatty acid synthesis resulted from a fat supplement of +60 and +120% of meal kilocalories, but this inhibition was likely due to an attenuated rate of glucose absorption. Ingestion of a high carbohydrate diet supplemented with 10, 17, or 30% added kilocalories as safflower oil or palmitate had no effect on lipogenesis after 10 days. On the other hand, liver fatty acid synthesis and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were selectively suppressed by safflower oil, whereas dietary palmitate was ineffective as an inhibitor of lipogenesis. These data clearly demonstrate that the well-characterized preferential suppression of liver lipogenesis by dietary polyunsaturated fats does not extend to lung tissue, and, more importantly, the inhibition of liver lipogenesis is not secondary to an essential fatty acid deficiency. The marked resistance of lung fatty acid synthesis to inhibition by dietary fat might be a biological protective mechanism to ensure adequate palmitate for dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

  10. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadrado, Irene; Estevez-Braun, Ana; Heras, Beatriz de las

    2012-01-01

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE{sub 2} production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-κB signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ► LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. ► IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ► Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ► LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ► LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α).

  11. Corrosion inhibition and adsorption behavior of methionine on mild steel in sulfuric acid and synergistic effect of iodide ion.

    PubMed

    Oguzie, E E; Li, Y; Wang, F H

    2007-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in sulfuric acid by methionine (MTI) was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The effect of KI additives on corrosion inhibition efficiency was also studied. The results reveal that MTI inhibited the corrosion reaction by adsorption onto the metal/solution interface. Inhibition efficiency increased with MTI concentration and synergistically increased in the presence of KI, with an optimum [KI]/[MTI] ratio of 5/5, due to stabilization of adsorbed MTI cations as revealed by AFM surface morphological images. Potentiodynamic polarization data suggest that the compound functioned via a mixed-inhibition mechanism. This observation was further corroborated by the fit of the experimental adsorption data to the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms. The inhibition mechanism has been discussed vis-à-vis the presence of both nitrogen and sulfur atoms in the MTI molecule.

  12. IR spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the glycation process by acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Gil, Herminia; Contreras, Silvia; Velasquez, William; Joshi, Narahari V.

    2000-05-01

    An IR spectroscopic study was carried out at room temperature for Human Serum albumin (HSA) glycated with fructose and glucose and inhibited with acetylsalicylic acid. The glycation process was carried out in our laboratory by a conventional method to confirm earlier reported observation of the effect of glycation on the intensity variation of the IR spectra, particularly, in the range 1500 cm-1 to 1700 cm-1 and around 3300 cm-1. IR spectra reveal that the effects of glycation of HSA by fructose are more intense than with glucose, which is the expected. Bovine serum albumin was also glycated using Glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt, and gamma-globulin was glycate with glucose, As expected, the glycation process was more intense with glucose-t-phosphate disodium salt. Acetyl salicylic acid was also used and its inhibitor effects could be observed in both cases, with glucose and with glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt even though, to a smaller extent with the latter. This is consistent with the earlier data and is explained on the basis of the attachment of macromolecules to (epsilon) -NH2 groups of lysines. The experimental results confirm that acetylsalicylic acid, indeed, acts as an inhibitor by acetylation of the (epsilon) -NG2 group where the sugars are supposed to be attached.

  13. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C.

  14. Hydrogen assisted cracking and inhibition of spring alloys in acidizing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, W.R.; Chitwood, G.B.; Rice, P.W.; Walker, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Several experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the hydrogen assisted cracking resistance of high strength, corrosion resistant spring alloys to acidizing fluids. Two cobalt-based alloys, UNS R30035 and UNS R30003, and one nickel-based alloy, UNS N07750, were evaluated. The tests involved exposing stressed spring segments of all alloys and C-rings of R30035 to uninhibited 28% HCl, 28% HCl with two different inhibitors, and the NACE TM0177 solution. Failures of N07750 spring segments in the uninhibited acid parallel field performance of this alloy. There were no failures of the R30035 or R30003 spring segments in the environments tested. Springs made from N07750 are more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than either R30035 or R30003. The C-ring tests of R30035 revealed the benefit of corrosion inhibition as a means of elevating the threshold cracking stress and increasing the time to failure in corrosive media. A strong beneficial effect of elevated-temperature thermal processing was observed for UNS R30035. High performance acidizing inhibitors are required in order to provide effective protection to high alloy spring materials.

  15. Leucine deprivation inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells via fatty acid synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chunxia; Yin, Hongkun; Yu, Junjie; Chen, Shanghai; Fang, Jing; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Substantial studies on fatty acid synthase (FASN) have focused on its role in regulating lipid metabolism and researchers have a great interest in treating cancer with dietary manipulation of amino acids. In the current study, we found that leucine deprivation caused the FASN-dependent anticancer effect. Here we showed that leucine deprivation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In an in vivo tumor xenograft model, the leucine-free diet suppressed the growth of human breast cancer tumors and triggered widespread apoptosis of the cancer cells. Further study indicated that leucine deprivation decreased expression of lipogenic gene FASN in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of FASN or supplementation of palmitic acid (the product of FASN action) blocked the effects of leucine deprivation on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, leucine deprivation suppressed the FASN expression via regulating general control non-derepressible (GCN)2 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C (SREBP1C). Taken together, our study represents proof of principle that anticancer effects can be obtained with strategies to deprive tumors of leucine via suppressing FASN expression, which provides important insights in prevention of breast cancer via metabolic intervention. PMID:27579768

  16. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  17. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  18. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  19. [omega]-Hydroxylation of Oleic Acid in Vicia sativa Microsomes (Inhibition by Substrate Analogs and Inactivation by Terminal Acetylenes).

    PubMed Central

    Pinot, F.; Bosch, H.; Alayrac, C.; Mioskowski, C.; Vendais, A.; Durst, F.; Salaun, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Oleic acid (18:1) is hydroxylated exclusively on the terminal methyl by a microsomal cytochrome P-450-dependent system ([omega]-OAH) from clofibrate-induced Vicia sativa L. (var minor) seedlings (F. Pinot, J.-P. Salaun, H. Bosch, A. Lesot, C. Mioskowski, F. Durst [1992] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 184: 183-193). This reaction was inactivated by two terminal acetylenes: (Z)-9-octadecen-17-ynoic acid (17-ODCYA) and the corresponding epoxide, (Z)-9,10-epoxyoctadecan-17-ynoic acid (17-EODCYA). Inactivation was mechanism-based, with an apparent binding constant of 21 and 32 [mu]M and half-lives of 16 and 19 min for 17-ODCYA and 17-EODCYA, respectively. We have investigated the participation of one or more [omega]-hydroxylase isoforms in the oxidation of fatty acids in this plant system. Lauric acid (12:0) is [omega]-hydroxylated by the cytochrome P-450 [omega]-hydroxylase [omega]-LAH (J.-P. Salaun, A. Simon, F. Durst [1986] Lipids 21: 776-779). Half-lives of [omega]-OAH and [omega]-LAH in the presence of 40 [mu]M 17-ODCYA were 23 and 41 min, respectively. Inhibition of oleic acid [omega]-hydroxylation was competitive with linoleic acid (18:2), but noncompetitive with lauric acid (12:0). In contrast, oleic acid did not inhibit [omega]-hydroxylation of lauric acid. Furthermore, 1-pentadecyltriazole inhibited [omega]-hydroxylation of oleic acid but not of lauric acid. These results suggest that distinct monooxygenases catalyze [omega]-hydroxylation of medium- and long-chain fatty acids in V. sativa microsomes. PMID:12231907

  20. Ursolic acid sensitized colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting MDR1 through HIF-1α*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jian-zhen; Xuan, Yan-yan; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Jian-jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the efficacy of ursolic acid in sensitizing colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia and its underlying mechanisms. Methods: Three colon cancer cell lines (RKO, LoVo, and SW480) were used as in vitro models. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin were used as chemotherapeutic drugs. Cell viability and apoptosis were tested to evaluate the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to chemotherapy. The transcription and expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunoblotting. Cycloheximide and MG132 were used to inhibit protein synthesis and degradation, respectively. In vitro tube formation assay was used to evaluate angiogenesis. Results: We demonstrated the chemosensitizing effects of ursolic acid with 5-FU and oxaliplatin in three colon cancer cell lines under hypoxia. This effect was correlated to its inhibition of MDR1 through HIF-1α. Moreover, ursolic acid was capable of inhibiting HIF-1α accumulation with little effects on its constitutional expression in normoxia. In addition, ursolic acid also down-regulated VEGF and inhibited tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions: Ursolic acid exerted chemosensitizing effects in colon cancer cells under hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-1α accumulation and the subsequent expression of the MDR1 and VEGF. PMID:27604859

  1. Effect of molecular structure of aniline-formaldehyde copolymers on corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Nie, Mengyan; Wang, Xiutong; Zhu, Yukun; Shi, Fuhua; Yu, Jianqiang; Hou, Baorong

    2015-05-30

    Aniline-formaldehyde copolymers with different molecular structures have been prepared and investigated for the purpose of corrosion control of mild steel in hydrochloric acid. The copolymers were synthesized by a condensation polymerization process with different ratios of aniline to formaldehyde in acidic precursor solutions. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of as-synthesized copolymers for Q235 mild steel was investigated in 1.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid solution by weight loss measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. All the results demonstrate that as-prepared aniline-formaldehyde copolymers are efficient mixed-type corrosion inhibitors for mild steels in hydrochloric acid. The corrosion inhibition mechanism is discussed in terms of the role of molecular structure on adsorption of the copolymers onto the steel surface in acid solution.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Lee, Youngae; Eun, Hee Chul Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-04-04

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an omega-3 ({omega}-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Some reports have demonstrated that EPA inhibits NF-{kappa}B activation induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in various cells. However, its detailed mode of action is unclear. In this report, we investigated whether EPA inhibits the expression of TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 in human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT). TNF-{alpha} induced MMP-9 expression by NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathway. Pretreatment of EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression and p65 phosphorylation. However, EPA could not affect I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and DNA binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced p65 phosphorylation through p38 and Akt inhibition and this inhibition was IKK{alpha}-dependent event. Taken together, we demonstrate that EPA inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression through inhibition of p38 and Akt activation.

  3. Glycyrrhetinic acid might increase the nephrotoxicity of bakuchiol by inhibiting cytochrome P450 isoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zijing; Yuan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Licorice, a popular traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is widely used to moderate the effects (detoxification) of other herbs in TCM and often combined with Fructus Psoraleae. However, the classical TCM book states that Fructus Psoraleae is incompatible with licorice; the mechanism underlying this incompatibility has not been identified. Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the active metabolite of licorice, may increase the toxicity of bakuchiol (BAK), the main chemical ingredient in Psoralea corylifolia, by inhibiting its detoxification enzymes CYP450s. Methods The effect of concomitant GA administration on BAK-induced nephrotoxicity was investigated, and the metabolic interaction between BAK and GA was further studied in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity was assessed using an MTT assay in a co-culture model of HK-2 cell and human liver microsomes (HLMs). The effect of GA on the metabolism of BAK, and on the activities of CYP isoforms were investigated in HLMs. The toxicokinetics and tissue exposure of BAK as well as the renal and hepatic functional markers were measured after the administration of a single oral dose in rats. Results In vitro studies showed that the metabolic detoxification of BAK was significantly reduced by GA, and BAK was toxic to HK-2 cells, as indicated by 25∼40% decreases in viability when combined with GA. Further investigation revealed that GA significantly inhibited the metabolism of BAK in HLMs in a dose-dependent manner. GA strongly inhibits CYP3A4 and weakly inhibits CYP2C9 and CYP1A2; these CYP isoforms are involved in the metabolism of BAK. In vivo experiment found that a single oral dose of BAK combined with GA or in the presence of 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT), altered the toxicokinetics of BAK in rats, increased the internal exposure, suppressed the elimination of BAK prototype, and therefore may have enhanced the renal toxicity. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that GA inhibits CYP isoforms and subsequently may

  4. Gambogic acid inhibits growth, induces apoptosis, and overcomes drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WEN, CHUANGYU; HUANG, LANLAN; CHEN, JUNXIONG; LIN, MENGMENG; LI, WEN; LU, BIYAN; RUTNAM, ZINA JEYAPALAN; IWAMOTO, AIKICHI; WANG, ZHONGYANG; YANG, XIANGLING; LIU, HUANLIANG

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of chemoresistance is a major limitation of colorectal cancer (CRC) therapies and novel biologically based therapies are urgently needed. Natural products represent a novel potential anticancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Garcinia hanburyi Hook. f., has been demonstrated to be highly cytotoxic to several types of cancer cells and have low toxicity to the hematopoietic system. However, the potential role of GA in colorectal cancer and its ability to overcome the chemotherapeutic resistance in CRC cells have not been well studied. In the present study, we showed that GA directly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) sensitive and 5-FU resistant colorectal cancer cells; induced apoptosis via activating JNK signaling pathway. The data, therefore, suggested an alternative strategy to overcome 5-FU resistance in CRC and that GA could be a promising medicinal compound for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:26397804

  5. Studies on the Inhibition of Mild Steel Corrosion by Rauvolfia serpentina in Acid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothi Raja, P.; Sethuraman, M. G.

    2010-07-01

    Alkaloid extract of Rauvolfia serpentina was tested as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 using weight loss method at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313, and 323 K, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. It is evident from the results of this study that R. serpentina effectively inhibits the corrosion in both the acids through adsorption process following Tempkin adsorption isotherm. The protection efficiency increased with increase in inhibitor concentration and temperature. Free energy of adsorption calculated from the temperature studies also revealed the chemisorption. The mixed mode of action exhibited by the inhibitor was confirmed by the polarization studies while SEM analysis substantiated the formation of protective layer over the mild steel surface.

  6. Inhibition of norsolorinic acid accumulation to Aspergillus parasiticus by marine actinomycetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peisheng; Shi, Cuijuan; Shen, Jihong; Wang, Kai; Gao, Xiujun; Li, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Thirty-six strains of marine actinomycetes were isolated from a sample of marine sediment collected from the Yellow Sea and evaluated in terms of their inhibitory activity on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and the production of norsolorinic acid using dual culture plate assay and agar diffusion methods. Among them, three strains showed strong antifungal activity and were subsequently identified as Streptomyces sp. by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The supernatant from the fermentation of the MA01 strain was extracted sequentially with chloroform and ethyl acetate, and the activities of the extracts were determined by tip culture assay. The assay results show that both extracts inhibited mycelium growth and toxin production, and the inhibitory activities of the extracts increased as their concentrations increased. The results of this study suggest that marine actinomycetes are biologically important for the control of mycotoxins, and that these bacteria could be used as novel biopesticides against mycotoxins.

  7. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-04-08

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment.

  8. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  9. Aristolochic Acid I Causes Testis Toxicity by Inhibiting Akt and ERK1/2 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seoul

    2016-01-19

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a natural bioactive substance found in Chinese herbs that induce toxicity during ovarian maturation of animals and humans. Apoptosis is induced by various types of damage and governs the progression of biological cell removal that controls the equilibrium between cell growth and death. However, the AA toxicity mechanism during testis maturation in mouse has not been elucidated and was thus the focus of the present study. This study used TM4 Sertoli cells and an ICR mouse model, both of which were injected with aristolochic acid I (AAI) for 4 weeks. Testis dimensions and weight were surveyed to define AAI cytotoxicity in the mice testis. The MTT assay was used to analyze the cytotoxicity of AAI in TM4 Sertoli cells. An apoptosis expression mediator was analyzed through Western blotting, while the measure of apoptosis-induced cell death of TM4 Sertoli cells and testis tissues was analyzed by the TUNEL assay. We found that AAI strongly inhibits survival in TM4 cells and that AAI significantly activated apoptosis-induced cell death in TM4 Sertoli cells and mice testis tissue. In addition, AAI suppressed the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), a factor related to anti-apoptosis. It markedly improved pro-apoptotic protein expression, including Bcl-2-associated X protein, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, we observed that AAI significantly reduced the size and weight of mouse testis. Moreover, germ cells and somatic cells in testis were markedly damaged by AAI. In addition, we found that AAI significantly inhibits ERK1/2 and Akt activation in TM4 Sertoli cells and testis tissue. The data obtained in this study indicate that AAI causes severe injury for the period of testis development by impeding apoptosis related to the Akt and ERK1/2 pathway.

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  11. Competitive inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amézquita, A; Brashears, M M

    2002-02-01

    Forty-nine strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), isolated from commercially available ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products, were screened for their ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at refrigeration (5 degrees C) temperatures on agar spot tests. The three most inhibitory strains were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus paracasei by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Their antilisterial activity was quantified in associative cultures in deMan Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth at 5 degrees C for 28 days, resulting in a pathogen reduction of 3.5 log10 cycles compared to its initial level. A combined culture of these strains was added to frankfurters and cooked ham coinoculated with L. monocytogenes, vacuum packaged, and stored at 5 degrees C for 28 days. Bacteriostatic activity was observed in cooked ham, whereas bactericidal activity was observed in frankfurters. Numbers of L. monocytogenes were 4.2 to 4.7 log10 and 2.6 log10 cycles lower than controls in frankfurters and cooked ham, respectively, after the 28-day refrigerated storage. In all cases, numbers of LAB increased by only 1 log10 cycle. The strain identified as P. acidilactici was possibly a bacteriocin producer, whereas the antilisterial activity of the other two strains was due to the production of organic acids. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the antilisterial activity detected in frankfurters whether the LAB strains were used individually or as combined cultures. Further studies over a 56-day period indicated no impact on the quality of the product. This method represents a potential antilisterial intervention in RTE meats, because it inhibited the growth of the pathogen at refrigeration temperatures without causing sensory changes.

  12. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  13. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-11-16

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization.

  14. 9-Phenanthrol and flufenamic acid inhibit calcium oscillations in HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Burt, Rees; Graves, Bridget M; Gao, Ming; Li, Chaunfu; Williams, David L; Fregoso, Santiago P; Hoover, Donald B; Li, Ying; Wright, Gary L; Wondergem, Robert

    2013-09-01

    It is well established that intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) controls the inotropic state of the myocardium, and evidence mounts that a "Ca2+ clock" controls the chronotropic state of the heart. Recent findings describe a calcium-activated nonselective cation channel (NSCCa) in various cardiac preparations sharing hallmark characteristics of the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4). TRPM4 is functionally expressed throughout the heart and has been implicated as a NSCCa that mediates membrane depolarization. However, the functional significance of TRPM4 in regards to Ca2+ signaling and its effects on cellular excitability and pacemaker function remains inconclusive. Here, we show by Fura2 Ca-imaging that pharmacological inhibition of TRPM4 in HL-1 mouse cardiac myocytes by 9-phenanthrol (10 μM) and flufenamic acid (10 and 100 μM) decreases Ca2+ oscillations followed by an overall increase in [Ca2+]i. The latter occurs also in HL-1 cells in Ca(2+)-free solution and after depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ with thapsigargin (10 μM). These pharmacologic agents also depolarize HL-1 cell mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, by on-cell voltage clamp we show that 9-phenanthrol reversibly inhibits membrane current; by fluorescence immunohistochemistry we demonstrate that HL-1 cells display punctate surface labeling with TRPM4 antibody; and by immunoblotting using this antibody we show these cells express a 130-150 kDa protein, as expected for TRPM4. We conclude that 9-phenanthrol inhibits TRPM4 ion channels in HL-1 cells, which in turn decreases Ca2+ oscillations followed by a compensatory increase in [Ca2+]i from an intracellular store other than the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We speculate that the most likely source is the mitochondrion.

  15. 5-aminosalicylic acid in combination with nimesulide inhibits proliferation of colon carcinoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hai-Ming; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Ma, Wei-Juan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in combination with nimesulide on the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and its potential mechanisms. METHODS: Inhibitory effects of drugs (5-ASA, nimesulide and their combination) on HT-29 colon carcinoma cells were investigated by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis and proliferation were detected by TUNEL assay and immunocytochemical staining, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with 5-ASA or nimesulide at the concentration of 10-1000 μmol/L inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro (t = 5.122, P < 0.05; t = 3.086, P < 0.05, respectively). The inhibition rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation was also increased when pretreated with 5-ASA (100 μmol/L) or nimesulide (100 μmol/L) for 12-96 h, which showed an obvious time-effect relationship (t = 6.149, P < 0.05; t = 4.159, P < 0.05, respectively). At the concentration of 10-500 μmol/L, the apoptotic rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells significantly increased (t = 18.156, P < 0.001; t = 19.983, P < 0.001, respectively), while expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was remarkably decreased (t = 6.828, P < 0.05; t = 14.024, P < 0.05, respectively). 5-ASA in combination with nimesulide suppressed the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells more than either of these agents in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner (t = 5.448, P < 0.05; t = 4.428, P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: 5-ASA and nimesulide may inhibit the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and coadministration of these agents may have additional chemopreventive potential. PMID:17569127

  16. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) β/γ specificity, in Ptch1 +/− mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARγ activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth. PMID:18483315

  17. A Quantitative Description of Suicide Inhibition of Dichloroacetic Acid in Rats and Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, Deborah A.; Schultz, Irv R.; Mahle, Deirdre A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2004-09-16

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a minor metabolite of trichloroethylene (TCE) and water disinfection byproduct, remains an important risk assessment issue because of its carcinogenic potency. DCA has been shown to inhibit its own metabolism by irreversibly inactivating glutathione transferase zeta (GSTzeta). To better predict internal dosimetry of DCA, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DCA was developed. Suicide inhibition was described dynamically by varying the rate of maximal GSTzeta mediated metabolism of DCA (Vmax) over time. Resynthesis (zero-order) and degradation (first-order) of metabolic activity we