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Sample records for hydroxamic acid inhibition

  1. Hydroxamic Acids in Asymmetric Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst’s center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Due to their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation, which uses titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:23157425

  2. QSAR studies of PC-3 cell line inhibition activity of TSA and SAHA-like hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di-Fei; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul; Lan-Hargest, Hsuan-Yin; Wiech, Norbert L

    2004-02-09

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for a series of new trichostatin A (TSA)-like hydroxamic acids for the inhibition of cell proliferation of the PC-3 cell line have been developed using molecular descriptors from Qikprop and electronic structure calculations. The best regression model shows that the PM3 atomic charge on the carbonyl carbon in the CONHOH moiety(Qco), globularity (Glob), and the hydrophilic component of the solvent-accessible surface area (FISA) describe the IC(50) of 19 inhibitors of the PC-3 cell line with activities ranging over five orders of magnitude with an R(2)=0.92 and F=59.2. This information will be helpful in the further design of novel anticancer drugs for treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases affected by HDAC inhibition.

  3. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces growth inhibition and enhances taxol-induced cell death in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-kang; Li, Zhong-hua; Han, Xi-qian; Yi, Ji-hu; Wang, Zhen-hua; Hou, Jing-li; Feng, Cong-ran; Fang, Qing-hong; Wang, Hui-hui; Zhang, Peng-fei; Wang, Feng-shan; Shen, Jie; Wang, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) enhances taxol-induced antitumor effects against some human cancer cells. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SAHA can enhance taxol-induced cell death against human breast cancer cells and to illustrate the mechanism in detail. A panel of eight human breast cancer cell lines and an immortalized human breast epithelial cell line were used to determine the inhibitory effects of SAHA, taxol, or their combination by MTT assay. The effects of SAHA with or without taxol on cell cycle distributions, apoptosis, and protein expressions were also examined. The inhibitory effects on tumor growth were characterized in vivo in BALB/c nude mice bearing a breast cancer xenograft model. Taxol-resistant and multi-resistant breast cancer cells were as sensitive to SAHA as taxol-sensitive breast cancer cells. A dose-dependent synergistic growth inhibition was found in all the tested breast cancer cell lines treated with the SAHA/taxol combinations. The synergetic effect was also observed in the in vivo xenograft tumor model. The cell cycle analysis and apoptosis assay showed that the synergistic effects resulted from enhanced G2/M arrest and apoptosis. SAHA increased the anti-tumor effects of taxol in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The combination of SAHA and taxol may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Inhibition of potato lipoxygenase by linoleyl hydroxamic acid: kinetic and EPR spectral evidence for a two-step reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A; Reddy, C Channa

    2002-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of an electrophoretically pure potato tuber lipoxygenase (ptLOX) was studied by EPR spectroscopy. An EPR spectrum of the 'native' ptLOX recorded at 4.5+/-0.5 K showed signals of a high-spin (pseudo) axial Fe(3+) with a g-value of approx. 6.3+/-0.1 with a shoulder at g=5.9+/-0.1, and a rhombic Fe(3+) signal at g=4.35+/-0.05. When the enzyme was treated with a 2-fold molar excess of 13(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid [13(S)-HPODE], a 3-fold increase in the integral intensity of the g=6.3 signal was observed, indicating that 25% of the native ptLOX iron was in ferrous state. The positional isomer 9(S)-HPODE caused similar spectral changes. Therefore the catalytic centre of ptLOX appears to accommodate both positional isomers of linoleic acid hydroperoxides in a manner that ensures proper alignment of their hydroperoxy groups with the iron centre of the enzyme. Treatment of the Fe(3+)-ptLOX form with a 3-fold molar excess of linoleyl hydroxamic acid (LHA) completely quenched the g=6.3 signal. Concurrently, a dramatic increase in the signal at g=4.35 was detected, which was attributed to a newly formed LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. The spectral characteristics of the complex are similar to those of a 4-nitrocatechol-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. From these observations, we conclude that LHA did not reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), but rather formed a LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. Formation of such a complex may be responsible for the inhibitory activity of LHA, at least in the initial stages of enzyme inhibition. A prolonged 15 min incubation of the complex at 23+/-1 degrees C led to the partial quenching of the g=4.35 signal. The quenching is attributed to the reduction of Fe(3+)-ptLOX by LHA, with concomitant formation of its oxidation product(s). A kinetic scheme for the inhibition is proposed. PMID:11985498

  6. Solvent extraction of metals with hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Vernon, F; Khorassani, J H

    1978-07-01

    Solvent extraction with hydroxamic acids has been investigated. with comparison of aliphatic and aromatic reagents for the extraction of iron, copper, cobalt and nickel. Caprylohydroxamic acid has been evaluated for use in extraction systems for titanium, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and uranium, both in terms of acidity of aqueous phase and oxidation state of the metal. It has been established that caprylohydroxamic acid in 1-hexanol is a suitable extractant for the removal of titanium(IV), vanadium(V), chromium(VI), molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from 6M hydrochloric acid.

  7. Structural Requirements of HDAC Inhibitors: SAHA Analogs Functionalized Adjacent to the Hydroxamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bieliauskas, Anton V.; Weerasinghe, Sujith V. W.; Pflum, Mary Kay H.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) have emerged as effective therapeutic anti-cancer agents. To better understand the structural requirements of HDAC inhibitors, a small molecule library with a variety of substituents attached adjacent to the metal binding hydroxamic acid of SAHA was synthesized. The presence of a substituent adjacent to the hydroxamic acid led to an 800 to 5000-fold decrease in inhibition compared to SAHA. The observed results have implications for drug design, suggesting that HDAC inhibitors with substituents near the metal binding moiety will have inhibitory activities in the μM rather than nM range. PMID:17307359

  8. New hydroxamic acid derivatives of fluoroquinolones: synthesis and evaluation of antibacterial and anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Rajulu, Gavara Govinda; Bhojya Naik, Halehatty Seephya; Viswanadhan, Abhilash; Thiruvengadam, Jayaraman; Rajesh, Kondodiyil; Ganesh, Sambasivam; Jagadheshan, Hiriyan; Kesavan, Poonimangadu Koppolu

    2014-01-01

    A series of new hydroxamic acid derivatives (6a-f) at C-3 position of fluoroquinolones were designed and synthesized through multistep synthesis. The design concept involved replacement of the 3-carboxylic acid in fluoquinolones with hydroxamic acid as an acid mimicking group. The synthetic work employed in this work provides a good example for the synthesis of pure hydroxamic acid based fluoroquinolones. The synthesized compounds were characterized by (1)H-NMR, electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and IR. The new compounds were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial and anti-proliferative activity. Out of the six derivatives, compound 6e exhibited moderate antibacterial activity by inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MIC: 4.00-8.00 µg/mL). Compounds 6b and 6f displayed good growth inhibition against A549 Lung adenocarcinoma and HCT-116 Colon carcinoma cell lines.

  9. Chemical basis for the phytotoxicity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Héctor R; Villarroel, Elisa; Copaja, Sylvia V; Argandoña, Victor H

    2008-01-01

    Germination inhibition activity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues was measured on lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa). Lipophilicity of the compounds was determined by HPLC. A correlation between lipophilicity values and percentage of germination inhibition was established. A model mechanism of action for auxin was used for analyzing the effect of the substituent at the alpha carbon atom (Ca) on the polarization of hydroxamic and amide functions in relation to the germination inhibition activity observed. Results suggest that the lipophilic and acidic properties play an important role in the phytotoxicity of the compounds. A test with the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was used to evaluate the potential herbicide activity of the hydroxamic acids and acetanilides.

  10. Hydroxamic acid – A novel molecule for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Saha, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxamic acid is a potent moiety not only in the field of cancer therapy but also as a mutagenic agent. Among the various derivatives of hydroxamic acid, SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) is considered as a potent anticancer agent. Scientists from the different corner synthesized different hydroxamic acid moieties with some straight chain oxazole, thiadiazole, biphenyl moieties in the terminal position. Acetylation and deacetylation of histones of the core proteins of nucleosomes in chromatin play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The level of acetylation of histones is established and maintained by two classes of enzymes, histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylases, which have been identified as transcriptional coactivators and transcriptional corepressors, respectively. There is increasing evidence that aberrant histone acetylation has been linked to various malignant diseases. Great efforts are currently underway for the design of more potent and less toxic candidates for the treatment of cancer. In recent years, hydroxamic acid derivatives have attracted increasing attention for their potential as highly efficacious in combating various etiological factors associated with cancer. Our main intention to draw an attention is that this single functional moiety has not only fit in the receptor but also create a diversified activity. PMID:22837956

  11. Therapeutic potential of sulindac hydroxamic acid against human pancreatic and colonic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Stefano; Banti, Irene; Stefanelli, Fabio; Picchianti, Luca; Digiacomo, Maria; Macchia, Marco; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Lapucci, Annalina

    2010-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac exhibits cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and COX-independent chemopreventive properties in human cancer. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the hydroxamic acid substitution for the carboxylic acid group could enhance the in vitro antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of sulindac. Characterization tools used on this study included analyses of cell viability, caspase 3/7 induction, DNA fragmentation, and gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that the newly synthesized hydroxamic acid derivative of sulindac and its sulfone and sulfide metabolites were characterized by a good anticancer activity on human pancreatic and colon cancer cells, both in terms of potency (IC(50) mean values from 6 ± 1.1 μM to 64 ± 1.1 μM) and efficacy (E(max) of ∼100%). Hydroxamic acid derivatives trigger a higher degree of apoptosis than carboxylic acid counterparts, increase bax/bcl-2 expression ratio and induce caspase 3/7 activation. Most notably, these compounds significantly inhibit proangiogenic growth factor-stimulated proliferation of vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) at sub-micromolar concentrations. Our data also provide evidence that the COX-active metabolite of sulindac hydroxamic acid were the most active of the series and selective inhibition of COX-1 but not COX-2 can mimic its effects, suggesting that COX inhibition could only play a partial role in the mechanism of compound action. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that substitution of the carboxylic acid group with the hydroxamic acid moiety enhances in vitro antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antiangiogenic properties of sulindac, therefore increasing the therapeutic potential of this drug. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid under UREX+ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alyapyshev, M.; Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Cleveland, M.A.; Bruso, J.E.

    2007-07-01

    Aceto-hydroxamic acid (AHA) is used as a stripping agent In the UREX process. While extraction yields of uranium remain high upon addition of AHA, hexavalent plutonium and neptunium are rapidly reduced to the pentavalent state while the tetravalent species and removed from the product stream. However, under acidic conditions, aceto-hydroxamic acid undergoes hydrolytic degradation. In this study, the kinetics of the hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid in nitric and perchloric acid media was investigated at several temperatures. The decrease of the concentration of AHA was determined via its ferric complex using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The data obtained were analyzed using the method of initial rates. The data follow the pseudo-first order reaction model. Gamma irradiation of AHA/HNO{sub 3} solutions with 33 kGy/s caused two-fold faster degradation of AHA. The rate equation and thermodynamic data will be presented for the hydrolysis reaction with respect to the concentrations of aceto-hydroxamic acid, nitrate and hydronium ions, and radiation dose. (authors)

  13. Copper extraction by fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives synthesized based on palm kernel oil.

    PubMed

    Haron, Jelas; Jahangirian, Hossein; Silong, Sidik; Yusof, Nor Azah; Kassim, Anuar; Moghaddam, Roshanak Rafiee; Peyda, Mazyar; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Amin, Jamileh; Gharayebi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives based on palm kernel oil which are phenyl fatty hydroxamic acids (PFHAs), methyl fatty hydroxamic acids (MFHAs), isopropyl fatty hydroxamic acids (IPFHAs) and benzyl fatty hydroxamic acids (BFHAs) were applied as chelating agent for copper liquid-liquid extraction. The extraction of copper from aqueous solution by MFHAs, PFHAs, BFHAs or IPFHAs were carried out in hexane as an organic phase through the formation of copper methyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-MFHs), copper phenyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-PFHs), copper benzyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-BFHs) and copper isopropyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-IPFHs). The results showed that the fatty hydroxamic acid derivatives could extract copper at pH 6.2 effectively with high percentage of extraction (the percentages of copper extraction by MFHAs, PFHAs, IPFHs and BFHAs were found to be 99.3, 87.5, 82.3 and 90.2%, respectively). The extracted copper could be quantitatively stripped back into sulphuric acid (3M) aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that the copper recovery percentages from Cu-MFHs, Cu-PFHs, Cu-BFHs and Cu-IPFHs are 99.1, 99.4, 99.6 and 99.9 respectively. The copper extraction was not affected by the presence of a large amount of Mg (II), Ni (II), Al (III), Mn (II) and Co (II) ions in the aqueous solution.

  14. Discovery, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of spiropiperidine hydroxamic acid based derivatives as structurally novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Varasi, Mario; Thaler, Florian; Abate, Agnese; Bigogno, Chiara; Boggio, Roberto; Carenzi, Giacomo; Cataudella, Tiziana; Dal Zuffo, Roberto; Fulco, Maria Carmela; Rozio, Marco Giulio; Mai, Antonello; Dondio, Giulio; Minucci, Saverio; Mercurio, Ciro

    2011-04-28

    New spiro[chromane-2,4'-piperidine] and spiro[benzofuran-2,4'-piperidine] hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDAC inhibitors have been identified by combining privileged structures with a hydroxamic acid moiety as zinc binding group. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit nuclear extract HDACs and for their in vitro antiproliferative activity on different tumor cell lines. This work resulted in the discovery of spirocycle 30d that shows good oral bioavailability and tumor growth inhibition in an HCT-116 murine xenograft model.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of fatty hydroxamic acids from triacylglycerides.

    PubMed

    Hoidy, Wisam H; Ahmad, Mansor B; Al-Mulla, Emad A Jaffar; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor azowa Bt

    2010-01-01

    In this study, fatty haydroxamic acids (FHAs), which have biological activities as antibiotics and antifungal, have been synthesized via refluxing of triacylglycrides, palm olein, palm stearin or corn oil with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The products were characterized using the complex formation test of hydroxamic acid group with zinc(I), copper(II) and iron(III), various technique methods including nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Parameters that may affect the conversion of oils to FHAs including the effect of reaction time, effect of organic solvent and effect of hydro/oil molar issue were also investigated in this study. Results of characterization indicate that FHAs were successfully produced from triacylglycrides. The conversion percentages of palm stearin, palm olein and corn oil into their fatty hydroxamic acids are 82, 81 and 78, respectively. Results also showed that hexane is the best organic solvent to produce the FHAs from the three oils used in this study. The optimum reaction time to achieve the maximum conversion percentage of the oils to FHAs was found to be 10 hours for all the three oils, while the optimum molar ration of hydro/to oil was found to be 7:1 for all the different three oils.

  16. Interaction of imidazole containing hydroxamic acids with Fe(III): hydroxamate versus imidazole coordination of the ligands.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Etelka; Bátka, Dávid; Csóka, Hajnalka; Nagy, Nóra V

    2007-01-01

    Solution equilibrium studies on Fe(III) complexes formed with imidazole-4-carbohydroxamic acid (Im-4-Cha), N-Me-imidazole-4-carbohydroxamic acid (N-Me-Im-4-Cha), imidazole-4-acetohydroxamic acid (Im-4-Aha), and histidinehydroxamic acid (Hisha) have been performed by using pH-potentiometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, EPR, ESI-MS, and H1-NMR methods. All of the obtained results demonstrate that the imidazole moiety is able to play an important role very often in the interaction with Fe(III), even if this metal ion prefers the hydroxamate chelates very much. If the imidazole moiety is in alpha-position to the hydroxamic one (Im-4-Cha and N-Me-Im-4-Cha) its coordination to the metal ion is indicated unambiguously by our results. Interestingly, parallel formation of (Nimidazole, Ohydroxamate), and (Ohydroxamate, Ohydroxamate) type chelates seems probable with N-Me-Im-4-Cha. The imidazole is in beta-position to the hydroxamic moiety in Im-4-Aha and an intermolecular noncovalent (mainly H-bonding) interaction seems to organize the intermediate-protonated molecules in this system. Following the formation of mono- and bishydroxamato mononuclear complexes, only EPR silent species exists in the Fe(III)-Hisha system above pH 4, what suggests the rather significant "assembler activity" of the imidazole (perhaps together with the ammonium moiety).

  17. Defining the role of histone deacetylases in the inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis by dietary energy restriction (DER): effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and DER in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N; Thompson, Henry J

    2013-04-01

    Dietary energy restriction (DER) inhibits experimentally induced mammary cancer, an effect accompanied by elevated levels of silent information regulator 2 (SIRT1), a class III histone deacetylase (HDAC). However, the effect of DER on targets of other classes of HDACs has not been reported, a highly relevant issue given evidence that HDAC induction favors the development of cancer and tumor growth. Experiments were carried out to determine whether suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor with broad activity, would affect the anti-cancer activity of DER. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 30/group) were injected with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (50 mg/kg) at 21 days of age and 7 days thereafter were randomized to groups fed: (i) control diet (AIN-93G), (ii) 0.1% SAHA (w/w), (iii) 40% DER, or (iv) 0.1% SAHA + 40% DER. An additional group was fed 0.1% SAHA + 40%DER for 5 weeks and released to control diet for 3 weeks. DER significantly reduced mammary cancer incidence, multiplicity, and cancer burden and prolonged cancer latency (P < 0.01). Cancer inhibition was maintained in SAHA + DER, despite evidence that histone (H2A(Lys9), H2B(Lys5), and H4(Lys5/8/12/16), but not H3(Lys9); P < 0.001) and non-histone protein deacetylation (p53(Lys373) and p53(Lys382); P < 0.001) induced by DER was reversed by SAHA. This indicates that the inhibition of DER of cancer is not dependent on HDAC induction. After releasing rats from DER + SAHA, cancer multiplicity remained lower than control (P < 0.05), consistent with apoptosis-mediated cell deletion. These findings support further investigation of the hypothesis that HDAC induction by DER blunts its anti-carcinogenic impact.

  18. CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR analysis on hydroxamic acid derivatives as urease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer-; Wadood, Abdul; Uddin, Reaz

    2009-02-01

    Urease (EC 3.5.1.5) serves as a virulence factor in pathogens that are responsible for the development of many diseases in humans and animals. Urease allows soil microorganisms to use urea as a source of nitrogen and aid in the rapid break down of urea-based fertilizers resulting in phytopathicity. It has been well established that hydroxamic acids are the potent inhibitors of urease activity. The 3D-QSAR studies on thirty five hydroxamic acid derivatives as known urease inhibitors were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods to determine the factors required for the activity of these compounds. The CoMFA model produced statistically significant results with cross-validated (q(2)) 0.532 and conventional (r(2)) correlation coefficients 0.969.The model indicated that the steric field (70.0%) has greater influence on hydroxamic acid inhibitors than the electrostatic field (30.0%). Furthermore, five different fields: steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, H-bond donor and H-bond acceptor assumed to generate the CoMSIA model, which gave q(2) 0.665 and r(2) 0.976.This model showed that steric (43.0%), electrostatic (26.4%) and hydrophobic (20.3%) properties played a major role in urease inhibition. The analysis of CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided insight into the possible modification of the hydroxamic acid derivatives for improved activity.

  19. Solvent-Controlled Chemoselectivity in the Photolytic Release of Hydroxamic Acids and Carboxamides from Solid Support.

    PubMed

    Qvortrup, Katrine; Petersen, Rico G; Dohn, Asmus O; Møller, Klaus B; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2017-06-16

    The synthetic utility and theoretical basis of a photolabile hydroxylamine-linker are presented. The developed protocols enable the efficient synthesis and chemoselective photolytic release of either hydroxamates or carboxamides from solid support. The bidetachable mode of the linker unit is uniquely dependent on the solvent. Hydroxamic acids are obtained by performing photolysis in protic solvents, whereas photolysis in aprotic solvents enables the selective release of carboxamides.

  20. [Synthesis of hydroxamic acids and study of their complexes with iron (II) and (III) ions].

    PubMed

    Nenortiene, Palma; Sapragoniene, Marija; Stankevicius, Antanas

    2002-01-01

    Hydroxamic acids are widespread in the tissues of plants, in metabolites of bacteria and fungi, including complex compounds with metal ions. These acids have wide spectrum of biological activity and therefore are perspective reagents for analysis of chemical elements. Fourteen aliphatic and aromatic derivatives of hydroxamic acids have been synthesized from esters of carboxylic acids. Photometric reactions of hydroxamic acids with iron (II) and (III) were investigated. Complex formation of iron (II) and (III) depending on pH was studied with series of synthesized hydroxamic acids: octanohydroxamic, maleic hydroxamic, 2-hydroxybenzoxydroxamic, benzoxydroxamic, phthalmonoxydroxamic and 3-metoxybenzohydroxamic acids. Composition of iron (III) complexes with 2-hydroxybenzohydroxamic, octanoxydroxamic, 3-metoxybenzohydroxamic acids and iron (II) with 2-hydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was studied by methods of mole ratio and isomolar solutions. Sensitivity of reagents was evaluated by values of absorption coefficients (epsilon). Stability of complexes in water and organic solvents was investigated. Interaction between iron (III) and hydroxamic acids (octanoxydroxamic, 2-hydroxybenzohydroxamic, 3-metoxybenzohydroxamic) have been applied for quantitative photometric analysis of iron (III) salts. Color reaction of iron (II) with 2-hydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was applied for quantitative photometric determination of iron (II) salts. 3-Metoxybenzohydroxamic acid was proposed as a new indicator for complexonometric analysis of iron (III). Chelatometric titration of iron (III) using this indicator is not influenced by copper, cobalt, zinc, manganese, so this methods is recommended for iron quantity detection in antianemic drugs, which are composed of latter microelements. Synthesis procedure of 2-benzoylamino-3-arylacrylhydroxamic acids from saturated azlactones was created. Color and precipitate reactions of iron (II) and (III), copper (II), nickel (II) and cobalt (II) ions with

  1. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel hydroxamic acids bearing artemisinin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ha, Vu Thi; Kien, Vu Tuan; Binh, Le Huy; Tien, Vu Dinh; My, Nguyen Thi Thuy; Nam, Nguyen Hai; Baltas, Michael; Hahn, Hyunggu; Han, Byung Woo; Thao, Do Thi; Vu, Tran Khac

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydroxamic acids bearing artemisinin skeleton was designed and synthesized. Some compounds in this series exhibited moderate inhibition against the whole cell HDAC enzymes. Especially, compound 6g displayed potent cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines, including HepG2 (liver cancer), MCF-7 (breast cancer) and HL-60 (leukemia cancer), with IC50 values of 2.50, 2.62 and 1.28μg/mL, respectively. Docking studies performed with two potent compounds 6a and 6g using Autodock Vina showed that both compounds bound to HDAC2 with relatively high binding affinities from -7.1 to 7.0kcal/mol compared to SAHA (-7.4kcal/mol). It was found in this research that most of the target compounds seemed to be more cytotoxic toward blood cancer cells (HL-60) than liver (HepG2), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells.

  3. Active Transport of Iron in Bacillus megaterium: Role of Secondary Hydroxamic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Davis, W. B.; Byers, B. R.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetics of radioactive iron transport were examined in three strains of Bacillus megaterium. In strain ATCC 19213, which secretes the ferric-chelating secondary hydroxamic acid schizokinen, 59Fe3+ uptake from 59FeCl3 or the ferric hydroxamate Desferal-59Fe3+ was rapid and reached saturation within 3 min. In strain SK11, which does not secrete schizokinen, transport from 59FeCl3 was markedly reduced; the two ferric hydroxamates Desferal-59Fe3+ or schizokinen-59Fe3+ increased both total 59Fe3+ uptake and the 59Fe3+ appearing in a cellular trichloroacetic acid-insoluble fraction, although 10 min was required to reach saturation. Certain characteristics of transport from both ferric hydroxamates and FeCl3 suggest that iron uptake was an active process. The growth-inhibitory effect of aluminum on strain SK11 was probably due to the formation of nonutilizable iron-aluminum complexes which blocked uptake from 59FeCl3. Desferal or schizokinen prevented this blockage. A strain (ARD-1) resistant to the ferric hydroxamate antibiotic A22765 was isolated from strain SK11. Strain ARD-1 failed to grow with Desferal-Fe3+ as an iron source, and it was unable to incorporate 59Fe3+ from this source. Growth and iron uptake in strain ARD-1 were similar to strain SK11 with schizokinen-Fe3+ or the iron salt as sources. It is suggested that the ferric hydroxamates, or the iron they chelate, may be transported by a special system which might be selective for certain ferric hydroxamates. Strain ARD-1 may be unable to recognize both the antibiotic A22765 and the structurally similar chelate Desferal-Fe3+, while retaining its capacity to utilize schizokinen-Fe3+. PMID:5000305

  4. Synthesis of new glycyrrhetinic acid derived ring A azepanone, 29-urea and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gaware, Rawindra; Khunt, Rupesh; Czollner, Laszlo; Stanetty, Christian; Da Cunha, Thierry; Kratschmar, Denise V; Odermatt, Alex; Kosma, Paul; Jordis, Ulrich; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. Recently, we published a series of hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid showing high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1. Starting from the lead compounds glycyrrhetinic acid and the hydroxamic acid derivatives, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Here we describe novel 29-urea- and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as well as derivatives with the Beckman rearrangement of the 3-oxime to a seven-membered ring, and the rearrangement of the C-ring from 11-keto-12-ene to 12-keto-9(11)-ene. The combination of modifications on different positions led to compounds comprising further improved selective inhibition of 11β-HSD2 in the lower nanomolar range with up to 3600-fold selectivity.

  5. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of N-Aryl Hydroxamic Acids via Insertion of Arynes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanlan; Geng, Yu; Jin, Zhong

    2016-05-06

    An efficient and transition-metal-free N-arylation of amides via the insertion of arynes into the N-H bonds in the N-alkoxy amides is described. A variety of the reactive functional groups including the reactive aldehyde carbonyl group, furan ring, carbon-carbon double bonds, and free N-H bond of indole are found to be compatible with this process. In particular, the protocol is applicable in the synthesis of structurally diverse N-aryl hydroxamates and hydroxamic acids derived from N-protecting amino acids and peptides. In the presence of multiple amide N-H bonds, the N-arylation reaction can proceed selectively in the N-H bonds of terminal N-OBn amides giving rise to the desired N-aryl hydroxamates.

  6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  7. Effects of Hydroxamic Acids Isolated from Gramineae on Adenosine 5′-triphosphate Synthesis in Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Queirolo, Carlos B.; Andreo, Carlos S.; Vallejos, Rubén H.; Niemeyer, Hermann M.; Corcuera, Luis J.

    1981-01-01

    Two hydroxamic acids isolated from maize extracts, 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-(2H)-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA) and the 2-O-β-d-glucopyranoside of DIMBOA, inhibit photophosphorylation by spinach chloroplasts. Both cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylations were inhibited to the same extent. The concentrations producing 50% inhibition for DIMBOA and its glucoside were about 1 and 4 millimolar, respectively. These compounds inhibit coupled electron transport but do not affect basal or uncoupled electron transport. Both acids inhibit the ATPase activities of membrane-bound coupling factor 1 (CF1) and of purified CF1. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that DIMBOA and its glucoside act as energy transfer inhibitors of photophosphorylation. PMID:16662030

  8. Preparation of bifunctional isocyanate hydroxamate linkers: Synthesis of carbamate and urea tethered polyhydroxamic acid chelators

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Rasika; Shirley, Jonathan M.; Torres, Emilio; Jacobs, Hollie K.; Gopalan, Aravamudan S.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel bifunctional N-methylhydroxamate-isocyanate linkers 20 and 21 were prepared in good yield and high purity from the corresponding amine salts using a biphasic reaction with phosgene. The facile ring opening reaction of N-Boc lactams using the anion of O-benzylhydroxylamine gave the protected amino hydroxamates 6a and 6c in good yields. The selective methylation of the hydroxamate nitrogen in the presence of the N-Boc group in these intermediates could be readily accomplished. The utility of the linkers was clearly demonstrated by the synthesis of the carbamate-tethered trishydroxamic acid 27 and the urea-tethered 29 PMID:23162172

  9. A `Clicked' Tetrameric Hydroxamic Acid Glycopeptidomimetic Antagonizes Sugar-Lectin Interactions On The Cellular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zang, Yi; Xie, Juan; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2014-07-01

    A tetrameric N-acetyl galactosaminyl (GalNAc) peptidomimetic was constructed by N-acetylation of repeating proline-based hydroxamic acid units, followed by a convergent `click chemistry' coupling. This novel glycopeptidomimetic was determined to effectively antagonize the interaction between a transmembrane hepatic lectin and GalNAc on the cellular level.

  10. Salinomycin Hydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structure, and Biological Activity of Polyether Ionophore Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Chygorin, Eduard; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2016-06-09

    The polyether ionophore salinomycin has recently gained attention due to its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cancer stem cells within a number of cancer cell lines. Efficient single step strategies for the preparation of hydroxamic acid hybrids of this compound varying in N- and O-alkylation are presented. The parent hydroxamic acid, salinomycin-NHOH, forms both inclusion complexes and well-defined electroneutral complexes with potassium and sodium cations via 1,3-coordination by the hydroxamic acid moiety to the metal ion. A crystal structure of an cationic sodium complex with a noncoordinating anion corroborates this finding and, moreover, reveals a novel type of hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the head-to-tail conformation that encapsulates the cation analogously to the native structure. The hydroxamic acid derivatives display down to single digit micromolar activity against cancer cells but unlike salinomycin selective reduction of ALDH(+) cells, a phenotype associated with cancer stem cells was not observed. Mechanistic implications are discussed.

  11. Hydroxamic acid content and toxicity of rye at selected growth stages.

    PubMed

    Rice, Clifford P; Park, Yong Bong; Adam, Frédérick; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Teasdale, John R

    2005-08-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) is an important cover crop that provides many benefits to cropping systems including weed and pest suppression resulting from allelopathic substances. Hydroxamic acids have been identified as allelopathic compounds in rye. This research was conducted to improve the methodology for quantifying hydroxamic acids and to determine the relationship between hydroxamic acid content and phytotoxicity of extracts of rye root and shoot tissue harvested at selected growth stages. Detection limits for an LC/MS-MS method for analysis of hydroxamic acids from crude aqueous extracts were better than have been reported previously. (2R)-2-beta-D-Glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIBOA-G), 2,4-dihydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIBOA), benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA), and the methoxy-substituted form of these compounds, (2R)-2-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA glucose), 2,4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), and 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (MBOA), were all detected in rye tissue. DIBOA and BOA were prevalent in shoot tissue, whereas the methoxy-substituted compounds, DIMBOA glucose and MBOA, were prevalent in root tissue. Total hydroxamic acid concentration in rye tissue generally declined with age. Aqueous crude extracts of rye shoot tissue were more toxic than extracts of root tissue to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) root length. Extracts of rye seedlings (Feekes growth stage 2) were most phytotoxic, but there was no pattern to the phytotoxicity of extracts of rye sampled at growth stages 4 to 10.5.4, and no correlation of hydroxamic acid content and phytotoxicity (I50 values). Analysis of dose-response model slope coefficients indicated a lack of parallelism among models for rye extracts from different growth stages, suggesting that phytotoxicity may be attributed to compounds with different modes of action at

  12. Adsorption and self-assembly of octyl hydroxamic acid at a fluorite surface as revealed by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuming; Liu, Jin; Miller, Jan D

    2008-09-15

    In the study described here, the surface structure of a self-assembly octyl hydroxamic acid at a calcium fluoride (CaF(2)) surface is evaluated using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS). Of particular significance are the results that show octyl hydroxamic acid adsorbs at the fluorite surface from octanol solution and has more ordering and molecular conformation than the octyl hydroxamic acid adsorbed from solution. At the fluorite/0.1 M octyl hydroxamic acid octanol solution interface a bilayer-like structure consisting of an octyl hydroxamic acid layer in contact with fluorite and a tilted alcohol layer was observed by SFVS. The alcohol molecules are oriented with respect to the hydroxamic acid monolayer with the OH groups directed towards the bulk alcohol phase and the terminal CH(3) group oriented to face the alkyl chains of the hydroxamic acid monolayer.

  13. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic Acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, alters multiple signaling pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Sokolowski, Kevin; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2017-04-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has preclinical efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), despite an unclear molecular mechanism. We sought to further investigate the effects of SAHA on HCC. We hypothesize SAHA will inhibit HCC cellular proliferation through apoptosis and aid in further profiling SAHA's effect on HCC oncogenic pathways. HCC cell lines were treated with various concentrations of SAHA. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT and colonogenic assays. Cell lysates were analyzed via Western blotting for apoptotic and oncogenic pathway markers. Caspase glo-3/7 was used to assess apoptosis. SAHA treatment demonstrated significant (<0.05) reduction in cell growth and colony formation through apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Western analysis showed reduction in Notch, pAKT and pERK1/2 proteins. Interestingly, phosphorylated STAT3 was increased in all cell lines. SAHA inhibits Notch, AKT, and Raf-1 pathways but not the STAT3 pathway. We believe that STAT3 may lead to cancer cell progression, reducing SAHA efficacy in HCC. Therefore, combination of SAHA and STAT or Notch inhibition may be a strategy for HCC treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Linker for the Solid-Phase Synthesis of Hydroxamic Acids and Identification of HDAC6 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bang, Claus G; Jensen, Jakob F; O'Hanlon Cohrt, Emil; Olsen, Lasse B; Siyum, Saba G; Mortensen, Kim T; Skovgaard, Tine; Berthelsen, Jens; Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael; Qvortrup, Katrine; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2017-09-06

    We herein present broadly useful, readily available and nonintegral hydroxylamine linkers for the routine solid-phase synthesis of hydroxamic acids. The developed protocols enable the efficient synthesis and release of a wide range of hydroxamic acids from various resins, relying on high control and flexibility with respect to reagents and synthetic processes. A trityl-based hydroxylamine linker was used to synthesize a library of peptide hydroxamic acids. The inhibitory effects of the compounds were examined for seven HDAC enzyme subtypes using a chemiluminescence-based assay.

  15. Promotion of Germination Using Hydroxamic Acid Inhibitors of 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Sajjad Z.; Chandler, Jake O.; Harrison, Peter J.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Thompson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination and the regulation of ABA biosynthesis has a role in maintenance of seed dormancy. The key rate-limiting step in ABA biosynthesis is catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). Two hydroxamic acid inhibitors of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), D4 and D7, previously found to inhibit CCD and NCED in vitro, are shown to have the novel property of decreasing mean germination time of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds constitutively overexpressing LeNCED1. Post-germination, D4 exhibited no negative effects on tomato seedling growth in terms of height, dry weight, and fresh weight. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seeds containing a tetracycline-inducible LeNCED1 transgene were used to show that germination could be negatively and positively controlled through the chemical induction of gene expression and the chemical inhibition of the NCED protein: application of tetracycline increased mean germination time and delayed hypocotyl emergence in a similar manner to that observed when exogenous ABA was applied and this was reversed by D4 when NCED expression was induced at intermediate levels. D4 also improved germination in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds under thermoinhibitory temperatures and in tomato seeds imbibed in high osmolarity solutions of polyethylene glycol. D4 reduced ABA and dihydrophaseic acid accumulation in tomato seeds overexpressing LeNCED1 and reduced ABA accumulation in wild type tomato seeds imbibed on polyethylene glycol. The evidence supports a mode of action of D4 through NCED inhibition, and this molecule provides a lead compound for the design of NCED inhibitors with greater specificity and potency. PMID:28373878

  16. Synthesis and characterization of two new hydroxamic acids derivatives and their metal complexes. An investigation on the keto/enol, E/Z and hydroxamate/hydroximate forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiguzel, Ekrem; Yilmaz, Fatih; Emirik, Mustafa; Ozil, Musa

    2017-01-01

    2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-acetohydroxamic acid (HL1), 2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-butanohydroxamic acid (HL2) and Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The results of NMR spectra and theoretical calculations showed that the hydroxamic acids were in the keto-E and keto-Z conformations. The elemental analysis and thermal analysis indicated that M:L ratio of the complexes are 1:1 and the spectral analysis confirmed that hydroxamate groups are keto form in the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-phenylbenzimidazole-N-butanohydroxamic acid and enol form in the other complexes.

  17. A strategy for the solution-phase parallel synthesis of N-(pyrrolidinylmethyl)hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, M; Flessner, T; Wong, C H

    2000-06-16

    Both five- and six-membered iminocyclitols have proven to be useful transition-state analogue inhibitors of glycosidases. They also mimic the transition-state sugar moiety of the nucleoside phosphate sugar in glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions. Described here is the development of a general strategy toward the parallel synthesis of a five-membered iminocyclitol linked to a hydroxamic acid group designed to mimic the transition state of GDP-fucose complexed with Mn(II) in fucosyltransferase reactions. The iminocyclitol 8 containing a protected hydroxylamine unit was prepared from D-mannitol. The hydroxamic acid moiety was introduced via the reaction of 8 with various acid chlorides. The strategy is generally applicable to the construction of libraries for identification of glycosyltransferase inhibitors.

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, protects dopaminergic neurons from neurotoxin-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, SH; Wu, HM; Ossola, B; Schendzielorz, N; Wilson, BC; Chu, CH; Chen, SL; Wang, Q; Zhang, D; Qian, L; Li, X; Hong, JS; Lu, RB

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Prevention or disease-modifying therapies are critical for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. However, no such intervention is currently available. Growing evidence has demonstrated that administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors ameliorates a wide range of neurologic and psychiatric disorders in experimental models. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) was the first HDAC inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the sole use of cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential new indications of SAHA for therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in in vitro Parkinson's disease models. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mesencephalic neuron–glia cultures and reconstituted cultures were used to investigate neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of SAHA. We measured toxicity in dopaminergic neurons, using dopamine uptake assay and morphological analysis and expression of neurotrophic substances by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time RT PCR. KEY RESULTS In mesencephalic neuron–glia cultures, SAHA displayed dose- and time-dependent prolongation of the survival and protection against neurotoxin-induced neuronal death of dopaminergic neurons. Mechanistic studies revealed that the neuroprotective effects of SAHA were mediated in part by promoting release of neurotrophic factors from astroglia through inhibition of histone deacetylation. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The novel neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of SAHA demonstrated in this study suggest that further study of this HDAC inhibitor could provide a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21726209

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) at subtoxic concentrations increases the adhesivity of human leukemic cells to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Brodská, Barbora; Otevrelová, Petra; Elknerová, Klára; Grebenová, Dana; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2010-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) which is being introduced into clinic for the treatment of hematological diseases. We studied the effect of this compound on six human hematopoietic cell lines (JURL-MK1, K562, CML-T1, Karpas-299, HL-60, and ML-2) as well as on normal human lymphocytes and on leukemic primary cells. SAHA induced dose-dependent and cell type-dependent cell death which displayed apoptotic features (caspase-3 activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation) in most cell types including the normal lymphocytes. At subtoxic concentrations (0.5-1 microM), SAHA increased the cell adhesivity to fibronectin (FN) in all leukemia/lymphoma-derived cell lines but not in normal lymphocytes. This increase was accompanied by an enhanced expression of integrin beta1 and paxillin, an essential constituent of focal adhesion complexes, both at the protein and mRNA level. On the other hand, the inhibition of ROCK protein, an important regulator of cytoskeleton structure, had no consistent effect on SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity. The promotion of cell adhesivity to FN seems to be specific for SAHA as we observed no such effects with other HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A and sodium butyrate).

  20. BW A4C and other hydroxamic acids are potent inhibitors of linoleic acid 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    PubMed

    Brodowsky, I D; Hamberg, M; Oliw, E H

    1994-03-11

    Linoleic acid is converted to 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid by the soluble 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis. Effects of different lipoxygenase inhibitors on the 8R-dioxygenase were evaluated. Three hydroxamic acid derivatives were investigated. BW A4C (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)acetohydroxamic acid) was the most potent with an IC50 of 0.2 microM, followed by zileuton (3-10 microM) and linoleate-hydroxamic acid (0.02 mM). Two other lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and eicosatetraynoic acid, were less potent (IC50 0.09 and 0.15 mM, respectively). The 8R-dioxygenase was also strongly inhibited by commonly used buffer additives, dithiothreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. G. graminis also contains a hydroperoxide isomerase, which converts 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid to 7S,8S-dihydroxylinoleic acid. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration indicated that the dioxygenase and the hydroperoxide isomerase activities could be separated.

  1. Efficient Route to Highly Water-Soluble Aromatic Cyclic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-06

    2-Hydroxyisoquinolin-1-one (1,2-HOIQO) is a new member of the important class of aromatic cyclic hydroxamic acid ligands which are widely used in metal sequestering applications and metal chelating therapy. The first general approach for the introduction of substituents at the aromatic ring of the chelating moiety is presented. As a useful derivative, the highly water-soluble sulfonic acid has been synthesized by an efficient route that allows general access to 1,2-HOQIO 3-carboxlic acid amides, which are the most relevant for applications.

  2. The variable hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440.

    PubMed

    Ejje, Najwa; Soe, Cho Zin; Gu, Jiesi; Codd, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440 revealed a high frequency of gene clusters which code for the biosynthesis of known and novel secondary metabolites. Of these metabolites, bioinformatics analysis predicted that S. tropica CNB-440 could potentially biosynthesize, as high affinity Fe(iii) ligands, siderophores from the hydroxamic acid desferrioxamine class (sid1 gene cluster) and the phenolate-thia(oxa)zoli(di)ne class (sid2 and sid4 gene clusters). In this work, we have used Ni(ii)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) to pre-fractionate the hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of S. tropica CNB-440 from the secondary metabolome, to reveal low abundance siderophores. LC-MS measurements and electronic absorption spectra from purified extracts incubated with exogenous Fe(iii) revealed eight siderophores from the desferrioxamine class (DFOA2, DFOA1a, DFOA1b, DFOB, DFON, DFOD2, DFOE, DFOD1), which included two constitutional isomers (DFOA1a, DFOA1b), and one new siderophore (DFON), the latter which would require assembly from a combination of 1,5-diaminopentane and 1,6-diaminohexane as diamine substrates. Three additional species (m/zobs 496.14, 792.34 and 804.34) with electronic absorption spectra characteristic of complexes formed between Fe(iii) and hydroxamic acid-type siderophores were evident under some conditions. The signal at m/zobs 792.34 eluted in the hydrophobic region of the reverse-phase LC and correlated with a DFOD1 analogue with a C-terminal branched chain fatty acid ([M + K(+)](+)m/zcalc 792.35), which has been previously identified from marine sediment dwelling Micrococcus luteus KLE1011. The S. tropica CNB-440 hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome was modulated by culture conditions (pH 7, 22 °C; pH 7, 28 °C; pH 9, 28 °C) designed to simulate the variable marine environment. An increase in temperature at constant pH value showed increased levels of DFOA2 and DFOA1, and

  3. A novel hydroxamic acid-containing antibiotic produced by a Saharan soil-living Streptomyces strain.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, A; Meklat, A; Bijani, C; Toumatia, O; Errakhi, R; Lebrihi, A; Mathieu, F; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N

    2015-06-01

    During screening for potentially antimicrobial actinobacteria, a highly antagonistic strain, designated WAB9, was isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria. A polyphasic approach characterized the strain taxonomically as a member of the genus Streptomyces. The strain WAB9 exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity toward various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. A PCR-based assay of genomic potential for producing bioactive metabolites revealed the presence of PKS-II gene. After 6 days of strain fermentation, one bioactive compound was extracted from the remaining aqueous phase and then purified by HPLC. The chemical structure of the compound was determined by spectroscopic (UV-visible, and (1)H and (13)C NMR) and spectrometric analysis. The compound was identified to be 2-amino-N-(2-amino-3-phenylpropanoyl)-N-hydroxy-3-phenylpropanamide, a novel hydroxamic acid-containing molecule. The pure molecule showed appreciable minimum inhibitory concentration values against a selection of drug-resistant bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. Significance and impact of the study: This study presents the isolation of a Streptomyces strain, named WAB9, from a Saharan soil in Algeria. This strain was found to produce a new hydroxamic acid-containing molecule with interesting antimicrobial activities towards various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Although hydroxamic acid-containing molecules are known to exhibit low toxicities in general, only real evaluations of the toxicity levels could decide on the applications for which this new molecule is potentially most appropriate. Thus, this article provides a new framework of research.

  4. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for human breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototype of the newly developed, second-generation, hybrid polar compounds. It is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with high potency for inducing cell differentiation of cultured murine erythroleukemia cells. Studies with SAHA have primarily been performed with hematopoietic tumor cells. Here we extent these studies with SAHA to human breast cancer cell lines in an attempt to find better therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435, as well as normal cells, including the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, and fibroblasts, were treated with SAHA. Cells assayed for cell survival by using trypan blue exclusion assay, colony formation assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. The effects of SAHA on cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins were examined by Western blots analysis. The identification of additional target genes was carried out by differential display (DD) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: SAHA inhibited clonogenic growth of MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These cells were more sensitive to SAHA-mediated cytotoxic effects than normal breast epithelial cells and fibroblasts. The cytotoxic effects of SAHA on breast cancer cells were manifested by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. The pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, blocked SAHA-induced cell death, DNA laddering, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of caspases in SAHA-mediated apoptosis. In addition, SAHA modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins. For example, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were induced, and retinoblastoma protein pRb was hypophosphorylated. Moreover, SAHA induced several genes associated with differentiation and/ or growth inhibition. These genes encode gelsolin

  5. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Saturated N-Heterocycles by Enantioselective Amidation with Chiral Hydroxamic Acids.

    PubMed

    Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-12-20

    The preparation of enantioenriched chiral compounds by kinetic resolution dates back to the laboratories of Louis Pasteur in the middle of the 19th century. Unlike asymmetric synthesis, this process can always deliver enantiopure material (ee > 99%) if the reactions are allowed to proceed to sufficient conversion and the selectivity of the process is not unity (s > 1). One of the most appealing and practical variants is acylative kinetic resolution, which affords easily separable reaction products, and several highly efficient enzymatic and small molecule catalysts are available. Unfortunately, this method is applicable to limited substrate classes such as alcohols and primary benzylamines. This Account focuses on our work in catalytic acylative kinetic resolution of saturated N-heterocycles, a class of molecules that has been notoriously difficult to access via asymmetric synthesis. We document the development of hydroxamic acids as suitable catalysts for enantioselective acylation of amines through relay catalysis. Alongside catalyst optimization and reaction development, we present mechanistic studies and theoretical calculation accounting for the origins of selectivity and revealing the concerted nature of many amide-bond forming reactions. Immobilization of the hydroxamic acid to form a polymer supported reagent allows simplification of the experimental setup, improvement in product purification, and extension of the substrate scope. The kinetic resolutions are operationally straight forward: reactions proceed at room temperature and open to air conditions, without generation of difficult-to-remove side products. This was utilized to achieve decagram scale resolution of antimalarial drug mefloquine to prepare more than 50 g of (+)-erythro-meflqouine (er > 99:1) from the racemate. The immobilized quasienantiomeric acyl hydroxamic acid reagents were also exploited for a rare practical implementation of parallel kinetic resolution that affords both enantiomers of

  6. A new approach to cyclic hydroxamic acids: Intramolecular cyclization of N-benzyloxy carbamates with carbon nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Jacobs, Hollie K.

    2011-01-01

    N-Alkyl-N-benzyloxy carbamates, 2, undergo facile intramolecular cyclization with a variety of carbon nucleophiles to give functionalized 5- and 6-membered protected cyclic hydroxamic acids, 3, in good to excellent yields. This method can be extended to prepare seven-membered cyclic hydroxamic acids in moderate yields. The sulfone intermediates 3 from this study can be alkylated while the corresponding phosphonates have been shown to undergo HWE reaction. The α,β-unsaturated synthon, 8, prepared by thermal elimination of sulfoxide 3m, undergoes Michael addition with secondary amines. The usefulness of this approach to prepare polydentate chelators has been demonstrated by the synthesis of bis cyclic hydroxamic acids 12, 14, and 15. PMID:21499514

  7. Removal of fluoride ion from aqueous solution by a cerium-poly(hydroxamic acid) resin complex.

    PubMed

    Haron, M J; Yunus, W M

    2001-05-01

    A cerium-loaded poly(hydroxamic acid) chelating ion exchanger was used for fluoride ion removal from aqueous solution. The resin was effective in decreasing the fluoride concentration from 5 mM down to 0.001 mM in acidic pH between 3 and 6. The sorption followed a Langmuir model with a maximum capacity of 0.5 mmol/g. The removal is accomplished by an anion exchange mechanism. The rate constant for the sorption was found to be 9.6 x 10(-2) min-1. A column test shows that the fluoride ion was retained on the column until breakthrough point and the fluoride sorbed in the column can be eluted with 0.1 M NaOH. The column can be reused after being condition with hydrochloric acid at pH 4. The resin was tested and found to be effective for removal of fluoride from actual industrial wastewater.

  8. Betulinic acid derived hydroxamates and betulin derived carbamates are interesting scaffolds for the synthesis of novel cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wiemann, Jana; Heller, Lucie; Perl, Vincent; Kluge, Ralph; Ströhl, Dieter; Csuk, René

    2015-12-01

    The betulinic acid-derived hydroxamates 5-18, the amides 19-24, and betulin-derived bis-carbamates 25-28 as well as the carbamates 31-40 and 44-48 were prepared and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity in a photometric sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay against several human cancer cell lines and nonmalignant mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3). While for 3-O-acetyl hydroxamic acid 5 EC50 values as low as EC50 = 1.3 μM were found, N,O-bis-alkyl substituted hydroxamates showed lowered cytotoxicity (EC50 = 16-20 μM). In general, hydroxamic acid derivatives showed only reduced selectivity for tumor cells, except for allyl substituted compound 13 (EC50 = 5.9 μM for A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells and EC50 > 30 μM for nonmalignant mouse fibroblasts). The cytotoxicity of betulinic acid derived amides 19-24 and of betulin derived bis-carbamates 25-28 was low, except for N-ethyl substituted 25. Hexyl substituted 39 showed EC50 = 5.6 μM (518A2 cells) while for mouse fibroblasts EC50 > 30 was determined.

  9. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acids bearing urea/thiourea unit as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengqing; Bi, Yanjing; He, Yujun; Huang, WenYuan; Liu, Lifei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Sihan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Niefang

    2013-12-01

    A novel class of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acid derivatives containing urea or thiourea unit was designed, synthesized and evaluated as HDAC inhibitors. All tested compounds demonstrated significant HDAC inhibitory activities and anti-proliferative effects against diverse human tumor cell lines. Among them, 7l exhibited most potent pan-HDAC inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 130 nM. It also showed strong cellular inhibition against diverse cell lines including HCT-116, MCF-7, MDB-MB-435 and NCI-460, with GI50 values of 0.35, 0.22, 0.51 and 0.48 μM, respectively.

  10. Benzothiazole-containing hydroxamic acids as histone deacetylase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Oanh, Dao Thi Kim; Hai, Hoang Van; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Sook; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Hue, Van Thi My; Nam, Nguyen-Hai

    2011-12-15

    Data from clinical studies indicate that inhibitors of Class I and Class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes show great promise for the treatment of cancer. Zolinza (SAHA, Zolinza) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of the cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. As a part of our ongoing effort to identify novel small molecules to target these important enzymes, we have prepared two series of benzothiazole-containing analogues of SAHA. It was found that several compounds with 6C-bridge linking benzothiazole moiety and hydroxamic functional groups showed good inhibition against HDAC3 and 4 at as low as 1 μg/ml and exhibited potent cytotoxicity against five cancer cell lines with average IC(50) values of as low as 0.81 μg/ml, almost equipotent to SAHA.

  11. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  12. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    PubMed

    Tambunan, Usman S F; Bramantya, N; Parikesit, Arli A

    2011-01-01

    The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC.

  13. Production of l-Arginine by Arginine Hydroxamate-Resistant Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kisumi, Masahiko; Kato, Jyoji; Sugiura, Masaki; Chibata, Ichiro

    1971-01-01

    l-Arginine hydroxamate inhibited the growth of various bacteria, and the inhibition was readily reversed by arginine. l-Arginine hydroxamate (10−3m) completely inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis. This inhibitory effect was prevented by 2.5 × 10−4ml-arginine, which was the most effective of all the natural amino acids in reversing the inhibition. l-Arginine hydroxamate-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated and found to excrete l-arginine in relatively high yields. One of the mutants, strain AHr-5, produced 4.5 mg of l-arginine per ml in shaken culture in 3 days. PMID:5002904

  14. Metabolic changes in rat serum after administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and discriminated by SVM.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wu, H; Lin, Z; Su, K; Zhang, J; Sun, F; Wang, X; Wen, C; Cao, H; Hu, L

    2017-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) exerts marked anticancer effects via promotion of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and prevention of oncogene expression. In this study, serum metabolomics and artificial intelligence recognition were used to investigate SAHA toxicity. Forty rats (220 ± 20 g) were randomly divided into control and three SAHA groups (low, medium, and high); the experimental groups were treated with 12.3, 24.5, or 49.0 mg kg(-1) SAHA once a day via intragastric administration. After 7 days, blood samples from the four groups were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and pathological changes in the liver were examined using microscopy. The results showed that increased levels of urea, oleic acid, and glutaconic acid were the most significant indicators of toxicity. Octadecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, glycerol, propanoic acid, and uric acid levels were lower in the high SAHA group. Microscopic observation revealed no obvious damage to the liver. Based on these data, a support vector machine (SVM) discrimination model was established that recognized the metabolic changes in the three SAHA groups and the control group with 100% accuracy. In conclusion, the main toxicity caused by SAHA was due to excessive metabolism of saturated fatty acids, which could be recognized by an SVM model.

  15. Copper (II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution onto fatty hydroxamic acid - Immobilized zeolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhsinun, Sugita, Purwantiningsih; Purwaningsih, Henny

    2017-01-01

    Separation of Cu (II) ion from a mixture containing Zn (II) ion was conducted by solid-liquid extraction method through column chromatography. The column was filled with FHA-ZEO resin. This resin is the result of immobilized fatty hydroxamic acid (FHA) into activated natural zeolite (ZEO) involving as solid phase. Parameters becoming variable were resin mass to concentration ratio and pH of Cu (II) ion solution. The research result shows that optimum condition of Cu (II) ion adsorption was 1 gram resin mass FHA-ZEO to ion Cu (II) solution concentration of 100 ppm with pH value of 5. This Cu (II) ion separation from its mixture containing Zn (II) ion gives Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity of 162.39 mg/g FHA-ZEO in that optimum condition, 4 times higher than Zn (II) ion adsorption with Cu (II) ion recovery of 93,88%.

  16. Sorption of Pb(ll) by poly(hydroxamic acid) grafted oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Haron, M J; Tiansin, M; Ibrahim, N A; Kassim, A; Wan Yunus, W M Z; Talebi, S M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the sorption of Pb(ll) from aqueous solution. Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber was first grafted with poly(methylacrylate) and then treated with hydroxylammonium chloride in alkaline medium to produce hydroxamic acid (PHA) grafted OPEFB. Sorption of Pb(ll) by PHA-OPEFB was maximum at pH 5. The sorption followed the Langmuir model with maximum capacityof 125.0 mg g-1 at 25 degrees C. The sorption process was exothermic, as shown by the negative value of enthalpy change, Delta H0. The free energy change (DeltaG0) for the sorption was negative, showing that the sorption process was spontaneous. A kinetic study showed that the Pb(ll) sorption followed a second order kinetic model.

  17. Hydroxamic acid derivatives: a promising scaffold for rational compound optimization in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Dayanne da Rocha; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; Rodrigues, Giseli Capaci; de Souza Pereira, Mirian Claudia; Almeida, Igor Rodrigues; de Aguiar, Alcino Palermo; Supuran, Claudiu T; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the antitrypanocidal activity of two hydroxamic acid derivatives containing o-ethoxy (HAD1) and p-ethoxy (HAD2) as substituent in the aromatic ring linked to the isoxazoline ring. HAD1 and HAD2 induced a significant reduction in the number of intracellular parasites and consequently showed activity on the multiplication of the parasite. Treatment of cardiomyocytes and macrophages with the compounds revealed no significant loss in cell viability. Ultrastructural alterations after treatment of cardiomyocytes or macrophages infected by Trypanosoma cruzi with the IC50 value of HAD1 revealed alterations to amastigotes, showing initial damage seen as swelling of the kinetoplast. This gave a good indication of the ability of the drug to permeate through the host cell membrane as well as its selectivity to the parasite target. Both compounds HAD1 and 2 were able to reduce the cysteine peptidases and decrease the activity of metallopeptidases.

  18. Clinical experience with the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in patients with relapsed lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, O A

    2006-01-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or SAHA) inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, increases acetylated histones H2a, H2b, H3, and H4, and thereby induces differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of tumour cell lines, including murine erythroleukaemia, human bladder transitional cell carcinoma, and human breast adenocarcinoma. On the basis of these favourable preclinical findings, vorinostat has been selected as a candidate for clinical development with the potential to treat patients with selected malignances, including Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Phase I clinical trials in patients with haematological malignances and solid tumours showed that both intravenous (i.v.) and oral formulations of vorinostat are well tolerated, can inhibit HDAC activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumour tissue biopsies, and produce objective tumour regression and symptomatic improvement with little clinical toxicity. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of i.v. vorinostat were primarily haematologic and were rapidly reversible within 4–5 days of therapy cessation. In contrast, the DLT for oral vorinostat were primarily non-haematologic (including dehydration, anorexia, diarrhoea, fatigue) and were also rapidly reversible, usually within 3 days. Further research is warranted to optimise the dosing schedule for vorinostat, particularly with respect to dose, timing of administration, and duration of therapy, and to fully delineate the mechanism(s) of antitumour effect of vorinostat in various types of malignances. Several phase II studies are currently ongoing in patients with haematological malignances and solid tumours.

  19. A Hydroxamic Acid Anchoring Group for Durable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Incorporating a Cobalt Redox Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Kurumisawa, Yuma; Cai, Ning; Fujimori, Yamato; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Nimura, Shimpei; Packwood, Daniel M; Park, Jaehong; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2017-09-11

    A hydroxamic acid group has been employed for the first time as an anchoring group for cobalt-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The porphyrin dye YD2-o-C8HA including a hydroxamic acid anchoring group exhibited a power conversion efficiency (η) of 6.4 %, which is close to that of YD2-o-C8, a representative porphyrin dye incorporating a conventional carboxylic acid. More importantly, YD2-o-C8HA was found to be superior to YD2-o-C8 in terms of both binding ability to TiO2 and durability of cobalt-based DSSCs. Notably, YD2-o-C8HA photocells revealed a higher η-value (4.1 %) than YD2-o-C8 (2.8 %) after 500 h illumination. These results suggest that the hydroxamic acid can be used for DSSCs with other transition-metal-based redox shuttle to ensure high cell durability as well as excellent photovoltaic performance. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structure of 'linkerless' hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket.

    PubMed

    Tabackman, Alexa A; Frankson, Rochelle; Marsan, Eric S; Perry, Kay; Cole, Kathryn E

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylated lysine side chains in histone and non-histone proteins, and play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. Aberrant HDAC activity is associated with cancer, making these enzymes important targets for drug design. In general, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis, and comprise some of the leading therapies in cancer treatments. To date, four HDACi have been FDA approved for the treatment of cancers: suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, Vorinostat, Zolinza®), romidepsin (FK228, Istodax®), belinostat (Beleodaq®), and panobinostat (Farydak®). Most current inhibitors are pan-HDACi, and non-selectively target a number of HDAC isoforms. Six previously reported HDACi were rationally designed, however, to target a unique sub-pocket found only in HDAC8. While these inhibitors were indeed potent against HDAC8, and even demonstrated specificity for HDAC8 over HDACs 1 and 6, there were no structural data to confirm the mode of binding. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Compound 6 complexed with HDAC8 to 1.98Å resolution. We also describe the use of molecular docking studies to explore the binding interactions of the other 5 related HDACi. Our studies confirm that the HDACi induce the formation of and bind in the HDAC8-specific subpocket, offering insights into isoform-specific inhibition.

  1. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of thienopyrimidine hydroxamic acid based derivatives as structurally novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Su, Mingbo; Li, Tingting; Gao, Anhui; Yang, Wei; Sheng, Li; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-10

    New thienopyrimidine hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACs inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated. All compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit recombinant human HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC6 isoforms and in vitro anti-proliferative activity on tumor cell lines RMPI 8226 and HCT 116. Most of these compounds displayed good to excellent inhibitory activities against HDACs. The IC50 values of compound 9m against HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC6 was 29.81 ± 0.52 nM, 24.71 ± 1.16 nM, and 21.29 ± 0.32 nM. Most of these compounds showed strong anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines including RMPI 8226 and HCT 116. The IC50 values of compound 9m against RPMI 8226 and HCT 116 proliferation were 0.97 ± 0.072 μM and 1.01 ± 0.033 μM, respectively. In addition, compound 9m noticeably up-regulated the level of histone H3 acetylation at the low concentration of 0.3 μM.

  2. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  3. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA)-Induced Dynamics of a Human Histone Deacetylase Protein Interaction Network*

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Smith, Karen T.; Groppe, Brad D.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Saraf, Anita; Egidy, Rhonda; Peak, Allison; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L.; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are targets for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an HDAC inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the Sin3/HDAC complex in cancer, we extended its protein–protein interaction network and identified a mutually exclusive pair within the complex. We then assessed the effects of SAHA on the disruption of the complex network through six homologous baits. SAHA perturbs multiple protein interactions and therefore compromises the composition of large parts of the Sin3/HDAC network. A comparison of the effect of SAHA treatment on gene expression in breast cancer cells to a knockdown of the ING2 subunit indicated that a portion of the anticancer effects of SAHA may be attributed to the disruption of ING2's association with the complex. Our dynamic protein interaction network resource provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of SAHA action and demonstrates the potential for drugs to rewire networks. PMID:25073741

  4. Olaparib hydroxamic acid derivatives as dual PARP and HDAC inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zigao; Chen, Shaopeng; Sun, Qinsheng; Wang, Ning; Li, Dan; Miao, Shuangshuang; Gao, Chunmei; Chen, Yuzong; Tan, Chunyan; Jiang, Yuyang

    2017-08-01

    Olaparib was the first PARP inhibitor approved by the FDA for patients with BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated enhanced anticancer effects of combination therapy consisting of olaparib and HDAC inhibitors. Herein, based on rational drug design strategy, hydroxamic acid derivatives of olaparib were constructed as dual PARP and HDAC inhibitors. These hybrid compounds showed potent inhibitory activities against PARP1/2 and HDAC1/6 with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, compound P1 exhibited broad-spectrum antiproliferative activities in selected human cancer cell lines. Specially, P1 showed more potent activity than olaparib and SAHA in cancer cells MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and Raji, and 4.1-fold less cytotoxicity compared with SAHA to normal cells MCF-10A. Further mechanism study indicated that P1 could induce the cleavage of PARP and the hyperacetylation of histones, increase the expression of DNA damage biomarker γ-H2AX, decrease the level of BRCA1 and RAD51, and regulate tumor cell growth and apoptosis through modulating both mitochondrial- and death receptor-mediated pathways. Therefore, our study suggested that compounds targeting PARP and HDAC concurrently might be a practical approach for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Single Conformation Spectroscopy of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid: a Molecule Bites its Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Dean, Jacob; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-06-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (C_6H_5NHCO(CH_2)_6CONHOH, SAHA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved by the FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. With one hydrogen bonding group adjacent to ring and the other at the end of a long C_6 hydrocarbon tail, SAHA possesses an interesting potential energy landscape to be probed by single-conformation methods. A large number of extended structures favored by entropy are offset by a few structures in which head-to-tail or tail-to-head H-bonds close a large loop between the two groups separated by the C_6 chain. We use laser desorption to bring SAHA into the gas phase and cool it in a supersonic expansion before interrogation with resonant two-photon ionization. Single-conformation UV spectra in the S_0-S_1 region and infrared spectra in the hydride stretch region were recorded using IR-UV hole-burning and resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopies, respectively. Four different conformers were observed and spectroscopically characterized. Comparison of the experimental IR spectra with density functional theory (DFT) calculations leads to assignments for two of the major conformers, which adopt head-to-tail and tail-to-head binding patterns. The implication of the observed structures for the folding landscape and configuration preference of SAHA will be discussed.

  6. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  7. Synthesis of novel 3-amino and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanetty, Christian; Czollner, Laszlo; Koller, Iris; Shah, Priti; Gaware, Rawindra; Cunha, Thierry Da; Odermatt, Alex; Jordis, Ulrich; Kosma, Paul; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2010-11-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. So far, no selective 11β-HSD2 inhibitor has been developed and neither animal studies nor clinical trials have been reported based on 11β-HSD2 inhibition. Starting from the lead compound glycyrrhetinic acid, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Several hydroxamic acid derivatives showed high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1.

  8. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Alleviates Salinity Stress in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Patanun, Onsaya; Ueda, Minoru; Itouga, Misao; Kato, Yukari; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Utsumi, Chikako; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Minoru; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) demand has been rising because of its various applications. High salinity stress is a major environmental factor that interferes with normal plant growth and limits crop productivity. As well as genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance, the use of small molecules is considered as an alternative methodology to modify plants with desired traits. The effectiveness of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for increasing tolerance to salinity stress has recently been reported. Here we use the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to enhance tolerance to high salinity in cassava. Immunoblotting analysis reveals that SAHA treatment induces strong hyper-acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in roots, suggesting that SAHA functions as the HDAC inhibitor in cassava. Consistent with increased tolerance to salt stress under SAHA treatment, reduced Na+ content and increased K+/Na+ ratio were detected in SAHA-treated plants. Transcriptome analysis to discover mechanisms underlying salinity stress tolerance mediated through SAHA treatment reveals that SAHA enhances the expression of 421 genes in roots under normal condition, and 745 genes at 2 h and 268 genes at 24 h under both SAHA and NaCl treatment. The mRNA expression of genes, involved in phytohormone [abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and gibberellin] biosynthesis pathways, is up-regulated after high salinity treatment in SAHA-pretreated roots. Among them, an allene oxide cyclase (MeAOC4) involved in a crucial step of JA biosynthesis is strongly up-regulated by SAHA treatment under salinity stress conditions, implying that JA pathway might contribute to increasing salinity tolerance by SAHA treatment. Our results suggest that epigenetic manipulation might enhance tolerance to high salinity stress in cassava. PMID:28119717

  9. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Alleviates Salinity Stress in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Patanun, Onsaya; Ueda, Minoru; Itouga, Misao; Kato, Yukari; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Utsumi, Chikako; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Minoru; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) demand has been rising because of its various applications. High salinity stress is a major environmental factor that interferes with normal plant growth and limits crop productivity. As well as genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance, the use of small molecules is considered as an alternative methodology to modify plants with desired traits. The effectiveness of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for increasing tolerance to salinity stress has recently been reported. Here we use the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to enhance tolerance to high salinity in cassava. Immunoblotting analysis reveals that SAHA treatment induces strong hyper-acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in roots, suggesting that SAHA functions as the HDAC inhibitor in cassava. Consistent with increased tolerance to salt stress under SAHA treatment, reduced Na(+) content and increased K(+)/Na(+) ratio were detected in SAHA-treated plants. Transcriptome analysis to discover mechanisms underlying salinity stress tolerance mediated through SAHA treatment reveals that SAHA enhances the expression of 421 genes in roots under normal condition, and 745 genes at 2 h and 268 genes at 24 h under both SAHA and NaCl treatment. The mRNA expression of genes, involved in phytohormone [abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and gibberellin] biosynthesis pathways, is up-regulated after high salinity treatment in SAHA-pretreated roots. Among them, an allene oxide cyclase (MeAOC4) involved in a crucial step of JA biosynthesis is strongly up-regulated by SAHA treatment under salinity stress conditions, implying that JA pathway might contribute to increasing salinity tolerance by SAHA treatment. Our results suggest that epigenetic manipulation might enhance tolerance to high salinity stress in cassava.

  10. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-induced HeLa cell death is closely correlated with oxidative stress and thioredoxin 1 levels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which has anticancer effects. We evaluated the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA on HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC(50) of approximately 10 µM at 24 h, and induced apoptosis which was accompanied by the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 activation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψ(m)). All the tested caspase inhibitors prevented HeLa cell death induced by SAHA whereas TNF-α intensified apoptotic cell death in SAHA-treated HeLa cells. With respect to ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels, SAHA increased ROS levels, especially mitochondrial O(2)•- in HeLa cells and also induced GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors reduced the levels of ROS and GSH depletion in SAHA-treated HeLa cells whereas TNF-α enhanced the levels in these cells. The well-known antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) attenuated cell death and an increase in ROS levels was caused by SAHA. Moreover, SAHA decreased the levels of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) in HeLa cells. While the downregulation of Trx1 enhanced cell death and ROS levels in SAHA-treated HeLa cells, the overexpression of Trx1 attenuated the levels in these cells. In conclusion, SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cell via caspase-dependent apoptosis, which was influenced by the mitochondrial O(2)•- and Trx1 levels.

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) enhances olaparib activity by targeting homologous recombination DNA repair in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Wilson, Andrew J; Saskowski, Jeanette; Wass, Erica; Khabele, Dineo

    2014-06-01

    Approximately 50% of serous epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) contain molecular defects in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) have efficacy in HR-deficient, but not in HR-proficient, EOC tumors as a single agent. Our goal was to determine whether the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), can sensitize HR-proficient ovarian cancer cells to the PARPi AZD-2281 (olaparib). Ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3, OVCAR-8, NCI/ADR-Res, UWB1.289 BRCA1null and UWB1.289+BRCA1 wild-type) were treated with saline vehicle, olaparib, SAHA or olaparib/SAHA. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assessed cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence and Western blot assays assessed markers of apoptosis (cleaved PARP) and DNA damage (pH2AX and RAD51). Drug effects were also tested in SKOV-3 xenografts in Nude mice. Affymetrix microarray experiments were performed in vehicle and SAHA-treated SKOV-3 cells. In a microarray analysis, SAHA induced coordinated down-regulation of HR pathway genes, including RAD51 and BRCA1. Nuclear co-expression of RAD51 and pH2AX, a marker of efficient HR repair, was reduced approximately 40% by SAHA treatment alone and combined with olaparib. SAHA combined with olaparib induced apoptosis and pH2AX expression to a greater extent than either drug alone. Olaparib reduced cell viability at increasing concentrations and SAHA enhanced these effects in 4 of 5 cell lines, including BRCA1 null and wild-type cells, in vitro and in SKOV-3 xenografts in vivo. These results provide preclinical rationale for targeting DNA damage response pathways by combining small molecule PARPi with HDACi as a mechanism for reducing HR efficiency in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) enhances olaparib activity by targeting homologous recombination DNA repair in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Wilson, Andrew J.; Saskowski, Jeanette; Wass, Erica; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Approximately 50% of serous epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) contain molecular defects in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) have efficacy in HR-deficient, but not HR-proficient, EOC tumors as a single agent. Our goal was to determine whether the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), can sensitize HR-proficient ovarian cancer cells to the PARPi AZD-2281 (olaparib). Methods Ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3, OVCAR-8, NCI/ADR-Res, UWB1.289 BRCA1null and UWB1.289 + BRCA1 wild-type) were treated with saline vehicle, olaparib, SAHA or olaparib/SAHA. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assessed cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence and Western blot assays assessed markers of apoptosis (cleaved PARP) and DNA damage (pH2AX and RAD51). Drug effects were also tested in SKOV-3 xenografts in Nude mice. Affymetrix microarray experiments were performed in vehicle and SAHA-treated SKOV-3 cells. Results In a microarray analysis, SAHA induced coordinated down-regulation of HR pathway genes, including RAD51 and BRCA1. Nuclear co-expression of RAD51 and pH2AX, a marker of efficient HR repair, was reduced approximately 40% by SAHA treatment alone and combined with olaparib. SAHA combined with olaparib induced apoptosis and pH2AX expression to a greater extent than either drug alone. Olaparib reduced cell viability at increasing concentrations and SAHA enhanced these effects in 4 of 5 cell lines, including BRCA1 null and wild-type cells, in vitro and in SKOV-3 xenografts in vivo. Conclusions These results provide preclinical rationale for targeting DNA damage response pathways by combining small molecule PARPi with HDACi as a mechanism for reducing HR efficiency in ovarian cancer. PMID:24631446

  13. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  14. The Histone-Deacetylase-Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Promotes Dental Pulp Repair Mechanisms Through Modulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Activity.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Henry F; Smith, Anthony J; Fleming, Garry J P; Partridge, Nicola C; Shimizu, Emi; Moran, Gary P; Cooper, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Direct application of histone-deacetylase-inhibitors (HDACis) to dental pulp cells (DPCs) induces chromatin changes, promoting gene expression and cellular-reparative events. We have previously demonstrated that HDACis (valproic acid, trichostatin A) increase mineralization in dental papillae-derived cell-lines and primary DPCs by stimulation of dentinogenic gene expression. Here, we investigated novel genes regulated by the HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to identify new pathways contributing to DPC differentiation. SAHA significantly compromised DPC viability only at relatively high concentrations (5 μM); while low concentrations (1 μM) SAHA did not increase apoptosis. HDACi-exposure for 24 h induced mineralization-per-cell dose-dependently after 2 weeks; however, constant 14d SAHA-exposure inhibited mineralization. Microarray analysis (24 h and 14 days) of SAHA exposed cultures highlighted that 764 transcripts showed a significant >2.0-fold change at 24 h, which reduced to 36 genes at 14 days. 59% of genes were down-regulated at 24 h and 36% at 14 days, respectively. Pathway analysis indicated SAHA increased expression of members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Furthermore, SAHA-supplementation increased MMP-13 protein expression (7 d, 14 days) and enzyme activity (48 h, 14 days). Selective MMP-13-inhibition (MMP-13i) dose-dependently accelerated mineralization in both SAHA-treated and non-treated cultures. MMP-13i-supplementation promoted expression of several mineralization-associated markers, however, HDACi-induced cell migration and wound healing were impaired. Data demonstrate that short-term low-dose SAHA-exposure promotes mineralization in DPCs by modulating gene pathways and tissue proteases. MMP-13i further increased mineralization-associated events, but decreased HDACi cell migration indicating a specific role for MMP-13 in pulpal repair processes. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC and MMP may

  15. Protective effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid against LPS-induced septic shock in rodents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Zhao, Hang; Sailhamer, Elizabeth A; Fukudome, Eugene Y; Zhang, Xiaobo; Kheirbek, Tareq; Finkelstein, Robert A; Velmahos, George C; deMoya, Marc; Hales, Charles A; Alam, Hasan B

    2009-11-01

    We have recently found that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, improves survival in a lethal model of hemorrhagic shock in rats. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether SAHA treatment would prevent LPS-induced septic shock and improve the survival in a murine model. C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups. Experimental mice were given intraperitoneal SAHA (50 mg/kg) in vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide fluid (n = 10). The control mice (n = 10) received vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide only. They were injected with LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.) 2 h later, and the animals from the treatment group were given a second dose of SAHA. Survival was monitored during the next 7 days. In a parallel study, mice treated with or without SAHA were subjected to LPS insult while normal (sham) mice serviced as controls. 1) Lungs were harvested at 3 and 48 h for analysis of gene expression and pathologic changes, respectively; 2) spleens were isolated for analysis of neutrophilic cell population. In addition, RAW264.7 mouse macrophages were cultured to assess the effects of SAHA on LPS-induced inflammation in vitro. All mice in the control group that were subjected to LPS challenge died in less than 48 h. However, SAHA-treated animals displayed a significantly higher 1-week survival rate (87.5%) compared with the control group (0%). Moreover, LPS insult decreased the acetylation of histone proteins (H2A, H2B, and H3), elevated the levels of TNF-alpha in vivo (circulation) and in vitro (culture medium), increased the neutrophilic cell population in the spleen, enhanced the expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta genes in lung tissue, and augmented the pulmonary neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, SAHA treatment markedly attenuated all of these LPS-induced alterations. We report for the first time that administration of SAHA (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuates a variety of inflammatory markers and improves long-term survival after a lethal

  16. Cytotoxic effects of Jay Amin hydroxamic acid (JAHA), a ferrocene-based class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, on triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Librizzi, Mariangela; Longo, Alessandra; Chiarelli, Roberto; Amin, Jahanghir; Spencer, John; Luparello, Claudio

    2012-11-19

    The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a class of chemically heterogeneous anticancer agents of which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototypical member. SAHA derivatives may be obtained by three-dimensional manipulation of SAHA aryl cap, such as the incorporation of a ferrocene unit like that present in Jay Amin hydroxamic acid (JAHA) and homo-JAHA [ Spencer , et al. ( 2011 ) ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2 , 358 - 362 ]. These metal-based SAHA analogues have been tested for their cytotoxic activity toward triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. The results obtained indicate that of the two compounds tested, only JAHA was prominently active on breast cancer cells with an IC(50) of 8.45 μM at 72 h of treatment. Biological assays showed that exposure of MDA-MB231 cells to the HDACi resulted in cell cycle perturbation with an alteration of S phase entry and a delay at G(2)/M transition and in an early reactive oxygen species production followed by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation and autophagy inhibition. No annexin binding was observed after short- (5 h) and longer (24 and 48 h) term incubation with JAHA, thereby excluding the promotion of apoptosis by the HDACi. Although caution must be exercised in extrapolation of in vitro results to the in vivo situation for which research on animals and human trials are needed, nevertheless JAHA treatment possesses the potential for its development as an agent for prevention and/or therapy of "aggressive" breast carcinoma, thus prompting us to get more insight into the molecular basis of its antibreast cancer activity.

  17. Ultra-fast photo-patterning of hydroxamic acid layers adsorbed on TiAlN: The challenge of modeling thermally induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemgesberg, Maximilian; Schütz, Simon; Müller, Christine; Schlörholz, Matthias; Latzel, Harald; Sun, Yu; Ziegler, Christiane; Thiel, Werner R.

    2012-10-01

    Long-chain n-alkyl terminated hydroxamic acids (HA) are used for the modification of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) surfaces. HA coatings improve the hydrophobicity of this wear resistant and industrially relevant ceramic. Therefore, HAs with different structural properties are evaluated with respect to their wear resistance and their thermal desorption properties. In order to find new coatings for rewritable offset printing plates, the changes in the surface polarity, composition, and morphology are analyzed by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning force microscopy (SFM), respectively. The results are referenced to the strongly bonding molecule n-dodecyl phosphonate (PO11M), which has been used for surface hydrophobization before but proved difficult to remove due to the high laser outputs required for thermal desorption. It is found that for certain HAs, an equally good hydrophobization compared to PO11M can be achieved. Contact angles obtained for different hydroxamic acid coatings can be correlated to their modes of adsorption. Only for selected HA species, resistance to mechanical wear is sufficient for further investigations. Photo-patterning of these hydroxamic acid layers is achieved using a high energy IR laser beam at different energy inputs. Fitting of the obtained data and further evaluation using finite element analysis (FEM) calculations reveal significantly reduced energy consumption of about 20% for the removal of a specific hydroxamic acid coating from the ceramic surface compared to PO11M.

  18. Pretreatment with anti-oxidants sensitizes oxidatively stressed human cancer cells to growth inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)

    PubMed Central

    Mahlum, Amy; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J.; Guo, Song; Peters, Noel R.; Wilding, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Most prostate, colon and breast cancer cells are resistant to growth inhibitory effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We have examined whether the high oxidative stress in these cells causes a loss of SAHA activity and if so, whether pretreatment with an anti-oxidant can sensitize these cells to SAHA. Methods A DNA-Hoechst dye fluorescence measured cell growth and dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCF-DA) dye fluorescence measured reactive oxygen species (ROS). Growth inhibitory and ROS-generating activities of SAHA in androgen-treated or untreated LNCaP cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, HT-29 and HCT-115 colon cancer cells, MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells with or without pretreatment with an anti-oxidant Vitamin E was determined. SAHA activity against LNCaP cells treated with another anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was also determined. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to determine intracellular SAHA level. Results SAHA treatment markedly inhibits LNCaP cell growth, when the cells are at a low ROS level. SAHA is, however, inactive against the same cell line, when the cells are at a high ROS level. A significant decrease in SAHA level was observed in LNCaP cells with high ROS after 24-and 72-h treatment when compared to cells with low ROS. Vitamin E pretreatment that reduces cellular ROS, synergistically sensitizes oxidatively stressed LNCaP, PC-3, HT-29, HCT-115 and MDA-MB231 cells, but not the A-549 and NCI-H460 cells with low ROS to SAHA. NAC treatment also sensitized androgen-treated LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA. Conclusion Response to SAHA could be improved by combining anti-oxidants such as Vitamin E with SAHA for the treatment of oxidatively stressed human malignancies that are otherwise resistant to SAHA. PMID:20512578

  19. Benzyl and Methyl Fatty Hydroxamic Acids Based on Palm Kernel Oil as Chelating Agent for Liquid-Liquid Iron(III) Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Haron, Md Jelas; Jahangirian, Hossein; Silong, Sidik; Yusof, Nor Azah; Kassim, Anuar; Rafiee-Moghaddam, Roshanak; Mahdavi, Behnam; Peyda, Mazyar; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Amin, Jamileh

    2012-01-01

    Liquid-liquid iron(III) extraction was investigated using benzyl fatty hydroxamic acids (BFHAs) and methyl fatty hydroxamic acids (MFHAs) as chelating agents through the formation of iron(III) methyl fatty hydroxamate (Fe-MFHs) or iron(III) benzyl fatty hydroxamate (Fe-BFHs) in the organic phase. The results obtained under optimized conditions, showed that the chelating agents in hexane extract iron(III) at pH 1.9 were realized effectively with a high percentage of extraction (97.2% and 98.1% for MFHAs and BFHAs, respectively). The presence of a large amount of Mg(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Mn(II) and Co(II) ions did affect the iron(III) extraction. Finally stripping studies for recovering iron(III) from organic phase (Fe-MFHs or Fe-BFHs dissolved in hexane) were carried out at various concentrations of HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4. The results showed that the desired acid for recovery of iron(III) was 5 M HCl and quantitative recovery of iron(III) was achieved from Fe(III)-MFHs and Fe(III)-BFHs solutions in hexane containing 5 mg/L of Fe(III). PMID:22408444

  20. Utilization of Boron Compounds for the Modification of Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid as Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase Class II Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Ridla; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Satriyanto, Cipta Prio; Kerami, Djati; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a critical function in regulating gene expression. The inhibition of HDAC has developed as an interesting anticancer research area that targets biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. In this study, an HDAC inhibitor that is available commercially, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has been modified to improve its efficacy and reduce the side effects of the compound. Hydrophobic cap and zinc-binding group of these compounds were substituted with boron-based compounds, whereas the linker region was substituted with p-aminobenzoic acid. The molecular docking analysis resulted in 8 ligands with ΔGbinding value more negative than the standards, SAHA and trichostatin A (TSA). That ligands were analyzed based on the nature of QSAR, pharmacological properties, and ADME-Tox. It is conducted to obtain a potent inhibitor of HDAC class II Homo sapiens. The screening process result gave one best ligand, Nova2 (513246-99-6), which was then further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25214833

  1. Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket

    SciTech Connect

    Tabackman, Alexa A.; Frankson, Rochelle; Marsan, Eric S.; Perry, Kay; Cole, Kathryn E.

    2016-11-04

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylated lysine side chains in histone and non-histone proteins, and play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. Aberrant HDAC activity is associated with cancer, making these enzymes important targets for drug design. In general, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis, and comprise some of the leading therapies in cancer treatments. To date, four HDACi have been FDA approved for the treatment of cancers: suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, Vorinostat, Zolinza®), romidepsin (FK228, Istodax®), belinostat (Beleodaq®), and panobinostat (Farydak®). Most current inhibitors are pan-HDACi, and non-selectively target a number of HDAC isoforms. Six previously reported HDACi were rationally designed, however, to target a unique sub-pocket found only in HDAC8. While these inhibitors were indeed potent against HDAC8, and even demonstrated specificity for HDAC8 over HDACs 1 and 6, there were no structural data to confirm the mode of binding. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Compound 6 complexed with HDAC8 to 1.98 Å resolution. We also describe the use of molecular docking studies to explore the binding interactions of the other 5 related HDACi. Our studies confirm that the HDACi induce the formation of and bind in the HDAC8-specific subpocket, offering insights into isoform-specific inhibition.

  2. Hydroxamic acid interactions with solvated cerium hydroxides in the flotation of monazite and bastnäsite-Experiments and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, A.; Azizi, D.; Larachi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments were performed to clarify the interaction mechanisms between hydroxamic acid collectors and cerium hydroxides during the flotation of bastnäsite and monazite minerals. These minerals showed considerable floatability at moderately alkaline pH which was related to the adsorption of hydroxamic acids on their surfaces as confirmed by vibrational spectroscopic and zeta potential measurements. DFT simulations showed that at moderately alkaline pH, the interactions between solvated Ce(OH)2+ and Ce(OH)2+ and heptyl-hydroxamic acid (HHA) anions resulted in the formation of, respectively, [Ce(OH)(HHA)x(H2O)y]2-x (x[y = ] = 1[6],2[3],3[1]) and [Ce(OH)2(HHA)x(H2O)y]1-x (x[y = ] = 1[5],2[1],3[0]) complexes. The collector anions were found to interact directly through formation of two covalent bonds between their two polar-head oxygen atoms and cerium in the hydroxide complexes. However, formation of such new bonds resulted in breakage of a few covalent/electrostatic bonds between cerium and water molecules initially present in the first hydration shell of the rare-earth metal cation. Building up in the electric double layer of the semi-soluble minerals, these complexes, and by extension, those from other rare-earth elements belonging to monazite and bastnäsite, are speculated to play a role in the interactions between rare-earth minerals and hydroxamic acid collectors.

  3. Exploration of the labeling of [11C]Tubastatin A at the hydroxamic acid site with [11C]carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuiyu; Zhang, Yi; Kalin, Jay; Cai, Lisheng; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pike, Victor W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to label tubastatin A (1) with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) in the hydroxamic acid site to provide a potential radiotracer for imaging histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Initial attempts at a one-pot Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and hydroxylamine gave low radiochemical yields (< 5%) of [11C]1. Labeling was achieved in useful radiochemical yields (16.1 ± 5.6%, n = 4) through a two-step process based on Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and p-nitrophenol to give the [11C]p-nitrophenyl ester ([11C]5), followed by ultrasound-assisted hydroxyaminolysis of the activated ester with excess hydroxylamine in DMSO/THF mixture in the presence of a strong phosphazene base P1-t-Bu. However, the success in labeling the hydroxamic acid group of [11C]tubastatin A was not transferable to the labeling of three other model hydroxamic acids. PMID:26647018

  4. Synthesis and Anti-tumor Activities of Novel Phenyl Substituted Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Derivatives Against Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Shi, Jinghua; Qu, Yue; Tang, Pingwah; Wu, Xinying; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    A facile and atom-economical boric acid catalyzed direct amidation without any coupling agents for the preparation of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) and SAHA-based inhibitors targeting anti-proliferation of cancer cells is described. It is applicable to the preparation of SAHA-based inhibitors having an unprotected hydroxyl group in the phenyl ring without the need of the protection. The in-vitro assays data indicate that the nature and the position of the substituents (activating and/or deactivating) in the capping group (phenyl ring) of SAHA-based inhibitors synthesized in this study have a vital impact on the potency of anti-proliferative activity against cancer cells. With low toxicity toward the normal cells, a number of synthesized SAHA-based inhibitors with two substituents in the phenyl ring possess higher antiproliferative activity than SAHA and Cisplatin toward six studied cancer cell lines: A375 human skin cancer cells, A549 human lung cancer cells, MGC80-3 human gastric cancer cells, H460 human lung cancer cells, H1299 human lung cancer cells, and HepG2 human liver cancer cells. Cisplatin is a common chemotherapeutic drug with high cytotoxicity for a variety of cancer treatments. The inhibitors provided in this study might signify future therapeutic drugs for cancer treatment.

  5. LBH589, A Hydroxamic Acid-Derived HDAC Inhibitor, is Neuroprotective in Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Khanna, Prarthana; Paganetti, Paolo; Kuhn, Rainer; Young, Anne B; Kazantsev, Aleksey G; Hersch, Steven

    2016-12-15

    Modulation of gene transcription by HDAC inhibitors has been shown repeatedly to be neuroprotective in cellular, invertebrate, and rodent models of Huntington's disease (HD). It has been difficult to translate these treatments to the clinic, however, because existing compounds have limited potency or brain bioavailability. In the present study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of LBH589, an orally bioavailable hydroxamic acid-derived nonselective HDAC inhibitor in mouse models of HD. The efficacy of LBH589 is tested in two HD mouse models using various biochemical, behavioral and neuropathological outcome measures. We show that LBH589 crosses the blood brain barrier; induces histone hyperacetylation and prevents striatal neuronal shrinkage in R6/2 HD mice. In full-length knock-in HD mice LBH589-treatment improves motor performance and reduces neuronal atrophy. Our efficacious results of LBH589 in fragment and full-length mouse models of HD suggest that LBH589 is a promising candidate for clinical assessment in HD patients and provides confirmation that non-selective HDAC inhibitors can be viable clinical candidates.

  6. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid suppresses hepatic stellate cells activation by HMGB1 dependent reduction of NF-κB1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Yan, Min; Ji, Qiuhong; Lu, Jinbiao; Ji, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation is essential to the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Exploring drugs targeting HSC activation is a promising anti-fibrotic strategy. In the present study, we found suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, prominently suppressed the activation phenotype of a human hepatic stellate cell line—LX2. The production of collagen type I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) as well as the proliferation and migration of LX2 cells were significantly reduced by SAHA treatment. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this suppression, genome wild gene regulation by SAHA was determined by Affymetrix 1.0 human cDNA array. Upon SAHA treatment, the abundance of 331 genes was up-regulated and 173 genes was down-regulated in LX2 cells. Bioinformatic analyses of these altered genes highlighted the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) pathway was one of the most relevant pathways that contributed to SAHA induced suppression of HSCs activation. Further studies demonstrated the increased acetylation of intracellular HMGB1 in SAHA treated HSCs, and this increasing is most likely to be responsible for SAHA induced down-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B1 (NF-κB1) and is one of the main underlying mechanisms for the therapeutic effect of SAHA for liver fibrosis. PMID:26557438

  7. LBH589, A Hydroxamic Acid-Derived HDAC Inhibitor, is Neuroprotective in Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Khanna, Prarthana; Paganetti, Paolo; Kuhn, Rainer; Young, Anne B.; Kazantsev, Aleksey G.; Hersch, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modulation of gene transcription by HDAC inhibitors has been shown repeatedly to be neuroprotective in cellular, invertebrate, and rodent models of Huntington’s disease (HD). It has been difficult to translate these treatments to the clinic, however, because existing compounds have limited potency or brain bioavailability. Objective: In the present study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of LBH589, an orally bioavailable hydroxamic acid-derived nonselective HDAC inhibitor in mouse models of HD. Method: The efficacy of LBH589 is tested in two HD mouse models using various biochemical, behavioral and neuropathological outcome measures. Results: We show that LBH589 crosses the blood brain barrier; induces histone hyperacetylation and prevents striatal neuronal shrinkage in R6/2 HD mice. In full-length knock-in HD mice LBH589-treatment improves motor performance and reduces neuronal atrophy. Conclusions: Our efficacious results of LBH589 in fragment and full-length mouse models of HD suggest that LBH589 is a promising candidate for clinical assessment in HD patients and provides confirmation that non-selective HDAC inhibitors can be viable clinical candidates. PMID:27983565

  8. Simultaneous determination of decitabine and vorinostat (Suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katan; Guichard, Sylvie M; Jodrell, Duncan I

    2008-02-15

    A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method with electrospray ionization and detection by tandem mass spectrometry is described for the simultaneous quantitative determination of decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and vorinostat (Suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) in human plasma. The method involves a simple acetonitrile precipitation step and centrifugation followed by injection of the supernatant onto a C18 150mmx2.1mm I.D., 3microm HPLC column at 36 degrees C. Separation of decitabine, SAHA and their respective internal standards was achieved with a gradient elution and detection was via the mass spectrometer operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. The method was within the defined validation parameters for linearity, repeatability, reproducibility and stability. The limit of detection was determined as 1.0 and 0.125ngml(-1) and lower limits of quantitation were 10 and 1ngml(-1) for decitabine and SAHA, respectively. Effects of sample preparation on stability were also evaluated in human plasma. For clinical sample handling tetrahydrouridine, an inhibitor of cytidine deaminase was found to help prevent decitabine degradation. The method is currently being used in clinical pharmacokinetic studies for the evaluation of decitabine and SAHA combination therapies.

  9. Metal complexes of salicylhydroxamic acid (H2Sha), anthranilic hydroxamic acid and benzohydroxamic acid. Crystal and molecular structure of [Cu(phen)2(Cl)]Cl x H2Sha, a model for a peroxidase-inhibitor complex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, E C; Farkas, E; Gil, M J; Fitzgerald, D; Castineras, A; Nolan, K B

    2000-04-01

    Stability constants of iron(III), copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylhydroxamic acid (H2Sha), anthranilic hydroxamic acid (HAha) and benzohydroxamic acid (HBha) have been determined at 25.0 degrees C, I=0.2 mol dm(-3) KCl in aqueous solution. The complex stability order, iron(III) > copper(II) > nickel(II) approximately = zinc(II) was observed whilst complexes of H2Sha were found to be more stable than those of the other two ligands. In the preparation of ternary metal ion complexes of these ligands and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) the crystalline complex [Cu(phen)2(Cl)]Cl x H2Sha was obtained and its crystal structure determined. This complex is a model for hydroxamate-peroxidase inhibitor interactions.

  10. Unexpected formation of a copper(II) 12-metallacrown-4 with (S)-glutamic-gamma-hydroxamic acid: a thermodynamic and spectroscopic study in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tegoni, Matteo; Dallavalle, Francesco; Belosi, Barbara; Remelli, Maurizio

    2004-05-07

    The equilibria of copper(II) with (S)-glutamic-gamma-hydroxamic acid (H2L) were investigated in aqueous solution by different techniques: glass electrode potentiometry; calorimetry; VIS and CD spectrophotometry; and ES-MS. An unexpected pentacopper(II) 12-metallacrown-4 [Cu5L4H(-4)](2-) was detected, analogous to those well known formed by alpha- and beta-aminohydroxamic acids, but of lower stability. Another five species were found: [CuLH]+; [CuL2H2]; [Cu2L2]; [CuL2H]-; and [CuL2]2-. Their structures are proposed based on both spectroscopic and calorimetric data.

  11. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (5(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  13. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data analysis of copper (II) hydroxamic acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, N.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of copper mixed ligand complexes, having hydroxamic acid as one of the ligands, have been recorded at the K-edge of copper at BL-8 Dispersive EXAFS beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS-2 Synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. For the analysis of EXAFS data, crystallographic data of the complex or of its analog is required, which is not available. Hence, for the analysis of EXAFS data, theoretical EXAFS data of the studied complexes have been generated using the EXAFS equation employing computer software program Mathcad. Firstly, the experimental data has been processed using the computer program Athena to obtain the normalized absorption versus energy data. From the experimental EXAFS data, the phase shift parameter (an energy independent constant 5) has been computed using Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method. The backscattering amplitude has been taken from the available theoretical tabulations and other parameters have been taken from crystallographic data of the copper metal. Fourier transforms of both the experimental and theoretical data have been computed, and the two Fourier transforms are found to agree with each other for all the complexes. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of the first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length as a result of energy dependence of the phase factor (δ(k)) in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. Since, the Fourier transform method and LSS method both are uncorrected for phase and other parameters of the EXAFS equation, the present method gives phase uncorrected bond length of the first coordination shell.

  14. A novel suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid histone deacetylase inhibitor derivative, N25, exhibiting improved antitumor activity in both human U251 and H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Huang, Wei-Bin; Wu, Li; Wang, Lai-You; Ye, Lian-Bao; Feng, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    N1- (2, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (N25) is a novel SAHA cap derivative of HDACi, with a patent (No. CN 103159646). This invention is a hydroxamic acid compound with a structural formula of RNHCO(CH2)6CONHOH (wherein R=2, 5dimethoxyaniline), a pharmaceutically acceptable salt which is soluble. In the present study, we investigated the effects of N25 with regard to drug distribution and molecular docking, and anti-proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycling, and LD50. First, we designed a molecular approach for modeling selected SAHA derivatives based on available structural information regarding human HDAC8 in complex with SAHA (PDB code 1T69). N25 was found to be stabilized by direct interaction with the HDAC8. Anti-proliferative activity was observed in human glioma U251, U87, T98G cells and human lung cancer H460, A549, H1299 cells at moderate concentrations (0.5-30 μM). Compared with SAHA, N25 displayed an increased antitumor activity in U251 and H460 cells. We further analyzed cell death mechanisms activated by N25 in U251 and H460 cells. N25 significantly increased acetylation of Histone 3 and inhibited HDAC4. On RT-PCR analysis, N25 increased the mRNA levels of p21, however, decreased the levels of p53. These resulted in promotion of apoptosis, inducing G0/G1 arrest in U251 cells and G2/M arrest in H460 cells in a time-dependent and dose- dependent manner. In addition, N25 was able to distribute to brain tissue through the blood-brain barrier of mice (LD50: 240.840 mg/kg). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that N25 will provide an invaluable tool to investigate the molecular mechanism with potential chemotherapeutic value in several malignancies, especially human glioma.

  15. Synergistic antineoplastic effect of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), on prostate and liver cancer cells: perspectives for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Yang, Xu-Yu; Popescu, Nicholas C

    2010-04-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes is a major contributing alteration in the initiation or progression of cancer. The human tumor suppressor gene DLC1 (deleted in liver cancer 1) is frequently downregulated or silenced in multiple cancers, predominantly by epigenetic mechanisms. With the current considerable interest and progress in epigenetic therapy, a number of promising antineoplastic agents, particularly histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have been developed and used successfully in clinical trials. Both DLC1 and HDAC inhibitors exert antineoplastic functions, and their combined action could be exploited for a more effective cancer therapy. To evaluate the potential benefits of this approach, we examined the antineoplastic effects of adenoviral (Ad)-DLC1-mediated transduction and exposure to suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a powerful HDAC inhibitor, in two human cancer cell lines that lack intrinsic DLC1 expression, 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells and 7703K human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Consistent with the oncosuppressive function of DLC1 in several cancers, including prostate and liver cancer, transduction of 22Rv1 and 7703K cells with an Ad-DLC1 expression vector resulted in alterations of cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. A low concentration of SAHA (5 microM) efficiently restored the expression of DLC1 in 22Rv1 cells that lack DLC1 expression due to histone deacetylation but had a minimal effect in 7703K cells in which silencing of the DLC1 gene is due mainly to promoter hypermethylation. Regardless of the epigenetic mechanism of DLC1 inactivation, SAHA treatment of DLC1-transduced cells had a synergistic inhibitory effect on tumor cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in both cell lines. In 22Rv1 cells, this combination regimen nearly abolished the formation of colonies in semisolid media as a measure of tumorigenicity in vitro. Current in vitro

  16. Wortmannilactones I-L, new NADH-fumarate reductase inhibitors, induced by adding suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid to the culture medium of Talaromyces wortmannii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Yi-Yu; Liu, Jun-Hui; Ke, Ai-Bing; Zheng, Zhi-Hui; Lu, Xin-Hua; Luan, Yu-Shi; Xiu, Zhi-Long; Dong, Yue-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of finding more potential inhibitors against NADH-fumarate reductase (specific target for treating helminthiasis and cancer) from natural resources, Talaromyces wortmannii was treated with the epigenome regulatory agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which resulted in the isolation of four new wortmannilactones derivatives (wortmannilactones I-L, 1-4). The structures of these new compounds were elucidated based on IR, HRESIMS and NMR spectroscopic data analyses. These four new compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against NADH-fumarate reductase with the IC50 values ranging from 0.84 to 1.35μM.

  17. Tetrahydrofuranyl and Tetrahydropyranyl Protection of Amino Acid Side-Chains Enables Synthesis of a Hydroxamate-Containing Aminoacylated tRNA†

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Lester J.; Miller, Marvin J.; Huber, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to specifically engineer metal binding sites into target proteins has far-reaching consequences ranging from the development of new biocatalysts and imaging reagents to the production of proteins with increased stability. We report the efficient tRNA-mediated incorporation of the hydroxamate containing amino acid, Nε-acetyl-Nε-hydroxy-l-lysine, into a transcription factor (TFIIIA). Because this amino acid is compact, hydrophilic, and uncharged at physiological pH, it should have little or no effect on protein folding or solubility. The Nε-hydroxy group of the hydroxamate is refractory to photodeprotection and required the identification of reagents for O-protection that are compatible with the synthesis of acylated tRNA. Tetrahydrofuranyl and tetrahydropyranyl O-protecting groups can be removed using mild acid conditions and allowed for an orthogonal protection strategy in which deprotection of the amino acid side chain precedes ligation of an acylated dinucleotide to a truncated suppressor tRNA. These protecting groups will provide a valuable alternative for O-protection, especially in cases where photodeprotection cannot be used. PMID:25562392

  18. New benzothiazole/thiazole-containing hydroxamic acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Tung, Truong Thanh; Oanh, Dao Thi Kim; Dung, Phan Thi Phuong; Hue, Van Thi My; Park, Sang Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Nam, Nguyen-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Results from clinical studies have demonstrated that inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes possess promise for the treatment of several types of cancer. Zolinza(®) (widely known as SAHA) has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma. As a continuity of our ongoing research to find novel small molecules to target these important enzymes, we synthesized a series of benzothiazole-containing analogues of SAHA and found several compounds with very potent anticancer cytotoxicity. In this study, three more compounds of this type, including N(1)-(6-chlorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (3a), N(1)-[6-(trifluoromethyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl]-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (3b) and N(1)-(thiazol-2-yl)-N(8)-hydroxyoctanediamide (6) were synthesized and evaluated for HDAC inhibition and cytotoxic activities. All three compounds showed very potent HDAC inhibitory effects. Docking revealed that both two compounds 3a, 3b showed higher affinities towards HDAC(8) compared to SAHA. In vitro, compound 3a exhibited cytotoxicity equipotent to SAHA against five human cancer cell lines. In term of in vivo activity, compound 3a demonstrated equivalent efficacy to SAHA in mouse xenograft model.

  19. Determination of metal ions by high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of their hydroxamic acid chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, M.D.; Fritz, J.S.

    1987-09-15

    Metal ions are determined by adding N-methylfurohydroxamic acid to an aqueous sample and then separating the metal chelates by direct injection onto a liquid chromatographic column. Separations on a C/sub 8/ silica column and a polystyrene-divinylbenzene column are compared, with better separations seen on the polymeric column. The complexes formed at low pH values are cationic and are separated by an ion pairing mechanism. Retention times and selectivity of the metal complexes can be varied by changing the pH. Several metal ions can be separated and quantified; separation conditions, linear calibration curve ranges, and detection limits are presented for Zr(IV), Hf(IV), Fe(III), Nb(V), Al(III), and Sb(III). Interferences due to the presence of other ions in solution are investigated. Finally, an antiperspirant sample is analyzed for zirconium by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  20. Cardiomyogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Follicle-derived Stem Cells by Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid and Their In Vivo Homing Property

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Iel-Yong; Son, Han-Na; Ullah, Imran; Bharti, Dinesh; Park, Ju-Mi; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Byun, June-Ho; Kang, Young-Hoon; Sung, Su-Jin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of human dental follicle-derived stem cells (DFCs) under the influence of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor family, and analyze the in vivo homing capacity of induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs) when transplanted systemically. DFCs from extracted wisdom teeth showed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics such as plate adherent growing, expression of MSC markers (CD44, CD90, and CD105), and mesenchymal lineage-specific differentiation potential. Adding SAHA to the culture medium induced the successful in vitro differentiation of DFCs into cardiomyocytes. These iCMs expressed cardiomyogenic markers, including alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), cardiac muscle troponin T (TNNT2), Desmin, and cardiac muscle alpha actin (ACTC1), at both the mRNA and protein level. For the assessment of homing capacity, PKH26 labeled iCMs were intraperitoneally injected (1×106 cells in 100 µL of PBS) into the experimental mice, and the ratios of PKH26 positive cells to the total number of injected cells, in multiple organs were determined. The calculated homing ratios, 14 days after systemic cell transplantation, were 5.6 ± 1.0%, 3.6 ± 1.1%, and 11.6 ± 2.7% in heart, liver, and kidney respectively. There was no difference in the serum levels of interleukin-2 and interleukin-10 at 14 days after transplantation, between the experimental (iCM injected) and control (no injection or PBS injection) groups. These results demonstrate that DFCs can be an excellent source for cardiomyocyte differentiation and regeneration. Moreover, the iCMs can be delivered into heart muscle via systemic administration without eliciting inflammatory or immune response. This can serve as the pilot study for further investigations into the in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of DFCs under the influence of SAHA and the in vivo homing capacity

  1. Response of preclinical medulloblastoma models to combination therapy with 13-cis retinoic acid and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA).

    PubMed

    Spiller, Susan E; Ditzler, Sally H; Pullar, Barbara J; Olson, James M

    2008-04-01

    Current medulloblastoma therapy, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is unacceptably toxic. However, 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) and SAHA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, have each been shown to induce apoptosis in medulloblastoma cultures and mouse models. Both drugs cross the blood brain barrier, have been given safely to children, and achieve brain concentrations that are at or near therapeutic levels. Retinoic acid acts by transcriptionally activating bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and SAHA facilitates transcriptional activity through chromatin accessibility. We tested the hypothesis that these drugs additively induce BMP-2 transcription and apoptosis. RA + SAHA induction of BMP-2 transcription and apoptosis in medulloblastoma cultures was evaluated. Subsequently the response of mouse medulloblastomas to these two agents in the presence and absence of cisplatin was evaluated. BMP-2 transcription multiplied 3-fold with addition of RA to culture, and 7-fold with both agents. The IC50 of SAHA was reduced by 40% when low dose RA was added. Interestingly, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor that partially blocks RA-induced apoptosis did not inhibit the activity of RA + SAHA. Flank D283 tumors in athymic mice had slower growth in the RA + SAHA arm than single drug or control arms. Intracranial tumors in ND2:SmoA1 mice treated with RA + SAHA + cisplatin showed a 4-fold increase in apoptosis over controls, and a 2-fold increase over animals receiving only SAHA or RA + SAHA. RA + SAHA additively induce BMP-2 transcription and medulloblastoma apoptosis. The combination may act through a p38 MAPK independent mechanism. Efficacy increased with cisplatin, which has implications for clinical trial design.

  2. Hydroxamate-induced spectral perturbations of cobalt Aeromonas aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, S H; Prescott, J M

    1987-06-25

    The absorption spectrum of cobalt(II)-substituted Aeromonas aminopeptidase is markedly perturbed by the presence of equimolar concentrations of D-amino acid hydroxamates and acyl hydroxamates that have previously been shown to be powerful inhibitors of this enzyme (Wilkes, S. H., and Prescott, J. M. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 13517-13521). D-Valine hydroxamate produces the most distinctive perturbation, splitting the characteristic 527 nm absorption peak of the cobalt enzyme to form peaks at 564, 520, and 487 nm with molar extinction values of 126, 98, and 67 M-1 cm-1, respectively. A qualitatively similar perturbation, albeit with lower extinction values, results from the addition of D-leucine hydroxamate, whereas D-alanine hydroxamate perturbs the spectrum, but does not evoke the peak at 564 nm. In contrast, hydroxamates of L-valine and L-leucine in concentrations equi-molar to that of the enzyme produce only faint indications of change in the spectrum, but the hydroxamates of several other L-amino acids perturb the spectrum essentially independently of the identity of the side chain and in a qualitatively different manner from that of D-valine hydroxamate and D-leucine hydroxamate. At the high enzyme:substrate ratios used in the spectral experiments, L-leucine hydroxamate and L-valine hydroxamate proved to be rapidly hydrolyzed, hence their inability to perturb the spectrum of the cobalt-substituted enzyme during the time course of a spectral experiment. Values of kcat for L-amino acid hydroxamates, all of which are good reversible inhibitors of the hydrolysis of L-leucine-p-nitroanilide by Aeromonas aminopeptidase, were found to range from 0.01 min-1 to 5.6 min-1 for the native enzyme and from 0.27 min-1 to 108 min-1 for the cobalt-substituted enzyme; their km values toward the cobalt aminopeptidase range from 1.2 X 10(-7) M to 1.9 X 10(-5) M. The mutual exclusivity of binding for hydroxamate inhibitors and 1-butaneboronic acid, previously shown by kinetics

  3. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  4. Fate of labeled hydroxamates during iron transport from hydroxamate-ion chelates.

    PubMed

    Arceneaux, J E; Davis, W B; Downer, D N; Haydon, A H; Byers, B R

    1973-09-01

    The fate of the hydroxamic acid-iron transport cofactors during iron uptake from the (59)Fe(3+) chelates of the (3)H-labeled hydroxamates schizokinen and aerobactin was studied by assay of simultaneous incorporation of both (59)Fe(3+) and (3)H. In the schizokinen-producing organism Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213 transport of (59)Fe(3+) from the (3)H-schizokinen-(59)Fe(3+) chelate at 37 C was accompanied by rapid uptake and release (within 2 min) of (3)H-schizokinen, although (3)H-schizokinen discharge was temperature-dependent and did not occur at 0 C. In the schizokinen-requiring strain B. megaterium SK11 similar release of (3)H-schizokinen occurred only at elevated concentrations of the double-labeled chelate; at lower chelate concentrations, (3)H-schizokinen remained cell-associated. Temperature-dependent uptake of deferri (iron-free) (3)H-schizokinen to levels equivalent to those incorporated from the chelate form was noted in strain SK11, but strain ATCC 19213 showed only temperature-independent binding of low concentrations of deferri (3)H-schizokinen. These results indicate an initial temperature-independent binding of the ferric hydroxamate which is followed rapidly by temperature-dependent transport of the chelate into the cell and an enzyme catalyzed separation of iron from the chelate. The resulting deferri hydroxamate is discharged from the cell only when a characteristic intracellular concentration of the hydroxamate is exceeded, which happens in the schizokinen-requiring strain only at elevated concentrations of the chelate. This strain also appears to draw the deferri hydroxamate into the cell by a temperature-dependent mechanism. The aerobactin-producing organism Aerobacter aerogenes 62-1 also demonstrated rapid initial uptake and temperature-dependent discharge of (3)H-aerobactin during iron transport from (3)H-aerobactin-(59)Fe(3+), suggesting a similar ferric hydroxamate transport system in this organism.

  5. Γ-aminobutyric acid(C) (GABAC) selective antagonists derived from the bioisosteric modification of 4-aminocyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid: amides and hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Locock, Katherine E S; Yamamoto, Izumi; Tran, Priscilla; Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary; Johnston, Graham A R; Allan, Robin D

    2013-07-11

    Series of compounds were generated via the bioisosteric replacement of the carboxylate of 4-ACPCA (2) with hydroxamate or amide groups. All compounds from this study exhibited increased selectivity for GABAC, the most potent being 4-ACPHA (10a, IC50 = 13 μM) and 4-ACPAM (11a, IC50 = 10 μM). This provides evidence that a zwitterionic structure is not essential for GABAC antagonists, rather the emphasis lies in appropriate heteroatoms to participate in hydrogen bonding.

  6. Speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation, preconcentration, transport and ICP-AES determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI) with calix-crown hydroxamic acid in high purity grade materials and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y K; Sharma, K R

    2005-07-15

    A new functionalized calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid is reported for the speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation and trace determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI). Chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) are extracted at pH 4.5, 1.5M HCl and 6.0M HCl, respectively with calixcrown hydroxamic acid (37,38,39,40,41,42-hexahydroxy7,25,31-calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid) in chloroform in presence of large number of cations and anions. The extraction mechanism is investigated. The various extraction parameters, appropriate pH/M HCl, choice of solvent, effect of the reagent concentration, temperature and distribution constant have been studied. The speciation, preconcentration and kinetic of transport has been investigated. The maximum transport is observed 35, 45 and 30min for chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(IV), respectively. For trace determination the extracts were directly inserted into the plasma for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, ICP-AES, measurements of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten which increase the sensitivity by 30-fold, with detection limits of 3ngml(-1). The method is applied for the determination of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten in high purity grade ores, biological and environmental samples. The chromium was recovered from the effluent of electroplating industries.

  7. A quantum chemical study of molecular properties and QSPR modeling of oximes, amidoximes and hydroxamic acids with nucleophilic activity against toxic organophosphorus agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar Filho, Edilson B.; Santos, Aline A.; Oliveira, Boaz G.

    2017-04-01

    The proposal of this work includes the use of quantum chemical methods and cheminformatics strategies in order to understand the structural profile and reactivity of α-nucleophiles compounds such as oximes, amidoximes and hydroxamic acids, related to hydrolysis rate of organophosphates. Theoretical conformational study of 41 compounds were carried out through the PM3 semiempirical Hamiltonian, followed by the geometry optimization at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, complemented by Polarized Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate the aqueous environment. In line with the experimental hypothesis about hydrolytic power, the strength of the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds (IHBs) at light of the Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) is related to the preferential conformations of α-nucleophiles. A set of E-Dragon descriptors (1,666) were submitted to a variable selection through Ordered Predictor Selection (OPS) algorithm. Five descriptors, including atomic charges obtained from the Natural Bond Orbitals (NBO) protocol jointly with a fragment index associated to the presence/absence of IHBs, provided a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) model via Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). This model showed good validation parameters (R2 = 0.80, Qloo2 = 0.67 and Qext2 = 0.81) and allowed the identification of significant physicochemical features on the molecular scaffold in order to design compounds potentially more active against organophosphorus poisoning.

  8. Molecular octopus: octa functionalized calix[4]resorcinarene-hydroxamic acid [C4RAHA] for selective extraction, separation and preconcentration of U(VI).

    PubMed

    Jain, Vinod K; Pillai, Shibu G; Pandya, Rujul A; Agrawal, Yaduvendra K; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2005-01-30

    A solvent extraction separation of uranium, in the presence of thorium, cerium and lanthanides with a new calix[4]resorcinarene bearing eight hydroxamic acid groups (C4RAHA) is described. Quantitative extraction of uranium is possible in ethyl acetate solution of C4RAHA at pH 8.0. The lambda(max) and molar absorptivity (varepsilon) for uranium is 356nm and 8352Lmol(-1)cm(-1). The Binding ratio of uranium with C4RAHA as evaluated by Job's method is 4:1. The system obeys Beer's law over the range 0.075-6.0mugml(-1) of uranium with Sandell sensitivity 0.0284mugcm(-2). A preconcentration factor of 142 was achieved by directly aspirating the extract for GF-AAS measurements. The two-phase stability constant evaluated at 25 degrees C for uranium is 15.91. The complexation is characterized by favorable enthalpy and entropy changes. A liquid membrane transport study of uranium was carried out from source to the receiving phase under controlled conditions and a mechanism of transport is proposed. Uranium has been determined in standard and environmental samples.

  9. Wheat bulb fly (Delia coarctata, Fallén, Diptera: Anthomyiidae) larval response to hydroxamic acid constituents of host-plant root exudates.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C D; Evans, K A

    2013-06-01

    Wheat bulb fly (WBF, Delia coarctata, Fallén, Diptera: Anthomyiidae) is a pest of commercial importance in wheat, barley and rye, with attacked crops failing to produce full potential yields. Females do not oviposit in association with a host-plant; therefore, prompt location of a suitable host is critical to the survival of the newly hatched larvae. The objective of this study was to conduct choice test bioassays to assess the attraction of WBF larvae to specific chemical constituents of WBF host-plant root exudates, the hydroxamic acids DIMBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one) and MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2-one). The larval response to four concentrations of each test compound was assessed in arena bioassays. Analysis using a Rayleigh test of uniformity of the final resting positions of larvae in response to these chemicals indicated attraction. These results go some way to explaining the mechanisms by which WBF larvae locate host plants, giving the potential to develop semiochemical based control strategies.

  10. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Treatment Reveals Crosstalks among Proteome, Ubiquitylome and Acetylome in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level. PMID:25825284

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment reveals crosstalks among proteome, ubiquitylome and acetylome in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-03-31

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level.

  12. The histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induces a cell-death pathway characterized by cleavage of Bid and production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Astrid A.; Ausserlechner, Michael J.; Bernhard, David; Sutton, Vivien R.; Tainton, Kellie M.; Kofler, Reinhard; Smyth, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2001-01-01

    Many chemotherapeutic agents induce mitochondrial-membrane disruption to initiate apoptosis. However, the upstream events leading to drug-induced mitochondrial perturbation have remained poorly defined. We have used a variety of physiological and pharmacological inhibitors of distinct apoptotic pathways to analyze the manner by which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a chemotherapeutic agent and histone deacetylase inhibitor, induces cell death. We demonstrate that SAHA initiates cell death by inducing mitochondria-mediated death pathways characterized by cytochrome c release and the production of reactive oxygen species, and does not require the activation of key caspases such as caspase-8 or -3. We provide evidence that mitochondrial disruption is achieved by means of the cleavage of the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bid. SAHA-induced Bid cleavage was not blocked by caspase inhibitors or the overexpression of Bcl-2 but did require the transcriptional regulatory activity of SAHA. These data provide evidence of a mechanism of cell death mediated by transcriptional events that result in the cleavage of Bid, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane, and production of reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. PMID:11535817

  13. High turbulence liquid chromatography online extraction and tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and its two metabolites in human serum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihong; Musson, Donald G; Wang, Amy Qiu

    2005-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive method incorporating high turbulence liquid chromatography (HTLC) online extraction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), for simultaneous determination of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and its two metabolites, SAHA-glucuronide (M1) and 4-anilino-4-oxobutanoic acid (M2), in human serum, has been developed to support clinical studies. The HTLC technology significantly reduces the time required for sample clean-up since sample extraction and analysis are performed online. Clinical samples, internal standards (IS) and buffer are transferred into 96-well plates using a robotic liquid handling system. A 20 microL aliquot of prepared sample is directly injected into the HTLC/LC-MS/MS system where the matrix is rapidly washed away to waste and the analytes are retained on the narrow-bore extraction column (0.5 x 50 mm), using an aqueous mobile phase at 1.5 mL/min. Analytes are then eluted from the extraction column and transferred to the analytical column using a gradient mobile phase prior to detection by MS/MS. Interference with determination of SAHA from in-source dissociation of M1 is eliminated by the chromatographic separation. The resolution of SAHA and M1 did not change for more than 1500 serum sample injections by applying an acid wash (15% acetic acid) on the extraction column. The linear calibration ranges for SAHA, M1, and M2 are 2-500, 5-2000, and 10-2000 ng/mL, respectively. Assay intraday validation was conducted using five calibration curves prepared in five lots of human control serum. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) is less than 6.8% and accuracy is 94.6-102.9% of nominal values for all three analytes. Assay specificity, freeze/thaw stability, storage stability, and matrix effects were also assessed. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Effects of Molecular Hydrogen and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid on Paraquat-Induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and TNF-α in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaoyang; Wu, Xizi; Chen, Yao; Zeng, Renqing; Zhao, Yangzi; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Danna; Zhao, Qianwen; Deng, Yunlei; Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B; Chong, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on paraquat (PQ)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in macrophages. First, the PQ optimal concentration was determined in RAW264.7 macrophage by treating serum-starved cells with PQ at 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mM. We evaluated at 1, 2 and 8 h (1) cell viability (by means of trypan blue exclusion method), (2) intracellular ROS levels (with a fluorescent DCFH-DA probe), and (3) TNF-α level in the culture media (determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA). Subsequently, mouse RAW267.4 macrophages were treated with PQ in combination with SAHA and/or H2 for 8 h. PQ exerted a significant stimulatory but nontoxic effect on RAW267.4 macrophages at 0.1 mM. This PQ concentration was used in the subsequent experiments. H2 and H2 combined with SAHA evoked a greater reduction in PQ-induced ROS production than SAHA alone, especially at 2 and 8 h. At 1 and 2 h, treatments involving H2 caused a greater decrease in PQ-induced production of TNF-α than the corresponding treatments without H2. However, at 8 h, treatment with SAHA evoked more pronounced effects on TNF-α than treatment without SAHA. H2 decreases PQ-induced ROS production and attenuates early PQ-induced TNF-α production whereas SAHA reduces the late phase of the PQ-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. The effects are enhanced by the combination of H2 and SAHA.

  15. In vivo efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with radiotherapy in a malignant rhabdoid tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors are promising new substances in cancer therapy and have also been shown to sensitize different tumor cells to irradiation (XRT). We explored the effect as well as the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in vivo in a malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) mouse model. Methods and material Potential radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in MRT xenografts by analysis of tumor growth delay, necrosis (HE), apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (ki-67) and γH2AX expression as well as dynamic 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG -PET) after treatment with either SAHA alone, single-dose (10 Gy) or fractionated XRT (3 × 3Gy) solely as well as in combination with SAHA compared to controls. Results SAHA only had no significant effect on tumor growth. Combination of SAHA for 8 days with single-dose XRT resulted in a higher number of complete remissions, but failed to prove a significant growth delay compared to XRT only. In contrast fractionated XRT plus SAHA for 3 weeks did induce significant tumor growth delay in MRT-xenografts. The histological examination showed a significant effect of XRT in tumor necrosis, expression of Ki-67, γH2AX and apoptosis. SAHA only had no significant effect in the histological examination. Comparison of xenografts treated with XRT and XRT plus SAHA revealed a significantly increased γH2AX expression and apoptosis induction in the mice tumors after combination treatment with single-dose as well as fractionated XRT. The combination of SAHA with XRT showed a tendency to increased necrosis and decrease of proliferation compared to XRT only, which, however, was not significant. The 18F-FDG-PET results showed no significant differences in the standard uptake value or glucose transport kinetics after either treatment. Conclusion SAHA did not have a significant effect alone, but proved to enhance the effect of XRT in our MRT in vivo model. PMID:22458853

  16. Effects of Treatment with Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid; (SAHA) on SIV-Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Binhua; Piatak, Michael; Rogers, Linda; Johnson, Ann-Marie; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Hazuda, Daria J.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Viral reservoirs–persistent residual virus despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)–remain an obstacle to cure of HIV-1 infection. Difficulty studying reservoirs in patients underscores the need for animal models that mimics HIV infected humans on cART. We studied SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (Ch-RM) treated with intensive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and 3 weeks of treatment with the histone deacetyalse inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Methods SIVmac251 infected Ch-RM received reverse transcriptase inhibitors PMPA and FTC and integrase inhibitor L-870812 beginning 7 weeks post infection. Integrase inhibitor L-900564 and boosted protease inhibitor treatment with Darunavir and Ritonavir were added later. cART was continued for 45 weeks, with daily SAHA administered for the last 3 weeks, followed by euthanasia/necropsy. Plasma viral RNA and cell/tissue-associated SIV gag RNA and DNA were quantified by qRT-PCR/qPCR, with flow cytometry monitoring changes in immune cell populations. Results Upon cART initiation, plasma viremia declined, remaining <30 SIV RNA copy Eq/ml during cART, with occasional blips. Decreased viral replication was associated with decreased immune activation and partial restoration of intestinal CD4+ T cells. SAHA was well tolerated but did not result in demonstrable treatment-associated changes in plasma or cell associated viral parameters. Conclusions The ability to achieve and sustain virological suppression makes cART-suppressed, SIV-infected Ch-RM a potentially useful model to evaluate interventions targeting residual virus. However, despite intensive cART over one year, persistent viral DNA and RNA remained in tissues of all three animals. While well tolerated, three weeks of SAHA treatment did not demonstrably impact viral RNA levels in plasma or tissues; perhaps reflecting dosing, sampling and assay limitations. PMID:25033210

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), enhances anti-tumor effects of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Ahrum; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Debora Keunyoung; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jun; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-You; O'Connor, Mark J; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2015-03-07

    Olaparib, a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, has been found to have therapeutic potential for treating cancers associated with impaired DNA repair capabilities, particularly those with deficiencies in the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important for enabling functional HRR of DNA by regulating the expression of HRR-related genes and promoting the accurate assembly of HRR-directed sub-nuclear foci. Thus, HDAC inhibitors have recently emerged as a therapeutic agent for treating cancer by inhibiting DNA repair. Based on this, HDAC inhibition could be predicted to enhance the anti-tumor effect of PARP inhibitors in cancer cells by blocking the HRR pathway. We determined whether suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a HDAC inhibitor, could enhance the anti-tumor effects of olaparib on breast cancer cell lines using a cytotoxic assay, cell cycle analysis, and Western blotting. We evaluated how exposure to SAHA affects the expression of HRR-associated genes. The accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by combination treatment was assessed. Induction of autophagy was monitored by imaging green fluorescent protein-tagged microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) expression following co-treatment with olaparib and SAHA. These in vitro data were validated in vivo using a human breast cancer xenograft model. Triple-negative breast cancer cell (TNBC) lines showed heterogeneous responses to the PARP and HDAC inhibitors. Co-administration of olaparib and SAHA synergistically inhibited the growth of TNBC cells that expressed functional Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). This effect was associated with down-regulation of the proliferative signaling pathway, increased apoptotic and autophagic cell death, and accumulation of DNA damage. The combined anti-tumor effect of olaparib and SAHA was also observed in a xenograft model. These data suggest that PTEN expression in TNBC cells can

  18. Palladium(II)-catalyzed enantioselective C(sp³)-H activation using a chiral hydroxamic acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kai-Jiong; Lin, David W; Miura, Motofumi; Zhu, Ru-Yi; Gong, Wei; Wasa, Masayuki; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2014-06-04

    An enantioselective method for Pd(II)-catalyzed cross-coupling of methylene β-C(sp(3))-H bonds in cyclobutanecarboxylic acid derivatives with arylboron reagents is described. High yields and enantioselectivities were achieved through the development of chiral mono-N-protected α-amino-O-methylhydroxamic acid (MPAHA) ligands, which form a chiral complex with the Pd(II) center. This reaction provides an alternative approach to the enantioselective synthesis of cyclobutanecarboxylates containing α-chiral quaternary stereocenters. This new class of chiral catalysts also show promises for enantioselective β-C(sp(3))-H activation of acyclic amides.

  19. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  20. Forward and reverse (retro) iron(III) or gallium(III) desferrioxamine E and ring-expanded analogues prepared using metal-templated synthesis from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers.

    PubMed

    Lifa, Tulip; Tieu, William; Hocking, Rosalie K; Codd, Rachel

    2015-04-06

    A metal-templated synthesis (MTS) approach was used to preorganize the forward endo-hydroxamic acid monomer 4-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-PBH) about iron(III) in a 1:3 metal/ligand ratio to furnish the iron(III) siderophore for-[Fe(DFOE)] (ferrioxamine E) following peptide coupling. Substitution of for-PBH with the reverse (retro) hydroxamic acid analogue 3-(6-amino-N-hydroxyhexanamido)propanoic acid (ret-PBH) furnished ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (ret-ferrioxamine E). As isomers, for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] gave identical mass spectrometry signals ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 654.3, m/zobs 654.3), yet for-[Fe(DFOE)] eluted in a more polar window (tR = 23.44 min) than ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (tR = 28.13 min) on a C18 reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) column. for-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 22.99 min) and ret-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 28.11 min) were prepared using gallium(III) as the metal-ion template and showed the same trend for the retention time. Ring-expanded analogues of for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] were prepared from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers with one additional methylene unit in the amine-containing region, 4-[(6-aminohexyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-HBH) or 3-(7-amino-N-hydroxyheptanamido)propanoic acid (ret-HBH), to give the corresponding tris(homoferrioxamine E) macrocycles, for-[Fe(HHDFOE)] or ret-[Fe(HHDFOE)] ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 696.3, m/zobs 696.4). The MTS reaction using a constitutional isomer of for-HBH that transposed the methylene unit to the carboxylic acid containing region, 5-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-5-oxopentanoic acid (for-PPH), gave the macrocycle for-[Fe(HPDFOE)] in a yield significantly less than that for for-[Fe(HHDFOE)], with the gallium(III) analogue for-[Ga(HPDFOE)] unable to be detected. The work demonstrates the utility and limits of MTS for the assembly of macrocyclic siderophores from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers. Indirect measures (RP-HPLC order of elution, c log P values

  1. Phosphanilic Acid Inhibits Dihydropteroate Synthase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    dihydropteroate synthases of P. aeruginosa and E . coli were about equally susceptible to inhibition by PA. These results suggest that cells of P. aeruginosa...are more permeable to PA than cells of E . coli . Although a weak inhibitor, PA acted on dihydropteroate synthase in the same manner as the sulfonamides...with which PA is structurally related. Inhibition of E . coli by PA in a basal salts-glucose medium was prevented by p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). However

  2. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  3. Chemical Characterization, Crossfeeding and Uptake Studies on Hydroxamate Siderophore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B; Meyer, J M; Kale, S P

    2011-06-01

    We report the production of two types of siderophores namely catecholate and hydroxamate in modified succinic acid medium (SM) from Alcaligenes faecalis. Two fractions of siderophores were purified on amberlite XAD, major fraction was hydroxamate type having a λ(max) at 224 nm and minor fraction appeared as catecholate with a λ(max) of 264 nm. The recovery yield obtained from major and minor fractions was 297 and 50 mg ml(-1) respectively. The IEF pattern of XAD-4 purified siderophore suggested the pI value of 6.5. Cross feeding studies revealed that A. faecalis accepts heterologous as well as self (hydroxamate) siderophore in both free and iron complexed forms however; the rate of siderophore uptake was more in case of siderophores complexed to iron. Siderophore iron uptake studies indicated the differences between hydroxamate siderophore of A. faecalis and Alc E, a siderophore of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

  4. Effects of hydroxamate metalloendoprotease inhibitors on botulinum neurotoxin A poisoned mouse neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Potian, Joseph G.; Garcia, Carmen C.; Hognason, Kormakur; Čapková, Kateřina; Moe, Scott T.; Jacobson, Alan R.; Janda, Kim D.; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Currently the only therapy for botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) poisoning is antitoxin. Antidotes that are effective after BoNT/A has entered the motor nerve terminals would dramatically benefit BoNT/A therapy. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of BoNT/A light chain by metalloendoprotease inhibitors (MEIs) is under development. We tested the effects of MEIs on in vitro as well as in vivo BoNT/A poisoned mouse nerve muscle preparations (NMPs). The Ki for inhibition of BoNT/A metalloendoprotease was 0.40 and 0.36 μM, respectively, for 2, 4 – dichlorocinnamic acid hydroxamate (DCH) and its methyl derivative, ABS 130. Acute treatment of nerve muscle preparations with 10 pM BoNT/A inhibited nerve evoked muscle twitches, reduced mean quantal content, and induced failures of endplate currents (EPCs). Bath application of 10 μM DCH or 5 μM ABS 130 reduced failures, increased the quantal content of EPCs, and partially restored muscle twitches after a delay of 40 to 90 min. The restorative effects of DCH and ABS 130, as well as 3,4 diaminopyridine (DAP) on twitch tension were greater at 22 °C compared to 37 °C. Unlike DAP, neither DCH nor ABS 130 increased Ca2+ levels in cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. Injection of MEIs into mouse hind limbs before or after BoNT/A injection neither prevented the toe spread reflex inhibition nor improved muscle functions. We suggest that hydroxamate MEIs partially restore neurotransmission of acutely BoNT/A poisoned nerve muscle preparations in vitro in a temperature dependent manner without increasing the Ca2+ levels within motor nerve endings. PMID:20211192

  5. Water-Stable, Hydroxamate Anchors for Functionalization of TiO2 Surfaces with Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.R.; Milot, R.L.; Song, H.; Snoeberger III, R.C.; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, C.A.; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of derivatized hydroxamic acid linkages for robust sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) under various aqueous conditions is described. The stability of linkages bound to metal oxides under various conditions is important in developing photocatalytic cells which incorporate transition metal complexes for solar energy conversion. In order to compare the standard carboxylate anchor to hydroxamates, two organic dyes differing only in anchoring groups were synthesized and attached to TiO{sub 2} NPs. At acidic, basic, and close to neutral pH, hydroxamic acid linkages resist detachment compared to the labile carboxylic acids. THz spectroscopy was used to compare ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (IET) into the conduction band of TiO{sub 2} for both linkages and found similar IET characteristics. Observable electron injection and stronger binding suggest that hydroxamates are a suitable class of anchors for designing water stable molecules for functionalizing TiO{sub 2}.

  6. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as Novel Zinc Binding Group for Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H.; Kornacki, James R.; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative non-hydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 nM and 3675 nM respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. PMID:23547652

  7. Antimalarial activity of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Chen, Yufeng; Andrews, Katherine T; Caridha, Diana; Gerena, Lucia; Gettayacamin, Montip; Johnson, Jacob; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Obaldia, Nicanor; Tran, Thanh N; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) was evaluated. In in vitro growth inhibition assays approximately 50 analogs were evaluated against four drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The range of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) was 0.0005 to >1 microM. Five analogs exhibited IC(50)s of <3 nM, and three of these exhibited selectivity indices of >600. The most potent compound, WR301801 (YC-2-88) was shown to cause hyperacetylation of P. falciparum histones, which is a marker for HDAC inhibition in eukaryotic cells. The compound also inhibited malarial and mammalian HDAC activity in functional assays at low nanomolar concentrations. WR301801 did not exhibit cures in P. berghei-infected mice at oral doses as high as 640 mg/kg/day for 3 days or in P. falciparum-infected Aotus lemurinus lemurinus monkeys at oral doses of 32 mg/kg/day for 3 days, despite high relative bioavailability. The failure of monotherapy in mice may be due to a short half-life, since the compound was rapidly hydrolyzed to an inactive acid metabolite by loss of its hydroxamate group in vitro (half-life of 11 min in mouse microsomes) and in vivo (half-life in mice of 3.5 h after a single oral dose of 50 mg/kg). However, WR301801 exhibited cures in P. berghei-infected mice when combined at doses of 52 mg/kg/day orally with subcurative doses of chloroquine. Next-generation HDACIs with greater metabolic stability than WR301801 may be useful as antimalarials if combined appropriately with conventional antimalarial drugs.

  8. Iron chelating active packaging: Influence of competing ions and pH value on effectiveness of soluble and immobilized hydroxamate chelators.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Yoshiko; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-04-01

    Many packaged foods utilize synthetic chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) to inhibit iron-promoted oxidation or microbial growth which would result in quality loss. To address consumer demands for all natural products, we have previously developed a non-migratory iron chelating active packaging material by covalent immobilization of polyhydroxamate and demonstrated its efficacy in delaying lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of this hydroxamate-functionalized iron chelating active packaging to retain iron chelating capacity; even in the presence of competing ions common in food. Both immobilized and soluble hydroxamate chelators retained iron chelating capacity in the presence of calcium, magnesium, and sodium competing ions, although at pH 5.0 the presence of calcium reduced immobilized hydroxamate iron chelation. A strong correlation was found between colorimetric and mass spectral analysis of iron chelation by the chelating packaging material. Such chelating active packaging may support reducing additive use in product formulations, while retaining quality and shelf life.

  9. The HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid exhibit multiple modalities of benefit for the vascular pathobiology of sickle transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Pace, Betty S.; Solovey, Anna N.; Kollander, Rahn; Abanonu, Chine F.; Nguyen, Julia; Vineyard, Julie V.; Belcher, John D.; Abdulla, Fuad; Osifuye, Shadé; Eaton, John W.; Kelm, Robert J.; Slungaard, Arne

    2010-01-01

    The vascular pathobiology of sickle cell anemia involves inflammation, coagulation, vascular stasis, reperfusion injury, iron-based oxidative biochemistry, deficient nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and red cell sickling. These disparate pathobiologies intersect and overlap, so it is probable that multimodality therapy will be necessary for this disease. We have, therefore, tested a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), for efficacy in reducing endothelial activation. We found that pulmonary vascular endothelial VCAM-1 and tissue factor (TF) expression (both are indicators of endothelial activation) are powerfully and significantly inhibited by TSA. This is seen both with pretreatment before the inducing stress of hypoxia/reoxygenation (NY1DD sickle transgenic mouse), and upon longer-term therapy after endothelial activation has already occurred (hBERK1 sickle mouse at ambient air). In addition, TSA prevented vascular stasis in sickle mice, it exhibited activity as an iron chelator, and it induced expression of the antisickling hemoglobin, hemoglobin F. Notably, the TSA analog SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxaminc acid) that is already approved for human clinical use exhibits the same spectrum of biologic effects as TSA. We suggest that SAHA possibly could provide true, multimodality, salubrious effects for prevention and treatment of the chronic vasculopathy of sickle cell anemia. PMID:20053759

  10. The HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid exhibit multiple modalities of benefit for the vascular pathobiology of sickle transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hebbel, Robert P; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Pace, Betty S; Solovey, Anna N; Kollander, Rahn; Abanonu, Chine F; Nguyen, Julia; Vineyard, Julie V; Belcher, John D; Abdulla, Fuad; Osifuye, Shadé; Eaton, John W; Kelm, Robert J; Slungaard, Arne

    2010-03-25

    The vascular pathobiology of sickle cell anemia involves inflammation, coagulation, vascular stasis, reperfusion injury, iron-based oxidative biochemistry, deficient nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and red cell sickling. These disparate pathobiologies intersect and overlap, so it is probable that multimodality therapy will be necessary for this disease. We have, therefore, tested a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), for efficacy in reducing endothelial activation. We found that pulmonary vascular endothelial VCAM-1 and tissue factor (TF) expression (both are indicators of endothelial activation) are powerfully and significantly inhibited by TSA. This is seen both with pretreatment before the inducing stress of hypoxia/reoxygenation (NY1DD sickle transgenic mouse), and upon longer-term therapy after endothelial activation has already occurred (hBERK1 sickle mouse at ambient air). In addition, TSA prevented vascular stasis in sickle mice, it exhibited activity as an iron chelator, and it induced expression of the antisickling hemoglobin, hemoglobin F. Notably, the TSA analog SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxaminc acid) that is already approved for human clinical use exhibits the same spectrum of biologic effects as TSA. We suggest that SAHA possibly could provide true, multimodality, salubrious effects for prevention and treatment of the chronic vasculopathy of sickle cell anemia.

  11. Effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) administration on the residual virus pool in a model of combination antiretroviral therapy-mediated suppression in SIVmac239-infected indian rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Quiñones, Octavio A; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I; Wai, John S; Tan, Christopher M; Alvord, W Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2014-11-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4(+) T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches.

  12. Discovery and Characterization of New Hydroxamate Siderophores, Baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Penwell, William F; DeGrace, Nancy; Tentarelli, Sharon; Gauthier, Lise; Gilbert, Catherine M; Arivett, Brock A; Miller, Alita A; Durand-Reville, Thomas F; Joubran, Camil; Actis, Luis A

    2015-07-27

    Acinetobacter baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin but grows under iron limitation. Accordingly, analyses of AYE iron-restricted culture supernatants resulted in the isolation of two fractions, which contained only hydroxamates and showed siderophore activity. Structural analyses identified baumannoferrin A and baumannoferrin B, which differ only by a double bond. These siderophores are composed of citrate, 1,3-diaminopropane, 2,4-diaminobutyrate, decenoic acid, and α-ketoglutarate. Analysis of the AYE genome showed the presence of a 12-gene cluster coding for proteins similar to those involved in the production and utilization of the hydroxamate siderophores acinetoferrin and achromobactin. As A. baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin and harbors only one gene cluster encoding the production and utilization of a siderophore, this strain's growth under iron limitation depends on baumannoferrin, a novel hydroxamate that could play a role in its virulence.

  13. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  14. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  15. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  16. Inhibition of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cell malignant transformation through restoring dysregulated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yichen; Gong, Zhihong; Olson, James R; Xu, Peilin; Buck, Michael J; Ren, Xuefeng

    2013-10-04

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its high toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), are able to induce malignant transformation of human cells. Chronic exposure to these chemicals is associated with an increased risk of developing multiple cancers in human. However, the mechanisms contributing to iAs/MMA(III)-induced cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis are not fully elucidated. We recently showed that iAs/MMA(III) exposure to human cells led to a decreased level of histone acetylation globally, which was associated with an increased sensitivity to arsenic cytotoxicity. In the current study, it demonstrated that prolonged exposure to low-level MMA(III) in human urothelial cells significantly increased the expression and activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with an associated reduction of histone acetylation levels both globally and lysine specifically. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), at 4 weeks after the initial MMA(III) treatment inhibited the MMA(III)-mediated up-regulation of the expression and activities of HDACs, leading to increase histone acetylation and prevention of MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation. These new findings suggest that histone acetylation dysregulation may be a key mechanism in MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation and carcinogenesis, and that HDAC inhibitors could be targeted to prevent or treat iAs-related cancers.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex Histones Deacetylase (HDAC) Class II Homo Sapiens with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and its derivatives as inhibitors of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Bakri, Ridla; Prasetia, Tirtana; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Kerami, Djati

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is second most common cancer in woman worldwide. Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogene. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been known as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. SAHA is an HDAC inhibitor that has been used in cancer therapy but still has side effects. SAHA modification proposed to minimize side effects. Triazole attachment on the chain of SAHA has been known to enhance the inhibition ability of SAHA and less toxic. In this study, it will be carried out with molecular dynamic simulations of SAHA modifications consisting ligand 1a, 2a and, 2c to interact with six HDAC in hydrated conditions. To all six HDAC Class II, performed docking with SAHA and a modified inhibitor. The docking results were then carried out molecular dynamics simulations to determine the inhibitor affinities in hydrated conditions. The molecular dynamic simulations results show better affinities of ligand 2c with HDAC 4, 6, and 7 than SAHA itself, and good affinity was also shown by ligand 2a and 1c on HDAC 5 and 9. The results of this study can be a reference to obtain better inhibitors.

  18. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Megan E.; Hammer, Sandra S.; McCollum, Gary W.; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27966642

  19. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  20. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  1. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Royce, Liam A.; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance. PMID:24027566

  2. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, Laura R; Royce, Liam A; Liu, Ping

    2013-09-03

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance.

  3. Synthesis and Biological Investigation of Oxazole Hydroxamates as Highly Selective Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Senger, Johanna; Melesina, Jelena; Marek, Martin; Romier, Christophe; Oehme, Ina; Witt, Olaf; Sippl, Wolfgang; Jung, Manfred

    2016-02-25

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) catalyzes the removal of an acetyl group from lysine residues of several non-histone proteins. Here we report the preparation of thiazole-, oxazole-, and oxadiazole-containing biarylhydroxamic acids by a short synthetic procedure. We identified them as selective HDAC6 inhibitors by investigating the inhibition of recombinant HDAC enzymes and the protein acetylation in cells by Western blotting (tubulin vs histone acetylation). The most active compounds exhibited nanomolar potency and high selectivity for HDAC6. For example, an oxazole hydroxamate inhibits HDAC6 with an IC50 of 59 nM and has a selectivity index of >200 against HDAC1 and HDAC8. This is the first report showing that the nature of a heterocycle directly connected to a zinc binding group (ZBG) can be used to modulate subtype selectivity and potency for HDAC6 inhibitors to such an extent. We rationalize the high potency and selectivity of the oxazoles by molecular modeling and docking.

  4. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase by alpha-keto acids analogs of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J A; Montes, F J; Catalán, J; Galán, M A

    1996-04-01

    The inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase by certain alpha-keto acids products of the reaction with D-amino acids, in particular alpha-keto acids that are analogs of the amino acids alanine, valine, leucine, phenylanaline, phenylglycine, tyrosine and tryptophan, is reported. All the alpha-keto acids assayed behaved as substrate competitive inhibitors of the enzyme. The relationship between the degree of inhibition and the structure of the inhibitor is discussed.

  5. Targeted Polypharmacology: Discovery of a Highly Potent Non-Hydroxamate Dual Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-10/-13 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicole; Ott, Michael; Lanz, Jan; Riedl, Rainer

    2017-09-27

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in many diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis or arthritis. Interest in MMP inhibition has been revitalized very recently as the knowledge on the underlying network of biological pathways is steadily growing. Based on this new insight into the relevance of MMP-10 and MMP-13 within the MMP network and the ban of hydroxamate inhibitors from clinical development, the discovery of non-hydroxamate multi-target drugs against specific MMPs is of foremost interest. Here, we disclose the discovery of a very potent and selective non-hydroxamate MMP-10/-13 inhibitor. The high potency (IC50 of 31 nM [MMP-10] and 5 nM [MMP-13]) and selectivity over MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -12 and -14 enable this compound to decipher disease causing MMP networks and to generate new treatment options through targeted polypharmacology.

  6. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as novel zinc binding group for selective histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H; Kornacki, James R; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2013-05-09

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative nonhydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 and 3675 nM, respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines.

  7. Hydroxamate siderophore-promoted reactions between iron(II) and nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Duckworth, Owen W.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies show that ferrous iron (Fe II), which is often abundant in anaerobic soil and groundwater, is capable of abiotically reducing many subsurface contaminants. However, studies also demonstrate that Fe II redox reactivity in geochemical systems is heavily dependent upon metal speciation. This contribution examines the influence of hydroxamate ligands, including the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), on Fe II reactions with nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants (NACs). Experimental results demonstrate that ring-substituted NACs are reduced to the corresponding aniline products in aqueous solutions containing Fe II complexes with DFOB and two monohydroxamate ligands (acetohydroxamic acid and salicylhydroxamic acid). Reaction rates are heavily dependent upon solution conditions and the identities of both the Fe II-complexing hydroxamate ligand and the target NAC. Trends in the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene ( kobs, s -1) are quantitatively linked to the formation of Fe II species with standard one-electron reduction potentials, EH0 (Fe III/Fe II), below -0.3 V. Linear free energy relationships correlate reaction rates with the EH0 (Fe III/Fe II) values of different electron-donating Fe II complexes and with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of different electron-accepting NACs, EH1'(ArNO 2). Experiments describing a redox auto-decomposition mechanism for Fe II-DFOB complexes that occurs at neutral pH and has implications for the stability of hydroxamate siderophores in anaerobic environments are also presented. Results from this study indicate that hydroxamates and other Fe III-stabilizing organic ligands can form highly redox-active Fe II complexes that may contribute to the natural attenuation and remediation of subsurface contaminants.

  8. Hydroxamate-based colorimetric method for direct screening of transglutaminase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bourneow, Chaiwut; Benjakul, Soottawat; H-Kittikun, Aran

    2012-05-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) is a commercial enzyme that has been applied to many protein containing foods to improve their textural property. The screening of MTGase-producing microorganisms from various sources might lead to the discovery of a new MTGase with different characteristics. This report demonstrates the use of a direct detection method for MTGase-producing bacteria grown on an agar plate by filter paper disc (FPD) assay. The principle of the assay is the formation of a red burgundy color by the hydroxamate-ferric complex. The color developed intensity was linearly correlated by the concentration of hydroxamic acid in the range of 0.1-0.8 μM and was visually scored at 4 levels: 0, 1, 2 and 3. Streptoverticillium mobaraense DSM 40847, a positive MTGase-producer, was chosen for the verification and improving of the proposed method. The colonies grown on the nutrient agar plate at 37°C for 24 h were covered with FPDs and 30 μl of substrates (CBZ-Gln-Gly and hydroxylamine). After incubation, 10 μl of the ferric-TCA-HCl solution was placed on the FPD. The optimal time taken to catalyze the formation of CBZ-Gln-Gly-hydroxamic acid by the MTGase and the time taken for the hydroxamate-ferric complex to form color were 180 and 60 min, respectively. Using this assay, 30 of 189 colonies isolated from wastewater and floating-floc samples showed MTGase-positive colonies which were well correlated to the quantitative screening of MTGase activity (R(2) = 0.9758). The results revealed that the FPD assay could be used for the qualitative screening of MTGase-producing bacteria.

  9. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-03-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae.

  10. Design and synthesis of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamate derivative (ZYJ-34v), an oral active histone deacetylase inhibitor with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Chunxi; Chou, C James; Wang, Xuejian; Jia, Yuping; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, we developed a novel series of tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase inhibitors (Bioorg Med Chem, 2010, 18, 1761-1772; J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 2823-2838), among which, compound ZYJ-34c (1) was identified and validated as the most potent one with marked in vitro and in vivo antitumor potency (J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 5532-5539.). Herein, further modification in 1 afforded another oral active analog ZYJ-34v (2) with simplified structure and lower molecular weight. Biological evaluation of compound 2 showed efficacious inhibition against histone deacetylase 1, 2, 3, and 6, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis results. Most importantly, compound 2 exhibited similar even more potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities relative to the approved histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA.

  11. Design, synthesis, molecular docking, anti-Proteus mirabilis and urease inhibition of new fluoroquinolone carboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohammed A A; Abuo-Rahma, Gamal El-Din A A; Abdelhafez, El-Shimaa M N; Hassan, Heba A; Abd El-Baky, Rehab M

    2017-02-01

    New hydroxamic acid, hydrazide and amide derivatives of ciprofloxacin in addition to their analogues of levofloxacin were prepared and identified by different spectroscopic techniques. Some of the prepared compounds revealed good activity against the urease splitting bacteria, Proteus mirabilis. The urease inhibitory activity was investigated using indophenol method. Most of the tested compounds showed better activity than the reference acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). The ciprofloxacin hydrazide derivative 3a and levofloxacin hydroxamic acid 7 experienced the highest activity (IC50=1.22μM and 2.20μM, respectively). Molecular docking study revealed high spontaneous binding ability of the tested compounds to the active site of urease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. From α-nucleophiles to functionalized aggregates: exploring the reactivity of hydroxamate ion towards esterolytic reactions in micelles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Karpichev, Yevgen; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Sahu, Arvind K; Satnami, Manmohan L; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2015-03-14

    Owing to the rising threats of neurotoxic organophosphosphorus compounds, facile and efficient decontamination systems are required. Since the last few decades, the search for promising α-nucleophiles for straightforward and eco-friendly decontamination reactions using α-nucleophiles has been considerably boosted up. Among these, hydroxamic acids have been widely studied due to their potential α-nucleophilicity towards carbon and phosphorus based esters. This account summarizes our research on α-nucleophilicity of hydroxamate ions in water and micelles towards esterolytic reactions. Efforts of our group in the last few years have been collectively judged and compared with the crucial findings of researchers in the relevant field. The present article sheds light on the rich chemistry of the hydroxamate ion as a perfect candidate to degrade organophosphorus esters (i.e. nerve agents, pesticides and their simulants) in water, in micelles of conventional surfactants, and in functionalized micelles. The current report also provides an insight into the possible nature and mechanisms of these reactions. A brief account of the biological activities of hydroxamic acids that have recently spurred research in medicine against some fatal diseases has been included.

  13. Tandem mass spectrometry of coprogen and deferoxamine hydroxamic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Simionato, Ana V C; de Souza, Gezimar D; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of fragmentation of hydroxamic siderophores are proposed comparing deuterated and nondeuterated samples. Standard siderophores (e.g. deferoxamine and coprogen) were directly injected into both ion trap and linear quadrupole mass spectrometers with electrospray ionization (ESI). Four and two fragmentation steps were carried out for deferoxamine and coprogen (analyzed by positive and negative ESI, respectively). Deferoxamine cleavages occurred in both peptide and hydroxamic bonds while the coprogen fragmentation pattern is more elaborate, since it contains Fe(III) in its structure.

  14. Polymers containing hydroxamate groups: nanoreactors for hydrolysis of phosphoryl esters.

    PubMed

    Mello, Renata S; Orth, Elisa S; Loh, Watson; Fiedler, Haidi D; Nome, Faruk

    2011-12-20

    A polyhydroxamicalkanoate (PHA) polymer containing the functional groups hydroxamic acid and carboxylic acid with the ability to accelerate dephosphorylation reactions is proposed. The methodology used to prepare this polymer favored the position of the two functional groups next to each other, which allows for the cooperativity between these groups. This cooperative effect has an important role when one wants to mimic enzymes. The catalytic effect promoted by the polymer was evaluated on the cleavage of the bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate (BDNPP) and diethyl 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate (DEDNPP) esters. Indeed, PHA was very efficient and promiscuous because it increased the rate of both reactions by a factor of up to 10(6)-fold. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed that the presence of PHA aids the formation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles. Thus, the effect of the cationic surfactant CTABr on the dephosphorylation of BDNPP by PHA was also investigated, and it was observed that, when CTABr is added to PHA, the reaction is ca. 15-fold faster compared to the reaction when only PHA is present.

  15. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  16. Hydroxy-oleic acid, but not oleic acid, inhibits pharmacologic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oleic acid (OA) and other fatty acids can become abundant in the systemic circulation after air pollution exposure as endogenously released lipolysis byproducts or by entering the body as a component of air pollution. Vascular damage has been observed with OA infusion, but it is not yet established whether increased circulating OA is able to produce the type of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with exposure to air pollution, or the mechanisms involved with such damage. Based on responses observed upon exposure of cultured endothelial cells, we hypothesized that OA and a hydroxylated metabolite (12-OH OA) would increase vascular tissue injury and impair vascular reactivity. Thoracic descending aorta tissue was collected from male Wistar Kyoto rats, aged 13-16 weeks. Prior to reactivity testing, independent LDH assays were performed with aortic rings to establish a subcytotoxic OA dose. To determine changes in vascular reactivity, aortic ring segments (n=3-4) were exposed for 1 hr to 100 µM OA, 12-OH OA, or an equivalent EtOH vehicle, followed by testing using myography and pharmacologic agents. Only 12-OH OA exposure significantly inhibited acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in aortic ring segments (25-30% reduction relative to EtOH control), based on maximum relaxation and dose-response. No change was seen in smooth muscle sensitivity to an exogenous nitric oxide source, sodium nitroprusside. Maximum aortic contractile force ge

  17. Selective growth promotion and growth inhibition of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by synthetic siderophore-beta-lactam conjugates.

    PubMed

    Möllmann, U; Ghosh, A; Dolence, E K; Dolence, J A; Ghosh, M; Miller, M J; Reissbrodt, R

    1998-01-01

    Conjugates of a carbacephalosporin with hydroxamate, spermexatol, N alpha,N epsilon-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-L-lysine, mixed catecholate/hydroxamate and cyanuric acid-based siderophores were investigated for their potential to promote growth of siderophore indicator strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria under iron depleted conditions, for their antibacterial activity and for their ability to use iron transport pathways to penetrate the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. The selective growth promotion of enterobacterial and pseudomonas strains by hydroxamate, spermexatol and mixed catecholate-hydroxamate siderophore-based conjugates bearing a L- or D-amino acid spacer was correlated with TonB dependent uptake routes. The preferred outer membrane siderophore receptor used in Escherichia coli was found to be Fiu, followed by Cir. Antagonistic effects of siderophores administered with the conjugates to determine antibacterial activity confirmed the active transport of conjugates via siderophore receptors. All of the conjugates were still able to diffuse through the porin proteins OmpC and OmpF. Nevertheless, strong inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomones aeruginosa outer membrane mutants DC2 and K799/61 compared to the parent strains indicated inefficient penetrability of all types of conjugates tested. Mycobacterium smegmatis SG 987 was able to use all of the siderophore-cephalosporin conjugates as growth promotors. Consequently there was no growth inhibition of this strain.

  18. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    PubMed

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%.

  19. Inhibition of in vitro cholesterol synthesis by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Endo, A

    1976-01-18

    Inhibitory effect of 44 species of fatty acids on cholesterol synthesis has been examined with a rat liver enzyme system. In the case of saturated fatty acids, the inhibitory activity increased with chain length to a maximum at 11 to 14 carbons, after which activity decreased rapidly. The inhibition increased with the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids. Introduction of a hydroxy group at the alpha-position of fatty acids abolished the inhibition, while the inhibition was enhanced by the presence of a hydroxy group located in an intermediate position of the chain. Branched chain fatty acids having a methyl group at the terminal showed much higher activity than the corresponding saturated straight chain fatty acids with the same number of carbons. With respect to the mechanism for inhibition, tridecanoate was found to inhibit acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase specifically without affecting the other reaction steps in the cholesterol synthetic pathway. The highly unsaturated fatty acids, arachidonate and linoleate, were specific inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA synthase. On the other hand, ricinoleate (hydroxy acid) and phytanate (branched-chain acid) diminished the conversion of mevalonate to sterols by inhibiting a step or steps between squalene and lanosterol.

  20. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  1. Synthesis, siderophore activity and iron(III) chelation chemistry of a novel mono-hydroxamate, bis-catecholate siderophore mimic: N(alpha),-N(epsilon)-Bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl]-l-lysyl-(gamma-N-methyl-N-hydroxyamido)-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Mies, Kassy A; Gebhardt, Peter; Möllmann, Ute; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel tripodal mono-hydroxamate, bis catecholate siderophore mimic, N(alpha),-N(epsilon)-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl]-l-lysyl-(gamma-N-methyl-N-hydroxyamido)-l-glutamic acid (H(6)L), is described. The structure of H(6)L was established by 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. The chelation chemistry of H(6)L with respect to iron(III) is characterized in aqueous solution through determination of ligand pK(a) values and iron(III) binding constants using spectrophotometric and potentiometric titration techniques. Proton dependent iron(III)-ligand equilibrium constants were determined using a model based on the sequential protonation of the iron(III)-siderophore complex. These results were used to calculate the pH dependent speciation, the overall formation constant logbeta(110) (31.4) and pM value (18.3) for H(6)L with iron(III). The ability of H(6)L to deliver the essential nutrient iron to living cells is determined through growth promotion assays using various bacterial strains.

  2. Novel hydroxamates potentiated in vitro activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Hariharan, Periasamy; Bharani, Thirunavukkarasu; Franklyne, Jonathan S.; Selvakumar, Thangapazham; Bharathimohan, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Chenniappan Vinoth; Kachhadia, Virendra; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Balasubramanian, Gopalan

    2017-01-01

    A set of 12 novel hydroxamate compounds (NHCs), structurally designed as inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme, were synthesized at our facility. These were adamantane derivatives with N-hydroxyacetamide as pharmacophore, and each of these compounds was tested for potentiating activity on fluconazole. The concentration of fluconazole which completely inhibited (concentration of complete inhibition [CCI]) the growth of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550 was determined by micro-dilution method in the absence and presence of NHCs. The CCI of fluconazole without the NHC combination was 64 μg/ml and 1024 μg/ml against C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550, respectively. The majority of the NHCs potentiated the fluconazole activity markedly as CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 90028 reduced to 0.25 μg/ml. Similarly, CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 64550 reduced to 4–8 μg/ml in combination with majority of NHCs while the best activity was displayed by the compound 1 with a reduction of CCI to 0.5 μg/ml. The study results revealed the potential usage of hydroxamate derivatives, structurally designed as HDAC inhibitors to enhance the activity of fluconazole against C. albicans. PMID:28250687

  3. Catecholates and mixed catecholate hydroxamates as artificial siderophores for mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Steffen; Heinisch, Lothar; Scherlitz-Hofmann, Ina; Stoiber, Thomas; Ankel-Fuchs, Dorothe; Möllmann, Ute

    2004-02-01

    Different mono-, bis- or triscatecholates and mixed mono- or biscatecholate hydroxamates were synthesized as potential siderophores for mycobacteria. SiderOphore activity was tested by growth promotion assays using wild type strains and iron transport mutants of mycobacteria as well as Gram-negative bacteria. Some triscatecholates and biscatecholate hydroxamates were active in mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis deficient in mycobactin and exochelin biosynthesis or exochelin permease, respectively, indicating an uptake route independent of the exochelin/mycobactin pathway. Structure activity relationships were studied. Ampicillin conjugates of some of these compounds were inactive against mycobacteria but active against Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  5. Molecular docking studies of a group of hydroxamate inhibitors with gelatinase-A by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xiaojie

    2002-01-01

    We have performed docking and molecular dynamics simulations of hydroxamates complexed with human gelatinase-A (MMP-2) to gain insight into the structural and energetic preferences of these inhibitors. The study was conducted on a selected set of eleven compounds with variation in structure and activity. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed at 300 K for 100 ps with equilibration for 50 ps. The structural analyses of the trajectories indicate that the coordinate bond interactions, the hydrogen bond interactions, the van der Waals interactions as well as the hydrophobic interactions between ligand and receptor are responsible simultaneously for the preference of inhibition and potency. The ligand hydroxamate group is coordinated to the catalytic zinc ion and form stable hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen of Gly 162. The P1' group makes extensive van der Waals and hydrophobic contacts with the nonpolar side chains of several residues in the S1' subsite, including Leu 197, Val 198, Leu 218 and Tyr 223. Moreover, four to eight hydrogen bonds between hydroxamates and MMP-2 are formed to stabilize the inhibitors in the active site. Compared with the P2' and P3' groups, the P1' groups of inhibitors are oriented regularly, which is produced by the restrain of the S1' subsite. From the relationship between the length of the nonpolar P1' group and the biological activity, we confirm that MMP-2 has a pocket-like S1' subsite, not a channel-like S1' subsite proposed by Kiyama (Kiyama, R. et al., J. Med. Chem. 42 (1999), 1723). The energetic analyses show that the experimental binding free energies can be well correlated with the interactions between the inhibitors and their environments, which could be used as a simple score function to evaluate the binding affinities for other similar hydroxamates. The validity of the force field parameters and the MD simulations can be fully testified by the satisfactory agreements between the experimental structure

  6. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  7. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  8. Ionic liquid containing hydroxamate and N-alkyl sulfamate ions

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2016-03-15

    Embodiments of the invention are related to ionic liquids and more specifically to ionic liquids used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the ionic liquid includes a cation and an anion selected from hydroxamate and/or N-alkyl sulfamate anions.

  9. Proteus mirabilis urease. Partial purification and inhibition by boric acid and boronic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, J M; Hausinger, R P

    1988-01-01

    Urease was purified 800-fold and partially characterized from Proteus mirabilis, the predominant microorganism associated with urinary stones. Boric acid is a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor of urease. The pH-dependence of inhibition exhibited pKa values of 6.25 and 9.3, where the latter value is probably due to the inherent pKa of boric acid. Three boronic acids also were shown to inhibit urease competitively. PMID:3291857

  10. Inhibition of noradrenaline release by lysergic acid diethylamide

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.

    1973-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) inhibits the release of labelled noradrenaline from the guinea-pig vas deferens during intramural nerve stimulation and causes a corresponding reduction in the contractions of the smooth muscle. These effects of LSD are most prominent at low stimulus frequencies and they are prevented by treatment with phentolamine. It is concluded that LSD inhibits noradrenaline release by interacting with presynaptic α-adrenoceptors. PMID:4788042

  11. Proton pump inhibition--the ultimate control of acid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Zdon, M.J.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Schafer, D.E.; Tyshkov, M.; Cambria, R.P.; Modlin, I.M.

    1986-04-01

    The cellular mechanisms of acid secretion by the parietal cell (PC) include stimulation of membrane receptors, increases in cytosolic cyclic AMP levels, and activation of protein kinase systems. These events culminate in stimulation of a membrane-based proton pump. This consists of a non-electrogenic H+-K+-ATPase which transports H+ ions into the secretory canaliculus of the PC in exchange for the cation K+. It has been proposed that blockade of this proton pump would result in inhibition of acid secretion by all classes of acid secretagogues. Thus, the effects of membrane receptor agonists as well as any agents which augment cellular cAMP levels should be inhibited. Substituted benzimidazoles are weak bases which prevent acid secretion by blocking the H+-K+-ATPase system. In order to test the above hypothesis, we investigated the effects of the substituted benzimidazole H168/68 and cimetidine (C) on histamine (H) and 8B-stimulated acid secretion. The rabbit isolated gastric gland (IGG) model was used and acid secretion assessed by the accumulation of /sup 14/C-labeled weak base aminopyrine (AP) within the IGG in response to secretagogue stimulation. H168/68 and C both inhibited H (5 X 10(-5) M)-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (P less than 0.05). H168/68 inhibited both H- and 8B-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05), while C inhibited only H-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05). H168/68 suppressed (/sup 14/C)AP below even unstimulated levels of (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation. These results support the hypothesis that H168/68 inhibits the PC distal to cAMP stimulation.

  12. Inhibition of purple acid phosphatase with alpha-alkoxynaphthylmethylphosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    McGeary, Ross P; Vella, Peter; Mak, Jeffrey Y W; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear hydrolases that catalyse the hydrolysis of a range of phosphorylated substrates. Human PAP is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. In patients suffering from this disorder, PAP activity contributes to increased bone resorption and, therefore, human PAP is a key target for the development of anti-osteoporotic drugs. This manuscript describes the design and synthesis of derivatives of 1-naphthylmethylphosphonic acids as inhibitors of PAP. The K(i) values of these compounds are as low as 4 microM, the lowest reported to date for a PAP inhibitor.

  13. Eskimo plasma constituents, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibit the release of atherogenic mitogens.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Willis, A L; Nguyen, N; Conner, D; Zahedi, S; Fulks, J

    1989-01-01

    Studies in man and laboratory animals suggest that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid constituents of fish oils have antiatherosclerotic properties. We have studied the effects of several such polyunsaturated fatty acids for ability to modify the in vitro release of mitogens from human platelets. Such mitogens may produce the fibro-proliferative component of atherosclerotic plaques. Both 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and 4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3), major constituents of fish oils, inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of platelets and the accompanying release of mitogens. These effects are dose dependent. Linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3), the biosynthetic precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid, also inhibited platelet aggregation and mitogen release. Eicosapentaenoic acid also inhibited mitogen release from human monocyte-derived macrophages, which, in vivo, are an additional source of mitogens during atherogenesis. Potent inhibition of human platelet aggregation and mitogen release was also seen with dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid 20:3 omega 6), whose levels are reportedly elevated in Eskimos subsisting on marine diets. We conclude that diets that elevate plasma and/or tissue levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid precursor gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 6) may exert antiatherosclerotic effects by inhibiting the release of mitogens from platelets and other cells.

  14. Mechanism of acid corrosion inhibition using magnetic nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Jauhari, Smita; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition effect of magnetic nanofluid on carbon steel in acid solutions was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic and SEM measurement. The inhibition efficiency increases up to 95% and 75% for 51.7 mM concentration, respectively, in 1 M HCl and 1 M H2SO4 medium. The adsorption of nanoparticles to the steel surface forms a barrier between the metal and the aggressive environment, which is responsible for observed inhibition action. The adsorption of nanoparticles on steel surface is supported by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm and surface morphology scanned through SEM.

  15. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  16. Chemistry, biology, and QSAR studies of substituted biaryl hydroxamates and mercaptoacetamides as HDAC inhibitors-nanomolar-potency inhibitors of pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Chen, Yufeng; Gaysin, Arsen M; Savoy, Doris N; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2008-03-01

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) are able to regulate gene expression, and inhibitors of the HDACs (HDACIs) hold promise in the treatment of cancer as well as a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the potential for isoform selectivity in the inhibition of HDACs, we prepared a small series of 2,4'-diaminobiphenyl ligands functionalized at the para-amino group with an appendage containing either a hydroxamate or a mercaptoacetamide group and coupled to an amino acid residue at the ortho-amino group. A smaller series of substituted phenylthiazoles was also explored. Some of these newly synthesized ligands show low-nanomolar potency in HDAC inhibition assays and display micromolar to low-nanomolar IC(50) values in tests against five pancreatic cancer cell lines. The isoform selectivity of these ligands for class I HDACs (HDAC1-3 and 8) and class IIb HDACs (HDAC6 and 10) together with QSAR studies of their correlation with lipophilicity are presented. Of particular interest is the selectivity of the mercaptoacetamides for HDAC6.

  17. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  18. Phosphatidic acid inhibits ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Presa, Natalia; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gangoiti, Patricia; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-12-15

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) was recently demonstrated to potently induce cell migration. This action could only be observed when C1P was applied exogenously to cells in culture, and was inhibited by pertussis toxin. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. In this work, we found that phosphatidic acid (PA), which is structurally related to C1P, displaced radiolabeled C1P from its membrane-binding site and inhibited C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. This effect was independent of the saturated fatty acid chain length or the presence of a double bond in each of the fatty acyl chains of PA. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with exogenous phospholipase D (PLD), an enzyme that produces PA from membrane phospholipids, also inhibited C1P-stimulated cell migration. Likewise, PA or exogenous PLD inhibited C1P-stimulated extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation, leading to inhibition of cell migration. However, PA did not inhibit C1P-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. It is concluded that PA is a physiological regulator of C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. These actions of PA may have important implications in the control of pathophysiological functions that are regulated by C1P, including inflammation and various cellular processes associated with cell migration such as organogenesis or tumor metastasis.

  19. Boric acid inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2004-12-08

    The role of boron in biology includes coordinated regulation of gene expression in mixed bacterial populations and the growth and proliferation of higher plants and lower animals. Here we report that boric acid, the dominant form of boron in plasma, inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCaP, in a dose-dependent manner. Non-tumorigenic prostate cell lines, PWR-1E and RWPE-1, and the cancer line PC-3 were also inhibited, but required concentrations higher than observed human blood levels. Studies using DU-145 cells showed that boric acid induced a cell death-independent proliferative inhibition, with little effect on cell cycle stage distribution and mitochondrial function.

  20. 2-Alkynoic fatty acids inhibit topoisomerase IB from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, Néstor M; Cartagena, Michelle; Sanabria, David; Tasdemir, Deniz; Prada, Christopher F; Reguera, Rosa M; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    2-Alkynoic fatty acids display antimycobacterial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities but their antiprotozoal activity has received little attention. In this work we synthesized the 2-octadecynoic acid (2-ODA), 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA), and 2-tetradecynoic acid (2-TDA) and show that 2-ODA is the best inhibitor of the Leishmania donovani DNA topoisomerase IB enzyme (LdTopIB) with an EC(50)=5.3±0.7μM. The potency of LdTopIB inhibition follows the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA, indicating that the effectiveness of inhibition depends on the fatty acid carbon chain length. All of the studied 2-alkynoic fatty acids were less potent inhibitors of the human topoisomerase IB enzyme (hTopIB) as compared to LdTopIB. 2-ODA also displayed in vitro activity against Leishmania donovani (IC(50)=11.0μM), but it was less effective against other protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi (IC(50)=48.1μM) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC(50)=64.5μM). The antiprotozoal activity of the 2-alkynoic fatty acids, in general, followed the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA. The experimental information gathered so far indicates that 2-ODA is a promising antileishmanial compound.

  1. The inhibition of human platelet function by ganodermic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C N; Chen, J C; Shiao, M S; Wang, C T

    1991-01-01

    Human gel-filtered platelets aggregate at greater than 20 microM-ganodermic acid S [lanosta-7,9(11),24-triene-3 beta, 15 alpha-diacetoxy-26-oic acid] [Wang, Chen, Shiao & Wang (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 986, 151-160]. This study showed that platelets at less than 20 microM-ganodermic acid S displayed both concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of function, in which the agent potency in response to inducers was ADP-fibrinogen greater than collagen greater than thrombin. The agent caused a biphasic time-dependent effect on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. The first phase involved the decrease in the pool size of phosphoinositide by 10-20%. The second phase, in which both the resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the decrease of [32P]phosphatidic acid occurred, took place after 30 min. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed a time-dependent morphological change in platelets in the presence of the agent. The cells initially became spiculate discs, then swelled to a 'potato-like' morphology at 60 min. Further studies on the time-dependent inhibition of thrombin response revealed that: (1) the percentage inhibition of cell aggregation was comparable with that occurring with an increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]i) or the phosphorylation of marker proteins; (2) [32P]Pi-labelled platelets showed the time-dependent inhibition of thrombin-stimulated PIP2 resynthesis as indicated by first-2-min time-course studies of phosphoinositide interconversion; (3) scanning electron microscopy revealed that the aged platelet population showed an increase in the percentage of non-responding cells on prolonged incubation. The results, taken together, enabled one to discuss a possible mechanism for the time-dependent inhibition by ganodermic acid S of platelet response to thrombin. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1649599

  2. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  3. Monochloramine potently inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yohko; Ikeda, Mai; Sakuma, Satoru

    2006-05-26

    In the present study, the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), monochloramine (NH(2)Cl), glutamine-chloramine (Glu-Cl) and taurine-chloramine (Tau-Cl) on the formation of 12-lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolite, 12-HETE, and cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites, TXB(2), and 12-HHT, from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in rat platelets were examined. Rat platelets (4x10(8)/ml) were preincubated with drugs for 5min at 37 degrees C prior to the incubation with AA (40microM) for 2min at 37 degrees C. HOCl (50-250microM) showed an inhibition on the formation of LOX metabolite (12-HETE, 5-67% inhibition) and COX metabolites (TXB(2), 33-73% inhibition; 12-HHT, 27-74% inhibition). Although Tau-Cl and Glu-Cl up to 100microM were without effect on the formation of 12-HETE, TXB(2) and 12-HTT, NH(2)Cl showed a strong inhibition on the formation of all three metabolites (10-100microM NH(2)Cl, 12-HETE, 21-92% inhibition; TXB(2), 58-94% inhibition; 12-HHT, 36-92% inhibition). Methionine reversed a reduction of formation of LOX and COX metabolites induced by NH(2)Cl, and taurine restoring that induced by both NH(2)Cl and HOCl. These results suggest that NH(2)Cl is a more potent inhibitor of COX and LOX pathways in platelets than HOCl, and taurine and methionine can be modulators of NH(2)Cl-induced alterations in the COX and LOX pathways in vivo.

  4. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  5. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  6. A comparative 2D QSAR study on a series of hydroxamic acid-based histone deacetylase inhibitors vis-à-vis comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA).

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anubha; Agarwal, Neeraj; Gupta, Satya P

    2014-06-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was performed on a series of indole amide analogues reported by Dai et al. [Bioorg Med Chem Lett (2003), 13, 1897-1901] to act as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. The multiple regression analysis (MRA) revealed a model showing the significant dependence of the activity on molar refractivity (MR) and global topological charge index (GTCI) of the compounds, suggesting that inhibition of the HDAC by this series of compounds might involve the dispersion interaction with the receptor, where charge transfer between pairs of atoms might greatly help to polarize the molecule. The MRA results were then compared with those obtained by Guo et al. [Bioorg Med Chem (2005), 13, 5424-5434] by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). It was found that MRA gave as good results and had as good predictive ability as CoMFA and CoMSIA. Besides, MRA was also able to throw the light on the physicochemical properties of the molecules that were involved in drug-receptor interactions, while CoMFA and CoMSIA could not. The dispersion interaction between the molecule and the active site of the receptor is suggested to be the main interaction.

  7. Inhibition studies of soybean (Glycine max) urease with heavy metals, sodium salts of mineral acids, boric acid, and boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2010-10-01

    Various inhibitors were tested for their inhibitory effects on soybean urease. The K(i) values for boric acid, 4-bromophenylboronic acid, butylboronic acid, and phenylboronic acid were 0.20 +/- 0.05 mM, 0.22 +/- 0.04 mM, 1.50 +/- 0.10 mM, and 2.00 +/- 0.11 mM, respectively. The inhibition was competitive type with boric acid and boronic acids. Heavy metal ions including Ag(+), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+) showed strong inhibition on soybean urease, with the silver ion being a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 2.3 x 10(-8) mM). Time-dependent inhibition studies exhibited biphasic kinetics with all heavy metal ions. Furthermore, inhibition studies with sodium salts of mineral acids (NaF, NaCl, NaNO(3), and Na(2)SO(4)) showed that only F(-) inhibited soybean urease significantly (IC(50) = 2.9 mM). Competitive type of inhibition was observed for this anion with a K(i) value of 1.30 mM.

  8. Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Bud Formation by Nalidixic Acid in Hyphomicrobium neptunium

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between chromosome replication and morphogenesis in the budding bacterium Hyphomicrobium neptunium has been investigated. Nalidixic acid was found to completely inhibit deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, but not ribonucleic acid synthesis. The antibiotic was bacteriostatic to the organism for the initial 5 h of exposure; thereafter it was bacteriocidal. Observation of inhibited cultures revealed cells that had produced abnormally long stalks, but no buds. These results indicate that bud formation is coupled to chromosome replication in H. neptunium. They do not exclude the possibilities that cross wall formation and bud separation may also be coupled to chromosome replication. Images PMID:4127631

  9. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  10. Pyridone Methylsulfone Hydroxamate LpxC Inhibitors for the Treatment of Serious Gram-Negative Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Justin I.; Brown, Matthew F.; Reilly, Usa; Price, Loren M.; Abramite, Joseph A.; Arcari, Joel; Barham, Rose; Che, Ye; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Chung, Seung Won; Collantes, Elizabeth M.; Desbonnet, Charlene; Doroski, Matthew; Doty, Jonathan; Engtrakul, Juntyma J.; Harris, Thomas M.; Huband, Michael; Knafels, John D.; Leach, Karen L.; Liu, Shenping; Marfat, Anthony; McAllister, Laura; McElroy, Eric; Menard, Carol A.; Mitton-Fry, Mark; Mullins, Lisa; Noe, Mark C.; O’Donnell, John; Oliver, Robert; Penzien, Joseph; Plummer, Mark; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Thoma, Christy; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Uccello, Daniel P.; Vaz, Alfin; Wishka, Donn G.

    2012-11-09

    The synthesis and biological activity of a new series of LpxC inhibitors represented by pyridone methylsulfone hydroxamate 2a is presented. Members of this series have improved solubility and free fraction when compared to compounds in the previously described biphenyl methylsulfone hydroxamate series, and they maintain superior Gram-negative antibacterial activity to comparator agents.

  11. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  12. Combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid inhibits tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Katsunori; Sato, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shinjiro; Morinaga, Tetsuo; Hirano, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Placental extract contains several biologically active compounds, and pharmacological induction of placental extract has therapeutic effects, such as improving liver function in patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis. Here, we searched for novel molecules with an anti-tumor activity in placental extracts. Active molecules were separated by chromatographic analysis, and their antiproliferative activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. We identified aspartic acid and glutamic acid to possess the antiproliferative activity against human hepatoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid exhibited enhanced antiproliferative activity, and inhibited Akt phosphorylation. We also examined in vivo tumor inhibition activity using the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The treatment mixture (emulsion of the amino acids with Lipiodol) administered by hepatic artery injection inhibited tumor cell growth of the rabbit VX2 liver. These results suggest that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid may be useful for induction of tumor cell death, and has the potential for clinical use as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  13. Inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility by volatile fatty acids and lactic acid in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P C

    1987-01-01

    1. A study was made of the influence on reticulo-ruminal motility, recorded by electromyography, of ruminal infusions of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and lactic acid in twenty-four sheep maintained by intragastric infusion of a complete liquid diet, in three sheep fed grass pellets, and in nine chronically vagotomized sheep; abomasal and duodenal infusions of VFA and lactic acid were tested in five sheep fed grass pellets. 2. Ruminal infusions of VFAs and lactic acid progressively inhibited the amplitude of the reticulo-ruminal contractions. In many experiments there was no effect on contraction frequency until the cessation of all reticulo-ruminal contractions at which point the maximal concentration of VFA recorded in the abomasum was 28 mM, and that of lactic acid was 20 mM. 3. The concentrations of undissociated VFAs causing cessation of reticulo-ruminal contractions in the vagus-intact sheep were very similar to the concentrations causing abolition of the organized intrinsic motility of the chronically vagotomized sheep. 4. The inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility with ruminal infusions of mixtures of VFAs and of lactic acid together with VFAs could largely be explained by the sum of the effects of the individual acids present. 5. Abomasal infusion of VFA or lactic acid inhibited the amplitude of ruminal, especially primary ruminal, contractions at concentrations of undissociated acid of 60 mM and above and increased the frequency of reticulum and primary ruminal contractions at about 80 mM. 6. Duodenal infusion of VFAs and lactic acid (100 mM, 5 ml/min) strongly inhibited abomasal motility without affecting reticulo-ruminal motility, and at a higher rate (100 mM, 10 ml/min) abolished motility and inhibited both the amplitude and frequency of reticulo-ruminal contractions. 7. It is concluded that the initial inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility in ruminal acidosis is unlikely to involve any significant influence from duodenal, or abomasal receptors. The

  14. Inhibition of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J.M.; Agee, K.; Sidow, S.; McNally, K.; Lindsey, K.; Borke, J.; Elsalanty, M.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to extracellular collagen matrix degradation in hybrid layers following adhesive dentin bonding procedures. Endodontic irrigants, including chlorhexidine (CHX) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) may help protect the hybrid layer from this process. The objective of the present study was to determine the exposure time necessary for EDTA to inactivate endogenous MMP activity in human dentin. Methods Dentin beams (2×1×3 mm) were prepared from mid-coronal dentin of extracted third molars. The beams were demineralized in 10 wt% phosphoric acid which also activated endogenous MMPs, and were divided into four experimental groups based on exposure time to 17% EDTA (0, 1, 2 or 5 min). A generic colorimetric MMP assay measured MMP activity via absorbance at 412 nm. Data were evaluated by Kruskal Wallis ANOVA, followed by Dunn’s pair-wise comparisons at α = 0.05. Results All exposure times resulted in significant inhibition (P<0.001) compared to unexposed controls. Specifically, percent inhibition for 1-, 2-, and 5-minute exposure times were 55.1±21.5%, 72.8±11.7%, and 74.7±19.7%, respectively. Conclusions 17% EDTA significantly inhibits endogenous MMP activity of human dentin within 1–2 min. This may minimize hybrid layer degradation following resin bonding procedures in the root canal space. PMID:22152622

  15. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Stephan M.; Cheah, Sing-Foong; Zapf, Rita; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Sposito, Garrison

    1998-08-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. In this paper, we report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D1, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) mu-mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 mu M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 mu-mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 mu-M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH > 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  16. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.; Cheah, S.F.; Zapf, R.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N.; Sposito, G.

    1999-10-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. The authors report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D{sub 1}, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) {micro}mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 {micro}mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH {gt} 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  17. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated hypochlorous acid production by nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Rees, Martin D; Bottle, Steven E; Fairfull-Smith, Kathryn E; Malle, Ernst; Whitelock, John M; Davies, Michael J

    2009-06-12

    Tissue damage resulting from the extracellular production of HOCl (hypochlorous acid) by the MPO (myeloperoxidase)-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system of activated phagocytes is implicated as a key event in the progression of a number of human inflammatory diseases. Consequently, there is considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Nitroxides are well established antioxidant compounds of low toxicity that can attenuate oxidative damage in animal models of inflammatory disease. They are believed to exert protective effects principally by acting as superoxide dismutase mimetics or radical scavengers. However, we show here that nitroxides can also potently inhibit MPO-mediated HOCl production, with the nitroxide 4-aminoTEMPO inhibiting HOCl production by MPO and by neutrophils with IC50 values of approx. 1 and 6 microM respectively. Structure-activity relationships were determined for a range of aliphatic and aromatic nitroxides, and inhibition of oxidative damage to two biologically-important protein targets (albumin and perlecan) are demonstrated. Inhibition was shown to involve one-electron oxidation of the nitroxides by the compound I form of MPO and accumulation of compound II. Haem destruction was also observed with some nitroxides. Inhibition of neutrophil HOCl production by nitroxides was antagonized by neutrophil-derived superoxide, with this attributed to superoxide-mediated reduction of compound II. This effect was marginal with 4-aminoTEMPO, probably due to the efficient superoxide dismutase-mimetic activity of this nitroxide. Overall, these data indicate that nitroxides have considerable promise as therapeutic agents for the inhibition of MPO-mediated damage in inflammatory diseases.

  18. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated hypochlorous acid production by nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; Bottle, Steven E.; Fairfull-Smith, Kathryn E.; Malle, Ernst; Whitelock, John M.; Davies, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage resulting from the extracellular production of HOCl (hypochlorous acid) by the MPO (myeloperoxidase)-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system of activated phagocytes is implicated as a key event in the progression of a number of human inflammatory diseases. Consequently, there is considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Nitroxides are well established antioxidant compounds of low toxicity that can attenuate oxidative damage in animal models of inflammatory disease. They are believed to exert protective effects principally by acting as superoxide dismutase mimetics or radical scavengers. However, we show here that nitroxides can also potently inhibit MPO-mediated HOCl production, with the nitroxide 4-aminoTEMPO inhibiting HOCl production by MPO and by neutrophils with IC50 values of approx. 1 and 6 μM respectively. Structure–activity relationships were determined for a range of aliphatic and aromatic nitroxides, and inhibition of oxidative damage to two biologically-important protein targets (albumin and perlecan) are demonstrated. Inhibition was shown to involve one-electron oxidation of the nitroxides by the compound I form of MPO and accumulation of compound II. Haem destruction was also observed with some nitroxides. Inhibition of neutrophil HOCl production by nitroxides was antagonized by neutrophil-derived superoxide, with this attributed to superoxide-mediated reduction of compound II. This effect was marginal with 4-aminoTEMPO, probably due to the efficient superoxide dismutase-mimetic activity of this nitroxide. Overall, these data indicate that nitroxides have considerable promise as therapeutic agents for the inhibition of MPO-mediated damage in inflammatory diseases. PMID:19379130

  19. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  20. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  1. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  2. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Hillary M.; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Landino, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecular weight inter-chain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Hypothiocyanous acid induced nearly stoichiometric oxidation of tubulin cysteines (1.9 mol cysteine/mol oxidant) and no methionine oxidation was observed. Because disulfide reducing agents restored all the polymerization activity that was lost due to oxidant treatment, we conclude that cysteine oxidation of tubulin inhibits microtubule polymerization. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines was markedly decreased in the presence of 4% glycerol, a component of the tubulin purification buffer. Due to its instability and buffer- and pH-dependent reactivity, hypothiocyanous acid studies require careful consideration of reaction conditions. PMID:24215946

  3. Curcumin improves alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang; Ma, Jingfan; Zhong, Qionghong; Zhao, Mengyuan; Hu, Tianxing; Chen, Tong; Qiu, Longxin; Wen, Longping

    2017-08-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a threat to human health. It has been long known that abstinence from alcohol is the most effective therapy, other effective therapies are not available for the treatment in humans. Curcumin has a great potential for anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, but the effect on metabolic reconstruction remains little known. Here we performed metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and explored ethanol pathogenic insight as well as curcumin action pattern. We identified seventy-one metabolites in mouse liver. Carbohydrates and lipids were characteristic categories. Pathway analysis results revealed that ethanol-induced pathways including biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid biosynthesis and pentose and glucuronate interconversions were suppressed by curcumin. Additionally, ethanol enhanced galactose metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism and pyruvate metabolism were inhibited in mice fed ethanol diet plus curcumin. Stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were disease biomarkers and therapical biomarkers. These results reflect the landscape of hepatic metabolism regulation. Our findings illustrate ethanol pathological pathway and metabolic mechanism of curcumin therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    PubMed

    Wang, L L; Johnson, E A

    1992-02-01

    Fatty acids and monoglycerides were evaluated in brain heart infusion broth and in milk for antimicrobial activity against the Scott A strain of Listeria monocytogenes. C12:0, C18:3, and glyceryl monolaurate (monolaurin) had the strongest activity in brain heart infusion broth and were bactericidal at 10 to 20 micrograms/ml, whereas potassium (K)-conjugated linoleic acids and C18:2 were bactericidal at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml. C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, glyceryl monomyristate, and glyceryl monopalmitate were not inhibitory at 200 micrograms/ml. The bactericidal activity in brain heart infusion broth was higher at pH 5 than at pH 6. In whole milk and skim milk, K-conjugated linoleic acid was bacteriostatic and prolonged the lag phase especially at 4 degrees C. Monolaurin inactivated L. monocytogenes in skim milk at 4 degrees C, but was less inhibitory at 23 degrees C. Monolaurin did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in whole milk because of the higher fat content. Other fatty acids tested were not effective in whole or skim milk. Our results suggest that K-conjugated linoleic acids or monolaurin could be used as an inhibitory agent against L. monocytogenes in dairy foods.

  5. Product Inhibition of the Fermentative Formation of Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Nunheimer, T. D.; Birnbaum, J.; Ihnen, E. D.; Demain, A. L.

    1970-01-01

    The addition of penicillin to cells of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing in 5-liter fermentors initiated the excretion of glutamic acid. The rate of glutamate production in fermentors declined continuously with time and reached 75% of the initial rate in 24 hr after penicillin had been added. The addition of glutamate to resting cell suspensions had only a slight effect on sugar utilization but caused a marked decrease in glutamate excretion. It is suggested that the high level of glutamate accumulating in the fermentation broth is responsible for inhibiting its own production. PMID:5480097

  6. Zinc cross-linked hydroxamated alginates for pulsed drug release

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha S; Deshmukh, Prasad R; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alginates can be tailored chemically to improve solubility, physicochemical, and biological properties and its complexation with metal ion is useful for controlling the drug release. Materials And Methods: Synthesized N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were subsequently complexed with zinc to form beads. Hydroxamation of sodium alginate was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The synthesized polymeric material exhibited reduced aqueous, HCl and NaOH solubility. The hydroxamated derivatives demonstrated pulsed release where change in pH of the dissolution medium stimulated the atenolol release. Conclusion: Atenolol loaded Zn cross-linked polymeric beads demonstrated the sustained the plasma drug levels with increased half-life. Although the synthesized derivatives greatly altered the aqueous solubility of sodium alginate, no significant differences in in vitro and in vivo atenolol release behavior amongst the N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were observed. PMID:24350039

  7. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  8. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  9. Azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and inhibits retinoic acid-mediated biological responses.

    PubMed

    Thoh, Maikho; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Raghavendra, Pongali B; Sureshkumar, Chitta; Manna, Sunil K

    2011-02-11

    Considering the role of retinoids in regulation of more than 500 genes involved in cell cycle and growth arrest, a detailed understanding of the mechanism and its regulation is useful for therapy. The extract of the medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica) is used against several ailments especially for anti-inflammatory, anti-itching, spermicidal, anticancer, and insecticidal activities. In this report we prove the detailed mechanism on the regulation of retinoic acid-mediated cell signaling by azadirachtin, active components of neem extract. Azadirachtin repressed all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-mediated nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation, not the DNA binding but the NF-κB-dependent gene expression. It did not inhibit IκBα degradation, IκBα kinase activity, or p65 phosphorylation and its nuclear translocation but inhibited NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Azadirachtin inhibited TRAF6-mediated, but not TRAF2-mediated NF-κB activation. It inhibited ATRA-induced Sp1 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) DNA binding. Azadirachtin inhibited ATRA binding with retinoid receptors, which is supported by biochemical and in silico evidences. Azadirachtin showed strong interaction with retinoid receptors. It suppressed ATRA-mediated removal of retinoid receptors, bound with DNA by inhibiting ATRA binding to its receptors. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and suppresses ATRA binding, inhibits falling off the receptors, and activates transcription factors like CREB, Sp1, NF-κB, etc. Thus, azadirachtin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-metastatic responses by a novel pathway that would be beneficial for further anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies.

  10. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  11. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  12. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  13. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  14. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  15. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  16. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug. PMID:25228885

  17. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug.

  18. Inhibition of Ileal Water Absorption by Intraluminal Fatty Acids INFLUENCE OF CHAIN LENGTH, HYDROXYLATION, AND CONJUGATION OF FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, Helmut V.; Phillips, Sidney F.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of fatty acids on ileal absorption of water, electrolytes, glucose, and taurocholate was examined in Thirty-Vella fistulas in five mongrel dogs. Fatty acid absorption also was measured. Segments of terminal ileum were perfused at steady state with isotonic electrolyte solutions containing 11.2 mM glucose, 4.5 mM taurocholate, and 0.1-5.0 mM fatty acid. Three C18 fatty acids, oleic acid, 10(9)-hydroxystearic acid, and ricinoleic acid, completely inhibited water absorption at 5 mM. Sodium, chloride, and potassium absorptions were inhibited in parallel with absorption of water. Differences between the potencies of C18 fatty acids were apparent when lesser concentrations were perfused. Dodecanoic and decanoic acids were as effective as C18 fatty acids at 5 mM but octanoic and hexanoic acids were ineffective. The polar group of C18 fatty acids was modified by conjugating oleic and ricinoleic acids with taurine. When these compounds and a substituted C18 fatty acid, p-n-decylbenzenesulfonate, were perfused, water absorption was also inhibited. Short-chain fatty acids (C3 and C4) and their hydroxylated derivatives were ineffective at 5 mM. When water absorption was inhibited, absorption of glucose and taurocholate was decreased. We speculate that the phenomenon of inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption by fatty acids may be relevant to steatorrhea and diarrhea in man. Images PMID:4808636

  19. Synthesis and cholinesterase inhibition of cativic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alza, Natalia P; Richmond, Victoria; Baier, Carlos J; Freire, Eleonora; Baggio, Ricardo; Murray, Ana Paula

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with memory impairment and cognitive deficit. Most of the drugs currently available for the treatment of AD are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In a preliminary study, significant AChE inhibition was observed for the ethanolic extract of Grindelia ventanensis (IC₅₀=0.79 mg/mL). This result prompted us to isolate the active constituent, a normal labdane diterpenoid identified as 17-hydroxycativic acid (1), through a bioassay guided fractionation. Taking into account that 1 showed moderate inhibition of AChE (IC₅₀=21.1 μM), selectivity over butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) (IC₅₀=171.1 μM) and that it was easily obtained from the plant extract in a very good yield (0.15% w/w), we decided to prepare semisynthetic derivatives of this natural diterpenoid through simple structural modifications. A set of twenty new cativic acid derivatives (3-6) was prepared from 1 through transformations on the carboxylic group at C-15, introducing a C2-C6 linker and a tertiary amine group. They were tested for their inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE and some structure-activity relationships were outlined. The most active derivative was compound 3c, with an IC₅₀ value of 3.2 μM for AChE. Enzyme kinetic studies and docking modeling revealed that this inhibitor targeted both the catalytic active site and the peripheral anionic site of this enzyme. Furthermore, 3c showed significant inhibition of AChE activity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, and was non-cytotoxic.

  20. Inhibition of Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporters Suppresses Kynurenic Acid Production Via Inhibition of Kynurenine Uptake in Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Kuroki, Yusuke; Urata, Tomomi; Mori, Noriyuki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increases of brain KYNA levels are involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and regulation of KYNA production has become a new target for treatment of these diseases. Kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is transported into astrocytes via large neutral amino acid transporters (LATs). In the present study, the effect of LATs regulation on KYN uptake and KYNA production was investigated in vitro and in vivo using an LATs inhibitor, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). In the in vitro study, cortical slices of rat brain were incubated with a physiological concentration of KYN and 3 µmol/L-3 mmol/L BCH. BCH inhibited KYNA production and KYN uptake in a dose-dependent manner, and their IC50 values were 90.7 and 97.4 µmol/L, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were administered KYN (50 mg/kg BW) orally and BCH (200 mg/kg BW) intravenously. Administration of KYN increased brain KYN and KYNA levels compared with the mice treated with vehicle, whereas additional administration of BCH suppressed KYN-induced elevations in KYN and KYNA levels to 50 and 70 % in the brain. These results suggest that inhibition of LATs prevented the increase of KYNA production via blockade of KYN uptake in the brain in vitro and in vivo. LATs can be a target to modulate brain function by regulation of KYNA production in the brain.

  1. Effects of glycine hydroxamate, carbon dioxide, and oxygen on photorespiratory carbon and nitrogen metabolism in spinach mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Lawyer, A L; Cornwell, K L; Gee, S L; Bassham, J A

    1982-05-01

    The effects of added glycine hydroxamate on the photosynthetic incorporation of (14)CO(2) into metabolites by isolated mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was investigated under conditions favorable to photorespiratory (PR) metabolism (0.04% CO(2) and 20% O(2)) and under conditions leading to nonphotorespiratory (NPR) metabolism (0.2% CO(2) and 2.7% O(2)). Glycine hydroxamate (GH) is a competitive inhibitor of the photorespiratory conversion of glycine to serine, CO(2) and NH(4) (+). During PR fixation, addition of the inhibitor increased glycine and decreased glutamine labeling. In contrast, labeling of glycine decreased under NPR conditions. This suggests that when the rate of glycolate synthesis is slow, the primary route of glycine synthesis is through serine rather than from glycolate. GH addition increased serine labeling under PR conditions but not under NPR conditions. This increase in serine labeling at a time when glycine to serine conversion is partially blocked by the inhibitor may be due to serine accumulation via the "reverse" flow of photorespiration from 3-P-glycerate to hydroxypyruvate when glycine levels are high. GH increased glyoxylate and decreased glycolate labeling. These observations are discussed with respect to possible glyoxylate feedback inhibition of photorespiration.

  2. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  3. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: a suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor alpha=0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor beta=0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  4. Tumor Selective Cytotoxic Action of a Thiomorpholin Hydroxamate Inhibitor (TMI-1) in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Lynda; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Cabaud, Olivier; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Combes, Sébastien; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Viens, Patrice; Collette, Yves; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeted therapies, associated with standard chemotherapies, have improved breast cancer care. However, primary and acquired resistances are frequently observed and the development of new concepts is needed. High-throughput approaches to identify new active and safe molecules with or without an “a priori” are currently developed. Also, repositioning already-approved drugs in cancer therapy is of growing interest. The thiomorpholine hydroxamate compound TMI-1 has been previously designed to inhibit metalloproteinase activity for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We present here the repositioning of TMI-1 drug in breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effect of TMI-1 on luminal, basal and ERBB2-overexpressing breast tumor cell lines and on MMTV-ERBB2/neu tumor evolution. We measured the effects on i) cell survival, ii) cell cycle, iii) extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, iv) association with doxorubicin, docetaxel and lapatinib, v) cancer stem cells compartment. In contrast with conventional cytotoxic drugs, TMI-1 was highly selective for tumor cells and cancer stem cells at submicromolar range. All non-malignant cells tested were resistant even at high concentration. TMI-1 was active on triple negative (TN) and ERBB2-overexpressing breast tumor cell lines, and was also highly efficient on human and murine “primary” ERBB2-overexpressing cells. Treatment of transgenic MMTV-ERBB2/neu mice with 100 mg/kg/day TMI-1 alone induced tumor apoptosis, inhibiting mammary gland tumor occurrence and development. No adverse effects were noticed during the treatment. This compound had a strong synergistic effect in association with docetaxel, doxorubicin and lapatinib. We showed that TMI-1 mediates its selective effects by caspase-dependent apoptosis. TMI-1 was efficient in 34/40 tumor cell lines of various origins (ED50: 0.6 µM to 12.5 µM). Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration of the tumor selective

  5. The lactic acid bacteria metabolite phenyllactic acid inhibits both radial growth and sporulation of filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Food spoilage caused by molds is a severe problem. In food and feed, e.g. dairy products, sourdough bread and silage, lactic acid bacteria are used as starter cultures. Besides lactic and acetic acid, some strains produce other low molecular weight compounds with antifungal activities. One of these metabolites is phenyllactic acid (PLA), well known for its antifungal effect. The inhibitory effect of PLA has only partially been investigated, and the objective of this study was to elucidate in detail the antifungal properties of PLA. Results We investigated the outgrowth of individual conidia from Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium roqueforti, and observed the morphologies of resulting colonies on solid media using different acid concentrations. We found that PLA inhibits molds similar to weak acid preservatives. Furthermore, it has an additional activity: at sub-inhibitory concentrations, fungal colonies displayed slower radial growth and inhibited sporulation. The L isoform of PLA is a more potent inhibitor than the D form. Increased expression of phiA was observed during PLA treatment. This gene was initially identified as being induced by Streptomyces-produced macrolide antibiotics, and is shown to be a structural protein in developed cells. This suggests that PhiA may act as a general stress protectant in fungi. Conclusion From a food protection perspective, the results of this study support the usage of lactic acid bacteria strains synthesizing PLA as starter cultures in food and feed. Such starter cultures could inhibit spore synthesis, which would be beneficial as many food borne fungi are spread by airborne spores. PMID:24229396

  6. The lactic acid bacteria metabolite phenyllactic acid inhibits both radial growth and sporulation of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Svanström, Åsa; Boveri, Silvio; Boström, Emma; Melin, Petter

    2013-11-14

    Food spoilage caused by molds is a severe problem. In food and feed, e.g. dairy products, sourdough bread and silage, lactic acid bacteria are used as starter cultures. Besides lactic and acetic acid, some strains produce other low molecular weight compounds with antifungal activities. One of these metabolites is phenyllactic acid (PLA), well known for its antifungal effect. The inhibitory effect of PLA has only partially been investigated, and the objective of this study was to elucidate in detail the antifungal properties of PLA. We investigated the outgrowth of individual conidia from Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium roqueforti, and observed the morphologies of resulting colonies on solid media using different acid concentrations. We found that PLA inhibits molds similar to weak acid preservatives. Furthermore, it has an additional activity: at sub-inhibitory concentrations, fungal colonies displayed slower radial growth and inhibited sporulation. The L isoform of PLA is a more potent inhibitor than the D form. Increased expression of phiA was observed during PLA treatment. This gene was initially identified as being induced by Streptomyces-produced macrolide antibiotics, and is shown to be a structural protein in developed cells. This suggests that PhiA may act as a general stress protectant in fungi. From a food protection perspective, the results of this study support the usage of lactic acid bacteria strains synthesizing PLA as starter cultures in food and feed. Such starter cultures could inhibit spore synthesis, which would be beneficial as many food borne fungi are spread by airborne spores.

  7. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D.; Wang, Xuming; Li, Minhua

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  8. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  9. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  10. Salvianolic acid B inhibits autophagy and protects starving cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Liu, Jian-xun; Li, Xin-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective or lethal role of autophagy and the effects of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on autophagy in starving myocytes. Methods: Cardiac myocytes were incubated under starvation conditions (GD) for 0, 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Autophagic flux in starving cells was measured via chloroquine (3 μmol/L). After myocytes were treated with Sal B (50 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of chloroquine (3 μmol/L) under GD 3 h, the amount of LC3-II, the abundance of LC3-positive fluorescent dots in cells, cell viability and cellular ATP levels were determined using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, MTT assay and luminometer, respectively. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) and immunofluorescent duel labeling of LC3 and Caspase-8 were used to examine the characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis. Results: Immunoblot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II in starving cells increased in a time-dependent manner accompanied by increased LC3-positive fluorescence and decreased cell viability and ATP content. Sal B (50 μmol/L) inhibited the increase in LC3-II, reduced the abundance of LC3 immunofluorescence and intensity of Caspase-8 fluorescence, and enhanced cellular viability and ATP levels in myocytes under GD 3 h, regardless of whether chloroquine was present. Conclusion: Autophagy induced by starvation for 3 h led to cell injury. Sal B protected starving cells by blocking the early stage of autophagic flux and inhibiting apoptosis that occurred during autophagy. PMID:21113177

  11. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  12. Amino acids inhibit kynurenic acid formation via suppression of kynurenine uptake or kynurenic acid synthesis in rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Okamoto, Misaki; Kanatani, Yuka; Sano, Mitsue; Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increase of brain KYNA levels is involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. KYNA-producing enzymes have broad substrate specificity for amino acids, and brain uptake of kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is via large neutral amino acid transporters (LAT). In the present study, to find out amino acids with the potential to suppress KYNA production, we comprehensively investigated the effects of proteinogenic amino acids on KYNA formation and KYN uptake in rat brain in vitro. Cortical slices of rat brain were incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer buffer containing a physiological concentration of KYN with individual amino acids. Ten out of 19 amino acids (specifically, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine, alanine, cysteine, glutamine, glutamate, and aspartate) significantly reduced KYNA formation at 1 mmol/L. These amino acids showed inhibitory effects in a dose-dependent manner, and partially inhibited KYNA production at physiological concentrations. Leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, all LAT substrates, also reduced tissue KYN concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, with their inhibitory rates for KYN uptake significantly correlated with KYNA formation. These results suggest that five LAT substrates inhibit KYNA formation via blockade of KYN transport, while the other amino acids act via blockade of the KYNA synthesis reaction in brain. Amino acids can be a good tool to modulate brain function by manipulation of KYNA formation in the brain. This approach may be useful in the treatment and prevention of neurological and psychiatric diseases associated with increased KYNA levels.

  13. Boric acid inhibition of steam generator materials corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wootten, M.J.; Wolfe, C.R.; Hermer, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In 1974, Westinghouse recommended a change from phosphate water chemistry control for nuclear steam generators to one in which no solids are intentionally added, called all volatile treatment (AVT). The reason for the recommended change in water chemistry control was the occurrence of phosphate thinning of the Alloy 600 heat transfer tubes in some operating plants. Since the change over to AVT, other types of corrosion from impurities in the water have been observed of the materials of construction of nuclear steam generators. Initially, several plants observed denting, which is caused by the corrosion of the carbon steel tube support plates. After 8 yr of usage as a denting inhibitor in nuclear plants, no detrimental effects have been identified as due to boric acid. It is believed that boric acid will inhibit denting-type corrosion and caustic attack of Alloy 600; however, it must be stressed that it is not a substitute for good chemistry practices and all levels and disciplines within the operating plant should recognize the importance of rigorous, long-term chemistry control.

  14. Gastric acid inhibition in the treatment of peptic ulcer hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Kovacs, Thomas O G; Jensen, Dennis M

    2009-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease is a common clinical event, resulting in considerable patient morbidity and significant health care costs. Inhibiting gastric acid secretion is a key component in improving clinical outcomes, including reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and surgery. Raising intragastric pH promotes clot stability and reduces the influences of gastric acid and pepsin. Patients with high-risk stigmata for ulcer bleeding (arterial bleeding, nonbleeding visible vessels, and adherent clots) benefit significantly from and should receive high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after successful endoscopic hemostasis. For patients with low-risk stigmata (flat spots or clean ulcer base), oral PPI therapy alone is sufficient. For oozing bleeding (an intermediate risk finding), successful endoscopic hemostasis and oral PPI are recommended. Using intravenous PPIs before endoscopy appears to reduce the frequency of finding high-risk stigmata on later endoscopy, but has not been shown to improve clinical outcomes. High-dose oral PPIs may be as effective as intravenous infusion in achieving positive clinical outcomes, but this has not been documented by randomized studies and its cost-effectiveness is unclear.

  15. Growth inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by cellular extracts of human intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Miyakawa, H; Hasegawa, A; Takazoe, I; Kawai, Y

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro growth of Streptococcus mutans was completely inhibited by water-soluble extracts from cells of various intestinal lactic acid bacteria identified as Streptococcus faecium, Streptococcus equinus, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus salivarius. The growth inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of the extracts. In contrast, the extracts did not inhibit the growth of the major indigenous intestinal lactic acid bacteria isolated from humans. These lactic acid bacteria were not acutely toxic in mice. PMID:4030098

  16. Ethacrynic acid inhibits multiple steps in the NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Yusheng; Englert, Joshua A; Delude, Russell L; Fink, Mitchell P

    2005-01-01

    Ethacrynic acid has been used as a safe and effective diuretic for more than 30 years. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ethacrynic acid is also an anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits signaling by the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB. We showed that ethacrynic acid inhibited luciferase expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells transfected with an NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase reporter vector and also inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (electrophoretic mobility shift assay). Ethacrynic acid inhibited degradation of IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Ethacrynic acid impaired DNA binding of wild-type p65 subunits of NF-kappaB in cells. However, DNA binding of a Cys--> Ser p65 mutant was not inhibited by ethacrynic acid, suggesting that ethacrynic acid inhibits DNA binding by alkylating p65 at Cys. In a cell-free system, binding of p50 homodimers to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence was inhibited by ethacrynic acid at concentrations from 10 to 100 microM, indicating that ethacrynic acid probably also covalently modifies the p50 subunit. These data indicate that ethacrynic acid inhibits activation of the NF-kappaB pathway at multiple points and suggest that this well-studied drug warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic for various conditions that are associated with excessive inflammation.

  17. New hydroxamate inhibitors of neurotensin-degrading enzymes. Synthesis and enzyme active-site recognition.

    PubMed

    Bourdel, E; Doulut, S; Jarretou, G; Labbe-Jullie, C; Fehrentz, J A; Doumbia, O; Kitabgi, P; Martinez, J

    1996-08-01

    Selective and mixed inhibitors of the three zinc metallopeptidases that degrade neurotensin (NT), e.g. endopeptidase 24-16 (EC 3.4.24.16), endopeptidase 24-11 (EC 3.4.24.11 or neutral endopeptidase, NEP) and endopeptidase 24-15 (EC 3.4.24.15), and leucine-aminopeptidase (type IV-S), that degrades the NT-related peptides, Neuromedin N (NN), are of great interest. On the structural basis of compound JMV 390-1 (N-[3-[(hydroxyamino)carbonyl]-1-oxo-2(R)-benzylpropyl]-L- isoleucyl-L-leucine), which was a full inhibitor of the major NT degrading enzymes, several hydroxamate inhibitors corresponding to the general formula HONHCO-CH2-CH(CH2-C6H5)CO-X-Y-OH (with X-Y = dipeptide) have been synthesized. Compound 7a (X-Y = Ile-Ala) was nearly 40-times more potent in inhibiting EC 24-16 than NEP and more than 800-times more potent than EC 24-15, with an IC50 (12 nM) almost equivalent to that of compound JMV 390-1. Therefore, this compound is an interesting selective inhibitor of EC 24-16, and should be an interesting probe to explore the physiological involvement of EC 24-16 in the metabolism of neurotensin.

  18. Characterization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition by Chlorogenic Acid and Cichoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Lipchock, James M; Hendrickson, Heidi P; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Ginther, Patrick S; Rivalta, Ivan; Ten, Nicholas S; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-01-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways and is an active target for the design of inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. Recently, cichoric acid (CHA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were predicted by docking methods to be allosteric inhibitors that bind distal to the active site. However, using a combination of steady-state inhibition kinetics, solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CHA is a competitive inhibitor that binds in the active site of PTP1B. CGA, while a noncompetitive inhibitor, binds in the second aryl phosphate binding site, rather than the predicted benzfuran binding pocket. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and cysteine-phosphoryl intermediate states with and without bound CGA suggest CGA binding inhibits PTP1B by altering hydrogen bonding patterns at the active site. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B.

  19. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  20. Inhibition of Sporulation by Cerulenin and Its Reversion by Exogenous Fatty Acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Tadao; Awaya, Juichi; Ōmura, Satoshi

    1976-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae G2-2 was inhibited by the antibiotic cerulenin which is known to be a specific inhibitor of fatty acid and sterol synthesis. This inhibition was reversed by various fatty acids, especially by oleic acid (C18:1) and pentadecanoic acid (C15:0). Ergosterol showed only slight reversibility of this inhibition. When cerulenin was added to the sporulation medium later than 12 h after the start of incubation, the marked inhibition disappeared. When the fatty acid fraction extracted from the sporulated yeasts was added to the cells pretreated with cerulenin for more than 6 h, sporulation became evident 6 h after the fatty acid fraction addition. Therefore, sufficient synthesis of fatty acids required for sporulation was assumed to occur during the first 6 h in phase I of yeast sporulation. PMID:769672

  1. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  2. Mechanism of triclosan inhibition of bacterial fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Heath, R J; Rubin, J R; Holland, D R; Zhang, E; Snow, M E; Rock, C O

    1999-04-16

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that inhibits bacterial fatty acid synthesis at the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) step. Resistance to triclosan in Escherichia coli is acquired through a missense mutation in the fabI gene that leads to the expression of FabI[G93V]. The specific activity and substrate affinities of FabI[G93V] are similar to FabI. Two different binding assays establish that triclosan dramatically increases the affinity of FabI for NAD+. In contrast, triclosan does not increase the binding of NAD+ to FabI[G93V]. The x-ray crystal structure of the FabI-NAD+-triclosan complex confirms that hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between triclosan and both the protein and the NAD+ cofactor contribute to the formation of a stable ternary complex, with the drug binding at the enoyl substrate site. These data show that the formation of a noncovalent "bi-substrate" complex accounts for the effectiveness of triclosan as a FabI inhibitor and illustrates that mutations in the FabI active site that interfere with the formation of a stable FabI-NAD+-triclosan ternary complex acquire resistance to the drug.

  3. Direct inhibition of retinoic acid catabolism by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Uhlemann, Ria; Regen, Francesca; Heuser, Isabella; Otte, Christian; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence from animal and human studies suggests neuroprotective effects of the SSRI fluoxetine, e.g., in the aftermath of stroke. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Because of its effects on the cytochrome P450 system (CYP450), we hypothesized that neuroprotection by fluoxetine is related to altered metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), whose CYP450-mediated degradation in brain tissue constitutes an important step in the regulation of its site-specific auto- and paracrine actions. Using traditional pharmacological in vitro assays, the effects of fluoxetine on RA degradation were probed in crude synaptosomes from rat brain and human-derived SH-SY5Y cells, and in cultures of neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, retinoid-dependent effects of fluoxetine on neuronal survival following glutamate exposure were investigated in rat primary neurons cells using specific retinoid receptor antagonists. Experiments revealed dose-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal RA degradation by fluoxetine along with dose-dependent increases in RA levels in cell cultures. Furthermore, fluoxetine's neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in rat primary neurons were demonstrated to partially depend on RA signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that the potent, pleiotropic antidepressant fluoxetine directly interacts with RA homeostasis in brain tissue, thereby exerting its neuroprotective effects.

  4. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Luana T; Moreira, Daniel C; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-15

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimalarial action of hydroxamate-based iron chelators and potentiation of desferrioxamine action by reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, J; Tsafack, A; Amichai, Y; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based chelators of iron are potent inhibitors of in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Two types of such chelators, the natural desferrioxamine and the synthetic reversed siderophore RSFileum2, are prototypes of antimalarial agents whose action spectra differ in the speed of action, stage dependence, and degree of reversibility of effects. This work explores the possibility of improving the antimalarial efficacy of these agents by using them in various combinations on in vitro cultures of P. falciparum. Growth assessment was based both on total nucleic acid synthesis and on parasitemia. The results indicate that the synthetic reversed siderophore more than complements the antimalarial action of desferrioxamine when applied during either ring, trophozoite, or mixed stages. The combined drug effects were significantly higher than the additive effect of the individual drugs. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for both reversible effects and irreversible (i.e., sustained) effects. Following an 8-h window of exposure the combined drug treatment caused parasite growth arrest and prevented its recovery, even 3 days after the treatment. The fact that such a combination of iron chelators displays a wider action spectrum than either drug alone has implications for the design of chemotherapy regimens. PMID:7695330

  6. Inhibition of oxidative metabolism by propionic acid and its reversal by carnitine in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, E P; Fennessey, P V; Miller, L V

    1986-01-01

    The present study was designed to study the interaction of propionic acid and carnitine on oxidative metabolism by isolated rat hepatocytes. Propionic acid (10 mM) inhibited hepatocyte oxidation of [1-14C]-pyruvate (10 mM) by 60%. This inhibition was not the result of substrate competition, as butyric acid had minimal effects on pyruvate oxidation. Carnitine had a small inhibitory effect on pyruvate oxidation in the hepatocyte system (210 +/- 19 and 184 +/- 18 nmol of pyruvate/60 min per mg of protein in the absence and presence of 10 mM-carnitine respectively; means +/- S.E.M., n = 10). However, in the presence of propionic acid (10 mM), carnitine (10 mM) increased the rate of pyruvate oxidation by 19%. Under conditions where carnitine partially reversed the inhibitory effect of propionic acid on pyruvate oxidation, formation of propionylcarnitine was documented by using fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy. Propionic acid also inhibited oxidation of [1-14C]palmitic acid (0.8 mM) by hepatocytes isolated from fed rats. The degree of inhibition caused by propionic acid was decreased in the presence of 10 mM-carnitine (41% inhibition in the absence of carnitine, 22% inhibition in the presence of carnitine). Propionic acid did not inhibit [1-14C]palmitic acid oxidation by hepatocytes isolated from 48 h-starved rats. These results demonstrate that propionic acid interferes with oxidative metabolism in intact hepatocytes. Carnitine partially reverses the inhibition of pyruvate and palmitic acid oxidation by propionic acid, and this reversal is associated with increased propionylcarnitine formation. The present study provides a metabolic basis for the efficacy of carnitine in patients with abnormal organic acid accumulation, and the observation that such patients appear to have increased carnitine requirements ('carnitine insufficiency'). PMID:3790065

  7. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  8. Inhibition and Mechanism of HDAC8 Revisited

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have found intense interest as drug targets for a variety of diseases, but there is disagreement about basic aspects of the inhibition and mechanism of HDACs. QM/MM calculations of HDAC8 including a large QM region provide a model that is consistent with the available crystal structures and structure–activity relationships of different HDAC inhibitors. The calculations support a spontaneous proton transfer from a hydroxamic acid to an active site histidine upon binding to the zinc. The role of the H142/D176 catalytic dyad as the general base of the reaction is elucidated. The reasons for the disagreements between previous proposals are discussed. The results provide detailed insights into the unique mechanism of HDACs, including the role of the two catalytic dyads and function of the potassium near the active site. They also have important implications for the design of novel inhibitors for a number of HDACs such as the class IIa HDACs. PMID:25060069

  9. Tetracycline Inhibits Propagation of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication and Alters Membrane Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pato, Martin L.

    1977-01-01

    Tetracycline, at concentrations greater than required for inhibition of protein synthesis, rapidly and completely inhibits replication of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. At these concentrations of tetracycline, synthesis of ribonucleic acid is not appreciably altered. In addition to inhibiting DNA replication, tetracycline causes alterations of the cytoplasmic membrane resulting in leakage of intracellular pools of nucleotides, amino acids, and the non-metabolizable sugar analogue, thiomethylgalactoside. As DNA is synthesized at a site on the membrane, alterations of membrane structure by tetracycline may be responsible for the observed inhibition of DNA replication. PMID:403855

  10. Inhibition of carnitine biosynthesis by valproic acid in rats--the biochemical mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farkas, V; Bock, I; Cseko, J; Sandor, A

    1996-11-08

    The anticonvulsive drug, valproic acid (VPA), inhibits the biosynthesis of carnitine, and may contribute in this way to carnitine deficiency associated with VPA therapy. The conversion of [3H]-butyrobetaine into [3H]-carnitine was determined 60 min following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.2 mmol/kg VPA in rats. The fraction of radioactivity found in [3H]-carnitine in the liver decreased from 63.2 +/- 1.50% to 39.2 +/- 1.11% (mean +/- SEM). Total carnitine in the liver also decreased, whereas the precursor butyrobetaine increased from 5.01 +/- 0.71 nmol/g to 8.22 +/- 0.82 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). VPA also exhibited a dramatic effect on the conversion of an unlabeled loading amount of butyrobetaine. The increment in total carnitine caused by butyrobetaine in liver was reduced from 161 +/- 15.4 nmol/g to 53.2 +/- 5.11 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). These data prove that VPA reduces the flux through butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.1.). The drug in vitro, however, did not inhibit the enzyme directly. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that VPA decreased the level of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; a cofactor of butyrobetaine hydroxylase) from 73.5 +/- 2.90 nmol/g to 52.9 +/- 2.2 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM) in the liver. The level of 1-glutamate showed a rather dramatic decrease in the liver. Moreover, alpha-KG proved to have a protective role against VPA in the [3H]-butyrobetaine conversion experiment.

  11. Cellobionic acid inhibition of cellobiohydrolase I and cellobiose dehydrogenase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    End-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose is a rate-limiting factor in cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. While cellobiose and glucose inhibition have been extensively investigated, cellobionate inhibition has been minimally studied despite the discovery that accessory proteins such as cello...

  12. The corrosion inhibition of iron and aluminum by various naturally occurring biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hansen, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Biological polymers that exhibit a strong affinity for metal surfaces are increasingly becoming the focus of research toward the development of environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors. This paper deals with the use of various naturally occurring organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors for iron or aluminum. Among the organic molecules considered are catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores isolated from bacteria, the adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L, and caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. FTIR analysis, anodic polarization curves, and AC impedance measurements were used to determine the adsorption and effectiveness of the various organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors. Parabactin, a catecholate siderophore, was effective in inhibiting both the corrosion of iron in hydrochloric acid and the pitting of aluminum in 0.1 M sodium chloride. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel was also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  13. Gene quantification by the NanoGene assay is resistant to inhibition by humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gha-Young; Wang, Xiaofang; Ahn, Hosang; Son, Ahjeong

    2011-10-15

    NanoGene assay is a magnetic bead and quantum dot nanoparticles based gene quantification assay. It relies on a set of probe and signaling probe DNAs to capture the target DNA via hybridization. We have demonstrated the inhibition resistance of the NanoGene assay using humic acids laden genomic DNA (gDNA). At 1 μg of humic acid per mL, quantitiative PCR (qPCR) was inhibited to 0% of its quantification capability whereas NanoGene assay was able to maintain more than 60% of its quantification capability. To further increase the inhibition resistance of NanoGene assay at high concentration of humic acids, we have identified the specific mechanisms that are responsible for the inhibition. We examined five potential mechanisms with which the humic acids can partially inhibit our NanoGene assay. The mechanisms examined were (1) adsorption of humic acids on the particle surface; (2) particle aggregation induced by humic acids; (3) fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by humic acids during hybridization; (4) humic acids mimicking of target DNA; and (5) nonspecific binding between humic acids and target gDNA. The investigation showed that no adsorption of humic acids onto the particles' surface was observed for the humic acids' concentration. Particle aggregation and fluorescence quenching were also negligible. Humic acids also did not mimic the target gDNA except 1000 μg of humic acids per mL and hence should not contribute to the partial inhibition. Four of the above mechanisms were not related to the inhibition effect of humic acids particularly at the environmentally relevant concentrations (<100 μg/mL). However, a substantial amount of nonspecific binding was observed between the humic acids and target gDNA. This possibly results in lesser amount of target gDNA being captured by the probe and signaling DNA.

  14. 3,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist for hydroxycarboxylic acid 1, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlu; Kuei, Chester; Zhu, Jessica; Yu, Jingxue; Zhang, Li; Shih, Amy; Mirzadegan, Taraneh; Shelton, Jonathan; Sutton, Steven; Connelly, Margery A; Lee, Grace; Carruthers, Nicholas; Wu, Jiejun; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2012-06-01

    Niacin raises high-density lipoprotein and lowers low-density lipoprotein through the activation of the β-hydroxybutyrate receptor hydroxycarboxylic acid 2 (HCA2) (aka GPR109a) but with an unwanted side effect of cutaneous flushing caused by vascular dilation because of the stimulation of HCA2 receptors in Langerhans cells in skin. HCA1 (aka GPR81), predominantly expressed in adipocytes, was recently identified as a receptor for lactate. Activation of HCA1 in adipocytes by lactate results in the inhibition of lipolysis, suggesting that agonists for HCA1 may be useful for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Lactate is a metabolite of glucose, suggesting that HCA1 may also be involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The low potency of lactate to activate HCA1, coupled with its fast turnover rate in vivo, render it an inadequate tool for studying the biological role of lactate/HCA1 in vivo. In this article, we demonstrate the identification of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (3-HBA) as an agonist for both HCA2 and HCA1, whereas 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-DHBA) is a specific agonist for only HCA1 (EC(50) ∼150 μM). 3,5-DHBA inhibits lipolysis in wild-type mouse adipocytes but not in HCA1-deficient adipocytes. Therefore, 3,5-DHBA is a useful tool for the in vivo study of HCA1 function and offers a base for further HCA1 agonist design. Because 3-HBA and 3,5-DHBA are polyphenolic acids found in many natural products, such as fruits, berries, and coffee, it is intriguing to speculate that other heretofore undiscovered natural substances may have therapeutic benefits.

  15. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by chlorogenic acid in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Jia-Da; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet. Recently, it is demonstrated to have potent antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying CGA analgesia. Here, we have found that CGA can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. First, CGA decreased the peak amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Second, CGA shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 41.76 ± 8.65% in the maximum current response to protons but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Third, CGA altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral administered CGA attenuated nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. ASICs are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Our findings CGA inhibition of native ASICs indicated that CGA may exert analgesic action by modulating ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which revealed a novel cellular and molecular mechanism underlying CGA analgesia.

  16. Polyunsaturated fatty acid inhibition of fatty acid synthase transcription is independent of PPAR activation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Turini, M; Jump, D B; Abraham, S; Reedy, M

    1998-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the (n-6) and (n-3) families inhibit the rate of gene transcription for a number of hepatic lipogenic and glycolytic genes, e.g., fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast, saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids have no inhibitory capability. The suppression of gene transcription resulting from the addition of PUFA to a high carbohydrate diet: occurs quickly (< 3 h) after its addition to a high glucose diet; can be recreated with hepatocytes cultured in a serum-free medium containing insulin and glucocorticoids; can be demonstrated in diabetic rats fed fructose; and is independent of glucagon. While the nature of the intracellular PUFA inhibitor is unclear, it appears that delta-6 desaturation is a required step in the process. Recently, the fatty acid activated nuclear factor, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) was suggested to be the PUFA-response factor. However, the potent PPAR activators ETYA and Wy-14643 did not suppress hepatic expression of FAS, but did induce the PPAR-responsive gene, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX). Similarly, treating rat hepatocytes with 20:4 (n-6) suppressed FAS expression but had no effect on AOX. Thus, it appears that the PUFA regulation of gene transcription involves a PUFA-response factor that is independent from PPAR.

  17. Talarolide A, a Cyclic Heptapeptide Hydroxamate from an Australian Marine Tunicate-Associated Fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB-TU011).

    PubMed

    Dewapriya, Pradeep; Prasad, Pritesh; Damodar, Rakesh; Salim, Angela A; Capon, Robert J

    2017-04-06

    A miniaturized 24-well plate microbioreactor approach was used to explore secondary metabolite media dependence in an Australian marine tunicate-associated fungus, Talaromyces sp. (CMB TU011). Detailed chemical investigations of an antifungal M1-saline cultivation yielded talarolide A (1), only the second reported natural cyclic peptide hydroxamate, and the first from a fungus. The antifungal properties of the M1-saline extract were attributed to the known diterpene glycoside sordarin (2). Structure elucidation of 1 and 2 was achieved by detailed spectroscopic analysis, with amino acid configurations in 1 assigned by the C3 and C18 Marfey's methods, and l-Ala and d-Ala regiochemistry by the recently reported 2D C3 Marfey's method.

  18. Ethacrynic Acid Inhibits Sphingosylphosphorylcholine-Induced Keratin 8 Phosphorylation and Reorganization via Transglutaminase-2 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Byun, Hyun Jung; Kang, Kyung Jin; Park, Mi Kyung; Lee, Hye Ja; Kang, June Hee; Lee, Eun Ji; Kim, You Ri; Kim, Hyun Ji; Kim, Young Woo; Jung, Kyung Chae; Kim, Soo Youl; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2013-09-30

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is significantly increased in the malicious ascites of tumor patients and induces perinuclear reorganization of keratin 8 (K8) filaments in PANC-1 cells. The reorganization contributes to the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells resulting in increased migration. Recently, we reported that transglutaminase-2 (Tgase-2) is involved in SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization. However, effects of Tgase-2 inhibitors on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization were not clearly studied. We found that ethacrynic acid (ECA) concentration-dependently inhibited Tgase-2. Therefore, we examined the effects of ECA on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization. ECA concentration-dependently suppressed the SPC-induced phosphorylation and perinuclear reorganization of K8. ECA also suppressed the SPC-induced migration and invasion. SPC induced JNK activation through Tgase-2 expression and ECA suppressed the activation and expression of JNK in PANC-1 cells. These results suggested that ECA might be useful to control Tgase-2 dependent metastasis of cancer cells such as pancreatic cancer and lung cancers.

  19. Intracellular dehydroascorbic acid inhibits SVCT2-dependent transport of ascorbic acid in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Cerioni, Liana; Scotti, Maddalena; Cantoni, Orazio

    2015-09-01

    Exposure of U937 cells to low concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (AA) is associated with a prompt cellular uptake and a further mitochondrial accumulation of the vitamin. Under the same conditions, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) uptake was followed by rapid reduction and accumulation of identical intracellular levels of AA, however, in the absence of significant mitochondrial uptake. This event was instead observed after exposure to remarkably greater concentrations of DHA. Furthermore, experiments performed in isolated mitochondria revealed that DHA transport through hexose transporters and Na(+) -dependent transport of AA were very similar. These results suggest that the different subcellular compartmentalization of the vitamin is mediated by events promoting inhibition of mitochondrial AA transport, possibly triggered by low levels of DHA. We obtained results in line with this notion in intact cells, and more direct evidence in isolated mitochondria. This inhibitory effect was promptly reversible after DHA removal and comparable with that mediated by established inhibitors, as quercetin. The results presented collectively indicate that low intracellular concentrations of DHA, because of its rapid reduction back to AA, are a poor substrate for direct mitochondrial uptake. DHA concentrations, however, appear sufficiently high to mediate inhibition of mitochondrial transport of AA/DHA-derived AA.

  20. An appraisal of cinnamyl sulfonamide hydroxamate derivatives (HDAC inhibitors) for anti-cancer, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Neetinkumar D; Shoja, M H; Biswas, Subhankar; Nayak, Pawan G; Kumar, Nitesh; Rao, C Mallikarjuna

    2016-06-25

    Multiple genetic mutations along with unusual epigenetic modifications play a major role in cancer development. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme overexpression observed in the majority of cancers is responsible for tumor suppressor gene silencing and activation of proto-oncogenes to oncogenes. Cinnamic acid derivatives exhibit anti-cancer potential through HDAC enzyme inhibition. We have synthesized a few cinnamyl sulfonamide hydroxamate derivatives (NMJ-1, -2 and -3) by already published in-house procedures and their purity, and chemical characterization were performed by NMR, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. The anti-cancer activities were also evaluated against colon cancer. The rationale for synthesis was based on bioisosterism concept. To take the work forward, these compounds were considered for in vitro anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in cancer cells. The effectiveness of these compounds was determined by SRB assay. The compounds showed cancer cell cytotoxicity (IC50 range of 5.7 ± 0.43 to 20.5 ± 1.9 μM). The mechanism of compound-induced cell death involves an intrinsic apoptosis pathway which was supported by the following: increase in apoptotic index, arrest in cell cycle at G2/M phase, increase in annexin V binding and induction of p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression in the treated cells. Further, their target modulating effect, measured as the expression of acetyl-H3 histone and acetyl α-tubulin was determined by Western blots. Hyper acetylation of H3 histone and α-tubulin were observed. Furthermore, increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, total Bad was estimated by ELISA. The anti-angiogenic effect was examined through cobalt (II) chloride (CoCl2)-induced HIF-1α expression, where the compounds reduced the expression of induced HIF-1α. In addition, their anti-metastatic ability was determined through phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced expression of MMP-2 and -9 by Western blotting and gelatin

  1. Structure of malonic acid-based inhibitors bound to human neutrophil collagenase. A new binding mode explains apparently anomalous data.

    PubMed Central

    Brandstetter, H.; Engh, R. A.; Von Roedern, E. G.; Moroder, L.; Huber, R.; Bode, W.; Grams, F.

    1998-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc endopeptidases, which have been implicated in various disease processes. Various classes of MMP inhibitors, including hydroxamic acids, phosphinic acids, and thiols, have been previously described. Most of these mimic peptides, and most likely bind analogous to the corresponding peptide substrates. Among the hydroxamic acids, malonic acid derivatives have been used as MMP inhibitors, although optimization of their inhibition potency was not successful. Here we report the design of malonic acid-based inhibitors using the X-ray structure of a collagenase/inhibitor complex, which revealed a nonsubstrate-like binding mode. The proposed beta-type turn-like conformation for the improved inhibitors was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The observation of nonsubstrate-like binding confirms the original strategy for structure-based modeling of improved malonic acid inhibitors, and explains kinetic data that are inconsistent with substrate-like binding. Detailed interactions for the improved inhibitors seen in the crystal structure also suggest possibilities for further modifications in cycles of structure based drug design. Indeed, we have designed nonpeptidic inhibitors with approximately 500-fold improved inhibition based on these structures. PMID:9655333

  2. Inhibition of N-acetylneuraminate lyase by N-acetyl-4-oxo-D-neuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Gross, H J; Brossmer, R

    1988-05-09

    We show that the 4-oxo analogue of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid strongly inhibits N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NeuAc aldolase, EC 4.1.3.3) from Clostridum perfringens (Ki = 0.025 mM) and Escherichia coli (Ki = 0.15 mM). In each case the inhibition was competitive. N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid; N-Acetylneuraminate lyase; N-Acetyl-D-neuraminic acid analog; 5-Acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-beta-D-manno-non-2,4-diulosonic acid; 2-Deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetyl-4-oxo-neuraminic acid; Competitive inhibitor.

  3. Mechanism of specific inhibition of phototropism by phenylacetic acid in corn seedling

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-05-01

    Using geotropism as a control for phototropism, compounds similar to phenylacetic acid that phototreact with flavins and/or have auxin-like activity were examined for their ability to specifically inhibit phototropism in corn seedlings using geotropism as a control. Results using indole-3-acetic acid, napthalene-1-acetic acid, naphthalene-2-acetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and ..beta..-phenylpyruvic acid suggest that such compounds will specifically inhibit phototropism primarily because of their photoreactivity with flavins and not their auxin activity. In addition, the in vivo concentration of phenylacetic acid required to induce specificity was well below that required to stimulate coleoptile growth. Estimates of the percentage of photoreceptor pigment inactivated by phenylacetic acid (>10%) suggest that phenylacetic acid could be used to photoaffinity label the flavoprotein involved in corn seedling phototropism.

  4. Weak acid inhibition of fermentation by Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M M; Loureiro-Dias, M C; Loureiro, V

    1997-05-20

    The inhibition kinetics of fermentation by Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated for weak carboxylic acids. Several regression equations were tried to fit the experimental data, most cases being best fitted to exponential curves. The following parameters were determined: i) acid concentration responsible for 50% inhibition of fermentation (C50%); ii) area under the regression curve up to that concentration (A50%) and iii) exponential inhibition constant (k(i)). These parameters were compared according to their ability to express the inhibitory effect of each acid. In broad terms, the values of k(i) in association with minimum inhibitory concentrations (x(min)), were found best to express the inhibitory effect of the weak acids. However, C50% values were satisfactorily correlated with k(i). The value of A50% more precisely reflected the occasional stimulatory effect of low concentrations of weak acids. Comparison of inhibition parameters for Z. bailii and for S. cerevisiae revealed a higher resistance of the former to acetic, propionic, butyric and benzoic acids and similar resistance to caproic, caprylic and sorbic acids. Previous cultivation in the presence of acetic, propionic and benzoic acids showed a distinct influence on the resistance of both yeasts, although it did not always induce cellular adaptation. Fermentation inhibition showed a good correlation with the lipid solubility of weak acids suggesting that the acids interact with the hydrophobic regions of cell membranes.

  5. Why Hydroxamates May Not Be the Best Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors--What Some May Have Forgotten or Would Rather Forget?

    PubMed

    Shen, Sida; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-01-05

    Hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been approved as therapeutic agents by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in oncology applications. While the potential utility of such HDACIs in other areas of medicinal chemistry is tremendous, there are significant concerns that "pan-HDAC inhibitors" may be too broadly acting and/or toxic for clinical use beyond oncology. In addition to the isozyme selectivity challenge, the potential mutagenicity of hydroxamate-containing HDAC inhibitors represents a major hindrance in their application to other therapeutic areas. Herein we report on the mutagenicity of known hydroxamates, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their genotoxicity, and review some of the current alternatives to hydroxamates. We conclude that the hydroxamate group, while providing high-potency HDACIs, is not necessarily the best zinc-binding group for HDACI drug discovery.

  6. Why Hydroxamates May Not Be the Best Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors—What Some May Have Forgotten or Would Rather Forget?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Sida

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been approved as therapeutic agents by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in oncology applications. While the potential utility of such HDACIs in other areas of medicinal chemistry is tremendous, there are significant concerns that “pan-HDAC inhibitors” may be too broadly acting and/or toxic for clinical use beyond oncology. In addition to the isozyme selectivity challenge, the potential mutagenicity of hydroxamate-containing HDAC inhibitors represents a major hindrance in their application to other therapeutic areas. Herein we report on the mutagenicity of known hydroxamates, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their genotoxicity, and review some of the current alternatives to hydroxamates. We conclude that the hydroxamate group, while providing high-potency HDACIs, is not necessarily the best zinc-binding group for HDACI drug discovery. PMID:26603496

  7. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  8. Bile acid inhibition of taurocholate uptake by rat hepatocytes: role of OH groups

    SciTech Connect

    Bellentani, S.; Hardison, W.G.M.; Marchegiano, P.; Zanasi, G.; Manenti, F.

    1987-03-01

    To define further the structural specificity of the taurocholate uptake site, the authors studied the ability of a variety of taurine-conjugated bile acids with differing hydroxyl substituents on the sterol moiety to inhibit (/sup 14/C) taurocholate uptake. Rat hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion were incubated in a tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane-phosphate buffer containing (/sup 14/C)taurocholate in the presence or absence of inhibitor bile acid. Stronger inhibitors were studied at a fixed concentration of 5 ..mu..M, weaker ones at 25 ..mu..M. Initial uptake velocity was measured. Uptake velocity could then be related to taurocholate concentration and a V/sub max/ and K/sub m/ could be determined by applying a nonlinear least squares fit to the data obtained with or without inhibitor. The kinetic parameters allowed the determination of the type of inhibition and of inhibition constants (K/sub i/) of the various test bile acids. The data indicate that bile acids containing a 6- or 7-OH group exhibit competitive inhibition, whereas bile acids with no 6- or 7-OH group exhibit noncompetitive inhibition. Of the compounds exhibiting competitive inhibition, K/sub i/ varied with the number of hydroxyl groups on the sterol moiety. They conclude that the presence of absence of a 6- or 7-OH group dictates the mechanism of inhibition; the number of hydroxyl substituents determines the potency of competitive inhibition.

  9. Ascorbic acid participates in a general mechanism for concerted glucose transport inhibition and lactate transport stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maite A; Angulo, Constanza; Brauchi, Sebastián; Nualart, Francisco; Concha, Ilona I

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel function for ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is an important water-soluble antioxidant and cofactor in various enzyme systems. We have previously demonstrated that an increase in neuronal intracellular ascorbic acid is able to inhibit glucose transport in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Because of the presence of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, ascorbic acid is highly concentrated in brain, testis, lung, and adrenal glands. In this work, we explored how ascorbic acid affects glucose and lactate uptake in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Using immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, the expression of glucose and ascorbic acid transporters in non-neuronal cells was studied. Like neurons, HEK293 cells expressed GLUT1, GLUT3, and SVCT2. With radioisotope-based methods, only intracellular ascorbic acid, but not extracellular, inhibits 2-deoxyglucose transport in HEK293 cells. As monocarboxylates such as pyruvate and lactate, are important metabolic sources, we analyzed the ascorbic acid effect on lactate transport in cultured neurons and HEK293 cells. Intracellular ascorbic acid was able to stimulate lactate transport in both cell types. Extracellular ascorbic acid did not affect this transport. Our data show that ascorbic acid inhibits glucose transport and stimulates lactate transport in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Mammalian cells frequently present functional glucose and monocarboxylate transporters, and we describe here a general effect in which ascorbic acid functions like a glucose/monocarboxylate uptake switch in tissues expressing ascorbic acid transporters.

  10. Pyrazinoic acid and its n-propyl ester inhibit fatty acid synthase type I in replicating tubercle bacilli.

    PubMed

    Zimhony, Oren; Vilchèze, Catherine; Arai, Masayoshi; Welch, John T; Jacobs, William R

    2007-02-01

    The activity of different analogs of pyrazinamide on Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid synthase type I (FASI) in replicating bacilli was studied. Palmitic acid biosynthesis was diminished by 96% in bacilli treated with n-propyl pyrazinoate, 94% in bacilli treated with 5-chloro-pyrazinamide, and 97% in bacilli treated with pyrazinoic acid, the pharmacologically active agent of pyrazinamide. We conclude that the minimal structure of pyrazine ring with an acyl group is sufficient for FASI inhibition and antimycobacterial activity.

  11. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed.

  12. Model for capping derived from inhibition of surface receptor capping by free fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Klausner, R D; Bhalla, D K; Dragsten, P; Hoover, R L; Karnovsky, M J

    1980-01-01

    When low concentrations (2-5 mole %) of cis unsaturated free fatty acids (group A) are intercalated into lymphocyte plasma membrane, capping is inhibited. No effect is seen with trans unsaturated or saturated fatty acids (group B). The capping inhibition is reversible with increasing doses of extracellular calcium. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery has shown that the group A free fatty acids do not inhibit the receptor immobilization associated with patch formation, but inhibit the final energy-dependent movement of the patched receptors into a cap. We have also shown that the group A free fatty acids cause a shift in membrane-bound calcium to the lipid phase from probable protein-associated sites. We have incorporated these findings into a model for capping and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions. Images PMID:6928636

  13. Vanadate monomers and dimers both inhibit the human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Crans, D C; Simone, C M; Saha, A K; Glew, R H

    1989-11-30

    A combination of enzyme kinetics and 51V NMR spectroscopy was used to identify the species of vanadate that inhibits acid phosphatases. Monomeric vanadate was shown to inhibit wheat germ and potato acid phosphatases. At pH 5.5, the vanadate dimer inhibits the human prostatic acid phosphatase whereas at pH 7.0 it is the vanadate monomer that inhibits this enzyme. The pH-dependent shift in the affinity of the prostatic phosphatase for vanadate is presumably due to deprotonation of an amino acid side chain in or near the binding site resulting in a conformational change in the protein. pH may be a subtle effector of the insulin-like vanadate activity in biological systems and may explain some of the differences in selectivity observed with the protein phosphatases.

  14. Inhibition of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenicity and DNA methylation by ellagic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, R; Gold, B

    1986-01-01

    Ellagic acid, a naturally occurring plant phenol, inhibits the activity of the direct-acting mutagen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNU) in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Ellagic acid at 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mM inhibited the mutagenicity of MeNU (0.40 mM) by 3%, 13%, 45%, and 60%, respectively. Ellagic acid (3 mM) also inhibited the mutagenic activity of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (25-200 mM) in the presence of pyrazole-induced rat liver fraction S-9. The effect of ellagic acid on DNA methylation was studied by incubating 0, 0.72, 1.32, 2.64, and 6.60 mM ellagic acid with DNA (0.9 mM nucleotide) and [3H]MeNU (0.66 mM). HPLC analysis of DNA hydrolysates showed that ellagic acid caused a dose-dependent 36-84% decrease in O6-methylguanine but only a 20% decrease in the 7-methylguanine adduct. Under conditions where methylation at the O6 position of guanine in double-stranded DNA was inhibited 65% by ellagic acid, no significant inhibition of either O6- or 7-methylguanine formation was detected in single-stranded DNA. Affinity-binding studies revealed that [3H]ellagic acid binds equally to double-stranded or single-stranded DNA but that poly(dA X dT) binds 1.5 times as much ellagic acid as does poly(dG X dC). The binding of ellagic acid to DNA is dependent on the concentration of both ellagic acid and DNA. The specific inhibition of O6-methylguanine formation only in double-stranded DNA and the relatively low inhibition of 7-methylguanine formation rule out the possibility that ellagic acid prevents DNA alkylation by scavenging the electrophilic intermediate generated in the hydrolysis of MeNU. The results suggest that ellagic acid inhibition of MeNU-induced mutagenicity is due to specific inhibition of methylation at the O6 position of guanine through an ellagic acid-duplex DNA affinity-binding mechanism. PMID:3464940

  15. Substrate-selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygeanse-2 by Fenamic Acid Derivatives Is Dependent on Peroxide Tone.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-07-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzes the oxygenation of arachidonic acid (AA) and endocannabinoid substrates, placing the enzyme at a unique junction between the eicosanoid and endocannabinoid signaling pathways. COX-2 is a sequence homodimer, but the enzyme displays half-of-site reactivity, such that only one monomer of the dimer is active at a given time. Certain rapid reversible, competitive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to inhibit COX-2 in a substrate-selective manner, with the binding of inhibitor to a single monomer sufficient to inhibit the oxygenation of endocannabinoids but not arachidonic acid. The underlying mechanism responsible for substrate-selective inhibition has remained elusive. We utilized structural and biophysical methods to evaluate flufenamic acid, meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid for their ability to act as substrate-selective inhibitors. Crystal structures of each drug in complex with human COX-2 revealed that the inhibitor binds within the cyclooxygenase channel in an inverted orientation, with the carboxylate group interacting with Tyr-385 and Ser-530 at the top of the channel. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching, continuous-wave electron spin resonance, and UV-visible spectroscopy demonstrate that flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid are substrate-selective inhibitors that bind rapidly to COX-2, quench tyrosyl radicals, and reduce higher oxidation states of the heme moiety. Substrate-selective inhibition was attenuated by the addition of the lipid peroxide 15-hydroperoxyeicosatertaenoic acid. Collectively, these studies implicate peroxide tone as an important mechanistic component of substrate-selective inhibition by flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, and tolfenamic acid.

  16. Synergistic inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in vitro through the combination of octanoic acid and acidic calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Alex L; Castillo, Alejandro; Harris, Kerri B; Keeton, Jimmy T; Hardin, Margaret D; Taylor, T Matthew

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that inhibition of foodborne pathogens can be enhanced by using antimicrobials in combination. A broth dilution assay was devised to determine whether inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to the combination of the fatty acid octanoic acid (OCT) and the organic acid-containing antimicrobial acidic calcium sulfate (ACS) was enhanced compared with the inhibition of the pathogen exposed to either antimicrobial applied singly. MICs for OCT and ACS were 25.00 μg/g and 1.56 ml/liter, respectively, for all strains of the pathogen tested. Fractional inhibitory concentrations (FICs) from the combination exposures were calculated for use in characterizing the antimicrobial interaction as antagonistic, additive indifferent, or synergistic with respect to L. monocytogenes inhibition. Combining OCT and ACS resulted in observed synergistic inhibition of L. monocytogenes; isobolograms for all strains curved toward the origin, and FIC indices (FIC(I)s) were <1.0. Future investigations of the antimicrobial combination should focus on determining the mechanism of action of combined antimicrobials and the levels of antimicrobials required for pathogen inhibition on the surfaces of ready-to-eat meats.

  17. Relieving Mipafox Inhibition in Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase by Rational Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    acid anhydrolase (OPAA, EC 3.1.8.2) was purified from halophilic Alteromonas sp. bacteria. OPPA displayed hydrolysis activity against several highly...2010, 49, 547–559. 3. DeFrank, J.J.; Cheng, T.-C. Purification and Properties of Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase from a Halophilic Bacterial

  18. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  19. Inhibition of rat liver microsomal fatty acid chain elongation by gemfibrozil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R M; Viñals, M; Alegret, M; Vázquez, M; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Laguna, J C

    1992-03-23

    Gemfibrozil, a hypolipidemic drug mainly used in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemic states, strongly inhibits the rat hepatic microsomal fatty acid chain elongation system in vitro. The inhibition is independent on the reducing cofactor used in the assay. Furthermore, gemfibrozil seems to act by inhibiting the rate-limiting step of the elongation process, the condensing reaction, without discriminating among the proposed three different condensing enzymes, devoted to condensation of saturated, mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated acyl-CoA substrates.

  20. Microencapsulation of tannic acid for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Iyer, Vidya; Flores, Floirendo P; Donhowe, Erik; Kong, Fanbin

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity is rapidly rising worldwide. Recently, there is increasing evidence that phytochemicals such as polyphenols in our diet could directly inhibit the activities of key digestive enzymes, representing a novel method of controlling and preventing diabetes mellitus and obesity. More research is required to determine how to effectively utilize phytochemicals within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to obtain maximum inhibition of digestive enzymes. This study investigated the inhibition efficiency of tannic acid (TA) on α-amylase as compared with other potential inhibitors using an in vitro method. The inhibition mode and kinetics were studied. The results showed that tannic acid (TA) is more effective in inhibiting α-amylase than a commercial starch blocker (Phase 2 Starch Blocker), and some selected flavonoids and polyphenols including quercetin, rutin, and polyphenon from green tea. It is also found that inhibition of α-amylase by TA in the GI tract is difficult if administered orally due to the non-specific and reversible noncompetitive interaction between tannic acid and α-amylase or other proteins. Accordingly, a pH-sensitive delivery system using calcium-alginate microspheres encapsulating tannic acid was successfully developed for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the GI tract. The encapsulated TA in calcium-alginate microspheres could be protected from the proteins in the stomach, and sustain release and inhibit α-amylase activity in the small intestine.

  1. Destabilization, oligomerization and inhibition of the mitogenic activity of acidic fibroblast-growth factor by aurintricarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lozano, R M; Rivas, G; Giménez-Gallego, G

    1997-08-15

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid has been used to inhibit angiogenesis, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and cell transformation, an effect that has been attributed to its relatively nonspecific inhibitory activity of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Here, we show that this compound binds to acidic fibroblast growth factor, a prototypic member of a family of protein mitogens activated by heparin, altering its physicochemical properties and decreasing its mitogenic activity. Counteraction of the effects of aurintricarboxylic acid by heparin shows that the two compounds have opposite and reversible effects on acidic fibroblast growth factor structure and biological activity. The studies reported here may contribute to a deeper understanding of the inhibition of fibroblast-growth-factor-dependent mitogenesis of relevance to future pharmacologic developments.

  2. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  3. A ROLE FOR AMPK IN THE INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as β-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:19646964

  4. Inhibition of Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. by fatty acids and their monoglycerides.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Clelia; Cardillo, Daniela; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2007-05-01

    The antifungal activity of three fatty acids (lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids) and their monoglycerides (monolaurin, monomyristic acid, and palmitin, respectively) against Aspergillus and Penicillium species in a model system was investigated. Data were modeled through a reparameterized Gompertz equation. The maximum colony diameter attained within the experimental time (30 days), the maximal radial growth rate, the lag time (i.e., the number of days before the beginning of radial fungal growth), and the minimum detection time (MDT; the number of days needed to attain 1 cm colony diameter) were evaluated. Fatty acids and their monoglycerides inhibited mold growth by increasing MDT and lag times. The effectiveness of the active compounds seemed to be strain and genus dependent. Palmitic acid was the most effective chemical against aspergilli, whereas penicilli were strongly inhibited by myristic acid. Aspergilli also were more susceptible to fatty acids than were penicilli, as indicated by the longer MDT.

  5. Dual mechanisms for telomerase inhibition in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to have antitumor activity. In this study, we have tested whether telomerase might be a target for the antitumor effect of fatty acids using DLD-1 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. In a cell-free approach, fatty acids were added directly to cell lysates, and we confirmed that increasing fatty acid unsaturation correlates with increased inhibition of telomerase activity. Using a cell culture approach, DLD-1 cells were cultured with fatty acids. In a time and dose dependent manner, EPA and DHA suppressed cellular telomerase activity and the mRNAs encoding hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and c-myc. Based on these observations, we suggest that PUFAs inhibit telomerase activity through dual mechanisms: direct inhibition of enzymatic activity and down regulation of hTERT, one of the telomerase components.

  6. Oligogalacturonic Acid Inhibits Vascular Calcification by Two Mechanisms: Inhibition of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Osteogenic Conversion and Interaction With Collagen.

    PubMed

    Hodroge, Ahmed; Trécherel, Eric; Cornu, Marjorie; Darwiche, Walaa; Mansour, Ali; Ait-Mohand, Katia; Verissimo, Thomas; Gomila, Cathy; Schembri, Carole; Da Nascimento, Sophie; Elboutachfaiti, Redouan; Boullier, Agnès; Lorne, Emmanuel; Courtois, Josiane; Petit, Emmanuel; Toumieux, Sylvestre; Kovensky, José; Sonnet, Pascal; Massy, Ziad A; Kamel, Saïd; Rossi, Claire; Ausseil, Jérôme

    2017-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases constitute the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Calcification of the vessel wall is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients having many diseases, including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is actively regulated by inductive and inhibitory mechanisms (including vascular smooth muscle cell adaptation) and results from an active osteogenic process. During the calcification process, extracellular vesicles (also known as matrix vesicles) released by vascular smooth muscle cells interact with type I collagen and then act as nucleating foci for calcium crystallization. Our primary objective was to identify new, natural molecules that inhibit the vascular calcification process. We have found that oligogalacturonic acids (obtained by the acid hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid) reduce in vitro inorganic phosphate-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells by 80% and inorganic phosphate-induced calcification of isolated rat aortic rings by 50%. A specific oligogalacturonic acid with a degree of polymerization of 8 (DP8) was found to inhibit the expression of osteogenic markers and, thus, prevent the conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteoblast-like cells. We also evidenced in biochemical and immunofluorescence assays a direct interaction between matrix vesicles and type I collagen via the GFOGER sequence (where single letter amino acid nomenclature is used, O=hydroxyproline) thought to be involved in interactions with several pairs of integrins. DP8 inhibits vascular calcification development mainly by inhibition of osteogenic marker expression but also partly by masking the GFOGER sequence-thereby, preventing matrix vesicles from binding to type I collagen. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks.

  8. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  9. Ursolic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of HT-29 colon cancer cells by inhibiting the EGFR/MAPK pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jian-zhen; Xuan, Yan-yan; Zheng, Shu; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Su-zhan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of ursolic acid on the proliferation and apoptosis of human HT-29 colon cancer cells. Methods: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assays were performed to evaluate the effects of ursolic acid on the growth and apoptosis of HT-29 cells. Western blot analysis was applied to investigate the inhibitory effects of ursolic acid on the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and the activity of B cell leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), B cell leukemia-xL (Bcl-xL), caspase-3, and caspase-9. Results: Ursolic acid inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. The median inhibition concentration (IC50) values for 24, 48, and 72 h treatment were 26, 20, and 18 μmol/L, respectively. The apoptotic rates of 10, 20, and 40 μmol/L ursolic acid treatments for 24 h were 5.74%, 14.49%, and 33.05%, and for 48 h were 9%, 21.39%, and 40.49%, respectively. Ursolic acid suppressed the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK, which is well correlated with its growth inhibitory effect. 10, 20, and 40 μmol/L ursolic acid significantly inhibited the proliferation of EGF-stimulated HT-29 cells (P<0.05). Cell proliferation was most significantly inhibited when treated with 10 and 20 μmol/L ursolic acid combined with 200 nmol/L AG 1478 or 10 μmol/L U0126 (P<0.01). Besides, it also down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and activated caspase-3 and caspase-9. Conclusion: Ursolic acid induces apoptosis in HT-29 cells by suppressing the EGFR/MAPK pathway, suggesting that it may be a potent agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:19735099

  10. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. FptA, the Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a phenolate siderophore receptor homologous to hydroxamate siderophore receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ankenbauer, R G; Quan, H N

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin is structurally unique among siderophores and possesses neither hydroxamate- nor catecholate-chelating groups. The structural gene encoding the 75-kDa outer membrane Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor FptA has been isolated by plasmid rescue techniques and sequenced. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the isolated FptA protein corresponded to that deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the fptA structural gene. The mature FptA protein has 682 amino acids and a molecular mass of 75,993 Da and has considerable overall homology with the hydroxamate siderophore receptors FpvA of P. aeruginosa, PupA and PupB of Pseudomonas putida, and FhuE of Escherichia coli. This observation indicates that homologies between siderophore receptors are an unreliable predictor of siderophore ligand class recognition by a given receptor. The fptA gene was strongly regulated by iron; fptA transcription was totally repressed by 30 microM FeCl3, as determined by Northern (RNA) blotting. The promoter of the fptA gene contained the sequence 5'-ATAATGATAAGCATTATC-3', which matches the consensus E. coli Fur-binding site at 17 of 18 positions. The -10 promoter region and transcriptional start site of the fptA gene reside within this Fur-binding site. Images PMID:8288523

  12. MYB76 Inhibits Seed Fatty Acid Accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shaowei; Jin, Changyu; Li, Dong; Gao, Chenhao; Qi, Shuanghui; Liu, Kaige; Hai, Jiangbo; Ma, Haoli; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    The MYB family of transcription factors is important in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. However, their role in regulating fatty acid accumulation in seeds is still largely unclear. Here, we found that MYB76, localized in the nucleus, was predominantly expressed in developing seeds during maturation. The myb76 mutation caused a significant increase in the amounts of total fatty acids and several major fatty acid compositions in mature seeds, suggesting that MYB76 functioned as an important repressor during seed oil biosynthesis. RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed remarkable alteration of numerous genes involved in photosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, modification, and degradation, and oil body formation in myb76 seeds at 12 days after pollination. These results help us to understand the novel function of MYB76 and provide new insights into the regulatory network of MYB transcriptional factors controlling seed oil accumulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:28270825

  13. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hermer, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied via crevice flushing, low power soaks, on-line, or using a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and how it should be correctly applied. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. This document has been prepared to be a comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. 49 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Human red cells scavenge extracellular hydrogen peroxide and inhibit formation of hypochlorous acid and hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed Central

    Winterbourn, C C; Stern, A

    1987-01-01

    The ability of intact human red cells to scavenge extracellularly generated H2O2 and O2-, and to prevent formation of hydroxyl radicals and hypochlorous acid has been examined. Red cells inhibited oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by H2O2. Cells treated with aminotriazole no longer inhibited, indicating that protection was almost entirely due to intracellular catalase. Contribution by the GSH system was slight, and apparent only with low H2O2 concentrations when catalase was inhibited by aminotriazole. The cells were about a quarter as efficient at inhibiting cytochrome c oxidation as an equivalent concentration of purified catalase. No inhibition of O2(-)-dependent reduction of ferricytochrome c or nitroblue tetrazolium was observed, although extracted red cell superoxide dismutase inhibited nitroblue tetrazolium reduction at one fortieth the concentration of that in the cells. Red cells efficiently inhibited deoxyribose oxidation by hydroxyl radicals generated from H2O2, O2- and Fe(EDTA), and myeloperoxidase-dependent oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide by stimulated neutrophils. Most of the red cell inhibition of hydroxyl radical production, and all the inhibition of methionine oxidation, was prevented by blocking intracellular catalase with aminotriazole. Thus red cells are able to efficiently scavenge H2O2, but not O2-, produced in their environment, and to inhibit formation of hydroxyl radicals and hypochlorous acid. They may therefore have an important role in extracellular antioxidant defense. PMID:2824562

  15. Photodegradation of lipopolysaccharides and the inhibition of macrophage activation by anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Miura, Takuya; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-07

    Target-selective photodegradation of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulopyranosonic acid (KDO) was achieved without additives and under neutral conditions using a designed anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrid and long wavelength UV light irradiation. The hybrid can photodegrade lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and inhibit macrophage activation induced by LPS.

  16. Inhibition of the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Manole, Gheorghe; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly inhibited by weak acids although the mechanism by which these compounds act is not completely understood. A series of substituted benzoic acids, nipecotic acid, ortho- and para-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid were investigated as inhibitors of three β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from this pathogen, mtCA 1 (Rv1284), mtCA 2 (Rv3588c) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). All three enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the submicromolar to the micromolar one, depending on the scaffold present in the carboxylic acid. mtCA 3 was the isoform mostly inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s in the range of 0.11-0.97 µM); followed by mtCA 2 (K(I)s in the range of 0.59-8.10 µM), whereas against mtCA 1, these carboxylic acids showed inhibition constants in the range of 2.25-7.13 µM. This class of relatively underexplored β-CA inhibitors warrant further in vivo studies, as they may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug or extensive multi-drug resistance.

  17. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  18. recA gene product is responsible for inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Trgovcević, Z; Petranović, D; Petranović, M; Salaj-Smic, E

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation was studied in wild-type, uvrA, recB, recA recB, and recA Escherichia coli strains. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, which occurs almost immediately after exposing the cells to ultraviolet radiation, depends on the functional gene recA. PMID:6997276

  19. DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN NORMAL HEPATOCYTES OF MALE F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA} inhibits proliferation and apoptosis in nonnal hepatocytes of
    male F344 rats.

    Large segments of the population are chronically exposed to dichloroacetic acid (DCA}: DCA is a by product of the chlorine disinfection of drinking water, a metab...

  20. Inhibition of hydroxycinnamic acid sulfation by flavonoids and their conjugated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Chun; Williamson, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonoids are dietary phenolic antioxidants that are abundant in our diet. Hydroxycinnamic acids are highly sulfated in vivo, and sulfotransferases (SULTs), in particular SULT1A1, play a major role in their metabolism. Flavonoids are potent inhibitors of human SULTs. In this study, the potential metabolic interaction between dietary hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonoids was investigated. Flavonoids, such as luteolin, quercetin, daidzein, and genistein, are identified as potent inhibitors of hydroxycinnamic acid sulfation in human liver S9 homogenate with IC50 values <1 µM. The inhibitory activity was less potent in the human intestinal S9 homogenate. We also demonstrate that quercetin conjugates found in vivo (quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, quercetin-7-O-glucuronide, and quercetin-3'-O-sulfate) moderately inhibited the sulfation of hydroxycinnamic acids in human liver S9. In an intact cellular system, human HepG2 cells, caffeic acid and ferulic acid sulfation was inhibited by luteolin and quercetin (IC50 : 1.6-3.9 µM). Quercetin-3'-O-sulfate weakly inhibited sulfation. Quercetin glucuronides, limited by their low cellular uptake, were ineffective. These data suggest that the inhibition of SULTs by flavonoids and in vivo flavonoid conjugates may modify the bioavailability of dietary hydroxycinnamic acids by suppressing their conversion to sulfated metabolites. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Ursodeoxycholic Acid but Not Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Inhibits Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Subcutaneous Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mališová, Lucia; Kováčová, Zuzana; Koc, Michal; Kračmerová, Jana; Štich, Vladimír; Rossmeislová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Stress of endoplasmic reticulum (ERS) is one of the molecular triggers of adipocyte dysfunction and chronic low inflammation accompanying obesity. ERS can be alleviated by chemical chaperones from the family of bile acids (BAs). Thus, two BAs currently used to treat cholestasis, ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and TUDCA), could potentially lessen adverse metabolic effects of obesity. Nevertheless, BAs effects on human adipose cells are mostly unknown. They could regulate gene expression through pathways different from their chaperone function, namely through activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5, G-coupled receptor. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze effects of UDCA and TUDCA on human preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes derived from paired samples of two distinct subcutaneous adipose tissue depots, abdominal and gluteal. While TUDCA did not alter proliferation of cells from either depot, UDCA exerted strong anti-proliferative effect. In differentiated adipocytes, acute exposition to neither TUDCA nor UDCA was able to reduce effect of ERS stressor tunicamycin. However, exposure of cells to UDCA during whole differentiation process decreased expression of ERS markers. At the same time however, UDCA profoundly inhibited adipogenic conversion of cells. UDCA abolished expression of PPARγ and lipogenic enzymes already in the early phases of adipogenesis. This anti-adipogenic effect of UDCA was not dependent on FXR or TGR5 activation, but could be related to ability of UDCA to sustain the activation of ERK1/2 previously linked with PPARγ inactivation. Finally, neither BAs did lower expression of chemokines inducible by TLR4 pathway, when UDCA enhanced their expression in gluteal adipocytes. Therefore while TUDCA has neutral effect on human preadipocytes and adipocytes, the therapeutic use of UDCA different from treating cholestatic diseases should be considered with caution because UDCA alters functions of human adipose cells

  2. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight.

  3. Salicylic acid inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) by competitively inhibiting polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Lin; Wu, Yanwen; Fan, Junfeng; Ouyang, Jie

    2015-03-15

    The inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of salicylic acid (SA) on the browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut were investigated. Shelled and sliced chestnuts were immersed in different concentrations of an SA solution, and the browning of the chestnut surface and interior were inhibited. The activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) extracted from chestnuts were measured in the presence and absence of SA. SA at concentrations higher than 0.3g/L delayed chestnut browning by significantly inhibiting the PPO activity (P<0.01), and the POD activity was not significantly affected (P>0.05). The binding and inhibition modes of SA with PPO and POD, determined by AUTODOCK 4.2 and Lineweaver-Burk plots, respectively, established SA as a competitive inhibitor of PPO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ginkgolic acid inhibits HIV protease activity and HIV infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yan, Shaoyu; Jamaluddin, Saha; Weakley, Sarah M.; Liang, Zhengdong; Siwak, Edward B.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Several HIV protease mutations, which are resistant to clinical HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), have been identified. There is a great need for second-generation PIs with different chemical structures and/or with an alternative mode of inhibition. Ginkgolic acid is a natural herbal substance and a major component of the lipid fraction in the nutshells of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether ginkgolic acid could inhibit HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in human cells. Material/Methods Purified ginkgolic acid and recombinant HIV-1 HXB2 KIIA protease were used for the HIV protease activity assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for HIV infection (HIV-1SF162 virus), determined by a p24gag ELISA. Cytotoxicity was also determined. Results Ginkgolic acid (31.2 μg/ml) inhibited HIV protease activity by 60%, compared with the negative control, and the effect was concentration-dependent. In addition, ginkgolic acid treatment (50 and 100 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the HIV infection at day 7 in a concentration-dependent manner. Ginkgolic acid at a concentration of up to 150 μg/ml demonstrated very limited cytotoxicity. Conclusions Ginkgolic acid effectively inhibits HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in PBMCs without significant cytotoxicity. Ginkgolic acid may inhibit HIV protease through different mechanisms than current FDA-approved HIV PI drugs. These properties of ginkgolic acid make it a promising therapy for HIV infection, especially as the clinical problem of viral resistance to HIV PIs continues to grow. PMID:22847190

  5. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  6. Role of hydroxyl group in the inhibitive action of benzoic acid toward corrosion of aluminum in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P.N.S.; Singh, A.K.; Wadhwani, R.

    1999-10-01

    Corrosion inhibition action of benzoic acid, p-hydroxy benzoic acid, 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, and 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid toward aluminum alloy 3003 (UNS A93003) in 20% (wt%) nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) using different concentrations of these compounds at 30 C, 40 C, and 50 C has been studied thoroughly. 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid (inhibition efficiency (IE): 30% and 72%) was the most effective inhibitor followed by 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 22% to 62%) p-hydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 11% to 52%), and benzoic acid (IE: 2.5% to 15%). IE increased with concentration and its maximum value was observed at 0.5% concentration of all inhibitors used. The percentage of IE of the inhibitors decreased with an increase in temperature from 30 C to 50 C. Values of heat adsorption and activation energy were calculated from weight loss data, which came out in the range for the reaction occurring at the surface. The behavior of inhibitors studied deviated from the Langmuir isotherm. The IE of higher hydroxy species was improved when more hydroxy centers were added. Anodic and cathodic polarization curves were shifted toward lower current density regions in the presence of inhibitors. This revealed that they were mixed inhibitors.

  7. Citric acid inhibits development of cataracts, proteinuria and ketosis in streptozotocin (type1) diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Ryoji; Nagai, Mime; Shimasaki, Satoko; Baynes, John W.; Fujiwara, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Although many fruits such as lemon and orange contain citric acid, little is known about beneficial effects of citric acid on health. Here we measured the effect of citric acid on the pathogenesis of diabetic complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Although oral administration of citric acid to diabetic rats did not affect blood glucose concentration, it delayed the development of cataracts, inhibited accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) such as Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) in lens proteins, and protected against albuminuria and ketosis . We also show that incubation of protein with acetol, a metabolite formed from acetone by acetone monooxygenase, generate CEL, suggesting that inhibition of ketosis by citric acid may lead to the decrease in CEL in lens proteins. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of citric acid ameliorates ketosis and protects against the development of diabetic complications in an animal model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:20117096

  8. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  9. Selective inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ synthesis in human neutrophils by ethacrynic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.H.

    1986-05-29

    Addition of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors, ethyacrynic acid (ET), caffeic acid (CA), and ferulic acid (FA) to human neutrophils led to inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ (LTC/sub 4/) synthesis induced by calcium ionophore A23187. ET is the most specific of these inhibitors for it had little effect on LTB/sub 4/, PGE/sub 2/, and 5-HETE synthesis. The inhibition of LTC/sub 4/ was irreversible and time dependent. ET also had little effect on /sup 3/H-AA release from A23187-stimulated neutrophils.

  10. The (5Z)-5-Pentacosenoic and 5-Pentacosynoic Acids Inhibit the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Lizabeth Giménez; Orellano, Elsie A; Rosado, Karolyna; Guido, Rafael V C; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Soto, Gabriela Ortiz; Rodríguez, José W; Sanabria-Ríos, David J; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2015-10-01

    The natural fatty acids (5Z)-5-pentacosenoic and (9Z)-9-pentacosenoic acids were synthesized for the first time in eight steps starting from either 4-bromo-1-butanol or 8-bromo-1-butanol and in 20-58% overall yields, while the novel fatty acids 5-pentacosynoic and 9-pentacosynoic acids were also synthesized in six steps and in 34-43% overall yields. The ∆(5) acids displayed the best IC50's (24-38 µM) against the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, comparable to nervonic acid (IC50 = 12 µM). The ∆(9) acids were not as effective towards HIV-RT with the (9Z)-9-pentacosenoic acid displaying an IC50 = 54 µM and the 9-pentacosynoic acid not inhibiting the enzyme at all. Fatty acid chain length and position of the unsaturation was important for the observed inhibition. None of the synthesized fatty acids were toxic (IC50 > 500 µM) towards peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Molecular modeling studies indicated the structural determinants underlying the biological activity of the most potent compounds. These results provide new insights into the structural requirements that must be present in fatty acids so as to enhance their inhibitory potential towards HIV-RT.

  11. Zoledronic acid inhibits aromatase activity and phosphorylation: potential mechanism for additive zoledronic acid and letrozole drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Schech, Amanda J; Nemieboka, Brandon E; Brodie, Angela H

    2012-11-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate originally indicated for use in osteoporosis, has been reported to exert a direct effect on breast cancer cells, although the mechanism of this effect is currently unknown. Data from the ABCSG-12 and ZO-FAST clinical trials suggest that treatment with the combination of ZA and aromatase inhibitors (AI) result in increased disease free survival in breast cancer patients over AI alone. To determine whether the mechanism of this combination involved inhibition of aromatase, AC-1 cells (MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with an aromatase construct) were treated simultaneously with combinations of ZA and AI letrozole. This combination significantly increased inhibition of aromatase activity of AC-1 cells when compared to letrozole alone. Treatment of 1 nM letrozole in combination with 1 μM or 10 μM ZA resulted in an additive drug interaction on inhibition of cell viability, as measured by MTT assay. Treatment with ZA was found to inhibit phosphorylation of aromatase on serine residues. Zoledronic acid was also shown to be more effective in inhibiting cell viability in aromatase transfected AC-1 cells when compared to inhibition of cell viability observed in non-transfected MCF-7. Estradiol was able to partially rescue the effect of 1 μM and 10 μM ZA on cell viability following treatment for 72 h, as shown by a shift to the right in the estradiol dose-response curve. In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of ZA and letrozole results in an additive inhibition of cell viability. Furthermore, ZA alone can inhibit aromatase activity through inhibition of serine phosphorylation events important for aromatase enzymatic activity and contributes to inhibition of cell viability.

  12. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  13. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O’Toole, George A.; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001%(w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the Staphylococcus aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01%(w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1%(w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters. PMID:20089325

  14. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O'Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-03-31

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001% (w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the S. aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01% (w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1% (w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters.

  15. Auxin-Induced Ethylene Triggers Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Growth Inhibition1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Hauke; Grossmann, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mm IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [3H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA

  16. alpha-Linolenic acid protects renal cells against palmitic acid lipotoxicity via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Katsoulieris, Elias; Mabley, Jon G; Samai, Mohamed; Green, Irene C; Chatterjee, Prabal K

    2009-11-25

    Unsaturated fatty acids may counteract the lipotoxicity associated with saturated fatty acids. Palmitic acid induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caused apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the renal proximal tubular cell line, NRK-52E. We investigated whether alpha-linolenic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, protected against ER stress and cell death induced by palmitic acid or by other non-nutrient ER stress generators. Incubation of NRK-52E cells for 24h with palmitic acid produced a significant increase in apoptosis and necrosis. Palmitic acid also increased levels of three indicators of ER stress - the phosphorylated form of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78). alpha-Linolenic acid dramatically reduced cell death and levels of all three indicators of ER stress brought about by palmitic acid. Tunicamycin, which induces ER stress by glycosylation of proteins, produced similar effects to those obtained using palmitic acid; its effects were partially reversed by alpha-linolenic acid. Salubrinal (a phosphatase inhibitor) causes increased levels of the phosphorylated form of eIF2alpha - this effect was partially reversed by alpha-linolenic acid. Palmitoleate, a monosaturated fatty acid, had similar effects to those of alpha-linolenic acid. These results suggest that part of the mechanism of protection of the kidney by unsaturated fatty acids is through inhibition of ER stress, eIF2alpha phosphorylation and consequential reduction of CHOP protein expression and apoptotic renal cell death.

  17. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the Ki values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitric oxide inhibits prooxidant actions of uric acid during copper-mediated LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Silvia M; Batthyány, Carlos; Trostchansky, Andrés; Botti, Horacio; López, Graciela I; Wikinski, Regina L W; Rubbo, Homero; Schreier, Laura E

    2004-03-15

    Interactions between uric acid and physiologically relevant fluxes of nitric oxide ((?)NO) during copper-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation were evaluated. In the absence of (?)NO, a dual pro- and antioxidant action of uric acid was evident: low concentrations of uric acid enhanced lipid oxidation and alpha-tocopherol consumption, while its protective role was observed at higher concentrations. The prooxidant effects of uric acid were mostly related to its copper-reducing ability to form Cu(+), an initiator of lipid oxidation processes. While the prooxidant action of uric acid was completely inhibited by (?)NO, the antioxidant action of (?)NO was slightly counterbalanced by uric acid. Enhancement of alpha-tocopherol consumption by uric acid was inhibited in the presence of (?)NO while additive antioxidant effects between (?)NO and uric acid were observed in conditions where uric acid spared alpha-tocopherol. Altogether, these results suggest that in the artery wall, the (?)NO/uric acid pair may exert antioxidant actions on LDL, even if increased amounts of redox active copper were available at conditions favoring prooxidant activities of uric acid.

  19. Inhibition of tubulin polymerization by hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kim, Shannon B; Hogan, Katherine M

    2011-04-15

    Protein thiol oxidation and modification by nitric oxide and glutathione are emerging as common mechanisms to regulate protein function and to modify protein structure. Also, thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. We assessed the effect of the oxidants hypochlorous acid and chloramines on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by the oxidants was monitored by labeling tubulin with the thiol-selective reagent 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein; by reaction with Ellman's reagent, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid); and by detecting interchain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Whereas HOCl induced both cysteine and methionine oxidation of tubulin, chloramines were predominantly cysteine oxidants. Cysteine oxidation of tubulin, rather than methionine oxidation, was associated with loss of microtubule polymerization activity, and treatment of oxidized tubulin with disulfide reducing agents restored a considerable portion of the polymerization activity that was lost after oxidation. By comparing the reactivity of hypochlorous acid and chloramines with the previously characterized oxidants, peroxynitrite and the nitroxyl donor Angeli's salt, we have identified tubulin thiol oxidation, not methionine oxidation or tyrosine nitration, as a common outcome responsible for decreased polymerization activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of tubulin polymerization by hypochlorous acid and chloramines

    PubMed Central

    Landino, Lisa M.; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Kim, Shannon B.; Hogan, Katherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Protein thiol oxidation and modification by nitric oxide and glutathione are emerging as common mechanisms to regulate protein function and to modify protein structure. Also, thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. We assessed the effect of the oxidants hypochlorous acid and chloramines on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by the oxidants was monitored by labeling tubulin with the thiol-selective reagent, 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein, by reaction with Ellman’s reagent, 5,5′dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), and by detecting interchain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Whereas HOCl induced both cysteine and methionine oxidation of tubulin, chloramines were predominantly cysteine oxidants. Cysteine oxidation of tubulin, rather than methionine oxidation, was associated with loss of microtubule polymerization activity and treatment of oxidized tubulin with disulfide reducing agents restored a considerable portion of the polymerization activity that was lost after oxidation. By comparing the reactivity of hypochlorous acid and chloramines with the previously characterized oxidants, peroxynitrite and the nitroxyl donor, Angeli’s salt, we have identified tubulin thiol oxidation, not methionine oxidation or tyrosine nitration, as a common outcome responsible for decreased polymerization activity. PMID:21256958

  1. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  2. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Visual and fluorogenic detection of a nerve agent simulant via a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate.

    PubMed

    Han, Shoufa; Xue, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhen; Wen, Ting Bin

    2010-11-28

    A visual and fluorogenic detection method for a nerve agent simulant was developed based on a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate, in the presence of diethyl chlorophosphate, under alkaline conditions.

  4. Myrsinoic acid B inhibits the production of hydrogen sulfide by periodontal pathogens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satomi; Shimura, Susumu; Tanaka, Tomoko; Yaegaki, Ken

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we reported that myrsinoic acid B purified from Myrsine seguinii inhibited methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) production by Fusobacterium nucleatum JCM8532. Since hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is the main component of physiological halitosis, while CH(3)SH is involved in pathological oral halitosis, the objective of this study is to determine whether myrsinoic acid B inhibits H(2)S production by oral microorganisms. F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola were incubated with myrsinoic acid B and a substrate such as l-cysteine or l-methionine. H(2)S or CH(3)SH concentration in the headspace air, was determined using a gas chromatograph. The concentration of myrsinoic acid B inhibiting 50% (IC(50)) of H(2)S production by F. nucleatum was 0.142 µg ml(-1), and the IC(50) of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were 2.71 µg ml(-1) and 28.9 µg ml(-1), respectively. The presence of pyruvate, a by-product of H(2)S production, was determined. The IC(50) values of myrsinoic acid B for pyruvate production were 22.9 µg ml(-1) for F. nucleatum, 87.7 µg ml(-1) for P. gingivalis and 165 µg ml(-1) for T. denticola. We concluded that myrsinoic acid B inhibited the production of both H(2)S and pyruvate by periodontal pathogens.

  5. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  6. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-01-26

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor.

  7. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  8. Ellagic acid induces apoptosis through inhibition of nuclear factor κB in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Odinokova, Irina; Ohno, Izumi; Gukovsky, Ilya; Go, Vay Liang W; Pandol, Stephen J; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of ellagic acid on apop-tosis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells and to determine the mechanism of the pro-survival effects of ellagic acid. METHODS: The effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis was assessed by measuring Phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation; and proliferation by measuring DNA thymidine incorporation. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured in permeabilized cells, and in isolated mitochondria. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was measured by electromobility shift assay (EMSA). RESULTS: We show that ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound in fruits and berries, at concentrations 10 to 50 mmol/L stimulates apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Further, ellagic acid decreases proliferation by up to 20-fold at 50 mmol/L. Ellagic acid stimulates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and the downstream caspase activation. Ellagic acid does not directly affect mitochondria. Ellagic acid dose-dependently decreased NF-κB binding activity. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity using IkB wild type plasmid prevented the effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that ellagic acid stimulates apoptosis through inhibition of the prosu-rvival transcription factor NF-κB. PMID:18595134

  9. The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid effectively targets lung cancer cells by inhibition of protein prenylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fan; Li, Pengcheng; Gong, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiahong; Ma, Jingping

    2015-11-27

    Aberrant activation of oncoproteins such as members of the Ras family is common in human lung cancers. The proper function of Ras largely depends on a post-translational modification termed prenylation. Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit prenylation in cancer cells. In this study, we show that zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, is effective in targeting lung cancer cells. This is achieved by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, through suppressing the activation of downstream Ras and EGFR signalling by zoledronic acid. The combination of zoledronic acid and paclitaxel or cisplatin (commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for lung cancer) augmented the activity of either drug alone in in vitro lung cancer cellular system and in vivo lung xenograft mouse model. Importantly, zoledronic acid inhibits protein prenylation as shown by the increased levels of unprenylated Ras and Rap1A. In addition, the effects of zoledronic acid were reversed in the presence of geranylgeraniol and farnesol, further confirming that mechanism of zoledroinc acid's action in lung cancer cells is through prenylation inhibition. Since zoledronic acid is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it may be an effective addition to the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Zoledronic acid (ZA) is effectively against lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • ZA acts on lung cancer cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. • ZA suppresses global downstream phosphorylation of Ras signalling. • ZA enhances the effects of chemotherapeutic drugs in lung cancer cells.

  10. Accumulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoic Acid Containing Large Amounts of Unsaturated Monomers in Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 Utilizing Saccharides and Its Inhibition by 2-Bromooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Joo; Choi, Mun Hwan; Kim, Tae-Un; Yoon, Sung Chul

    2001-01-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07, which is able to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) containing large amounts of 3-hydroxy-cis-5-dodecenoate unit up to 35 mol% in the cell from unrelated substrates such as fructose, succinate, etc., was isolated from an activated sludge in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. When it was grown on heptanoic acid (C7) to hexadecanoic acid (C16) as the sole carbon source, the monomer compositional characteristics of the synthesized PHA were similar to those observed in other fluorescent pseudomonads belonging to rRNA homology group I. However, growth on stearic acid (C18) led to no PHA accumulation, but instead free stearic acid was stored in the cell. The existence of the linkage between fatty acid de novo synthesis and PHA synthesis was confirmed by using inhibitors such as acrylic acid and two other compounds, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid, which are known to inhibit β-oxidation enzymes in animal cells. Acrylic acid completely inhibited PHA synthesis at a concentration of 4 mM in 40 mM octanoate-grown cells, but no inhibition of PHA synthesis occurred in 70 mM fructose-grown cells in the presence of 1 to 5 mM acrylic acid. 2-Bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid were found to much inhibit PHA synthesis much more strongly in fructose-grown cells than in octanoate-grown cells over concentrations ranging from 1 to 5 mM. However, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid did not inhibit cell growth at all in the fructose media. Especially, with the cells grown on fructose, 2-bromooctanoic acid exhibited a steep rise in the percent PHA synthesis inhibition over a small range of concentrations below 100 μM, a finding indicative of a very specific inhibition, whereas 4-pentenoic acid showed a broad, featureless concentration dependence, suggesting a rather nonspecific inhibition. The apparent inhibition constant Ki (the concentration for 50% inhibition of PHA synthesis) for 2

  11. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  12. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  13. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid correlates with the concentration of the free form.

    PubMed

    Kelmer-Bracht, A M; Bracht, A

    1993-05-01

    Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug, was measured in order to correlate the effect of the drug with the concentration of the free drug. The concentration of free drug was changed in two ways: (a) by changing the albumin concentration at a fixed total (free+bound) niflumic acid concentration; and, (b) by changing the drug concentration at a fixed albumin concentration. The degree of inhibition of gluconeogenesis by niflumic acid depends strictly on the concentration of the free drug, with half-maximal inhibition at 19.25 microM. This result is consistent with binding equilibrium in the extracellular space and with a flow-limited distribution between the extra- and intracellular spaces as proposed by our previous work.

  14. In vitro inhibition of OATP-mediated uptake of phalloidin using bile acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Vicens, Marta; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocyte uptake of phalloidin is carried out mainly by OATP1B1. We have used this compound as a prototypic substrate and assayed the ability to inhibit OATP-mediated phalloidin transport of four bile acid derivatives (BALU-1, BALU-2, BALU-3 and BALU-4) that showed positive results in preliminary screening. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes for heterologous expression of transporters, BALUs were found to inhibit taurocholic acid (TCA) transport by OATP1B1 (but not OATP1B3) as well as by rat Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4 and Oatp1b2. The study of their ability to inhibit sodium-dependent bile acid transporters revealed that the four BALUs induced an inhibition of rat Asbt-mediated TCA transport, which was similar to TCA-induced self-inhibition. Regarding human NTCP and rat Ntcp, BALU-1 differs from the other three BALUS in its lack of effect on TCA transport by these proteins. Using HPLC-MS/MS and CHO cells stably expressing OATP1B1 the ability of BALU-1 to inhibit the uptake of phalloidin itself by this transporter was confirmed. Kinetic analysis using X. laevis oocytes revealed that BALU-1-induced inhibition of OATP1B1 was mainly due to a competitive mechanism (Ki = 8 {mu}M). In conclusion, BALU-1 may be useful as a pharmacological tool to inhibit the uptake of compounds mainly taken up by OATP1B1 presumably without impairing bile acid uptake by the major carrier accounting for this process, i.e., NTCP.

  15. Tannic acid inhibits Staphylococcus aureus surface colonization in an IsaA-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Payne, David E; Martin, Nicholas R; Parzych, Katherine R; Rickard, Alex H; Underwood, Adam; Boles, Blaise R

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization.

  16. Tannic Acid Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Surface Colonization in an IsaA-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David E.; Martin, Nicholas R.; Parzych, Katherine R.; Rickard, Alex H.; Underwood, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization. PMID:23208606

  17. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Research. 56: 1189-1193, 1996. 19. Witters, L . and Kemp, B. Insulin activation of acetyl -CoA carboxylase accompanied by inhibition of the 5’-AMP...substrate for FAS, malonyl-CoA acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane to regulate fatty acid oxidation by inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1...compared to the xenograft, it has about 10 fold higher levels of acetyl -CoA, and higher levels of other CoA derivatives. These data indicate significant

  18. Charting the mechanism and reactivity of zirconium oxalate with hydroxamate ligands using density functional theory: implications in new chelate design.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Vasdev, Neil

    2014-07-14

    The reaction of [(89)Zr(C2O4)4](4-) with the tris-hydroxamate ligand desferrioxamine B (DFO) provides the basis of radiolabelling biological vectors such as antibodies and proteins with the radionuclide (89)Zr for positron emission tomography imaging. In this work, density functional theory methods were used to investigate the mechanism of reaction from [Zr(C2O4)4](4-) to Zr(MeAHA)4 by ligand substitution with N-methyl acetohydroxamate (MeAHA). Calculations were performed under simulated basic and acidic conditions. Ligand substitution under basic conditions was found to be thermodynamically feasible with an overall calculated change in solvation free energy, ΔGsol = -97 kJ mol(-1) using the B3LYP/DGDZVP methodology and a water continuum solvation model. In contrast, an acid-mediated mechanism of ligand substitution was found to be thermodynamically non-feasible. Molecular orbital analysis provides a rationale for the difference in thermodynamic stability between [Zr(C2O4)4](4-) and Zr(MeAHA)4. Overall, the DFT calculations are consistent with observed experimental (89)Zr-radiolabelling reactions and suggest that computational methods may prove useful in designing novel chelates for increasing the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of (89)Zr-complexes in vivo.

  19. Inhibition of bioluminescence in the living gills of the luminous fungus Mycena chlorophos by trans-4-aminocinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Katsunori

    2017-06-24

    The living gills of the fungus Mycena chlorophos spontaneously emit green light. It was previously reported that trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnnamic acid are essential for the bright light production in the living gills. However, the chemical mechanisms underlying their bioluminescence are unknown. In the present study, trans-4-aminocinnamic acid was found to inhibit light production in the living gills. The concentrations of trans-4-aminocinnamic acid that inhibited the bioluminescence intensity by 50% of initial values for immature and mature gills were 0.07 μM and 4 μM, respectively. Approximately 20% of the bioluminescence intensity of the immature and mature gills was not inhibited by a further increase in the concentration of trans-4-aminocinnamic acid. Moreover, the bioluminescence that was activated by trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid (0.01 mM) was completely inhibited by trans-4-aminocinnamic acid. Therefore, trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid functioned for the bioluminescence that was inhibited by trans-4-aminocinnamic acid. trans-4-Aminocinnamic acid strongly bound to the bioluminescence system(s) and withstood rinsing of the gills with 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH = 7), and high concentrations of trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (1 mM) and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid (0.1 mM) functioned to displace trans-4-aminocinnamic acid from the bioluminescence system(s) and reactivate bioluminescence. Benzenamine, trans-cinnamic acid, trans-2-aminocinnamic acid, and trans-3-aminocinnamic acid did not inhibit bioluminescence. Therefore, the structure-specific inhibition by trans-4-aminocinnamic acid suggested that the 4-hydroxy group in trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid molecules plays a functional role in the bioluminescence reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  1. Inhibition of Yeast Growth by Octanoic and Decanoic Acids Produced during Ethanolic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Rosa, M. Fernanda; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Novais, Júlio M.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibition of growth by octanoic or decanoic acids, two subproducts of ethanolic fermentation, was evaluated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus in association with ethanol, the main product of fermentation. In both strains, octanoic and decanoic acids, at concentrations up to 16 and 8 mg/liter, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate and the biomass yield at 30°C as an exponential function of the fatty acid concentration and increased the duration of growth latency. These toxic effects increased with a decrease in pH in the range of 5.4 to 3.0, indicating that the undissociated form is the toxic molecule. Decanoic acid was more toxic than octanoic acid. The concentrations of octanoic and decanoic acids were determined during the ethanolic fermentation (30°C) of two laboratory media (mineral and complex) by S. cerevisiae and of Jerusalem artichoke juice by K. marxianus. Based on the concentrations detected (0.7 to 23 mg/liter) and the kinetics of growth inhibition, the presence of octanoic and decanoic acids cannot be ignored in the evaluation of the overall inhibition of ethanolic fermentation. PMID:16347826

  2. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  3. Inhibition of Nitrogen Fixation in Alfalfa by Arsenate, Heavy Metals, Fluoride, and Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John R.; Sheridan, Richard P.

    1981-01-01

    The acute effects of aqueous solutions of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, F, and Zn ions at concentrations from 0.01 to 100 micrograms per milliliter and solutions adjusted to pH 2 to 6 with nitric or sulfuric acid were studied with respect to acetylene reduction, net photosynthesis, respiration rate, and chlorophyll content in Vernal alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Vernal). The effects of the various treatments on acetylene reduction varied from no demonstrable effect by any concentration of F− and 42% inhibition by 100 micrograms Pb2+ per milliliter, to 100% inhibition by 10 micrograms Cd2+ per milliliter and 100 micrograms per milliliter As, Cu2+, and Zn2+ ions. Zn2+ showed statistically significant inhibition of activity at 0.1 micrograms per milliliter. Acid treatments were not inhibitory above pH 2, at which pH nitric acid inhibited acetylene reduction activity more than did sulfuric acid. The inhibition of acetylene reduction by these ions was Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Cu2+ > AsO3− > Pb2+ > F−. The sensitivity of acetylene reduction to the ions was roughly equal to the sensitivity of photosynthesis, respiration, and chlorophyll content when Pb2+ was applied, but was 1,000 times more sensitive to Zn2+. The relationship of the data to field conditions and industrial pollution is discussed. PMID:16661858

  4. Inhibition of arachidonic acid release as the mechanism by which glucocorticoids inhibit endotoxin-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    1 Dexamethasone blocked endotoxin-induced diarrhoea in mice, but not that induced by arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2. 2 Indomethacin blocked endotoxin and arachidonic acid-induced diarrhoea, but not that induced by prostaglandin E2. 3 Codeine blocked all three forms of diarrhoea. 4 The above data, when considered in relation to literature reports that endotoxin induces prostaglandin synthesis, suggest that dexamethasone blocks diarrhoea by preventing the release of arachidonic acid, the substrate for prostaglandin biosynthesis. 5 The activities of indomethacin and dexamethasone in castor oil diarrhoea support the above conclusion and their inactivity in 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced diarrhoea confirms the absence of 'codeine-like' direct effects on the gut. 6 Other glucocorticoids (hydrocortisone, prednisolone) were also able to block endotoxin diarrhoea, but oestradiol, testosterone and progesterone did not. 7 The inhibitory action of dexamethasone on endotoxin diarrhoea could not be blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, nor by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, progesterone. Thus, involvement of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene activation could not be demonstrated. PMID:7237001

  5. External concentration of organic acid anions and pH: key independent variables for studying how organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C E; Broadbent, J R

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods are not fully understood, it is clear that intracellular accumulation of anions is a primary contributor to inhibition of bacterial growth. We hypothesize that intracellular accumulation of anions is driven by 2 factors, external anion concentration and external acidity. This hypothesis follows from basic chemistry principles that heretofore have not been fully applied to studies in the field, and it has led us to develop a novel approach for predicting internal anion concentration by controlling the external concentration of anions and pH. This approach overcomes critical flaws in contemporary experimental design that invariably target concentration of either protonated acid or total acid in the growth media thereby leaving anion concentration to vary depending on the pK(a) of the acids involved. Failure to control external concentration of anions has undoubtedly confounded results, and it has likely led to misleading conclusions regarding the antimicrobial action of organic acids. In summary, we advocate an approach for directing internal anion levels by controlling external concentration of anions and pH because it presents an additional opportunity to study the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit bacterial growth. Knowledge gained from such studies would have important application in the control of important foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, and may also facilitate efforts to promote the survival in foods or beverages of desirable probiotic bacteria.

  6. Method of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Mediated Antisense Inhibition of Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligonucleotide mimic that recognizes and binds to nucleic acids. The strong binding affinity of PNA to mRNA coupled with its high sequence specificity enable antisense PNA to selectively inhibit (i.e., knockdown) the protein synthesis of a target gene. This novel technology provides a powerful tool for Campylobacter studies because molecular techniques have been relatively less well-developed for this bacterium as compared to other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. This chapter describes a protocol for PNA-mediated antisense inhibition of gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

  7. Competitive Inhibition for Amino Acid Uptake by the Indigenous Microflora of Upper Klamath Lake1

    PubMed Central

    Burnison, B. Kent; Morita, Richard Y.

    1973-01-01

    The uptake of a specific 14C-amino acid by the heterotrophic microorganisms in the epilimnion of an eutrophic lake was influenced by the presence of other amino acids. The effect of unlabeled serine on 14C-glycine uptake was shown to be caused by competitive inhibition, which changed the interpretation of the kinetic parameters, the turnover time, Tt, and the sum of a transport constant, (Kt + (Sn), and the natural substrate concentration. The maximum velocity of uptake, Vmax, is unaffected by the competitive inhibition. PMID:4687063

  8. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  9. Inhibition of cold insolubility of an IgA cryoglobulin by decanedicarboxylic acid and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Lalezari, P; Kumar, M; Kumar, K M; Lawrence, C

    1983-11-01

    Cold insolubility of a serum IgA cryoimmunoglobulin was found to be inhibited by the addition of 1.5 mM sodium decanedicarboxylate in vitro. The patient with the cryoglobulin had advanced multiple myeloma complicated by severe hyperviscosity that caused lethargy and episodic loss of consciousness. Decanedicarboxylic acid administered orally resulted in transient relief of symptoms and the loss of cryoprecipitability of the paraprotein. Further in vitro studies revealed that sodium salts of long-chain monocarboxylic acids with a minimum of eight carbons, and dicarboxylic acids with a minimum of 12 carbons inhibited cryoprecipitation. Salts of short-chain carboxylic acids, by contrast, enhanced cryoprecipitation. Sodium phenolate and sodium salts of benzoic acid, 2,4-DNP, phenylpropionic acid, and salicylic acid were also inhibitory. These latter compounds, which have a ring structure, did not cause precipitation at any concentration. It was demonstrated that the presence of a free carboxylic group was required for these activities; conversion of carboxylic acid to amide resulted in the loss of both the inhibitory and cryoprecipitation-enhancing effects. Normal plasma, or plasma from five other patients who had IgG, IgM, or mixed-type cryoglobulinemia, were not affected by any of these compounds. It is suggested that in selected cases of hyperviscosity syndrome associated with cryoglobulinemia, some of these compounds, especially monocarboxylic acids with appropriate chain lengths, or those with a ring structure, may have therapeutic applications.

  10. Crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of human fatty acid synthase inhibited by orlistat

    SciTech Connect

    Pemble,C.; Johnson, L.; Kridel, S.; Lowther, W.

    2007-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is uniquely expressed at high levels in many tumor types. Pharmacological inhibition of FAS therefore represents an important therapeutic opportunity. The drug Orlistat, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inhibits FAS, induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and inhibits the growth of prostate tumor xenografts. We determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of FAS inhibited by Orlistat. Orlistat was captured in the active sites of two thioesterase molecules as a stable acyl-enzyme intermediate and as the hydrolyzed product. The details of these interactions reveal the molecular basis for inhibition and suggest a mechanism for acyl-chain length discrimination during the FAS catalytic cycle. Our findings provide a foundation for the development of new cancer drugs that target FAS.

  11. Inhibition of Micrococcus luteus DNA gyrase by norfloxacin and 10 other quinolone carboxylic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, M M; Edison, A

    1986-01-01

    The ability of norfloxacin, amifloxacin, cinoxacin, ciprofloxacin, flumequine, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin (OFL), oxolinic acid, perfloxacin, pipemidic acid, and rosoxacin to inhibit the in vitro supercoiling activity of Micrococcus luteus DNA gyrase was compared with the ability of each drug to inhibit the growth of the M. luteus strain from which the gyrase was purified. The potency of the quinolones as DNA gyrase inhibitors did not always correlate with antimicrobial potency. For example, OFL was a less potent inhibitor of gyrase than rosoxacin, yet the MIC of OFL was 16-fold lower than that of rosoxacin. Similarly, the MICs of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin (the most potent of the antibiotics tested in these assays) were several hundredfold lower than the MIC of nalidixic acid (the least potent of these antibiotics), but the inhibition of purified gyrase by these two quinolones was only 8- to 16-fold lower than that of nalidixic acid. These results suggest that factors in addition to inhibition of gyrase supercoiling activity are important in determining the potency of these drugs. Further studies indicated that the uptake of norfloxacin, OFL, and amifloxacin by M. luteus cells may not account for the large differences in MICs observed for these drugs (MICs of 0.8, 2.0, and 128 micrograms/ml, respectively). Images PMID:3010848

  12. Free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) agonists inhibit proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2017-07-01

    Many cellular actions of omega-3 fatty acids are mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors, FFA1 and FFA4, free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family members that are activated by these dietary constituents. FFAR agonists inhibit proliferation of human prostate and breast cancer cells. Since omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth, the current study tested the potential role of FFARs in the response. OVCAR3 and SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cell lines express mRNA for FFA1; FFA4 mRNA was detected at low levels in SKOV3 but not OVCAR3. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated proliferation of both cell lines; these responses were inhibited by eicosopentaneoic acid (EPA) and by GW9508, a synthetic FFAR agonist. The LPA antagonist Ki16425 also inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation; FFAR agonists had no further effect when added with Ki16425. The results suggest that FFARs are potential targets for ovarian cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Inhibition effects of perfluoroalkyl acids on progesterone production in mLTC-1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Cui, Ruina; Wang, Jianshe; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a class of fluorine substituted carboxylic acid, sulfonic acid and alcohol, structurally similar to their corresponding parent compounds. Previous study demonstrated the potential endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid, two dominant PFASs in animals and humans. We explored the relationship between eleven perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) with different carbon chain length and their ability to inhibit progesterone production in mouse Leydig tumor cells (mLTC-1). We found an obvious dose-response relationship between progesterone inhibition rate and PFAA exposure concentration in mLTC-1. The relative inhibition rate of progesterone by PFAAs was linearly related to the carbon chain length and molar refractivity of PFAAs. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decreased after PFAA exposure at the half-maximal inhibitory effect concentration (IC50) of progesterone production in mLTC-1, while the reactive oxygen species (ROS) content increased significantly. These results imply that the inhibition effect of PFAAs on progesterone production might be due, in part, to ROS damage and the decrease in MMP in mLTC-1. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Volatile Fatty Acids and the Inhibition of Escherichia coli Growth by Rumen Fluid1

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Meyer J.

    1969-01-01

    Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) normally found in bovine rumen fluid inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in Antibiotic Medium 3. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids each produced growth inhibition which was markedly pH-dependent. Little inhibition was observed at pH 7.0, and inhibition increased with decreasing pH. A combination of 60 μmoles of acetate, 20 μmoles of propionate, and 15 μmoles of butyrate per ml gave 96, 69, and 2% inhibition at pH 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0, respectively. Rumen fluid (50%) gave 89 and 48% inhibition at pH 6.0 and 6.5, respectively, and growth stimulation (22%) at pH 7.0. Rumen fluid inhibitory activity was heat-stable, was not precipitated by 63% ethyl alcohol, and was lost by dialysis and by treatment with anion-exchange resins but not with cation-exchange resins. These results are consistent with the idea that VFA are the inhibitory substances in rumen fluid. Previous results which indicated that rumen fluid VFA did not inhibit E. coli growth were due to lack of careful control of the final pH of the growth medium. The E. coli strain used does not grow in rumen fluid alone at pH 7.0. PMID:4886864

  15. Non-specific SIRT inhibition as a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of ginkgolic acids and urushiols.

    PubMed

    Ryckewaert, Lucie; Sacconnay, Lionel; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia

    2014-09-02

    Ginkgolic acids and urushiols are natural alkylphenols known for their mutagenic, carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. However, the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds has not been thoroughly elucidated so far. Considering that the SIRT inhibitory potential of anacardic acids has been hypothesized by in silico techniques, we herein demonstrated through both in vitro and computational methods that structurally related compounds such as ginkgolic acids and urushiols are able to modulate SIRT activity. Moreover, their SIRT inhibitory profile and cytotoxicity were comparable to sirtinol, a non-specific SIRT inhibitor (SIRT1 and SIRT2), and different from EX-527, a SIRT1 specific inhibitor. This is the first report on the SIRT inhibition of ginkgolic acids and urushiols. The results reported here are in line with previously observed effects on the induction of apoptosis by this class of compounds, and the non-specific SIRT inhibition is suggested as a new mechanism for their in vitro cytotoxicity.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of lovastatin-derived aliphatic hydroxamates that induce reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruo-Kai; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Lin; Wang, Chen-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Wei-Jan

    2016-11-15

    Some hydroxamate compounds induce cancer cell death by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study introduced the hydroxamate core into lovastatin, a fungus metabolite clinically used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The resulting compounds were evaluated for the activity for inducing ROS production. Most compounds exhibited higher activity than original lovastatin. Of these compounds, compound 3c had the most potent activity. Test of cytotoxicity in a panel of human cancer cell lines indicated compound 3c had activities superior to cisplatin in prostate cancer PC-3 cells and breast cancer T47D cells. In contrast, it in amounts up to 40μM had a much lower cytotoxic effect on normal human IMR-90 cells. Further profiling of cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis, and DNA damage activated checkpoint signaling pathway revealed the important role of compound 3c-mediated cytotoxicity in ROS generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Boric Acid Inhibition of Trichophyton rubrum Growth and Conidia Formation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2017-04-08

    Trichophyton rubrum is a common human dermatophyte that is the causative agent of 80-93% of fungal infections of the skin and nails. While dermatophyte infections in healthy people are easily treatable with over-the-counter medications, such infections pose a higher risk for patients with compromised immune function and impaired regenerative potential. The efficacy of boric acid (BA) for the treatment of vaginal yeast infections prompted an investigation of the effect of BA on growth and morphology of T. rubrum. This is of particular interest since BA facilitates wound healing, raising the possibility that treating athlete's foot with BA, either alone or in combination with other antifungal drugs, would combine the benefits of antimicrobial activity and tissue regeneration to accelerate healing of infected skin. The data presented here show that BA represses T. rubrum growth at a concentration reported to be beneficial for host tissue regeneration. Oxygen exposure increases BA toxicity, and mycelia growing under BA stress avoid colonizing the surface of the growth surface, which leads to a suppression of aerial mycelium growth and surface conidia formation. BA penetrates into solid agar matrices, but the relative lack of oxygen below the substrate surface limits the effectiveness of BA in suppressing growth of embedded T. rubrum cells.

  18. Retinoic acid inhibits histone methyltransferase Whsc1 during palatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiying; Higashihori, Norihisa; Yahiro, Kohei; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-03-13

    Cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P) is a common congenital anomaly in humans and is thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying orofacial clefts are not fully understood. Here, we investigate how the overdose of retinoic acid (RA), which can induce cleft palate in mice and humans, regulates histone methyltransferase, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1) during palatal development in mice. We treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with 1 μM all-trans RA and discovered that the global level of H3K36me3 was downregulated and that expression of the H3K36 methyltransferase gene, Whsc1, was reduced. The expression level of WHSC1 in embryonic palatal shelves was reduced during palatogenesis, following maternal administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of RA by gastric intubation. Furthermore, the expression of WHSC1 in palatal shelves was observed in epithelial and mesenchymal cells at all stages, suggesting an important role for palatal development. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of cleft palate observed after excessive RA exposure is likely to be associated with a reduction in the histone methyltransferase, WHSC1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Remodeling of ACL Allografts is Inhibited by Peracetic Acid Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Johannes; Kamp, Julia; Przybilla, Dorothea; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Sterilization of allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has become an important prerequisite to prevent disease transmission. However, current sterilization techniques impair the biological or mechanical properties of such treated grafts. Peracetic acid (PAA) has been successfully used to sterilize bone allografts without these disadvantages and does not impair the mechanical properties of soft tissue grafts in vitro. We asked whether PAA sterilization would influence recellularization, restoration of crimp length and pattern, and revascularization of ACL grafts during early healing. We used an in vivo sheep model for open ACL reconstruction. We also correlated the histologic findings with the restoration of anteroposterior stability and structural properties during load-to-failure testing. PAA slowed remodeling activity at 6 and 12 weeks compared to nonsterilized allografts and autografts. The mechanical properties of PAA grafts were also reduced compared to these control groups at both time points. We conclude PAA sterilization currently should not be used to sterilize soft tissue grafts typically used in ACL reconstruction. PMID:18491201

  20. Inhibition of aconitase in citrus fruit callus results in a metabolic shift towards amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Degu, Asfaw; Hatew, Bayissa; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Shlizerman, Ludmila; Zur, Naftali; Katz, Ehud; Fernie, Alisdair R; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2011-09-01

    Citrate, a major determinant of citrus fruit quality, accumulates early in fruit development and declines towards maturation. The isomerization of citrate to isocitrate, catalyzed by aconitase is a key step in acid metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity early in fruit development contributes to acid accumulation, whereas increased cytosolic activity of aconitase causes citrate decline. It was previously hypothesized that the block in mitochondrial aconitase activity, inducing acid accumulation, is caused by citramalate. Here, we investigated the effect of citramalate and of another aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on aconitase activity and regulation in callus originated from juice sacs. These compounds significantly increased citrate content and reduced the enzyme's activity, while slightly inducing its protein level. Citramalate inhibited the mitochondrial, but not cytosolic form of the enzyme. Its external application to mandarin fruits resulted in inhibition of aconitase activity, with a transient increase in fruit acidity detected a few weeks later. The endogenous level of citramalate was analyzed in five citrus varieties: its pattern of accumulation challenged the notion of its action as an endogenous inhibitor of mitochondrial aconitase. Metabolite profiling of oxalomalate-treated cells showed significant increases in a few amino acids and organic acids. The activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and aspartate kinase, as well as these of two γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-shunt enzymes, succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSAD) were significantly induced in oxalomalate-treated cells. It is suggested that the increase in citrate, caused by aconitase inhibition, induces amino acid synthesis and the GABA shunt, in accordance with the suggested fate of citrate during the acid decline stage in citrus fruit.

  1. Anacardic Acid Inhibits the Catalytic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M.; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K.; Kumar, Geetha B.; Tainer, John A.; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J. Jefferson P.

    2012-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1′ pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  2. Inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by ursolic acid. Evidence for a binding site for pentacyclic triterpenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Q L; Rinehart, A R; Simon, S R; Cheronis, J C

    1991-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid metabolites of plant origin are inhibitors of hydrolysis of both synthetic peptide substrates and elastin by human leucocyte elastase (HLE). Ursolic acid, the most potent of these compounds, has an inhibition constant of 4-6 microM for hydrolysis of peptide substrates in phosphate-buffered saline. With tripeptide and tetrapeptide substrates, the inhibition is purely competitive, whereas with a shorter dipeptide substrate the inhibition is non-competitive, suggesting that ursolic acid interacts with subsite S3 of the extended substrate-binding domain in HLE, but not with subsites S1 and S2. The carboxy group at position 28 in the pentacyclic-ring system of the triterpenes contributes to binding to HLE, since replacement of this group with a hydroxy group, as in uvaol, the alcohol analogue of ursolic acid, reduces the potency of inhibition. The inhibitory potency of ursolic acid is also reduced by addition of 1 M-NaCl, further supporting a postulated electrostatic interaction between the negative charge on the triterpene and a positively charged residue on the enzyme, which we assign to the side chain of Arg-217, located in the vicinity of subsites S4 and S5 in HLE. These observations are consistent with a binding site for ursolic acid which extends from S3 towards S4 and S5 on the enzyme. Other triterpenes, including oleanolic acid, erythrodiol, hederagenin and 18 beta-glycyrrhetic acid, can also interact with this binding site. On the basis of these results we conclude that the extended substrate-binding domain of HLE can accommodate a variety of hydrophobic ligands, including not only such molecules as fatty acids [Ashe & Zimmerman (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 75, 194-199; Cook & Ternai (1988) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 369, 629-637], but also polycyclic molecules such as the pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:1859379

  3. Bacteria and acid drainage from coal refuse: inhibition by sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, P.R.; Apel, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies have shown that the application of an aqueous solution of sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate to the surface of high-sulphur coal refuse inhibits the activity of iron- and sulphur-oxidising chemo-autotrophic bacteria and reduces the amount of acid drainage from the refuse. Further studies are recommended to assess the usefulness of this method for controlling formation of acid mine drainage in the field.

  4. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Van heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC50-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg−1. In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 605–611. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600056 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870544

  5. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Van Heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-02-12

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC(50)-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg(-1). In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action.

  6. Afferent signalling from the acid-challenged rat stomach is inhibited and gastric acid elimination is enhanced by lafutidine.

    PubMed

    Edelsbrunner, Martin E; Nakano, Motoko; Holzer, Peter

    2009-06-02

    Lafutidine is a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, the gastroprotective effect of which is related to its antisecretory activity and its ability to activate a sensory neuron-dependent mechanism of defence. The present study investigated whether intragastric administration of lafutidine (10 and 30 mg/kg) modifies vagal afferent signalling, mucosal injury, intragastric acidity and gastric emptying after gastric acid challenge. Adult rats were treated with vehicle, lafutidine (10 - 30 mg/kg) or cimetidine (10 mg/kg), and 30 min later their stomachs were exposed to exogenous HCl (0.25 M). During the period of 2 h post-HCl, intragastric pH, gastric volume, gastric acidity and extent of macroscopic gastric mucosal injury were determined and the activation of neurons in the brainstem was visualized by c-Fos immunocytochemistry. Gastric acid challenge enhanced the expression of c-Fos in the nucleus tractus solitarii but caused only minimal damage to the gastric mucosa. Lafutidine reduced the HCl-evoked expression of c-Fos in the NTS and elevated the intragastric pH following intragastric administration of excess HCl. Further analysis showed that the gastroprotective effect of lafutidine against excess acid was delayed and went in parallel with facilitation of gastric emptying, measured indirectly via gastric volume changes, and a reduction of gastric acidity. The H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine had similar but weaker effects. These observations indicate that lafutidine inhibits the vagal afferent signalling of a gastric acid insult, which may reflect an inhibitory action on acid-induced gastric pain. The ability of lafutidine to decrease intragastric acidity following exposure to excess HCl cannot be explained by its antisecretory activity but appears to reflect dilution and/or emptying of the acid load into the duodenum. This profile of actions emphasizes the notion that H2 receptor antagonists can protect the gastric mucosa from acid injury independently of their

  7. Inhibition of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis by 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Jun; Kaji, Hiroaki; Ichiyama, Kenji; Makino, Kazutaka; Gohda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Tai, Akihiro

    2007-10-15

    Inhibitory effects of 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives, ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G), ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-2P), and ascorbic acid 2-sulfate (AA-2S), on 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidative hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes were studied and were compared with those of ascorbic acid (AA) and other antioxidants. The order of the inhibition efficiency was AA-2S> or =Trolox=uric acid> or =AA-2P> or =AA-2G=AA>glutathione. Although the reactivity of the AA derivatives against AAPH-derived peroxyl radical (ROO(*)) was much lower than that of AA, the derivatives exerted equal or more potent protective effects on AAPH-induced hemolysis and membrane protein oxidation. In addition, the AA derivatives were found to react per se with ROO(*), not via AA as an intermediate. These findings suggest that secondary reactions between the AA derivative radical and ROO(*) play a part in hemolysis inhibition. Delayed addition of the AA derivatives after AAPH-induced oxidation of erythrocytes had already proceeded showed weaker inhibition of hemolysis compared to that of AA. These results suggest that the AA derivatives per se act as biologically effective antioxidants under moderate oxidative stress and that AA-2G and AA-2P may be able to act under severe oxidative stress after enzymatic conversion to AA in vivo.

  8. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Mitigation of Humic Acid Inhibition in Anaerobic Digestion of Cellulose by Addition of Various Salts

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Samet; Khadem, Ahmad F.; Zeeman, Grietje; van Lier, Jules B.; Plugge, Caroline M.

    2015-01-01

    Humic compounds are inhibitory to the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. In this study, the impact of salt addition to mitigate the inhibitory effects of humic compounds was investigated. The experiment was conducted using batch tests to monitor the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of humic acid. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron salts were tested separately for their efficiency to mitigate humic acid inhibition. All experiments were done under mesophilic conditions (30 °C) and at pH 7. Methane production was monitored online, using the Automatic Methane Potential Test System. Methane production, soluble chemical oxygen demand and volatile fatty acid content of the samples were measured to calculate the hydrolysis efficiencies. Addition of magnesium, calcium and iron salts clearly mitigated the inhibitory effects of humic acid and hydrolysis efficiencies reached up to 75%, 65% and 72%, respectively, which were similar to control experiments. Conversely, potassium and sodium salts addition did not mitigate the inhibition and hydrolysis efficiencies were found to be less than 40%. Mitigation of humic acid inhibition via salt addition was also validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analyses, which showed the binding capacity of different cations to humic acid. PMID:28955013

  10. Mitigation of Humic Acid Inhibition in Anaerobic Digestion of Cellulose by Addition of Various Salts.

    PubMed

    Azman, Samet; Khadem, Ahmad F; Zeeman, Grietje; van Lier, Jules B; Plugge, Caroline M

    2015-03-25

    Humic compounds are inhibitory to the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. In this study, the impact of salt addition to mitigate the inhibitory effects of humic compounds was investigated. The experiment was conducted using batch tests to monitor the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of humic acid. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron salts were tested separately for their efficiency to mitigate humic acid inhibition. All experiments were done under mesophilic conditions (30 °C) and at pH 7. Methane production was monitored online, using the Automatic Methane Potential Test System. Methane production, soluble chemical oxygen demand and volatile fatty acid content of the samples were measured to calculate the hydrolysis efficiencies. Addition of magnesium, calcium and iron salts clearly mitigated the inhibitory effects of humic acid and hydrolysis efficiencies reached up to 75%, 65% and 72%, respectively, which were similar to control experiments. Conversely, potassium and sodium salts addition did not mitigate the inhibition and hydrolysis efficiencies were found to be less than 40%. Mitigation of humic acid inhibition via salt addition was also validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analyses, which showed the binding capacity of different cations to humic acid.

  11. Autoxidated linolenic acid inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus via oxylipin species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shijuan; Liang, Yating; Zhang, Jindan; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus species are among the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds in nature. Although it has been known for a long time that seeds with high oil content are more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis remains controversial. Here we demonstrate in A. flavus that both the saturated stearic acid (C18:0) and the polyunsaturated linolenic acid (C18:3) promoted aflatoxin production, while C18:3, but not C18:0, inhibited aflatoxin biosynthesis after exposure to air for several hours. Further experiments showed that autoxidated C18:3 promoted mycelial growth, sporulation, and kojic acid production, but inhibited the expression of genes in the AF biosynthetic gene cluster. Mass spectrometry analyses of autoxidated C18:3 fractions that were able to inhibit aflatoxin biosynthesis led to the identification of multiple oxylipin species. These results may help to clarify the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis, and may explain why controversial results have been obtained for fatty acids in the past.

  12. Continuous or discontinuous tranexamic acid effectively inhibits fibrinolysis in children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Roland; Rubatti, Marina; Credico, Carmen; Louvain-Quintard, Virginie; Anerkian, Vregina; Doubine, Sylvie; Vasse, Marc; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas

    2014-04-01

    Tranexamic acid is given continuously or discontinuously as an anti-fibrinolytic therapy during cardiac surgery, but the effects on fibrinolysis parameters remain poorly investigated. We sought to assess the effects of continuous and discontinuous tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis parameters in children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Children requiring cardiac surgery or repeat surgery by sternotomy with CPB for congenital heart disease were randomized to receive either continuous or discontinuous tranexamic acid. Blood tranexamic acid, D-dimers, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), tPA-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (tPA-PAI1) complexes, fibrinogen and fibrin monomers were measured and compared to values obtained from children who did not receive tranexamic acid. Tranexamic acid inhibited the CPB-induced increase in D-dimers, with a similar potency between continuous and discontinuous regimens. Time courses for tPA, fibrin monomers, and fibrinogen were also similar for both regimen, and there was a significant difference in tPA-PAI1 complex concentrations at the end of surgery, which may be related to a significantly higher tranexamic acid concentration. Continuous and discontinuous regimen are suitable for an effective inhibition of fibrinolysis in children undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB, but the continuous regimen was previously shown to be more effective to maintain stable tranexamic acid concentrations.

  13. Valproic acid inhibits TTX-resistant sodium currents in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Szulczyk, Bartlomiej; Nurowska, Ewa

    2017-09-16

    Valproic acid is frequently prescribed and used to treat epilepsy, bipolar disorder and other conditions. However, the mechanism of action of valproic acid has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of valproic acid (200 μM) on TTX-resistant sodium currents in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Valproic acid inhibited the maximal amplitude and did not change the activation parameters of TTX-resistant sodium currents. Moreover, valproic acid (2 μM and 200 μM) shifted the TTX-resistant sodium channel inactivation curve towards hyperpolarisation. In the presence of valproic acid, TTX-resistant sodium currents recovered from inactivation more slowly. Valproic acid did not influence the use-dependent blockade of TTX-resistant sodium currents. This study suggests that a potential new mechanism of the antiepileptic action of valproic acid is, among others, inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium currents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Valproic Acid as a Potential Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Histone Deacetylase 1 (PfHDAC1): An in Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawi, Mohamed A. Abdallah; Awadalla, Mohamed Khalid Alhaj; Abdel Hamid, Muzamil Mahdi; Mohamed, Magdi Awadalla; Awad, Talal Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A new Plasmodium falciparum histone deacetylase1 (PfHDAC1) homology model was built based on the highest sequence identity available template human histone deacetylase 2 structure. The generated model was carefully evaluated for stereochemical accuracy, folding correctness and overall structure quality. All evaluations were acceptable and consistent. Docking a group of hydroxamic acid histone deacetylase inhibitors and valproic acid has shown binding poses that agree well with inhibitor-bound histone deacetylase-solved structural interactions. Docking affinity dG scores were in agreement with available experimental binding affinities. Further, enzyme-ligand complex stability and reliability were investigated by running 5-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations. Thorough analysis of the simulation trajectories has shown that enzyme-ligand complexes were stable during the simulation period. Interestingly, the calculated theoretical binding energies of the docked hydroxamic acid inhibitors have shown that the model can discriminate between strong and weaker inhibitors and agrees well with the experimental affinities reported in the literature. The model and the docking methodology can be used in screening virtual libraries for PfHDAC1 inhibitors, since the docking scores have ranked ligands in accordance with experimental binding affinities. Valproic acid calculated theoretical binding energy suggests that it may inhibit PfHDAC1. PMID:25679451

  15. Fatty acid synthesis is inhibited by inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids for glycerolipid assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Philip D.; Johnson, Sean R.; Cao, Xia; Li, Jia; Nam, Jeong-Won; Jaworski, Jan G.; Ohlrogge, John B.; Browse, John

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of unusual fatty acids through β-oxidation within transgenic plants has long been hypothesized as a major factor limiting the production of industrially useful unusual fatty acids in seed oils. Arabidopsis seeds expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase accumulate hydroxylated fatty acids up to 17% of total fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols; however, total seed oil is also reduced up to 50%. Investigations into the cause of the reduced oil phenotype through in vivo [14C]acetate and [3H]2O metabolic labeling of developing seeds surprisingly revealed that the rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis within the transgenic seeds was approximately half that of control seeds. RNAseq analysis indicated no changes in expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in hydroxylase-expressing plants. However, differential [14C]acetate and [14C]malonate metabolic labeling of hydroxylase-expressing seeds indicated the in vivo acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity was reduced to approximately half that of control seeds. Therefore, the reduction of oil content in the transgenic seeds is consistent with reduced de novo fatty acid synthesis in the plastid rather than fatty acid degradation. Intriguingly, the coexpression of triacylglycerol synthesis isozymes from castor along with the fatty acid hydroxylase alleviated the reduced acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity, restored the rate of fatty acid synthesis, and the accumulation of seed oil was substantially recovered. Together these results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism that detects inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids within the endoplasmic reticulum and activates an endogenous pathway for posttranslational reduction of fatty acid synthesis within the plastid. PMID:24398521

  16. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D; Convertino, Marino; De Vivo, Marco

    2016-06-20

    The design of multitarget-directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget-directed ligand named ARN2508 (2-[3-fluoro-4-[3-(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2-arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti-inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX.

  17. Inhibition of Cervical Cancer by Promoting IGFBP7 Expression Using Ellagic Acid from Pomegranate Peel

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongjun; Zhang, Dongya; Fu, Qingrui

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism by which cervical cancer is inhibited by promoting IGFBP7 expression using ellagic acid from pomegranate peel extract. Material/Methods HeLa cells were divided into 6 groups: control group (NC), blank control group (BL), and IGFBP7 overexpression group (IGFBP7), and 2.5 uM, 5. 0 uM, and 10.0 uM ellagic acid-treated groups. The cell proliferation ability was detected and the degree of invasion in the 6 groups was measured by Transwell assay. The expression levels of IGFBP7 and AKT/mTOR in the 6 groups of cells were detected by RT-PCR technique. Results Compared with NC and BL groups, The IGFBP7 gene expressions of the IGFPB7 and ellagic acid-treated groups were significantly increased (P<0.05). There was a dose-effect dependence in the ellagic acid-treated groups. The invasion ability of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups was significantly lower than that of NC and BL groups in HeLa cells (P<0.05). The apoptosis rate of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the NC and BL groups in HeLa cells (P<0.05). AKT and mTOR mRNA and protein expressions of the IGFBP7 group and ellagic acid-treated groups were significantly lower than that of the NC and BL groups (P<0.05). There was a dose-effect dependence in the ellagic acid-treated groups. Conclusions The ellagic acid in pomegranate peel extract can inhibit the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by enhancing the expression level of IGFBP7, which can inhibit the HeLa cells in cervical cancer. PMID:27941714

  18. Quantitative Analysis of the Modes of Growth Inhibition by Weak Organic Acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pHi) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pHi, was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pHi recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pHi, and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pHi upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport. PMID:23001666

  19. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-12-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pH(i)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pH(i), was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pH(i) recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pH(i), and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pH(i) upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport.

  20. D-amino acids do not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Wee Tin K; Frye, Mitchell; Gagnon, Patricia; Vogel, Joseph P; Chole, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a known biofilm-forming organism, is an opportunistic pathogen that plays an important role in chronic otitis media, tracheitis, cholesteatoma, chronic wounds, and implant infections. Eradication of biofilm infections has been a challenge because the biofilm phenotype provides bacteria with a protective environment from the immune system and antibiotics; thus, there has been great interest in adjunctive molecules that may inhibit biofilm formation or cause biofilm dispersal. There are reports that D-amino acids may inhibit biofilms. In this study, we test the ability of various D-amino acids to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in vitro. We evaluated the effect of D-alanine (10 mM), D-leucine (10 mM), D-methionine (10 mM), D-tryptophan (10 mM), and D-tyrosine (10 uM and 1 mM) on biofilm formation in two commonly studied laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa: PAO1 and PA14. Biofilms were grown in 24-well and 96-well tissue culture plates, documented photographically and stained with 0.1% crystal violet and solubilized in 33% glacial acetic acid for quantification. In strains PAO1 and PA14, the addition of D-amino acids did not result in an inhibitory effect on biofilm growth in 24-well plates. Repeating the study in 96-well plates confirmed our findings that D-amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. We conclude that D-amino acids only slow the production of biofilms rather than completely prevent biofilm formation; therefore, D-amino acids represent a poor option for potential clinically therapeutic interventions. N/A.

  1. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghu; Chen, Ren; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid's structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation.

  2. D‐amino acids do not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Mitchell; Gagnon, Patricia; Vogel, Joseph P.; Chole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a known biofilm‐forming organism, is an opportunistic pathogen that plays an important role in chronic otitis media, tracheitis, cholesteatoma, chronic wounds, and implant infections. Eradication of biofilm infections has been a challenge because the biofilm phenotype provides bacteria with a protective environment from the immune system and antibiotics; thus, there has been great interest in adjunctive molecules that may inhibit biofilm formation or cause biofilm dispersal. There are reports that D‐amino acids may inhibit biofilms. In this study, we test the ability of various D‐amino acids to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in vitro. Study Design We evaluated the effect of D‐alanine (10 mM), D‐leucine (10 mM), D‐methionine (10 mM), D‐tryptophan (10 mM), and D‐tyrosine (10 uM and 1 mM) on biofilm formation in two commonly studied laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa: PAO1 and PA14. Methods Biofilms were grown in 24‐well and 96‐well tissue culture plates, documented photographically and stained with 0.1% crystal violet and solubilized in 33% glacial acetic acid for quantification. Results In strains PAO1 and PA14, the addition of D‐amino acids did not result in an inhibitory effect on biofilm growth in 24‐well plates. Repeating the study in 96‐well plates confirmed our findings that D‐amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion We conclude that D‐amino acids only slow the production of biofilms rather than completely prevent biofilm formation; therefore, D‐amino acids represent a poor option for potential clinically therapeutic interventions. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:28286870

  3. [Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide production on chondrocytes induced by fulvic acid by ginger volatile oil].

    PubMed

    Guo, P; Xu, J; Xu, S; Wang, K

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of ginger on Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), the ginger volatile oil was taken as a scavenger and proved effective in inhibiting the production of hydrogen peroxide in chondrocytes induced by fulvic acid from KBD area.

  4. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  5. Differential Gene Expression for Investigation of Escherichia coli Biofilm Inhibition by Plant Extract Ursolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dacheng; Zuo, Rongjun; González Barrios, Andrés F.; Bedzyk, Laura A.; Eldridge, Gary R.; Pasmore, Mark E.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    After 13,000 samples of compounds purified from plants were screened, a new biofilm inhibitor, ursolic acid, has been discovered and identified. Using both 96-well microtiter plates and a continuous flow chamber with COMSTAT analysis, 10 μg of ursolic acid/ml inhibited Escherichia coli biofilm formation 6- to 20-fold when added upon inoculation and when added to a 24-h biofilm; however, ursolic acid was not toxic to E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio harveyi, and hepatocytes. Similarly, 10 μg of ursolic acid/ml inhibited biofilm formation by >87% for P. aeruginosa in both complex and minimal medium and by 57% for V. harveyi in minimal medium. To investigate the mechanism of this nontoxic inhibition on a global genetic basis, DNA microarrays were used to study the gene expression profiles of E. coli K-12 grown with or without ursolic acid. Ursolic acid at 10 and 30 μg/ml induced significantly (P < 0.05) 32 and 61 genes, respectively, and 19 genes were consistently induced. The consistently induced genes have functions for chemotaxis and mobility (cheA, tap, tar, and motAB), heat shock response (hslSTV and mopAB), and unknown functions (such as b1566 and yrfHI). There were 31 and 17 genes repressed by 10 and 30 μg of ursolic acid/ml, respectively, and 12 genes were consistently repressed that have functions in cysteine synthesis (cysK) and sulfur metabolism (cysD), as well as unknown functions (such as hdeAB and yhaDFG). Ursolic acid inhibited biofilms without interfering with quorum sensing, as shown with the V. harveyi AI-1 and AI-2 reporter systems. As predicted by the differential gene expression, deleting motAB counteracts ursolic acid inhibition (the paralyzed cells no longer become too motile). Based on the differential gene expression, it was also discovered that sulfur metabolism (through cysB) affects biofilm formation (in the absence of ursolic acid). PMID:16000817

  6. Ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibit cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo via apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoguang; Meng, Xiaomei; Dong, Yaozhong

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a cause of cancer death, making it one of the most common causes of death among women globally. Previously, a variety of studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms by which cervical cancer develops. However, there are still limitations in treatment for cervical cancer. Ursolic acid is a naturally derived pentacyclic triterpene acid, exhibiting broad anticancer effects. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been known to better the bioavailability of drugs on intranasal administration compared with only drug solutions. Administration of ursolic acid nanoparticles is thought to be sufficient to lead to considerable suppression of cervical cancer progression. We loaded gold-ursolic acid into poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to cervical cancer cell lines due to the properties of ursolic acid in altering cellular processes and the easier absorbance of nanoparticles. In addition, in this study, ursolic acid nanoparticles were administered to cervical cancer cells to find effective treatments for cervical cancer inhibition. In the present study, ELISA, western blotting, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry assays were carried out to calculate the molecular mechanism by which ursolic acid nanoparticles modulated cervical cancer progression. Data indicated that ursolic acid nanoparticles, indeed, significantly suppress cervial cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration compared to the control group, and apoptosis was induced by ursolic acid nanoparticles in cervical cancer cells through activating caspases, p53 and suppressing anti-apoptosis-related signals. Furthermore, tumor size was reduced by treatment of ursolic acid nanoparticles in in vivo experiments. In conclusion, this study suggests that ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation via apoptosis induction, which could be a potential target for future therapeutic strategy clinically.

  7. Inhibition effects of chlorogenic acid on benign prostatic hyperplasia in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Chen, Huaguo; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Xingdong; Hu, Enming; Jiang, Zhengmeng

    2017-08-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects and explore mechanisms of chlorogenic acid against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in mice. Benign prostatic hyperplasia model was induced in experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (7.5mg/kg/d) consecutively for 14 d. A total of 60 mice were randomly divided into six groups: (Group 1) normal control group, (Group 2) benign prostatic hyperplasia model control group, (Group 3) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with finasteride at a dose of 1mg/kg, (Group 4) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 0.8mg/kg (low dose group), (Group 5) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 1.6mg/kg (medium dose group) and (Group 6) benign prostatic hyperplasia mice treated with chlorogenic acid at dose levels of 3.2mg/kg (high dose group). Animals were sacrificed on the scheduled termination, pick out the eyeball to get blood, then prostates were weighed and prostatic index were determined. Then the serum acid phosphatase (ACP), prostatic acid phosphatase (PACP) and typeⅡ5-alpha-reductase (SRD5A2) levels were measured and observed morphological changes of the prostate. Comparing with benign prostatic hyperplasia model group, the high and medium dose of chlorogenic acid could significantly reduce prostate index and levels of acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase and typeⅡ5-alpha-reductase (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These findings were supported by histopathological observations of prostate tissues. Histopathological examination also indicated that chlorogenic acid treatment at the high and medium doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. The results indicated that chlorogenic acid exhibited restraining effect on benign prostatic hyperplasia model animals, and its mechanism might be related to inhibit typeⅡ5-alpha reductase activity. Copyright © 2017

  8. Ascorbic acid and reactive oxygen species are involved in the inhibition of seed germination by abscisic acid in rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Zhang, Aying; Li, Yingxuan; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Jia, Liguo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. The possible links among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC), and GA during rice seed germination were investigated. Unlike in non-seed tissues where ROS production is increased by ABA, ABA reduced ROS production in imbibed rice seeds, especially in the embryo region. Such reduced ROS also led to an inhibition of ASC production. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, which was indicated by the inhibited expression of GA biosynthesis genes, amylase genes, and enzyme activity. Application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. It can be concluded that ABA regulates seed germination in multiple dimensions. ROS and ASC are involved in its inhibition of GA biosynthesis.

  9. Ascorbic acid and reactive oxygen species are involved in the inhibition of seed germination by abscisic acid in rice seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Jia, Liguo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. The possible links among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC), and GA during rice seed germination were investigated. Unlike in non-seed tissues where ROS production is increased by ABA, ABA reduced ROS production in imbibed rice seeds, especially in the embryo region. Such reduced ROS also led to an inhibition of ASC production. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, which was indicated by the inhibited expression of GA biosynthesis genes, amylase genes, and enzyme activity. Application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. It can be concluded that ABA regulates seed germination in multiple dimensions. ROS and ASC are involved in its inhibition of GA biosynthesis. PMID:22200664

  10. Carnosic acid and fisetin combination therapy enhances inhibition of lung cancer through apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bin; Wang, Li-Fang; Meng, Wen-Shu; Chen, Liang; Meng, Zi-Li

    2017-06-01

    Carnosic acid is a phenolic diterpene with anti-inflammation, anticancer, anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, as well as neuroprotective properties, which is generated by many species from Lamiaceae family. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally flavonoid is abundantly produced in different vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been reported to have various positive biological effects, including anti-proliferative, anticancer, anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects. Lung cancer is reported as the most common neoplasm in human world-wide. In the present study, the possible benefits of carnosic acid combined with fisetin on lung cancer in vitro and in vivo was explored. Carnosic acid and fisetin combination led to apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Caspase-3 signaling pathway was promoted in carnosic acid and fisetin co-treatment, which was accompanied by anti-apoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl decreasing and pro-apoptotic signals of Bax and Bad increasing. The death receptor (DR) of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) was enhanced in carnosic acid and fisetin combined treatment. Furthermore, the mouse xenograft model in vivo suggested that carnosic acid and fisetin combined treatment inhibited lung cancer growth in comparison to the carnosic acid or fisetin monotherapy. This study supplies a novel therapy to induce apoptosis to inhibit lung cancer through caspase-3 activation.

  11. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  12. Fish protein decreases serum cholesterol in rats by inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Arai, Hirofumi; Kanda, Seiji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2011-05-01

    Fish protein has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol content by inhibiting absorption of cholesterol and bile acid in laboratory animals, though the mechanism underlying this effect is not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption following fish protein intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 dietary groups of 7 rats each, 1 group receiving a diet consisting of 20% casein and the other receiving a diet consisting of 10% casein and 10% fish protein. Both experimental diets also contained 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% sodium cholate. After the rats had been on their respective diets for 4 wk, their serum and liver cholesterol contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion contents were measured. Fish protein consumption decreased serum and liver cholesterol content and increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion and simultaneously increased fecal nitrogen excretion. In addition, fish protein hydrolyzate prepared by in vitro digestion had lower micellar solubility of cholesterol and higher binding capacity for bile acids compared with casein hydrolyzate. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effect of fish protein is mediated by increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion, which is due to the digestion products of fish protein having reduced micellar solubility of cholesterol and increased bile acid binding capacity.

  13. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    PubMed

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations.

  14. Uricase Inhibits Nitrogen Dioxide-Promoted Allergic Sensitization to Inhaled Ovalbumin Independent of Uric Acid Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Jennifer L.; Burgess, Edward J.; Hoyt, Laura R.; Randall, Matthew J.; Mandal, Mridul K.; Matthews, Dwight E.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental air pollutant and endogenously-generated oxidant that contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory disease and can function as an adjuvant to allergically sensitize to an innocuous inhaled antigen. Since uric acid has been implicated as a mediator of adjuvant activity, we sought to determine whether uric acid was elevated and participated in a mouse model of NO2-promoted allergic sensitization. We found that uric acid was increased in the airways of mice exposed to NO2 and that administration of uricase inhibited the development of ovalbumin (OVA)-driven allergic airway disease subsequent to OVA challenge as well as the generation of OVA-specific antibodies. However, uricase was itself immunogenic, inducing a uricase-specific adaptive immune response that occurred even when the enzymatic activity of uricase had been inactivated. Inhibition of the OVA-specific response was not due to the capacity of uricase to inhibit OVA uptake or processing and presentation by dendritic cells, but at a later step that inhibited OVA-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Whereas blocking uric acid formation by allopurinol did not affect outcomes, administration of ultra-clean human serum albumin at protein concentrations equivalent to that of uricase inhibited NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. These results implicate that whereas uric acid levels are elevated in the airways of NO2-exposed mice, the powerful inhibitory effect of uricase administration on allergic sensitization is mediated more through antigen-specific immune deviation than on suppression of allergic sensitization, a mechanism to be considered in the interpretation of results from other experimental systems. PMID:27465529

  15. Methanogenic inhibition by roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylarsonic acid) and related aromatic arsenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Cortinas, Irail; Field, Jim A

    2010-03-15

    Roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenylarsonic acid) and p-arsanilic acid (4-aminophenylarsonic acid) are feed additives widely used in the broiler and swine industry. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and other phenylarsonic compounds on the activity of acetate- and H(2)-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms. Roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and 4-hydroxy-3-aminophenylarsonic acid (HAPA) inhibited acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens when supplemented at concentrations of 1mM, and their inhibitory effect increased sharply with incubation time. Phenylarsonic acid (1mM) inhibited acetoclastic but not H(2)-utilizing methanogens. HAPA, a metabolite from the anaerobic biodegradation of roxarsone, was found to be sensitive to autooxidation by oxygen. The compound (2.6mM) caused low methanogenic inhibition (only 14.2%) in short-term assays of 12h when autooxidation was prevented by supplementing HAPA solutions with ascorbate. However, ascorbate-free HAPA solutions underwent spontaneous autooxidation in the presence of oxygen, leading to the formation of highly inhibitory compounds. These results confirm the microbial toxicity of organoarsenic compounds, and they indicate that biotic as well as abiotic transformations can potentially impact the fate and microbial toxicity of these contaminants in the environment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  17. Hydroxy-oleic acid, but not oleic acid, inhibits vascular responsiveness in isolated aortic tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oleic acid (OA) and other fatty acids can become abundant in circulation after air pollution exposure as endogenously released lipolysis byproducts or by entering the body as a component of air pollution. Vascular damage has been observed with OA infusion, but it is not yet estab...

  18. Hydroxy-oleic acid, but not oleic acid, inhibits vascular responsiveness in isolated aortic tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oleic acid (OA) and other fatty acids can become abundant in circulation after air pollution exposure as endogenously released lipolysis byproducts or by entering the body as a component of air pollution. Vascular damage has been observed with OA infusion, but it is not yet estab...

  19. Hydroxy-oleic acid, but not oleic acid, inhibits pharmacologic vascular responsiveness in isolated aortic tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oleic acid (OA) and other fatty acids can become abundant in the systemic circulation after air pollution exposure as endogenously released lipolysis byproducts or by entering the body as a component of air pollution. Vascular damage has been observed with OA infusion, but it is ...

  20. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  1. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  2. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  3. Uric Acid Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation and Inhibits Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Zhang; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Cang-Long; Tang, Yi-Xing; Wang, Fei; Fu, Qing-Ge

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of uric acid on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). The hBMSCs were isolated from bone marrow of six healthy donors. Cell morphology was observed by microscopy and cell surface markers (CD44 and CD34) of hBMSCs were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Cell morphology and immunofluorescence analysis showed that hBMSCs were successfully isolated from bone marrow. The number of hBMSCs in uric acid groups was higher than that in the control group on day 3, 4, and 5. Alizarin red staining showed that number of calcium nodules in uric acid groups was more than that of the control group. Oil red-O staining showed that the number of red fat vacuoles decreased with the increased concentration of uric acid. In summary, uric acid could promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs while inhibit adipogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  4. Inhibition of N2 fixation in soybean is associated with elevated ureides and amino acids.

    PubMed

    King, C Andy; Purcell, Larry C

    2005-04-01

    Decreased N2 fixation in soybean (Glycine max) L. Merr. during water deficits has been associated with increases in ureides and free amino acids in plant tissues, indicating a potential feedback inhibition by these compounds in response to drought. We evaluated concentrations of ureides and amino acids in leaf and nodule tissue and the concurrent change in N2 fixation in response to exogenous ureides and soil-water treatments for the cultivars Jackson and KS4895. Exogenous ureides applied to the soil and water-deficit treatments inhibited N2 fixation by 85% to 90%. Mn fertilization increased the apparent catabolism of ureides in leaves and hastened the recovery of N2 fixation following exogenous ureide application for both cultivars. Ureides and total free amino acids in leaves and nodules increased during water deficits and coincided with a decline in N2 fixation for both cultivars. N2 fixation recovered to 74% to 90% of control levels 2 d after rewatering drought-stressed plants, but leaf ureides and total nodule amino acids remained elevated in KS4895. Asparagine accounted for 82% of the increase in nodule amino acids relative to well-watered plants at 2 d after rewatering. These results indicate that leaf ureides and nodule asparagine do not feedback inhibit N2 fixation. Compounds whose increase and decrease in concentration mirrored the decline and recovery of N2 fixation included nodule ureides, nodule aspartate, and several amino acids in leaves, indicating that these are potential candidate molecules for feedback inhibition of N2 fixation.

  5. Inhibition of N2 Fixation in Soybean Is Associated with Elevated Ureides and Amino Acids1

    PubMed Central

    King, C. Andy; Purcell, Larry C.

    2005-01-01

    Decreased N2 fixation in soybean (Glycine max) L. Merr. during water deficits has been associated with increases in ureides and free amino acids in plant tissues, indicating a potential feedback inhibition by these compounds in response to drought. We evaluated concentrations of ureides and amino acids in leaf and nodule tissue and the concurrent change in N2 fixation in response to exogenous ureides and soil-water treatments for the cultivars Jackson and KS4895. Exogenous ureides applied to the soil and water-deficit treatments inhibited N2 fixation by 85% to 90%. Mn fertilization increased the apparent catabolism of ureides in leaves and hastened the recovery of N2 fixation following exogenous ureide application for both cultivars. Ureides and total free amino acids in leaves and nodules increased during water deficits and coincided with a decline in N2 fixation for both cultivars. N2 fixation recovered to 74% to 90% of control levels 2 d after rewatering drought-stressed plants, but leaf ureides and total nodule amino acids remained elevated in KS4895. Asparagine accounted for 82% of the increase in nodule amino acids relative to well-watered plants at 2 d after rewatering. These results indicate that leaf ureides and nodule asparagine do not feedback inhibit N2 fixation. Compounds whose increase and decrease in concentration mirrored the decline and recovery of N2 fixation included nodule ureides, nodule aspartate, and several amino acids in leaves, indicating that these are potential candidate molecules for feedback inhibition of N2 fixation. PMID:15778462

  6. Propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), a constitutional isomer of valproic acid, uncompetitively inhibits arachidonic acid acylation by rat acyl-CoA synthetase 4: a potential drug for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hiren R.; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y.; Li, Lei O.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bialer, Meir; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mood stabilizers used for treating bipolar disorder (BD) selectively downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) turnover (deacylation-reacylation) in brain phospholipids, when given chronically to rats. In vitro studies suggest that one of these, valproic acid (VPA), which is teratogenic, reduces AA turnover by inhibiting the brain acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl)-4 mediated acylation of AA to AA-CoA. We tested whether non-teratogenic VPA analogues might also inhibit Acsl-4 catalyzed acylation, and thus have potential anti-BD action. Methods Rat Acsl4-flag protein was expressed in E. coli, and the ability of three VPA analogues, propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), propylisopropylacetamide (PID) and N-methyl-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropanecarboxamide (MTMCD), and of sodium butyrate, to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 was quantified using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results Acsl4-mediated conversion of AA to AA-CoA in vitro was inhibited uncompetitively by PIA, with a Ki of 11.4 mM compared to a published Ki of 25 mM for VPA, while PID, MTMCD and sodium butyrate had no inhibitory effect. Conclusions PIA's ability to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 in vitro suggests that, like VPA, PIA may reduce AA turnover in brain phospholipids in unanesthetized rats, and if so, may be effective as a non-teratogenic mood stabilizer in BD patients. PMID:23354024

  7. Propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), a constitutional isomer of valproic acid, uncompetitively inhibits arachidonic acid acylation by rat acyl-CoA synthetase 4: a potential drug for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Modi, Hiren R; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y; Li, Lei O; Coleman, Rosalind A; Bialer, Meir; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2013-04-01

    Mood stabilizers used for treating bipolar disorder (BD) selectively downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) turnover (deacylation-reacylation) in brain phospholipids, when given chronically to rats. In vitro studies suggest that one of these, valproic acid (VPA), which is teratogenic, reduces AA turnover by inhibiting the brain long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl)4 mediated acylation of AA to AA-CoA. We tested whether non-teratogenic VPA analogues might also inhibit Acsl4 catalyzed acylation, and thus have a potential anti-BD action. Rat Acsl4-flag protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the ability of three VPA analogues, propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), propylisopropylacetamide (PID) and N-methyl-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropanecarboxamide (MTMCD), and of sodium butyrate, to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 was quantified using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Acsl4-mediated conversion of AA to AA-CoA in vitro was inhibited uncompetitively by PIA, with a Ki of 11.4mM compared to a published Ki of 25mM for VPA, while PID, MTMCD and sodium butyrate had no inhibitory effect. PIA's ability to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 in vitro suggests that, like VPA, PIA may reduce AA turnover in brain phospholipids in unanesthetized rats, and if so, may be effective as a non-teratogenic mood stabilizer in BD patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F.; Frank, Matthew W.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  9. Diuresis by intravenous administration of xanthurenic acid in rats, and inhibition by probenecid.

    PubMed

    Uwai, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yuta; Honjo, Emi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Nabekura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    The conjugates with sulfate and glucoside of xanthurenic acid, a tryptophan metabolite, were reported to show natriuresis. Sulfotransferase for xanthurenic acid works in the renal proximal tubule to produce the sulfate of xanthurenic acid as well as the liver, and we recently found that xanthurenic acid is a substrate of renal organic anion transporter OAT1. The purpose of this study was to examine relationship between the transport by OAT1 and diuresis related with xanthurenic acid. Drug transport experiment using Xenopus laevis oocytes represented that probenecid inhibited xanthurenic acid uptake by rat OAT1 (rOAT1). Although no diuresis was recognized by the intravenous injection of xanthurenic acid as a bolus in rats, the addition of its infusion exhibited natriuresis. Simultaneous administration of probenecid significantly decreased the urine volume and excreted amounts of sodium into urine. These findings showed the diuresis by the xanthurenic acid administration, and it was probenecid-sensitive. The rOAT1-mediated transport of xanthurenic acid might, at least in part, contribute to its diuretic effect.

  10. Ursolic acid inhibits the invasive phenotype of SNU-484 human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUN-SOOK; MOON, AREE

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer-related mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Ursolic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid compound derived from medicinal herbs, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects in various cancer cell systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid on the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells has yet to be reported. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ursolic acid on the invasiveness of SNU-484 human gastric cancer cells. Ursolic acid efficiently induced apoptosis, possibly via the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein and the proteolytic activation of caspase-3. Furthermore, the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase was increased by the administration of ursolic acid. In addition, ursolic acid significantly suppressed the invasive phenotype of the SNU-484 cells and significantly decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, indicating that MMP-2 may be responsible for the anti-invasive activity of ursolic acid. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that ursolic acid induces apoptosis and inhibits the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells; therefore, ursolic acid may have a potential application as a chemopreventive agent to prevent the metastasis of gastric cancer or to alleviate the process of metastasis. PMID:25621065

  11. Amelioration of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by chlorogenic acid through endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chun; Dong, Jing; Nie, Jing; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Wang, Hui; Chen, Qiong; Chen, Jun-Yi; Xia, Jia-Mei; Shuai, Wei

    2017-07-04

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of chlorogenic acid on pulmonary fibrosis and the internal mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. 30 male BALB/C mice were randomized into 5 groups: control group, pulmonary fibrosis model group, low, middle and high dose of chlorogenic acid groups. Mice in pulmonary fibrosis model group were administered 5.0 mg/kg bleomycin with intracheal instillation and mice in 3 chlorogenic acid groups were treated with chlorogenic acid every day for 28 days after bleomycin administration. Lung tissue histology was observed using HE staining. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were isolated and cultured. The expressions of fibrosis related factors (α-SMA and collagen I), as well as ER stress markers (CHOP and GRP78) were determined by both real-time PCR assay and Western blotting, while the expressions of other ER stress signaling pathway factors PERK, IRE-1, ATF-6 and protein levels of caspase-12, caspase-9, caspase-3, PARP were determined by Western blotting. RLE-6TN cell line induced by TGF-β1 was also used to verify the amelioration effects in vitro study. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, TUNEL staining was used to evaluate cell apoptosis. Expressions of collagen I, α-SMA, GRP78, and CHOP were significantly inhibited by chlorogenic acid in dose-dependent manner. Similarly, decreasing levels of cleaved caspase-12, caspase-9, caspase-3 and increasing level of uncleaved PARP were observed in chlorogenic acid groups compared with those in the fibrosis group both in vivo and in vitro. Chlorogenic acid could also significantly down-regulate the level of phosphorylation of PERK and cleaved ATF-6 in vivo study. Moreover, MTT assay demonstrated chlorogenic acid could enhance proliferation of RLE-6TN cells induced by TGFβ1 in vitro. And the apoptosis assays indicated that chlorogenic acid could significantly inhibit cell apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro studies. Chlorogenic acid could inhibit the pulmonary fibrosis through endoplasmic

  12. Inhibition of stromelysin-1 by caffeic acid derivatives from a propolis sample from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Narimane; Magid, Abdulmagid Alabdul; Decarme, Martine; Rhouati, Salah; Lahouel, Mesbah; Antonicelli, Frank; Lavaud, Catherine; Hornebeck, William

    2011-07-01

    Stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase-3: MMP-3) occupies a central position in collagenolytic and elastolytic cascades, leading to cutaneous intrinsic and extrinsic aging. We screened extracts of a propolis sample from Algeria with the aim to isolate compounds able to selectively inhibit this enzyme. A butanolic extract (B (3)) of the investigated propolis sample was found to potently inhibit MMP-3 activity (IC (50) = 0.15 ± 0.03 µg/mL), with no or only weak activity on other MMPs. This fraction also inhibited plasmin amidolytic activity (IC (50) = 0.05 µg/mL) and impeded plasmin-mediated proMMP-3 activation. B (3) was fractionated by HPLC, and one compound, characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopy and not previously identified in propolis, i.e., (+)-chicoric acid, displayed potent IN VITRO MMP-3 inhibitory activity (IC (50) = 6.3 × 10 (-7) M). In addition, both caffeic acid and (+)-chicoric acid methyl ester present in fraction B (3) significantly inhibited UVA-mediated MMP-3 upregulation by fibroblasts.

  13. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channel currents by propofol in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Guizhi; Fei, Jianchun; Meng, Tao; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingya; Yu, Jingui; Li, Jingxin

    2014-04-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), part of the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family, are activated by extracellular protons. The ASICs play a significant role in the acidosis-mediated perception of pain. The anaesthetic agent propofol also exerts antinociceptive effects, but the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not clear. We used whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the effect of propofol on proton-gated currents in: (i) rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; and (ii) HEK293 cells transfected with either ASIC1a or ASIC3. Propofol inhibited the amplitude of proton-gated currents in DRG neurons, but did not change the sensitivity of ASICs to H(+). Notably, propofol altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. In addition, we demonstrated that propofol inhibited ASICs by directly binding with these channels in HEK293 cells. These results suggest that propofol inhibits proton-gated currents in DRG neurons and that inhibition of proton-gated currents explains, in part, the antinociceptive effects of propofol in primary afferent neurons.

  14. Gallic acid is the major component of grape seed extract that inhibits amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqin; Pukala, Tara L; Musgrave, Ian F; Williams, Danielle M; Dehle, Francis C; Carver, John A

    2013-12-01

    Many protein misfolding diseases, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's, are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in an amyloid fibrillar form. Natural products which inhibit fibril formation are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In this study we have shown, using in vitro thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy, that grape seed extract inhibits fibril formation of kappa-casein (κ-CN), a milk protein which forms amyloid fibrils spontaneously under physiological conditions. Among the components of grape seed extract, gallic acid was the most active component at inhibiting κ-CN fibril formation, by stabilizing κ-CN to prevent its aggregation. Concomitantly, gallic acid significantly reduced the toxicity of κ-CN to pheochromocytoma12 cells. Furthermore, gallic acid effectively inhibited fibril formation by the amyloid-beta peptide, the putative causative agent in Alzheimer's disease. It is concluded that the gallate moiety has the fibril-inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibition Increases Reduction Potential in Neuronal Cells under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Stephen A.; Golovko, Svetlana A.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have reported a novel neuronal specific pathway for adaptation to hypoxia through increased fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis followed by esterification into lipids. However, the biological role of this pathway under hypoxia remains to be elucidated. In the presented study, we have tested our hypothesis that activation of FA synthesis maintains reduction potential and reduces lactoacidosis in neuronal cells under hypoxia. To address this hypothesis, we measured the effect of FA synthesis inhibition on NADH2+/NAD+ and NADPH2+/NADP+ ratios, and lactic acid levels in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells exposed to normoxic and hypoxic conditions. FA synthesis inhibitors, TOFA (inhibits Acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and cerulenin (inhibits FA synthase), increased NADH2+/NAD+ and NADPH2+/NADP+ ratios under hypoxia. Further, FA synthesis inhibition increased lactic acid under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and caused cytotoxicity under hypoxia but not normoxia. These results indicate that FA may serve as hydrogen acceptors under hypoxia, thus supporting oxidation reactions including anaerobic glycolysis. These findings may help to identify a radically different approach to attenuate hypoxia related pathophysiology in the nervous system including stroke. PMID:27965531

  16. Hop bitter acids inhibit tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Czech, Barbara; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-10-01

    Bitter acids (BAs) from the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. exhibit multiple beneficial biological properties with promising effects in cancer therapy and prevention, but information regarding the effects on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is missing. Here, we used two different hop bitter acid extracts enriched for either α-acids or β-acids to obtain insight into whether biological activity varies between these two groups of BAs. At a concentration of 25 µg/ml, only the β-acid rich started to induce aspartate transaminase (AST) release, and a significant increase was detected with 50 µg/ml of both extracts. Already at lower concentrations both extracts led to a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation, and migration was suppressed at a concentration as low as 5 µg/ml in HCC cells. The focus on different signaling pathways revealed an inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, downregulation of AP-1 activity and an alleviation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in HepG2 cells incubated with 5 µg/ml of both extracts, whereby the β-acid rich extract showed more pronounced effects. In conclusion, we identified ERK1/2, AP-1 and NFκB, which are important factors in tumor development and progression, as targets of hop BAs. Thus, these data suggest the potential use of BAs as functional nutrients for both prevention and treatment of HCC.

  17. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus × domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Enhancement of taxol-induced apoptosis by inhibition of NF-κB with ursorlic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Taxol is known to inhibit cell growth and triggers significant apoptosis in various cancer cells, and activation of proliferation factor NF-κB during Taxol-induced apoptosis is regarded as a main reason resulting in tumor cells resistance to Taxol. It has been found that ursorlic acid can inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In order to study whether ursorlic acid can enhance the Taxol-induced apoptosis, we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to compare the difference of caspase-3 activation between Taxol alone and Taxol combined ursorlic acid. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that ursorlic acid, a nontoxic food component, sensitizes ASTC-a-1 cells more efficiently to Taxol-induced apoptosis by advanced activation of caspase 3. The result also suggests that there would be a synergistic effect between Taxol and ursorlic acid, and the more detailed mechanism of synergistic effect needs to be clarified further, such as the correlations among NF-κB, Akt, caspase 8, which leads to the advanced activation of caspase 3 during combined treatment of Taxol and ursorlic acid. Moreover, this may be a new way to improve Taxol-dependent tumor therapy.

  19. Chemical inhibition of fatty acid absorption and cellular uptake limits lipotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ahowesso, Constance; Black, Paul N.; Saini, Nipun; Montefusco, David; Chekal, Jessica; Malosh, Chrysa; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic elevation of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels is commonly associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Experimental evidence indicates FFA and their metabolites contribute to disease development through lipotoxicity. Previously, we identified a specific fatty acid transport inhibitor CB16.2, a.k.a. Lipofermata, using high throughput screening methods. In this study, efficacy of transport inhibition was measured in four cell lines that are models for myocytes (mmC2C12), pancreatic ß-cells (rnINS-1E), intestinal epithelial cells (hsCaco-2), and hepatocytes (hsHepG2), as well as primary human adipocytes. The compound was effective in inhibiting uptake with IC50s between 3 and 6 µM for all cell lines except human adipocytes (39 µM). Inhibition was specific for long and very long chain fatty acids but had no effect on medium chain fatty acids (C6-C10), which are transported by passive diffusion. Derivatives of Lipofermata were evaluated to understand structural contributions to activity. Lipofermata prevented palmitate-mediated oxidative stress, induction of BiP and CHOP, and cell death in a dose-dependent manner in hsHepG2 and rnINS-1E cells, suggesting it will prevent induction of fatty acid-mediated cell death pathways and lipotoxic disease by channeling excess fatty acids to adipose tissue and away from liver and pancreas. Importantly, mice dosed orally with Lipofermata were not able to absorb 13C-oleate demonstrating utility as an inhibitor of fatty acid absorption from the gut. PMID:26394026

  20. Carnosol and carnosic acids from Salvia officinalis inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julia; Kuehnl, Susanne; Rollinger, Judith M; Scherer, Olga; Northoff, Hinnak; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Koeberle, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), the most relevant eicosanoid promoting inflammation and tumorigenesis, is formed by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and PGE(2) synthases from free arachidonic acid. Preparations of the leaves of Salvia officinalis are commonly used in folk medicine as an effective antiseptic and anti-inflammatory remedy and possess anticancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that a standard ethyl acetate extract of S. officinalis efficiently suppresses the formation of PGE(2) in a cell-free assay by direct interference with microsomal PGE(2) synthase (mPGES)-1. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract yielded closely related fractions that potently suppressed mPGES-1 with IC(50) values between 1.9 and 3.5 μg/ml. Component analysis of these fractions revealed the diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid as potential bioactive principles inhibiting mPGES-1 activity with IC(50) values of 5.0 μM. Using a human whole-blood assay as a robust cell-based model, carnosic acid, but not carnosol, blocked PGE(2) generation upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (IC(50) = 9.3 μM). Carnosic acid neither inhibited the concomitant biosynthesis of other prostanoids [6-keto PGF(1α), 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid, and thromboxane B(2)] in human whole blood nor affected the activities of COX-1/2 in a cell-free assay. Together, S. officinalis extracts and its ingredients carnosol and carnosic acid inhibit PGE(2) formation by selectively targeting mPGES-1. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of carnosic acid on PGE(2) formation, observed in the physiologically relevant whole-blood model, may critically contribute to the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of S. officinalis.

  1. Fat transforms ascorbic acid from inhibiting to promoting acid‐catalysed N‐nitrosation

    PubMed Central

    Combet, E; Paterson, S; Iijima, K; Winter, J; Mullen, W; Crozier, A; Preston, T; McColl, K E L

    2007-01-01

    Background The major potential site of acid nitrosation is the proximal stomach, an anatomical site prone to a rising incidence of metaplasia and adenocarcinoma. Nitrite, a pre‐carcinogen present in saliva, can be converted to nitrosating species and N‐nitroso compounds by acidification at low gastric pH in the presence of thiocyanate. Aims To assess the effect of lipid and ascorbic acid on the nitrosative chemistry under conditions simulating the human proximal stomach. Methods The nitrosative chemistry was modelled in vitro by measuring the nitrosation of four secondary amines under conditions simulating the proximal stomach. The N‐nitrosamines formed were measured by gas chromatography–ion‐trap tandem mass spectrometry, while nitric oxide and oxygen levels were measured amperometrically. Results In absence of lipid, nitrosative stress was inhibited by ascorbic acid through conversion of nitrosating species to nitric oxide. Addition of ascorbic acid reduced the amount of N‐nitrosodimethylamine formed by fivefold, N‐nitrosomorpholine by >1000‐fold, and totally prevented the formation of N‐nitrosodiethylamine and N‐nitrosopiperidine. In contrast, when 10% lipid was present, ascorbic acid increased the amount of N‐nitrosodimethylamine, N‐nitrosodiethylamine and N‐nitrosopiperidine formed by approximately 8‐, 60‐ and 140‐fold, respectively, compared with absence of ascorbic acid. Conclusion The presence of lipid converts ascorbic acid from inhibiting to promoting acid nitrosation. This may be explained by nitric oxide, formed by ascorbic acid in the aqueous phase, being able to regenerate nitrosating species by reacting with oxygen in the lipid phase. PMID:17785370

  2. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Mashek, Mara T.; Hendrickson, Anna M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:27351284

  3. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Becker, Jennifer R; Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Mashek, Mara T; Hendrickson, Anna M; Mullany, Lisa K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-26

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation.

  4. Gastrodin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Yang, Zhifan; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of proton-gated cation channels, are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. Gastrodin is a main bioactive constituent of the traditional herbal Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used in Oriental countries for centuries. As an analgesic, gastrodin has been used clinically to treat pain such as migraine and headache. However, the mechanisms underlying analgesic action of gastrodin are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that gastrodin inhibited the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Gastrodin dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. Gastrodin shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 36.92 ± 6.23% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, gastrodin altered acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied gastrodin relieved pain evoked by intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that gastrodin can inhibit the activity of ASICs in the primary sensory neurons, which provided a novel mechanism underlying analgesic action of gastrodin.

  5. Ambuic acid inhibits the biosynthesis of cyclic peptide quormones in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Jiro; Uemura, Yumi; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Norito; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-density-dependent regulatory system in gram-positive bacteria and is often regulated by cyclic peptides called "quormones," which function as extracellular communication signals. With an aim to discover an antipathogenic agent targeting quorum sensing in gram-positive bacteria, we screened 153 samples of fungal butanol extracts with the guidance of the inhibition of quorum-sensing-mediated gelatinase production in Enterococcus faecalis. Following the screenings, we found that ambuic acid, a known secondary fungal metabolite, inhibited the quorum-sensing-mediated gelatinase production without influencing the growth of E. faecalis. We further demonstrated that ambuic acid targeted the biosynthesis of a cyclic peptide quormone called gelatinase biosynthesis-activating pheromone. Furthermore, ambuic acid also inhibited the biosynthesis of the cyclic peptide quormones of Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria innocua. These results suggest the potential use of ambuic acid as a lead compound of antipathogenic drugs that target the quorum-sensing-mediated virulence expression of gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells.

  7. Omeprazole and SCH 28080 inhibit acid secretion by the turtle urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Graber, M L; Devine, P

    1993-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence that in addition to the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase, a gastric-type H+/K(+)-ATPase participates in acidification by the distal nephron. To determine whether a similar pump exists in the turtle bladder, we examined the dependence of acid secretion on mucosal K+, and the effects of supposedly specific inhibitors of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase, omeprazole and SCH 28080. In CO2-stimulated bladders both drugs produced dose-dependent inhibition of electrogenic H+ secretion measured as the reverse short-circuit current (RSCC). At the highest concentrations tested, H+ secretion decreased 45 +/- 16% with mucosal and 20 +/- 7% with serosal omeprazole (P < 0.01). SCH 28080 at 400 microM produced essentially complete inhibition of H+ secretion with either mucosal or serosal application. When H+ secretion was purposefully inhibited by DIDS or an adverse mucosal pH gradient, SCH 28080 had no effect on RSCC. Removing mucosal K+ (measured K+ < 50 microM), with or without mucosal barium, had no effect on RSCC. The inhibition of RSCC by omeprazole was reversed by mercaptoethanol. Finally, HCO3 secretion, as measured by either RSCC or pH-stat titration, increased significantly in response to 400 microM SCH 28080. The results demonstrate that these compounds inhibit acid secretion by the turtle bladder but stimulate the secretion of base. In view of the total independence of acid secretion on potassium, it is unlikely that any of the bladder's acid secretion is mediated by an H+/K(+)-ATPase. The most reasonable interpretation of the data is that omeprazole and SCH 28080, previously thought to be specific inhibitors of the H+/K(+)-ATPase, also inhibit the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase of the turtle bladder. The results also indicate that HCO3 secretion by the bladder employ a different mechanism of H+ transport than is used for acid secretion; there is no simple reversal of polarity in the acid- versus base-secreting cells.

  8. Inhibition of polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation in plants expressing a fatty acid epoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Thomaeus, S; Lee, M; Green, A; Stymne, S

    2000-12-01

    Earlier, we described the isolation of a Crepis palaestina cDNA (Cpal2) which encoded a Delta12-epoxygenase that could catalyse the synthesis of 12,13-epoxy-cis-9-octadecenoic acid (18:1E) from linoleic acid (18:2). When the Cpal2 gene was expressed under the control of a seed-specific promoter in Arabidopsis, plants were able to accumulate small amounts 18:1E and 12,13-epoxy-cis-9,15-octadec-2-enoic acid in their seed lipids. In this report we give results obtained from a detailed analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants containing the Cpal2 gene. The seeds from these plants accumulate varying levels of 18:1E, but show a marked increase in 18:1 and equivalent decrease in 18:2 and 18:3. We further observed that the co-expression of a C. palaestina Delta12-desaturase in Arabidopsis appears to return the relative proportions of the C(18) seed fatty acids to normal levels and results in a 2-fold increase in total epoxy fatty acids.

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal l-glutamate (l-Glu) and 5′-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3− secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3− secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3− secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3− secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3− secretion

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion.

  11. The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits mouse MC-26 colorectal cancer cell liver metastasis via inhibition of PGE2-dependent cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Hawcroft, G; Volpato, M; Marston, G; Ingram, N; Perry, SL; Cockbain, AJ; Race, AD; Munarini, A; Belluzzi, A; Loadman, PM; Coletta, PL; Hull, MA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has antineoplastic activity at early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, relevant to chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). We tested the hypothesis that EPA also has anti-CRC activity at later stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, relevant to treatment of metastatic CRC, via modulation of E-type PG synthesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A BALB/c mouse model, in which intrasplenic injection of syngeneic MC-26 mouse CRC cells leads to development of liver metastases, was used. Dietary EPA was administered in the free fatty acid (FFA) form for 2 weeks before and after ultrasound-guided intrasplenic injection of 1 × 106 MC-26 cells (n= 16 each group). KEY RESULTS Treatment with 5% (w w-1) EPA-FFA was associated with a reduced MC-26 mouse CRC cell liver tumour burden compared with control animals (median liver weight 1.03 g vs. 1.62 g; P < 0.034). Administration of 5% EPA-FFA was also linked to a significant increase in tumour EPA incorporation and lower intratumoural PGE2 levels (with concomitant increased production of PGE3). Liver tumours from 5% EPA-FFA- treated mice demonstrated decreased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive CRC cell proliferation and reduced phosphorylated ERK 1/2 expression at the invasive edge of tumours. A concentration-dependent reduction in MC-26 CRC cell Transwell® migration following EPA-FFA treatment (50–200 µM) in vitro was rescued by exogenous PGE2 (10 µM) and PGE1-alcohol (1 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS EPA-FFA inhibits MC-26 CRC cell liver metastasis. EPA incorporation is associated with a ‘PGE2 to PGE3 switch’ in liver tumours. Inhibition of PGE2-EP4 receptor-dependent CRC cell motility probably contributes to the antineoplastic activity of EPA. PMID:22300262

  12. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits cell proliferation by involving transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Santiago; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Ganado, Patricia; García, Marta; Rico, Laura; Del Rio, Marcela; Tejerina, Teresa

    2003-02-04

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) inhibits cell proliferation. This may be mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). TGF-beta directly stops cell proliferation, restrains cells in G(0), and inhibits the uptake of platelet-derived growth factor and insulin-like growth factor. These effects are identical to those observed with ASA treatment. We cultured rat thoracic aorta vascular smooth muscle cells and measured cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, cell cycle, transcription of TGF-beta1, and concentration of TGF-beta1 in supernatant medium. ASA dose-dependently restrained cells in G(0) phase with no cytotoxic effect and inhibited cell proliferation by 30.86%. Anti-TGF-beta1 reversed this inhibition by 30.21%. However, ASA treatment decreased TGF-beta1 transcription and had no significant effect on TGF-beta1 concentration. TGF-beta seems to play an important role in ASA-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Therefore, treatment with ASA prevents coronary disease not only by means of its antiplatelet properties but also by an important inhibition of plaque growth. This relationship between ASA and TGF-beta explains many other effects, such as cancer chemoprevention, immunomodulation, and wound healing. The aim of this study was to demonstrate this link.

  13. Ascorbic acid ameliorates seizures and brain damage in rats through inhibiting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Wang, Shengjun; Zhang, Tongxia; Zhao, Xiuhe; Liu, Xuewu; Cao, Lili; Chi, Zhaofu

    2013-10-16

    Oxidative stress is a mechanism of cell death induced by seizures. Antioxidant compounds have neuroprotective effects due to their ability to inhibit free radical production. Autophagy is a process in which cytoplasmic components such as organelles and proteins are delivered to the lysosomal compartment for degradation, and plays an essential role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The activity of autophagy is enhanced during oxidative stress. The objectives of this work were first to study the inhibitory action of antioxidant ascorbic acid on behavioral changes and brain damage induced by high doses of pilocarpine, then to study the effect of ascorbic acid on oxidative stress (MDA and SOD were used to estimate oxidative stress) and activated autophagy (beclin 1 was used to estimate autophagy) induced by seizures, aiming to further clarify the mechanism of action of this antioxidant compound. In order to determinate neuroprotective effects, we studied the effects of ascorbic acid (500 mg/kg, i.p.) on the behavior and brain lesions observed after seizures induced by pilocarpine (340 mg/kg, i.p., P340 model) in rats. Ascorbic acid injections prior to pilocarpine suppressed behavioral seizure episodes by increasing the latency to the first myoclonic, clonic and tonic seizure and decreasing the percentage of incidence of clonic and tonic seizures as well as the mortality rate. These findings suggested that oxidative stress can be produced and autophagy is increased during brain damage induced by seizures. In the P340 model, ascorbic acid significantly decreased cerebral damage, reduced oxidative stress and inhibited autophagy by reducing de novo synthesis of beclin 1. Antioxidant compound can exert neuroprotective effects associated with inhibition of free radical production and autophagy. These results highlighted the promising therapeutic potential of ascorbic acid in treatment for seizures.

  14. Bezafibrate lowers very long-chain fatty acids in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts by inhibiting fatty acid elongation.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Marc; Schackmann, Martin J A; Ofman, Rob; Sanders, Robert-Jan; Dijkstra, Inge M E; Houten, Sander M; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Wanders, Ronald J A; Kemp, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding ALDP, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane. ALDP deficiency results in impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation and the subsequent accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; > C22:0) in plasma and tissues. VLCFA are primarily derived from endogenous synthesis by ELOVL1. Therefore inhibiting this enzyme might constitute a feasible therapeutic approach. In this paper we demonstrate that bezafibrate, a PPAR pan agonist used for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidaemia reduces VLCFA levels in X-ALD fibroblasts. Surprisingly, the VLCFA-lowering effect was independent of PPAR activation and not caused by the increase in either mitochondrial or peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation capacity. In fact, our results show that bezafibrate reduces VLCFA synthesis by decreasing the synthesis of C26:0 through a direct inhibition of fatty acid elongation activity. Taken together, our data indicate bezafibrate as a potential pharmacotherapeutic treatment for X-ALD. A clinical trial is currently ongoing to evaluate the effect in patients with X-ALD.

  15. Inhibition by all-trans retinoic acid of collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Hongyan; Orita, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shinya; Wada, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yoshikuni; Nishida, Teruo; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts. Rabbit corneal fibroblasts were cultured with or without all-trans retinoic acid in a three-dimensional collagen gel, and the extent of collagen degradation was determined by measurement of hydroxyproline in acid hydrolysates of culture supernatants. Matrix metalloproteinase expression was examined by immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography. The abundance and phosphorylation state of the endogenous nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor IκB-α were examined by immunoblot analysis. Corneal ulceration was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide into the central corneal stroma of rabbits and was assessed by observation with a slitlamp microscope. All-trans retinoic acid inhibited interleukin-1β-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. It also attenuated the release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α induced by interleukin-1β in these cells. Topical application of all-trans retinoic acid suppressed corneal ulceration induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide into the corneal stroma. All-trans retinoic acid inhibited collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts exposed to interleukin-1β, with this effect being accompanied by suppression of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling as well as of matrix metalloproteinase release and activation in these cells. All-trans retinoic acid also attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced corneal ulceration in vivo. Our results therefore suggest that all-trans retinoic acid might prove effective for the treatment of patients with corneal ulceration. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  16. Fulvic acid inhibits aggregation and promotes disassembly of tau fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Alberto; Jiménez, José M; Caballero, Leonardo; Melo, Francisco; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder involving extracellular plaques (amyloid-β) and intracellular tangles of tau protein. Recently, tangle formation has been identified as a major event involved in the neurodegenerative process, due to the conversion of either soluble peptides or oligomers into insoluble filaments. At present, the current therapeutic strategies are aimed at natural phytocomplexes and polyphenolics compounds able to either inhibit the formation of tau filaments or disaggregate them. However, only a few polyphenolic molecules have emerged to prevent tau aggregation, and natural drugs targeting tau have not been approved yet. Fulvic acid, a humic substance, has several nutraceutical properties with potential activity to protect cognitive impairment. In this work we provide evidence to show that the aggregation process of tau protein, forming paired helical filaments (PHFs) in vitro, is inhibited by fulvic acid affecting the length of fibrils and their morphology. In addition, we investigated whether fulvic acid is capable of disassembling preformed PHFs. We show that the fulvic acid is an active compound against preformed fibrils affecting the whole structure by diminishing length of PHFs and probably acting at the hydrophobic level, as we observed by atomic force techniques. Thus, fulvic acid is likely to provide new insights in the development of potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease using natural products.

  17. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  18. Glycyrrhizic acid nanoparticles inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in 264.7 mouse macrophages compared with unprocessed glycyrrhizic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Song; Efferth, Thomas; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), the main component of radix glycyrrhizae, has a variety of pharmacological activities. In the present study, suspensions of GA nanoparticles with the average particle size about 200 nm were prepared by a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process. Comparative studies were undertaken using lipopolysaccardide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophages RAW 264.7 as in vitro inflammatory model. Several important inflammation mediators such as NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6 were examined. These markers were highly stimulated by LPS and were inhibited both by nano-GA and unprocessed GA in a dose-dependent manner, especially PGE2 and TNF-α. However nano-GA and unprocessed GA inhibited NO only at a high concentration. In general, we found that GA nanoparticle suspensions exhibited much better anti-inflammatory activities compared to unprocessed GA.

  19. Glycyrrhizic acid nanoparticles inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in 264.7 mouse macrophages compared with unprocessed glycyrrhizic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Song; Efferth, Thomas; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), the main component of radix glycyrrhizae, has a variety of pharmacological activities. In the present study, suspensions of GA nanoparticles with the average particle size about 200nm were prepared by a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process. Comparative studies were undertaken using lipopolysaccardide(LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophages RAW 264.7 as in vitro inflammatory model. Several important inflammation mediators such as NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6 were examined. These markers were highly stimulated by LPS and were inhibited both by nano-GA and unprocessed GA in a dose-dependent manner, especially PGE2 and TNF-α. However nano-GA and unprocessed GA inhibited NO only at a high concentration. In general, we found that GA nanoparticle suspensions exhibited much better anti-inflammatory activities compared to unprocessed GA. PMID:23610519

  20. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Cheese Using Chitosan-Grafted Lactic Acid Packaging.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Laura N; López, Monserrat; Montes-Díaz, Elizabeth; Espadín, Andres; Tecante, Alberto; Gimeno, Miquel; Shirai, Keiko

    2016-04-08

    A chitosan from biologically obtained chitin was successfully grafted with d,l-lactic acid (LA) in aqueous media using p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalyst to obtain a non-toxic, biodegradable packaging material that was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, water vapor permeability, and relative humidity (RH) losses. Additionally, the grafting in chitosan with LA produced films with improved mechanical properties. This material successfully extended the shelf life of fresh cheese and inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during 14 days at 4 °C and 22% RH, whereby inoculated samples with chitosan-g-LA packaging presented full bacterial inhibition. The results were compared to control samples and commercial low-density polyethylene packaging.

  1. Complete inhibition of food-stimulated gastric acid secretion by combined application of pirenzepine and ranitidine.

    PubMed Central

    Londong, W; Londong, V; Ruthe, C; Weizert, P

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo controlled and randomised secretory study the effectiveness of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and their combination was compared intraindividually in eight healthy subjects receiving intravenous bolus injections. Pirenzepine (0.15 mg/kg) plus ranitidine (0.6 mg/kg) suppressed peptone-stimulated gastric acid secretion from 69 +/- 11 to 2 +/- 0.4 mmol H+/3 h; the mean percentage inhibition was 97%. Postprandial gastrin was unaffected. There were only minor side-effects in a few experiments (reduction of salivation, brief blurring of vision), but no prolactin stimulation after ranitidine or ranitidine plus pirenzepine. The combined application of ranitidine and pirenzepine inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion more effectively and produced fewer side-effects than the combination of cimetidine plus pirenzepine studied previously. PMID:6114900

  2. Phenylboronic acid selectively inhibits human prostate and breast cancer cell migration and decreases viability.

    PubMed

    Bradke, Tiffany M; Hall, Casey; Carper, Stephen W; Plopper, George E

    2008-01-01

    We compared the in vitro effect of boric acid (BA) versus phenylboronic acid (PBA) on the migration of prostate and breast cancer cell lines and non-tumorigenic cells from the same tissues. Treatment at 24 hours with BA (< or =500 microM) did not inhibit chemotaxis on fibronectin in any cell line. However, treatment over the same time course with concentrations of PBA as low as 1 muM significantly inhibited cancer cell migration without effecting non-tumorigenic cell lines. The compounds did not affect cell adhesion or viability at 24 hours but did alter morphology; both decreased cancer cell viability at eight days. These results suggest that PBA is more potent than BA in targeting the metastatic and proliferative properties of cancer cells.

  3. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the

  4. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  5. Boric acid inhibits stored Ca2+ release in DU-145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Kim, Danny H; Stella, Salvatore L; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2009-08-01

    Boron (B) is a developmental and reproductive toxin. It is also essential for some organisms. Plants use uptake and efflux transport proteins to maintain homeostasis, and in humans, boron has been reported to reduce prostate cancer. Ca2+ signaling is one of the primary mechanisms used by cells to respond to their environment. In this paper, we report that boric acid (BA) inhibits NAD+ and NADP+ as well as mechanically induced release of stored Ca2+ in growing DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Cell proliferation was inhibited by 30% at 100 microM, 60% at 250 microM, and 97% at 1,000 microM BA. NAD+-induced Ca2+ transients were partly inhibited at 250 microM BA and completely at 1,000 microM BA, whereas both NADP+ and mechanically induced transients were inhibited by 1,000 microM BA. Expression of CD38 protein increased in proportion to BA exposure (0-1,000 microM). In vitro mass spectrometry analysis showed that BA formed adducts with the CD38 products and Ca2+ channel agonists cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). Vesicles positive for the Ca2+ fluorophore fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester accumulated in cells exposed to 250 and 1,000 microM BA. The BA analog, methylboronic acid (MBA; 250 and 1,000 microM), did not inhibit cell proliferation or NAD+, NADP+, or mechanically stimulated Ca2+ store release. Nor did MBA increase CD38 expression or cause the formation of intracellular vesicles. Thus, mammalian cells can distinguish between BA and its synthetic analog MBA and exhibit graded concentration-dependent responses. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that toxicity of BA stems from the ability of high concentrations to impair Ca2+ signaling.

  6. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  7. Dopaminergic inhibition involved in the alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid-induced jumping behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1980-05-16

    alpha-Naphthoxyacetic acid (alpha-NOAA), one of the retching-inducers, elicited a dose-dependent jumping behavior shortly after i.p. administration in doses ranging from 250 to 700 mg/kg in ddY mice, the incidence of jumping being 97% at a dose of 700 mg/kg. alpha-NOAA also induced hypothermia, retching, head shaking, salivation and lacrimation. Phentolamine, reserpine, disulfiram, tranylcypromine, haloperidol, scopolamine, bicuculline, diazepam and lithium among the drugs tested inhibited to a certain degree but not markedly the alpha-NOAA-induced jumping behavior. However, the behavior was markedly inhibited by a dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and this inhibitory effect was significantly antagonized by a dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol (2 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that the jumping behavior elicited by alpha-NOAA may be due to the inhibition of dopaminergic neuron activity.

  8. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected.

  9. Possible involvement of calcineurin in retinoic acid-induced inhibition of leukemic HL-60 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kihira, H; Hiasa, A; Yamamoto, M; Katayama, N; Kuno, T; Ohtsuka, K; Shiku, H; Nishikawa, M

    1998-03-01

    Differentiation of leukemic HL-60 cells by all transretinoic acid (ATRA) resulted in a reduced rate of growth. Cyclosporin A and FK506, at concentrations that inhibited calcineurin activity, abrogated the ATRA-induced inhibition of HL-60 cell growth but these immunosuppressants had no effect on the ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation. Treatment with 1 microM ATRA led to a progressive increase in calcineurin phosphatase activity of HL-60 cells; the increase in this activity appeared to parallel the functional change of HL-60 cells during granulocytic differentiation. Increase in calcineurin activity was concordant with the increased expressions of calcineurin A and calcineurin B subunit proteins. The FKBP12 expression increased during ATRA-induced differentiation and expression of cyclophilin A remained unchanged. We propose that the increased expression of calcineurin is involved in the ATRA-induced inhibition of HL-60 cell proliferation, as in the case with 1,25alpha-dihydroxy-vitamin D3.

  10. Anti-Cancer Effect of Lambertianic Acid by Inhibiting the AR in LNCaP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Lambertianic acid (LA) is known to have anti-allergic and antibacterial effects. However, the anticancer activities and mechanism of action of LA have not been investigated. Therefore, the anticancer effects and mechanism of LA are investigated in this study. LA decreased not only AR protein levels, but also cellular and secretory levels of PSA. Furthermore, LA inhibited nuclear translocation of the AR induced by mibolerone. LA suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 arrest, downregulating CDK4/6 and cyclin D1 and activating p53 and its downstream molecules, p21 and p27. LA induced apoptosis and the expression of related proteins, including cleaved caspase-9 and -3, c-PARP and BAX, and inhibited BCl-2. The role of AR in LA-induced apoptosis was assessed by using siRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that LA exerts the anticancer effect by inhibiting AR and is a valuable therapeutic agent in prostate cancer treatment. PMID:27399684

  11. Lipoxygenase inhibition by novel fatty acid ester from Annona squamosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat

    2008-12-01

    Studies on the seeds of Annona squamosa yielded a novel lipoxygenase inhibitor fatty acid ester, (+) - annonlipoxy (1). Compound 1 was screened for its enzyme inhibitory activity against lipoxygenase (E.C.1.14.18.1), exhibiting activity with IC(50) 69.05 +/- 5.06 microm. Baicalein (IC(50) 22.6 +/- 0.5 microm) was used as a positive control. Crude extracts of Annona squamosa fruit pulp and seeds were screened for its enzyme inhibitory activity against lipoxygenase and acetylcholinesterase. The crude ethanolic extract of fruit pulp and seeds of Annona squamosa also exhibited lipoxygenase activity with 22.2 and 26.7% inhibition, while the pet.ether extract of seeds of A. squamosa exhibited 52.7% inhibition at a concentration of 40 microg/200 ml. The crude ethanolic extract of seeds of Annona squamosa was also bioassayed for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and it was found inactive.

  12. Inhibition of mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus nomius vsc 23 by lactic acid bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; Arena, M.E.; Silva, J.; González, S.N.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different fermenting microorganisms on growth of a mycotoxin- producing Aspergillus nomius was assayed. Two lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of which are widely used in fermentation and preservation of food, were assayed on their fungus inhibitory properties. Assays were carried out by simultaneous inoculation of one of the possible inhibiting microorganisms and the fungus or subsequent inoculation of one of the microorganisms followed by the fungus. All three microorganisms assayed showed growth inhibition of the mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus strain. L. rhamnosus O236, isolated from sheep milk and selected for its technological properties, showed highest fungal inhibition of the microorg