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Sample records for hydroxyapatite ceramic burr-hole

  1. Integration of Rabbit Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Hydroxyapatite Burr Hole Button Device for Bone Interface Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, Viswanathan; Harikrishnan, Varma; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2016-01-01

    Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, multipotent stem cells isolated from adipose tissue, present close resemblance to the natural in vivo milieu and microenvironment of bone tissue and hence widely used for in bone tissue engineering applications. The present study evaluates the compatibility of tissue engineered hydroxyapatite burr hole button device (HAP-BHB) seeded with Rabbit Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (ADMSCs). Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress response, apoptotic behavior, attachment, and adherence of adipose MSC seeded on the device were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. The results of the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay indicated that powdered device material was noncytotoxic up to 0.5 g/mL on cultured cells. It was also observed that oxidative stress related reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis on cell seeded device were similar to those of control (cells alone) except in 3-day period which showed increased reactive oxygen species generation. Further scanning electron and confocal microscopy indicated a uniform attachment of cells and viability up to 200 μm deep inside the device, respectively. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the in-house developed HAP-BHB device seeded with ADMSCs is nontoxic/safe compatible device for biomedical application and an attractive tissue engineered device for calvarial defect regeneration. PMID:26880922

  2. 21 CFR 882.5250 - Burr hole cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A burr hole cover is a plastic or metal device used to cover or plug holes drilled into the skull during surgery and to reattach cranial bone removed during surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5250 - Burr hole cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A burr hole cover is a plastic or metal device used to cover or plug holes drilled into the skull during surgery and to reattach cranial bone removed during surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5250 - Burr hole cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A burr hole cover is a plastic or metal device used to cover or plug holes drilled into the skull during surgery and to reattach cranial bone removed during surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5250 - Burr hole cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A burr hole cover is a plastic or metal device used to cover or plug holes drilled into the skull during surgery and to reattach cranial bone removed during surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5250 - Burr hole cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A burr hole cover is a plastic or metal device used to cover or plug holes drilled into the skull during surgery and to reattach cranial bone removed during surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. The Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Burr Hole Technique for Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Urasaki, Eiichirou; Umeno, Tetsuya; Sakai, Waka; Nagaishi, Akiko; Nakane, Shunya; Fukudome, Takayasu; Yamakawa, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is performed by burr hole surgery. In microelectrode recording by multi-channel parallel probe, because all microelectrodes do not always fit in the burr hole, additional drilling to enlarge the hole is occasionally required, which is time consuming and more invasive. We report a stereotactic burr hole technique to avoid additional drilling, and the efficacy of this novel technique compared with the conventional procedure. Ten patients (20 burr holes) that received DBS were retrospectively analyzed (5 in the conventional burr hole group and 5 in the stereotactic burr hole group). In the stereotactic burr hole technique, the combination of the instrument stop slide of a Leksell frame and the Midas Rex perforator with a 14-mm perforator bit was attached to the instrument carrier slide of the arc in order to trephine under stereoguidance. The efficacy of this technique was assessed by the number of additional drillings. Factors associated with additional drilling were investigated including the angle and skull thickness around the entry points. Four of the 10 burr holes required additional drilling in the conventional burr hole group, whereas no additional drilling was required in the stereotactic burr hole group (p = 0.043). The thicknesses in the additional drilling group were 10.9 ± 0.9 mm compared to 9.1 ± 1.2 mm (p = 0.029) in the non-additional drilling group. There were no differences in the angles between the two groups. The stereotactic burr hole technique contributes to safe and exact DBS, particularly in patients with thick skulls. PMID:26345669

  8. The Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Burr Hole Technique for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    TOYODA, Keisuke; URASAKI, Eiichirou; UMENO, Tetsuya; SAKAI, Waka; NAGAISHI, Akiko; NAKANE, Shunya; FUKUDOME, Takayasu; YAMAKAWA, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is performed by burr hole surgery. In microelectrode recording by multi-channel parallel probe, because all microelectrodes do not always fit in the burr hole, additional drilling to enlarge the hole is occasionally required, which is time consuming and more invasive. We report a stereotactic burr hole technique to avoid additional drilling, and the efficacy of this novel technique compared with the conventional procedure. Ten patients (20 burr holes) that received DBS were retrospectively analyzed (5 in the conventional burr hole group and 5 in the stereotactic burr hole group). In the stereotactic burr hole technique, the combination of the instrument stop slide of a Leksell frame and the Midas Rex perforator with a 14-mm perforator bit was attached to the instrument carrier slide of the arc in order to trephine under stereoguidance. The efficacy of this technique was assessed by the number of additional drillings. Factors associated with additional drilling were investigated including the angle and skull thickness around the entry points. Four of the 10 burr holes required additional drilling in the conventional burr hole group, whereas no additional drilling was required in the stereotactic burr hole group (p = 0.043). The thicknesses in the additional drilling group were 10.9 ± 0.9 mm compared to 9.1 ± 1.2 mm (p = 0.029) in the non-additional drilling group. There were no differences in the angles between the two groups. The stereotactic burr hole technique contributes to safe and exact DBS, particularly in patients with thick skulls. PMID:26345669

  9. Comparative study between cortical bone graft versus bone dust for reconstruction of cranial burr holes

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Paulo V.; Ferreira, Nelson P.; Faria, Mario B.; Ferreira, Marcelo P.; Kraemer, Jorge L.; Collares, Marcus V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: As a consequence of the progressive evolution of neurosurgical techniques, there has been increasing concern with the esthetic aspects of burr holes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the use of cortical bone graft and bone dust for correcting cranial deformities caused by neurosurgical trephines. Methods: Twenty-three patients were enrolled for cranial burr hole reconstruction with a 1-year follow-up. A total of 108 burr holes were treated; 36 burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous cortical bone discs (33.3%), and the remaining 72 with autogenous wet bone powder (66.6%). A trephine was specifically designed to produce this coin-shaped bone plug of 14 mm in diameter, which fit perfectly over the burr holes. The reconstructions were studied 12 months after the surgical procedure, using three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography. Additionally, general and plastic surgeons blinded for the study evaluated the cosmetic results of those areas, attributing scores from 0 to 10. Results: The mean bone densities were 987.95 ± 186.83 Hounsfield units (HU) for bone fragment and 473.55 ± 220.34 HU for bone dust (P < 0.001); the mean cosmetic scores were 9.5 for bone fragment and 5.7 for bone dust (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The use of autologous bone discs showed better results than bone dust for the reconstruction of cranial burr holes because of their lower degree of bone resorption and, consequently, better cosmetic results. The lack of donor site morbidity associated with procedural low cost qualifies the cortical autograft as the first choice for correcting cranial defects created by neurosurgical trephines. PMID:21206899

  10. [Diffusion bonding of hydroxyapatite ceramics and biometals].

    PubMed

    Yamane, F

    1990-03-01

    To improve the mechanical characteristics of hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics, a metal-ceramic composite formed by a solid state direct diffusion bonding system was studied. The joining treatment was carried out of a high vacuum and high temperature, for the bioactive ceramics (HAP) and the following biometals; platinum, gold-platinum alloy, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, niobium and aluminium alloy. The effects of the variations of thermal expansion mismatch and the interactive reactions at the interface were investigated by fractographic observation (SEM), X-ray diffraction method and EPMA analysis. On some of these joining combinations, the bonding strength had the same bonding strength as the adhesive materials. The results of interface observations showed that the bonding strength is affected by the interface reactions and the diffusion phenomena. PMID:2135505

  11. Tiger hide appearance: Impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes after evacuation of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Gandhi, Ashok; Purohit, Devendra; Mittal, R S

    2016-01-01

    Burr hole evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) with or without drainage system is the most common surgical method among various techniques. There are various complications of burr hole drainage evacuation of chronic SDH, but there is no case report regarding impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr hole as a complication. Herewith, we are reporting a case of bilateral chronic SDH with prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed a characteristic look and we named it "Tiger hide appearance". We failed to find such characteristic appearance in MRI brain on reviewing the available literature. PMID:27366284

  12. Single burr hole evacuation for traumatic acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Osamu; Kameyama, Motonobu; Shimosegawa, Yasuko; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Sugai, Kazuyuki; Onuma, Takehide

    2002-08-01

    A 57-year-old man and a 55-year-old man presented with acute subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa due to trauma. Both were comatose preoperatively. Emergent single burr hole evacuation in the posterior cranial fossa was performed in the emergency room immediately after computed tomography. Neurological symptoms improved dramatically just after initiating the burr hole evacuation in both patients. A 57-year-old man became alert and could walk unassisted 1 month after surgery. The other could walk with assistance 4 months after surgery, although psychic disturbance resulting from cerebral contusion remained. Single burr hole evacuation in the emergency room is a useful treatment for acute subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa because the procedure can be performed easily and rapidly, thus achieving reduction of intracranial pressure. Progressing neurological deterioration, reversibility of brainstem function by mannitol administration and the sign of brainstem compression and noncommunicating hydrocephalus are good indicators for this treatment.

  13. Stability of hydroxyapatite while processing short-fibre reinforced hydroxyapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Knepper, M; Moricca, S; Milthorpe, B K

    1997-12-01

    Reinforcement by short fibres has been adapted from modern ceramic processing technologies to achieve an improvement of structural properties of hydroxyapatite. However, the influence of the reinforcement fibres on the thermochemical behaviour of the hydroxyapatite has yet to be clarified comprehensively. Titanium, alumina and 316L-stainless steel, all materials with a proven record as implant materials, were chosen as reinforcement materials. Short fibres of these materials were incorporated in a matrix of hydroxyapatite to toughen the hydroxyapatite. Composites were processed by sintering in air, hot isostatic pressing and a method combining sintering in inert gas atmosphere and hot isostatic pressing. PMID:9430334

  14. Antegrade rheolytic thrombectomy and thrombolysis for superior sagittal sinus thrombosis using burr hole access

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Darrin J; Latchaw, Richard E; Dahlin, Brian C; Dong, Paul R; Verro, Piero; Muizelaar, J Paul; Shahlaie, Kiarash

    2014-01-01

    Superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis has high morbidity and mortality, and urgent recanalization is critical for severe cases. Standard endovascular techniques for thrombolysis and thrombectomy use retrograde venous access, an approach that may be unsuccessful in cases with extensive firm clot burden involving the dural sinuses distal to the SSS. An anterior open transcranial approach to the SSS for catheter sheath placement to facilitate antegrade mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolysis of the SSS and more distal sinuses has not been previously described. Here we describe a case in which multiple unsuccessful attempts at retrograde endovascular access were attempted. Thus, a burr hole over the anterior SSS was performed for daily endovascular antegrade procedures using the Angiojet rheolytic catheter device and chemical thrombolysis. Near-complete recanalization of the SSS was achieved with venous outflow via dilated left transverse and left sigmoid sinuses, along with significant collateral flow in multiple cerebral veins. PMID:24692369

  15. Impact of Time Interval between Trauma Onset and Burr Hole Surgery on Recurrence of Late Subacute or Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-in; Kim, Jae-hoon; Kang, Hee-in; Moon, Byung-gwan; Kim, Joo-seung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although subdural hematoma (SDH) is commonly treatable by burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage, there is no clear consensus regarding appropriate management and exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence also remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with recurrence of SDH that requires burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage. We also identified the appropriate timing of surgery for reducing the recurrence. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 274 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage treated with burr hole surgery in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014. Excluding patients with acute intracranial complications or unknown time of trauma onset left 216 patients included in the study. Results Of 216 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage, recurrence was observed in 36 patients (16.7%). The timing of the operation in patients with late subacute stage (15–28 days) resulted in a significant decrease in recurrence (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17–0.65; p=0.001) compared to chronic stage (>28 days). Otherwise, no significant risk factors were associated with recurrences including comorbidities and surgical details. Conclusion The results indicated that time from trauma onset to burr hole surgery may be important for decreasing the risk of recurrence. Therefore, unless patients can be treated conservatively without surgery, prompt surgical management is recommended in patients diagnosed as having late subacute or chronic subdural hematoma treatable by burr hole surgery, even when neurological deficits are unclear.

  16. Impact of Time Interval between Trauma Onset and Burr Hole Surgery on Recurrence of Late Subacute or Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-in; Kim, Jae-hoon; Kang, Hee-in; Moon, Byung-gwan; Kim, Joo-seung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although subdural hematoma (SDH) is commonly treatable by burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage, there is no clear consensus regarding appropriate management and exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence also remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with recurrence of SDH that requires burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage. We also identified the appropriate timing of surgery for reducing the recurrence. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 274 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage treated with burr hole surgery in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014. Excluding patients with acute intracranial complications or unknown time of trauma onset left 216 patients included in the study. Results Of 216 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage, recurrence was observed in 36 patients (16.7%). The timing of the operation in patients with late subacute stage (15–28 days) resulted in a significant decrease in recurrence (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17–0.65; p=0.001) compared to chronic stage (>28 days). Otherwise, no significant risk factors were associated with recurrences including comorbidities and surgical details. Conclusion The results indicated that time from trauma onset to burr hole surgery may be important for decreasing the risk of recurrence. Therefore, unless patients can be treated conservatively without surgery, prompt surgical management is recommended in patients diagnosed as having late subacute or chronic subdural hematoma treatable by burr hole surgery, even when neurological deficits are unclear. PMID:27651869

  17. Improvement of the stability of hydroxyapatite through glass ceramic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Ra; Yang, Zheng Xun; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Kim, Tae Suk; Lee, Jong Kook

    2010-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite has achieved significant application in orthopedic and dental implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Sintered hydroxyapatites showed significant dissolution, however, after their immersion in water or simulated body fluid (SBF). This grain boundary dissolution, even in pure hydroxyapatites, resulted in grain separation at the surfaces, and finally, in fracture. In this study, hydroxyapatite ceramics containing apatite-wollastonite (AW) or calcium silicate (SG) glass ceramics as additives were prepared to prevent the dissolution. AW and SG glass ceramics were added at 0-7 wt% and powder-compacted uniaxially followed by firing at moisture conditions. The glass phase was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite to act as a sintering aid, followed by crystallization, to improve the mechanical properties without reducing the biocompatibility. As seen in the results of the dissolution test, a significant amount of damage was reduced even after more than 14 days. TEM and SEM showed no decomposition of HA to the secondary phase, and the fracture toughness increased, becoming even higher than that of the commercial hydroxyapatite.

  18. Fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite/mica composite, packed hydroxyapatite, alumina ceramics, silicon nitride and -carbide.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Yokobori, A T; Yokobori, T; Aizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    By using the fracture toughness estimation method based on two-dimensional map, it was found that the ductility of the high porosity hydroxyapatite/mice composite was comparable with silicon carbide. It was measured to be higher than that of packed hydroxyapatite. Alumina ceramics with more than 96% aluminium oxide showed a higher fracture toughness than the composite material. When bending strength was compared, the strength of the composite was two or three times lower than that of packed hydroxyapatite and much lower than the other studied materials. The composite material showed high porosity, which in turn gives it a lower bending strength. However, the high porosity is more favourable for biocompatibility.

  19. Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S R; Passi, D; Singh, P; Bhuibhar, A

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic defects with bone graft substitutes has shown promising result achieving almost complete bone regeneration depending on product resorption similar to human bone's physicochemical and crystallographic characteristics. Among these, non-ceramic and ceramic hydroxyapatite being the main inorganic salt of bone is the most studied calcium phosphate material in clinical practices ever since 1970s and non-ceramic since 1985. Its "chemical similarity" with the mineralized phase of biologic bone makes it unique. Hydroxyapatite as an excellent carrier of osteoinductive growth factors and osteogenic cell populations is also useful as drug delivery vehicle regardless of its density. Porous ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite is osteoconductive, biocompatible and very inert. The need for bone graft material keeps on increasing with increased age of the population and the increased conditions of trauma. Recent advances in genetic engineering and doping techniques have made it possible to use non-ceramic hydroxyapatite in larger non-ceramic crystals and cluster forms as a successful bone graft substitute to treat various types of bone defects. In this paper we have mentioned some recently studied properties of hydroxyapatite and its various uses through a brief review of the literatures available to date. PMID:25428698

  20. [A Case of Organizing Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Endoscopic Burr-Hole Surgery Using a Curettage and Suction Technique].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Oshiro, Shinya; Koga, Takaomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-09-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital because of difficulty with discrete movement of the right upper limb and dysarthria. Computed tomography(CT)of the head revealed a chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH)on the left side. The patient underwent single burr-hole irrigation and drainage on the same day. In addition to the burr hole, a cross-shaped dural incision was made which revealed a thick outer membrane and solidified hematoma. We removed as much of the clotted hematoma as possible using a curved suction tube under neuroendoscopy. The postoperative CT revealed that the hematoma was partially removed and the mass effect was reduced. As a result, the patient's neurological deficits improved. We reached a diagnosis of organizing CSDH following histologic examination of the removed hematoma that showed inflammatory cell infiltration and multiplication of fibroblasts. Neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation via a burr hole is minimally invasive and may be a useful procedure in the treatment of some cases of organizing CSDH. PMID:27605476

  1. Dissolution studies of hydroxyapatite and glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, A.C.; Santos, J.D.; Monteiro, F.J.; Prado da Silva, M.H

    2003-03-15

    In the continuous agitation assays, glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite (GR-HA) was shown to form a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer, but hydroxyapatite (HA) only formed dispersed precipitates. The formation of this layer was first detected on the GR-HA with a 7.5% glass addition (7.5 GR-HA) after only 3 days of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The time required for layer formation decreased as the amount of glass added to the HA increased. The dissolution rate of the materials followed a similar pattern, i.e. the dissolution rate for GR-HA was higher than for HA, and increased with the addition of glass. The immersion of 7.5 GR-HA in water showed almost linear dissolution kinetics over the immersion periods (3, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days). The concentration of calcium ions in solution and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the 7.5 GR-HA specimens immersed in water and in SBF revealed a clear competition between the material dissolution and the precipitation of a CaP phase. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy with alternated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) analysis indicated that the CaP phase that formed during longer immersion times (30 and 60 days) could be a carbonate-substituted CaP precipitate. As expected from previous work, the GR-HA behavior in terms of its in vitro bioactivity is higher than HA because a homogeneous CaP layer is formed and the precipitation occurs faster. From the dissolution test and in accordance with the chemical composition of the samples, GR-HA was more soluble than HA.

  2. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  3. Effect of multiple cranial burr hole surgery on prevention of recurrent ischemic attacks in children with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R S de; Amato, M C M; Simão, G N; Abud, D G; Avidago, E B; Specian, C M; Machado, H R

    2009-12-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is an uncommon cerebrovascular disorder characterized by progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and its main branches. Direct and indirect bypass techniques have been devised with the aim of promoting neoangiogenesis. The current study aimed to investigate the role of multiple cranial burr hole (MCBH) operations in the prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks in children with MMD. Seven children suffering from progressive MMD were submitted to the MCBH and arachnoid opening technique. Ten to 20 burr holes were drilled in the fronto-temporo-parieto-occipital area of each hemisphere in each patient, depending on the site and extent of the disease. All patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively by means of Barthel index (BI), CT, MR, angio-MR, and angiography. Patients had no recurrence of ischemic attacks postoperatively. Neoangiogenesis was observed in both hemispheres. One patient developed a persistent subdural collection after surgery, thus requiring placement of a subdural-peritoneal shunt. Postoperative BI was statistically significantly improved (P=0.02). This report suggests that MCBH for revascularization in MMD is a simple procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and effective for preventing cerebral ischemic attacks in children. In addition, MCBH may be placed as an adjunct to other treatments for MMD.

  4. A single burr hole approach for direct transverse sinus cannulation for the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Justin M; Kaminsky, Ian; Gailloud, Philippe; Huang, Judy

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a symptomatic Borden II/Cognard IIa+b transverse sinus dural arteriovenous fistula underwent an attempted percutaneous transvenous embolization which was ultimately not possible given the fistula anatomy. She then underwent a partial percutaneous transarterial embolization but the fistula recurred. Given the failed percutaneous interventions, the patient underwent a combined open surgical/transvenous embolization using neuronavigation and a single burr hole craniectomy. She has remained symptom free for 3 months. This case report illustrates the feasibility of combining minimally invasive open surgical access to allow for direct venous cannulation for endovascular embolization of a dural arteriovenous fistula when traditional percutaneous methods are not an option. PMID:24398868

  5. Enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 performance on hydroxyapatite ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schuessele, A; Mayr, H; Tessmar, J; Goepferich, A

    2009-09-15

    The immobilization of biomolecules on biomaterial surfaces allows for the control of their localization and retention. In numerous studies, proteins have been simply adsorbed to enhance the biological performance of various materials in vivo. We investigated the potential of surface modification techniques on hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic discs in an in vitro approach. A novel method for protein immobilization was evaluated using the aminobisphosphonates pamidronate and alendronate, which are strong Ca chelating agents, and was compared with the established silanization technique. Lysozyme and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were used to assess the suitability of the two surface modification methods with regard to the enzymatic activity of lysozyme and to the capacity of BMP-2 to stimulate the osteoblastic differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts. After immobilization, a 2.5-fold increase in enzymatic activity of lysozyme was observed compared with the control. The alkaline phosphatase activity per cell stimulated by immobilized BMP-2 was 2.5-fold higher [9 x 10(-6) I.U.] than the growth factor on unmodified surfaces [2-4 x 10(-6) I.U.]. With regard to the increase in protein activity, both procedures lead to equivalent results. Thus, the bisphosphonate-based surface modification represents a safe and easy alternative for the attachment of proteins to HA surfaces. PMID:18655137

  6. Porous hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics promote ectopic osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingli; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Maeda, Megumi; Minowa, Takashi; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2009-04-01

    Because calcium phosphate (Ca-P) ceramics have been used as bone substitutes, it is necessary to investigate what effects the ceramics have on osteoblast maturation. We prepared three types of Ca-P ceramics with different Ca-P ratios, i.e. hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics with dense-smooth and porous structures. Comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of mouse osteoblast-like cells cultured on these ceramics revealed that porous Ca-P ceramics considerably affected the gene expression profiles, having a higher potential for osteoblast maturation. In the in vivo study that followed, porous Ca-P ceramics were implanted into rat skeletal muscle. Sixteen weeks after the implantation, more alkaline-phosphatase-positive cells were observed in the pores of hydroxyapatite and BCP, and the expression of the osteocalcin gene (an osteoblast-specific marker) in tissue grown in pores was also higher in hydroxyapatite and BCP than in β-TCP. In the pores of any Ca-P ceramics, 16 weeks after the implantation, we detected the expressions of marker genes of the early differentiation stage of chondrocytes and the complete differentiation stage of adipocytes, which originate from mesenchymal stem cells, as well as osteoblasts. These marker gene expressions were not observed in the muscle tissue surrounding the implanted Ca-P ceramics. These observations indicate that porous hydroxyapatite and BCP had a greater potential for promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts than β-TCP.

  7. Contralateral acute epidural haematoma following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Panourias, Ioannis G; Skandalakis, Panajiotis N

    2006-06-01

    Chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is one of the most frequent causes for neurosurgical intervention. Although the prognosis is generally good and treatment modalities are well established, some devastating intracranial haematomas can complicate its evacuation. The authors report here a case of an acute epidural haematoma occurring after evacuation of a contralateral chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage without irrigation. Since this is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication, clinicians should suspect its occurrence when an unexpected postoperative course is demonstrated.

  8. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210

  9. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun; Chen, Cuili; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si-OH) and B-OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions.

  10. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun; Chen, Cuili; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si-OH) and B-OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. PMID:26117746

  11. Effects of rheological properties on ice-templated porous hydroxyapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Kechao; Bao, Yinxiang; Zhang, Dou

    2013-01-01

    Freeze casting of aqueous suspension was investigated as a method for fabricating hydroxyapatite (HA) porous ceramics with lamellar structures. The rheological properties of HA suspensions employed in the ice-templated process were investigated systematically. Well aligned lamellar pores and dense ceramic walls were obtained successfully in HA porous ceramics with the porosity of 68-81% and compressive strength of 0.9-2.4 MPa. The results exhibited a strong correlation between the rheological properties of the employed suspensions and the morphology and mechanical properties of ice-templated porous HA ceramics, in terms of lamellar pore characteristics, porosities and compressive strengths. The ability to produce aligned pores and achieve the manipulation of porous HA microstructures by controlling the rheological parameters were demonstrated, revealing the potential of the ice-templated method for the fabrication of HA scaffolds in biomedical applications.

  12. Study on the neotype zirconia's implant coated nanometer hydroxyapatite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. W.; Yang, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, biologic ceramics is a popular material of implants and bioactive surface modification of dental implant became a research emphasis, which aims to improve bioactivity of implants materials and acquire firmer implants-bone interface. The zirconia ceramic has excellent mechanical properties and nanometer HA ceramics is a bioceramic well known for its bioactivity, therefore, nanometer HA ceramics coating on zirconia, allows combining the excellent mechanical properties of zirconia substrates with its bioactivity. This paper shows a new method for implant shape design and bioactive modification of dental implants surface. Zirconia's implant substrate was prepared by sintered method, central and lateral tunnels were drilled in the zirconia hollow porous cylindrical implants by laser processing. The HA powders and needle-like HA crystals were made by a wet precipitation and calcining method. Its surface was coated with nanometer HA ceramics which was used brush HA slurry and vacuum sintering. Mechanical testing results revealed that the attachment strength of nanometer HA ceramics coated zirconia samples is high. SEM and interface observation after inserted experiment indicated that calcium and phosphor content increased and symmetrically around coated implant-bone tissue interface. A significantly higher affinity index was demonstrated in vivo by histomorphometric evaluation in coated versus uncoated implants. SEM analysis demonstrated better bone adhesion to the material in coated implant at any situation. In addition, the hollow porous cylindrical implant coated with nanometer HA ceramics increase the interaction of bone and implant, the new bone induced into the surface of hollow porous cylindrical implant and through the most tunnels filled into central hole. The branch-like structure makes the implant and bone a body, which increased the contact area and decreased elastic ratio. Therefore, the macroscopical and microcosmic nested structure of

  13. Phase purity of sol-gel-derived hydroxyapatite ceramic.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, M F; Perng, L H; Chin, T S; Perng, H G

    2001-10-01

    Calcium oxide was reported in the sol-gel-derived hydroxyapatite (HA) as an unavoidable major impurity. In this study phase purity of HA synthesized by sol-gel route was explored using precursors of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and triethyl phosphate. Two different drying methods, the fast drying of as-prepared precursors and the slow drying of aged precursors were adopted as major processing variables. The dried gels were subsequently calcined up to 600 degrees C. In the calcined powder from fast-dried gel, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed an intense CaO peak. For the slow-dried gel, thermogravimetric analysis revealed a 2-step weight-loss behavior during heating. XRD analysis of the calcined powder, corresponding to the second weight-loss step, showed major peaks of hydroxyapatite and a very weak CaO peak. P-31 NMR analysis indicated formation of calcium phosphate complex during aging. Complete incorporation of Ca(NO3)2 into the complex due to proper aging therefore diminishes CaO formation. It was also found that the minor CaO derived in the slow drying method can be easily and completely washed out just by distilled water.

  14. Densification Process of OH Controlled Hydroxyapatite Ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, D.; Koga, Y.; Ishida, E. H.; Ioku, K.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2:HA, is the inorganic principle component of natural bones and teeth. It has been already suggested that the amount of OH ion in the crystal structure of HA is closely related to the biocompatibility. The amount of OH ion in current HA, however, has not been controlled. In order to prepare more functional HA ceramics, the amount of OH ion must be controlled. In this study, HA ceramics with different OH amount were prepared from fine HA crystals by spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to reveal the ideal sintering conditions for preparation of transparent ceramics, densification process on SPS was investigated. The samples were pressed uniaxialy under 60 MPa, and then they were heated by SPS at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for 10 min with the heating rate of 25 deg. C{center_dot}min-1. The quantity of OH ion in HA ceramics sintered by SPS was decreased with increasing temperature of sintering. Transparent HA ceramics were prepared by SPS at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. In analysis of the densification behavior during sintering of HA by SPS, dominant sintering mechanism was plastic flow of densification. Transparent ceramics should be the most suitable materials to investigate the interface between human cells and ceramics.

  15. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. PMID:27524006

  16. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application.

  17. Bioactivity of thermal plasma synthesized bovine hydroxyapatite/glass ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganand, C. P.; Selvarajan, V.; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Cannillo, Valeria; Sola, Antonella

    2010-02-01

    Bone injuries and failures often require the inception of implant biomaterials. Research in this area is receiving increasing attention worldwide. A variety of artificial bone materials, such as metals, polymeric materials, composites and ceramics, are being explored to replace diseased bones. Calcium phosphate ceramics are currently used as biomaterials for many applications in both dentistry and orthopedics. Bioactive silicate-based glasses show a higher bioactive behaviour than calcium phosphate materials. It is very interesting to study the mixtures of HA and silicate-based glasses. In the present study; natural bovine hydroxyapatite / SiO2-CaO-MgO glass composites were produced using the Transferred arc plasma (TAP) melting method. TAP melting route is a brisk process of preparation of glass-ceramics in which the raw materials are melted in the plasma and crystallization of the melt occurs while cooling down at a much faster rate in relatively short processing times compared to the conventional methods of manufacture of glass ceramics/composites. It is well known that; one essential step to the understanding of the biological events occurring at the bone tissue/material interface is the biological investigation by in vitro tests. Cell lines are commonly used for biocompatibility tests, and are very efficient because of their reproducibility and culture facility. In this study, we report the results of a study on the response of primary cultures of human fibroblast cells to TAP melted bioactive glass ceramics.

  18. Resorption kinetics of four hydroxyapatite-based ceramics by particle induced X-ray emission and neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallot, E.; Irigaray, J. L.; Oudadesse, H.; Brun, V.; Weber, G.; Frayssinet, P.

    1999-05-01

    From the viewpoint of hard tissue response to implant materials, calcium phosphates are probably the most compatible materials presently known. During the last few years, much attention has been paid to hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as potential biomaterials for bone substitute. A good implantation of biomaterials in the skeleton is to reach full integration of non-living implant with living bone. The aim of this study is to compare the resorption kinetics of four kinds of calcium phosphate ceramics: hydroxyapatite (Ca{10}(PO4)6(OH)2), hydroxyapatite doped with manganese or zinc and a composite material of 75% hydroxyapatite and 25% β-tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2). Cylinders (5 6 mm in diameter) of these ceramics were packed into holes made in the femur diaphysis of mature ovine. At 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 28, 36 and 48 weeks after the operation, bone/implant interface was embedded in polymethylmethacrylate. We used the PIXE method (particle induced X-ray emission) to measure the distribution of mineral elements (Ca, P, Sr, Zn, Mn and Fe) at the bone/implant interface. At 4, 8, 16, 28 and 48 weeks after implantation we studied a biopsy of the ceramics by neutron activation method. Then, we have a global measurement of mineral elements in the biomaterial. The results showed that the resorption kinetics of hydroxyapatite doped with zinc was faster than that of the three other bioceramics.

  19. Experimental and in silico investigations of organic phosphates and phosphonates sorption on polymer-ceramic monolithic materials and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyńska, Monika; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Tomczak, Rafał; Mikołajczyk, Jakub; Rusińska-Roszak, Danuta; Voelkel, Adam; Buchwald, Tomasz; Jampílek, Josef; Lukáč, Miloš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    2016-10-10

    A method based on experimental and in silico evaluations for investigating interactions of organic phosphates and phosphonates with hydroxyapatite was developed. This quick and easy method is used for determination of differences among organophosphorus compounds of various structures in their mineral binding affinities. Empirical sorption evaluation was carried out using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry or UV-VIS spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm sorption of organic phosphates and phosphonates on hydroxyapatite. Polymer-ceramic monolithic material and bulk hydroxyapatite were applied as sorbent materials. Furthermore, a Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction device was used to investigate both sorption and desorption steps. Binding energies were computed from the fully optimised structures utilising Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Potential pharmacologic and toxic effects of the tested compounds were estimated by the Prediction of the Activity Spectra of Substances using GeneXplain software. PMID:27552905

  20. In vitro osteoclast formation and resorption of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Robert J; Brooks, Roger A; Ueda, Masato; Best, Serena M

    2015-10-01

    Materials that participate in bone remodeling at the implant/tissue interface represent a modern tissue engineering approach with the aim of balancing implant resorption and nascent tissue formation. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiHA) ceramics are capable of stimulating new bone formation, but little is known about their interaction with osteoclasts (OC). The effects of soluble silicate and SiHA on OCs were investigated in this study. Soluble silicate below 500 μM did not stimulate cell metabolism at 4 days or alter resorption area at 7 days on calcium phosphate discs. On sintered ceramics, OC numbers were similar on HA, Si0.3 HA (0.5 wt % Si) and Si0.5 HA (1.2 wt % Si) after 21 days in vitro, but actin ring sealing zone morphology on SiHA resembled that commonly found on bone or on carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (CHA). Smaller and thicker actin rings on SiHA as compared to HA were probably the result of altered surface chemistry and solubility differences. The more stable sealing zones and increased lattice solubility likely contributed to increased individual pit volumes observed on Si0.5 HA. The delayed formation of OCs on Si0.5 HA (lower numbers at day 14) excludes earlier differentiation as a possible mechanism of increased individual OC pit volumes at later times (day 21). Materials characterization of Si containing biomaterials remains paramount as the Si type and amounts can subsequently impact downstream OC behaviour in a complex manner. PMID:25847383

  1. In vitro osteoclast formation and resorption of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Robert J; Brooks, Roger A; Ueda, Masato; Best, Serena M

    2015-10-01

    Materials that participate in bone remodeling at the implant/tissue interface represent a modern tissue engineering approach with the aim of balancing implant resorption and nascent tissue formation. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiHA) ceramics are capable of stimulating new bone formation, but little is known about their interaction with osteoclasts (OC). The effects of soluble silicate and SiHA on OCs were investigated in this study. Soluble silicate below 500 μM did not stimulate cell metabolism at 4 days or alter resorption area at 7 days on calcium phosphate discs. On sintered ceramics, OC numbers were similar on HA, Si0.3 HA (0.5 wt % Si) and Si0.5 HA (1.2 wt % Si) after 21 days in vitro, but actin ring sealing zone morphology on SiHA resembled that commonly found on bone or on carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (CHA). Smaller and thicker actin rings on SiHA as compared to HA were probably the result of altered surface chemistry and solubility differences. The more stable sealing zones and increased lattice solubility likely contributed to increased individual pit volumes observed on Si0.5 HA. The delayed formation of OCs on Si0.5 HA (lower numbers at day 14) excludes earlier differentiation as a possible mechanism of increased individual OC pit volumes at later times (day 21). Materials characterization of Si containing biomaterials remains paramount as the Si type and amounts can subsequently impact downstream OC behaviour in a complex manner.

  2. Potential use of gelcasting hydroxyapatite porous ceramic as an implantable drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Netz, D J; Sepulveda, P; Pandolfelli, V C; Spadaro, A C; Alencastre, J B; Bentley, M V; Marchetti, J M

    2001-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic in a porous configuration is suggested as a drug release system. A new technique for the production of this material, based on the foaming of suspensions and in situ polymerization (gelcasting method), resulted in a material whose characteristics are likely to make it useful as an implantable drug delivery system. Three batches of HA ceramic with different porosities were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Pore size and shape as well as density were determined. In vitro experiments were performed in order to evaluate the dissolution behavior of cisplatin in the system. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the final product consisted of a single phase, indicating that the sintering process had not affected the structure of the HA. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed absence of impurities. Pore diameters were in the range 15--34 microm. SEM showed that the material presented a highly interconnected spheroidal porous network with open micropores and closed macropores. In vitro experiments showed significant differences in the release rate of cisplatin between three different porosities.

  3. Aging test and dynamic fatigue test of apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics and dense hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Kakutani, Y; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Kokubo, T; Takagi, M; Shibuya, T

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the changes in mechanical strength of two bioactive ceramics in living tissue. An aging test and dynamic fatigue test were performed using apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics (A X W-GC) and dense hydroxyapatite (HA). Specimens (5 mm X 5 mm X 25 mm, abraded with No. 2000 Al2O3 powder) were implanted into subcutaneous tissue of rats for varying periods of time. The bending strength of aged samples was measured by the three-point loading method. The bending strength of A X W-GC was greater than that of HA (P less than 0.001). There was no reduction in bending strength for both A X W-GC and HA in living tissue. The n value of both A X W-GC and HA did not decrease significantly after implantation as assessed by the results of the dynamic fatigue test according to analysis of covariance. SEM-EPMA showed that Si and Mg contents decreased, Ca content did not change, while P content increased in the surface of A X W-GC. The area where x-ray intensity changed increased moderately after implantation. There were no changes in Ca and P at the interface between HA and soft tissue. In macroscopic and microscopic observations, specimens were found to be encapsulated with a thin layer of connective tissue. Foreign body giant cells, osteoblasts, or osteoclasts were not observed in the soft tissue. There was no bonding between ceramics and soft tissue.

  4. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite coating on the osteoinductivity of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics exhibit good biocompatibility and bone conduction but are not inherently osteoinductive. To overcome this disadvantage, we coated conventional porous BCP ceramics with nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). nHA was chosen as a coating material due to its high osteoinductive potential. Methods We used a hydrothermal deposition method to coat conventional porous BCP ceramics with nHA and assessed the effects of the coating on the physical and mechanical properties of the underlying BCP. Next, its effects on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, proliferation, viability, and osteogenic differentiation were investigated. Results nHA formed a deposited layer on the BCP surface, and synthesized nHA had a rod-like shape with lengths ranging from ~50–200 nm and diameters from ~15–30 mm. The nHA coating did not significantly affect the density, porosity, flexural strength, or compressive strength of the underlying BCP (P > 0.1). Scanning electron microscopy showed MSC attachment to the scaffolds, with a healthy morphology and anchorage to nHA crystals via cytoplasmic processes. The densities of MSCs attached on BCP and nHA-coated BCP scaffolds were 62 ± 26 cells/mm2 and 63 ± 27 cells/mm2 (P > 0.1), respectively, after 1 day and 415 ± 62 cells/mm2 and 541 ± 35 cells/mm2 (P < 0.05) respectively, after 14 days. According to an MTT assay, MSC viability was higher on nHA-coated BCP scaffolds than on BCP scaffolds (P < 0.05). In addition, MSCs on nHA-coated BCP scaffolds produced more alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I, and osteocalcin than MSCs on BCP scaffolds (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BCP scaffolds coated with nHA were more conducive for MSC adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation than conventional, uncoated BCP scaffolds, indicating that nHA coating can enhance the osteoinductive potential of BCP ceramics, making this material more

  5. Behavior of osteoblast-like cells on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite ceramics composed of particles with different shapes and sizes.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Uno, Yuika; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In designing the biomaterials, it is important to control their surface morphologies, because they affect the interactions between the materials and cells. We previously reported that porous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics composed of rod-like particles had advantages over sintered porous HA ceramics; however, the effects of the surface morphology of calcium-deficient HA ceramics on cell behavior have remained unclear. Using a hydrothermal process, we successfully prepared porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics with different surface morphologies, composed of plate-like particles of 200-300, 500-800 nm, or 2-3 μm in width and rod-like particles of 1 or 3-5 μm in width, respectively. The effects of these surface morphologies on the behavior of osteoblast-like cells were examined. Although the numbers of cells adhered to the ceramic specimens did not differ significantly among the specimens, the proliferation rates of cells on the ceramics decreased with decreasing particle size. Our results reveal that controlling the surface morphology that is governed by particle shape and size is important for designing porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics.

  6. In vitro investigations of bone remodeling on a transparent hydroxyapatite ceramic.

    PubMed

    John, A; Varma, H K; Vijayan, S; Bernhardt, A; Lode, A; Vogel, A; Burmeister, B; Hanke, Th; Domaschke, H; Gelinsky, M

    2009-02-01

    The light microscopic examination of cells directly on bioceramic materials in the transmission mode is impossible because many of these materials are opaque. In order to enable direct viewing of living cells and to perform time-lapse studies, nearly transparent bioceramic materials were developed. A dense and fine-grained transparent hydroxyapatite (tHA) was processed by a gel-casting route followed by low-temperature sintering (1000 degrees C). By virtue of its transparency, direct visualization of cellular events on this material is possible in transmitted light. In this study, the interaction of different bone cell types with the tHA ceramic was envisaged. Investigation of rat calvaria osteoblasts (RCO) cultured on tHA by means of transmission light microscopy indicated good cytocompatibility of tHA. Microscopic analysis of osteogenic-induced human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) on tHA and quantitative analysis of their lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity at different time points of culture revealed favorable proliferation as well. An increase of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicated the differentiation of osteogenic-induced hBMSC towards the osteoblastic lineage. In addition, the differentiation of human monocytes to osteoclast-like cells could also be demonstrated on tHA and was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy imaging of multinucleated cells on the transparent material.

  7. Thermal and ultrasonic influence in the formation of nanometer scale hydroxyapatite bio-ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, GJE; Brundavanam, R; Le, X Thi; Djordjevic, S; Prokic, M; Fawcett, D

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is a widely used biocompatible ceramic in many biomedical applications and devices. Currently nanometer-scale forms of HAP are being intensely investigated due to their close similarity to the inorganic mineral component of the natural bone matrix. In this study nano-HAP was prepared via a wet precipitation method using Ca(NO3)2 and KH2PO4 as the main reactants and NH4OH as the precipitator under ultrasonic irradiation. The Ca/P ratio was set at 1.67 and the pH was maintained at 9 during the synthesis process. The influence of the thermal treatment was investigated by using two thermal treatment processes to produce ultrafine nano-HAP powders. In the first heat treatment, a conventional radiant tube furnace was used to produce nano-particles with an average size of approximately 30 nm in diameter, while the second thermal treatment used a microwave-based technique to produce particles with an average diameter of 36 nm. The crystalline structure and morphology of all nanoparticle powders produced were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Both thermal techniques effectively produced ultrafine powders with similar crystalline structure, morphology and particle sizes. PMID:22114473

  8. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelina, F. V.; Ungureanu, D. N.; Bratu, V.; Popescu, I. N.; Rusanescu, C. O.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal-ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  9. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Pei; Wei, Pingpin; Li, Pengjian; Gao, Chengde; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-11-15

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m{sup 1/2}) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability.

  10. Porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics coated with nano-hydroxyapatite and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for reconstruction of radius segmental defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianzhong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhou, Yongchun; Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    The osteoconduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics has been widely reported. In a previous study, we demonstrated that applying a nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating enhances the osteoinductive potential of BCP ceramics, making these scaffolds more suitable for bone tissue engineering applications. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of reconstructing radius defects in rabbits using nHA-coated BCP ceramics seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to compare the bone regeneration induced by different scaffolds. Radius defects were created in 20 New Zealand rabbits, which were divided into four groups by treatment: porous BCP ceramics (Group A), nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics (Group B), porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group C), and nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group D). After in vitro incubation, the cell/scaffold complexes were implanted into the defects. Twelve weeks after implantation, the specimens were examined macroscopically and histologically. Both the nHA coating and seeding with MSCs enhanced the formation of new bone tissue in the BCP ceramics, though the osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds with MSCs was greater than that of the nHA-coated scaffolds. Notably, the combination of nHA coating and MSCs significantly improved the bone regeneration capability of the BCP ceramics. Thus, MSCs seeded into porous BCP ceramics coated with nHA may be an effective bone substitute to reconstruct bone defects in the clinic. PMID:26449447

  11. Porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics coated with nano-hydroxyapatite and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for reconstruction of radius segmental defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianzhong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhou, Yongchun; Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    The osteoconduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics has been widely reported. In a previous study, we demonstrated that applying a nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating enhances the osteoinductive potential of BCP ceramics, making these scaffolds more suitable for bone tissue engineering applications. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of reconstructing radius defects in rabbits using nHA-coated BCP ceramics seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to compare the bone regeneration induced by different scaffolds. Radius defects were created in 20 New Zealand rabbits, which were divided into four groups by treatment: porous BCP ceramics (Group A), nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics (Group B), porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group C), and nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group D). After in vitro incubation, the cell/scaffold complexes were implanted into the defects. Twelve weeks after implantation, the specimens were examined macroscopically and histologically. Both the nHA coating and seeding with MSCs enhanced the formation of new bone tissue in the BCP ceramics, though the osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds with MSCs was greater than that of the nHA-coated scaffolds. Notably, the combination of nHA coating and MSCs significantly improved the bone regeneration capability of the BCP ceramics. Thus, MSCs seeded into porous BCP ceramics coated with nHA may be an effective bone substitute to reconstruct bone defects in the clinic.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy-based approach to understand the mechanism underlying the adhesion of dengue viruses on ceramic hydroxyapatite columns.

    PubMed

    Saito, Maiko; Kurosawa, Yae; Okuyama, Tsuneo

    2013-01-01

    Although ceramic hydroxyapatite (HAp) chromatography has been used as an alternative method ultracentrifugation for the production of vaccines, the mechanism of virus separation is still obscure. In order to begin to understand the mechanisms of virus separation, HAp surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy after chromatography with dengue viruses. When these processes were performed without elution and with a 10-207 mM sodium phosphate buffer gradient elution, dengue viruses that were adsorbed to HAp were disproportionately located in the columns. However, when eluted with a 10-600 mM sodium phosphate buffer gradient, few viruses were observed on the HAp surface. After incubating the dengue viruses that were adsorbed on HAp beads at 37°C and 2°C, the sphericity of the dengue viruses were reduced with an increase in incubation temperature. These results suggested that dengue virus was adsorbed to the HAp surface by electronic interactions and could be eluted by high-salt concentration buffers, which are commonly used in protein purification. Furthermore, virus fusion was thought to occur with increasing temperature, which implied that virus-HAp adhesion was similar to virus-cell adhesion.

  13. A modified milling system, using a bimodal distribution of highly resistant ceramics. Part 1. A natural hydroxyapatite study.

    PubMed

    Harabi, Abdelhamid; Harabi, Esma

    2015-06-01

    A careful combination of the main parameters controlling natural hydroxyapatite (NHA: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) production such as milling techniques, sintering temperature and holding time may lead to an interesting NHA based bio-ceramics without any foreign oxide additions. In this way, an original wet milling setup has been proposed to obtain sub-micron sized NHA powders. In order to avoid any possible NHA decomposition, a precise Ca/P ratio of NHA derived from animals was selected accordingly. Also, an alternative direct visual approach of the bone age classification was also proposed. A relative density of about 95% was obtained for powders sintered at 1300°C for 2h. The best Vickers micro-hardness and 3 point bending strength values for these sintered samples, using this proposed milling system and without any additions, were 4.7±0.3GPa and 37MPa, respectively. Finally, a complete correlation between the powder microstructure and the final product properties has been established.

  14. Applicability assessment of ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ to the eradication of Legionella in rainwater storage tanks for household use.

    PubMed

    Oana, Kozue; Kobayashi, Michiko; Yamaki, Dai; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nagano, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Water environments appear to be the habitats of Legionella species. Legionellosis is considered as a preventable illness because bacterial reservoirs can be controlled and removed. Roof-harvested rainwater has attracted significant attention not only as a groundwater recharge but also as a potential alternative source of nonpotable water. We successfully developed ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ using the thermal spraying method. The ceramic microbeads were demonstrated to have bactericidal activities against not only Legionella but also coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. Immersing the ceramic microbeads in household rainwater storage tanks was demonstrated to yield the favorable eradication of Legionella organisms. Not only rapid-acting but also long-lasting bactericidal activities of the ceramic microbead were exhibited against Legionella pneumophila. However, time-dependent attenuation of the bactericidal activities against Legionella were also noted in the sustainability appraisal experiment. Therefore, the problems to be overcome surely remain in constantly managing the Legionella-pollution by means of immersing the ceramic microbeads. The results of our investigation apparently indicate that the earthplus™-coated ceramic microbeads would become the favorable tool for Legionella measures in household rainwater storage tanks, which may become the natural reservoir for Legionella species. Our investigation would justify further research and data collection to obtain more reliable procedures to microbiologically regulate the Legionella in rainwater storage tanks. PMID:26346201

  15. Applicability assessment of ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ to the eradication of Legionella in rainwater storage tanks for household use

    PubMed Central

    Oana, Kozue; Kobayashi, Michiko; Yamaki, Dai; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nagano, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Water environments appear to be the habitats of Legionella species. Legionellosis is considered as a preventable illness because bacterial reservoirs can be controlled and removed. Roof-harvested rainwater has attracted significant attention not only as a groundwater recharge but also as a potential alternative source of nonpotable water. We successfully developed ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ using the thermal spraying method. The ceramic microbeads were demonstrated to have bactericidal activities against not only Legionella but also coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. Immersing the ceramic microbeads in household rainwater storage tanks was demonstrated to yield the favorable eradication of Legionella organisms. Not only rapid-acting but also long-lasting bactericidal activities of the ceramic microbead were exhibited against Legionella pneumophila. However, time-dependent attenuation of the bactericidal activities against Legionella were also noted in the sustainability appraisal experiment. Therefore, the problems to be overcome surely remain in constantly managing the Legionella-pollution by means of immersing the ceramic microbeads. The results of our investigation apparently indicate that the earthplus™-coated ceramic microbeads would become the favorable tool for Legionella measures in household rainwater storage tanks, which may become the natural reservoir for Legionella species. Our investigation would justify further research and data collection to obtain more reliable procedures to microbiologically regulate the Legionella in rainwater storage tanks. PMID:26346201

  16. Applicability assessment of ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ to the eradication of Legionella in rainwater storage tanks for household use.

    PubMed

    Oana, Kozue; Kobayashi, Michiko; Yamaki, Dai; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nagano, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Water environments appear to be the habitats of Legionella species. Legionellosis is considered as a preventable illness because bacterial reservoirs can be controlled and removed. Roof-harvested rainwater has attracted significant attention not only as a groundwater recharge but also as a potential alternative source of nonpotable water. We successfully developed ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ using the thermal spraying method. The ceramic microbeads were demonstrated to have bactericidal activities against not only Legionella but also coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. Immersing the ceramic microbeads in household rainwater storage tanks was demonstrated to yield the favorable eradication of Legionella organisms. Not only rapid-acting but also long-lasting bactericidal activities of the ceramic microbead were exhibited against Legionella pneumophila. However, time-dependent attenuation of the bactericidal activities against Legionella were also noted in the sustainability appraisal experiment. Therefore, the problems to be overcome surely remain in constantly managing the Legionella-pollution by means of immersing the ceramic microbeads. The results of our investigation apparently indicate that the earthplus™-coated ceramic microbeads would become the favorable tool for Legionella measures in household rainwater storage tanks, which may become the natural reservoir for Legionella species. Our investigation would justify further research and data collection to obtain more reliable procedures to microbiologically regulate the Legionella in rainwater storage tanks.

  17. Nano-sized ceramic particles of hydroxyapatite calcined with an anti-sintering agent.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2007-03-01

    Nano-sized crystals of calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) having spherical morphologies were fabricated by calcination at 800 degrees C for 1 h with an anti-sintering agent surrounding the original HAp particles and the agent was subsequently removed by washing after calcination. The original HAp particles were prepared by a modified emulsion system, and surrounded with poly(acrylic acid, calcium salt) (PAA-Ca) by utilizing a precipitation reaction between calcium hydroxide and poly(acrylic acid) adsorbed on the HAp particle surfaces in an aqueous medium. In the case of calcination without PAA-Ca, micron-sized particles consisting of sintered polycrystals were mainly observed by scanning electron microscopy, indicating the calcination-induced sintering among the crystals. On the other hand, most of the crystals calcined with the anti-sintering agent were observed as isolated particles, and the mean size of the HAp crystals was around 80 nm. This result indicates that PAA-Ca and its thermally decomposed product, CaO, surrounding the HAp crystals could protect them against calcination-induced sintering during calcination at 800 degrees C. The HAp crystals calcined with PAA-Ca showed high crystallinity, and no other calcium phosphate phases could be detected.

  18. Structure-property relationships of iron-hydroxyapatite ceramic matrix nanocomposite fabricated using mechanosynthesis method.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Jamillah Amer; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Saidin, Syafiqah; Nur, Hadi; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an attractive bioceramics due to its similar composition to bone mineral and its ability to promote bone-implant interaction. However, its low strength has limited its application as load bearing implants. This paper presented a work focusing on the improvement of HAp mechanical property by synthesizing iron (Fe)-reinforced bovine HAp nanocomposite powders via mechanosynthesis method. The synthesis process was performed using high energy milling at varied milling time (3, 6, 9, and 12h). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Its mechanical properties were investigated by micro-Vicker's hardness and compression tests. Results showed that milling time directly influenced the characteristics of the nanocomposite powders. Amorphous BHAp was formed after 9 and 12h milling in the presence of HPO4(2-) ions. Continuous milling has improved the crystallinity of Fe without changing the HAp lattice structure. The nanocomposite powders were found in spherical shape, agglomerated and dense after longer milling time. The hardness and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites were also increased at 69% and 66%, respectively, as the milling time was prolonged from 3 to 12h. Therefore, the improvement of the mechanical properties of nanocomposite was attributed to high Fe crystallinity and homogenous, dense structure produced by mechanosynthesis. PMID:25842138

  19. Structure-property relationships of iron-hydroxyapatite ceramic matrix nanocomposite fabricated using mechanosynthesis method.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Jamillah Amer; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Saidin, Syafiqah; Nur, Hadi; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an attractive bioceramics due to its similar composition to bone mineral and its ability to promote bone-implant interaction. However, its low strength has limited its application as load bearing implants. This paper presented a work focusing on the improvement of HAp mechanical property by synthesizing iron (Fe)-reinforced bovine HAp nanocomposite powders via mechanosynthesis method. The synthesis process was performed using high energy milling at varied milling time (3, 6, 9, and 12h). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Its mechanical properties were investigated by micro-Vicker's hardness and compression tests. Results showed that milling time directly influenced the characteristics of the nanocomposite powders. Amorphous BHAp was formed after 9 and 12h milling in the presence of HPO4(2-) ions. Continuous milling has improved the crystallinity of Fe without changing the HAp lattice structure. The nanocomposite powders were found in spherical shape, agglomerated and dense after longer milling time. The hardness and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites were also increased at 69% and 66%, respectively, as the milling time was prolonged from 3 to 12h. Therefore, the improvement of the mechanical properties of nanocomposite was attributed to high Fe crystallinity and homogenous, dense structure produced by mechanosynthesis.

  20. CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives for hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kalita, S J; Bose, S; Hosick, H L; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2004-05-01

    We have assessed the effect of CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives on mechanical and biological properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics. Five different compositions of sintering additives were selected and prepared by mixing of CaO, P2O5, and Na2CO3 powders. 2.5 wt% of each additive was combined with commercial HAp powder, separately, followed by ball milling, and sintering at 1250 degrees C and 1300 degrees C in a muffle furnace. Green and sintered densities of the compacts were analyzed for the influence of additives on densification of HAp. Phase analyses were carried out using an X-ray diffractometer. Vickers microhardness testing was used to evaluate hardness of sintered compacts of different compositions. A maximum microhardness of 4.6 (+/- 0.28) GPa was attained for a composition with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO:P2O5:Na2O in the ratio of 3:3:4. Results from mechanical property evaluation showed that some of these sintering additives improved failure strength of HAp under compressive loading. Maximum compressive strength was observed for samples with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO. Average failure strength for this set of samples was calculated to be 220 (+/- 50) MPa. Cytotoxicity, and cell attachment studies were carried out using a modified human osteoblast cell line called OPC-1. In vitro results showed that these compositions were non-toxic. Some sintering aids enhanced cell attachment and proliferation, which was revealed from SEM examination of the scaffolds seeded with OPC-1 cells. PMID:14741598

  1. Combined effects of melatonin and FGF-2 on mouse preosteoblast behavior within interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramics - in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Mohammad Zeshaan; SHIGEISHI, Hideo; SASAKI, Kazuki; OTA, Akira; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Biocompatible materials such as interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramics (IP-CHA) loaded with osteogenic cells and bioactive agents are part of an evolving concept for overcoming craniofacial defects by use of artificial bone tissue regeneration. Amongst the bioactive agents, melatonin (MEL) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) have been independently reported to induce osteoblastic activity. The present in vitro study was undertaken to examine the relationship between these two bioactive agents and their combinatory effects on osteoblastic activity and mineralization in vitro. Material and Methods Mouse preosteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were seeded and cultured within cylindrical type of IP-CHA block (ø 4x7 mm) by vacuum-assisted method. The IP-CHA/MC3T3 composites were subjected to FGF-2 and/or MEL. The proliferation assay, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity (ALP), mRNA expressions of late bone markers, namely Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN), and Alizarin Red staining were examined over a period of 7 days. Results FGF-2 mainly enhanced the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells within the IP-CHA constructs. MEL mainly induced the mRNA expression of late bone markers (OCN and OPN) and showed increased ALP activity of MC3T3 cells cultured within IP-CHA construct. Moreover, the combination of FGF-2 and MEL showed increased osteogenic activity within the IP-CHA construct in terms of cell proliferation, upregulated expressions of OCN and OPN, increased ALP activity and mineralization with Alizarin Red. The synergy of the proliferative potential of FGF-2 and the differentiation potential of MEL showed increased osteogenic activity in MC3T3-E1 cells cultured within IP-CHA constructs. Conclusion These findings indicate that the combination of FGF-2 and MEL may be utilized with biocompatible materials to attain augmented osteogenic activity and mineralization. PMID:27119764

  2. Polymer-ceramic spiral structured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: effect of hydroxyapatite composition on human fetal osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chang, Wei; Lee, Paul; Wang, Yuhao; Yang, Min; Li, Jun; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Yu, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    For successful bone tissue engineering, a scaffold needs to be osteoconductive, porous, and biodegradable, thus able to support attachment and proliferation of bone cells and guide bone formation. Recently, hydroxyapatites (HA), a major inorganic component of natural bone, and biodegrade polymers have drawn much attention as bone scaffolds. The present study was designed to investigate whether the bone regenerative properties of nano-HA/polycaprolactone (PCL) spiral scaffolds are augmented in an HA dose dependent manner, thereby establishing a suitable composition as a bone formation material. Nano-HA/PCL spiral scaffolds were prepared with different weight ratios of HA and PCL, while porosity was introduced by a modified salt leaching technique. Human fetal osteoblasts (hFOBs) were cultured on the nano-HA/PCL spiral scaffolds up to 14 days. Cellular responses in terms of cell adhesion, viability, proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of bone-related genes were investigated. These scaffolds supported hFOBs adhesion, viability and proliferation. Cell proliferation trend was quite similar on polymer-ceramic and neat polymer spiral scaffolds on days 1, 7, and 14. However, the significantly increased amount of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized matrix synthesis was evident on the nano-HA/PCL spiral scaffolds. The HA composition in the scaffolds showed a significant effect on ALP and mineralization. Bone phenotypic markers such as bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteonectin (ON), osteocalcin (OC), and type I collagen (Col-1) were semi-quantitatively estimated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. All of these results suggested the osteoconductive characteristics of HA/PCL nanocomposite and cell maturation were HA dose dependent. For instance, HA∶PCL = 1∶4 group showed significantly higher ALP mineralization and elevated levels of BSP, ON, OC and Col-I expression as compared other lower or higher ceramic ratios

  3. Hydroxyapatite ceramic coating for bone implant fixation. Mechanical and histological studies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Søballe, K

    1993-01-01

    The success of bone ingrowth into porous coated implants depends on several factors which can be separated into five main groups: implant related factors, such as design of implant, surface structure and pore characteristics. status of host bone bed, such as underlying disease (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis), available bone stock, use of drugs and surgical technique. mechanical stabilization and loading conditions applied on the implant. adjuvant therapies such as bone grafting and HA coating which might enhance the amount of bone ingrowth. remodeling of periprosthetic bone. Once bone ingrowth has occurred, maintenance of bony anchorage depends on bone remodeling at the interface. The present series of studies were performed in order to investigate the effect of some of these factors on bone ingrowth in relation to hydroxyapatite (HA) and titanium alloy (Ti) coating when subjected to pathological and mechanical conditions mimicking the clinical situation. HA- and Ti-coated implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of mature dogs. The observation period ranged from 4 to 16 weeks, and the results were evaluated by mechanical push-out testing, histomorphometric analysis, polarized light microscopy, UV fluorescence microscopy, collagen analysis and transmission electron microscopy (microanalysis). There were no complications related to the operative procedures and all dogs were terminated according to the original time schedule. Host bone related factors were studied in the initial experiments. First, the effect of a gap between bone and implant was studied and compared with press-fit insertion. The HA-coating yielded superior effect on bone ingrowth compared to Ti in situations where the implant was surrounded by a gap and also where the implants were inserted in press-fit. Gaps of 1 mm and 2 mm around the implant were bridged by bone around HA implants whereas significantly less amounts of bone filled the gap around Ti implants. The gap-healing capacity

  4. Reconstruction of goat femur segmental defects using triphasic ceramic-coated hydroxyapatite in combination with autologous cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manitha B; Varma, H K; Menon, K V; Shenoy, Sachin J; John, Annie

    2009-06-01

    Segmental bone defects resulting from trauma or pathology represent a common and significant clinical problem. In this study, a triphasic ceramic (calcium silicate, hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate)-coated hydroxyapatite (HASi) having the benefits of both HA (osteointegration, osteoconduction) and silica (degradation) was used as a bone substitute for the repair of segmental defect (2 cm) created in a goat femur model. Three experimental goat femur implant groups--(a) bare HASi, (b) osteogenic-induced goat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured HASi (HASi+C) and (c) osteogenic-induced goat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured HASi+platelet-rich plasma (HASi+CP)--were designed and efficacy performance in the healing of the defect was evaluated. In all the groups, the material united with host bone without any inflammation and an osseous callus formed around the implant. This reflects the osteoconductivity of HASi where the cells have migrated from the cut ends of host bone. The most observable difference between the groups appeared in the mid region of the defect. In bare HASi groups, numerous osteoblast-like cells could be seen together with a portion of material. However, in HASi+C and HASi+CP, about 60-70% of that area was occupied by woven bone, in line with material degradation. The interconnected porous nature (50-500 microm), together with the chemical composition of the HASi, facilitated the degradation of HASi, thereby opening up void spaces for cellular ingrowth and bone regeneration. The combination of HASi with cells and PRP was an added advantage that could promote the expression of many osteoinductive proteins, leading to faster bone regeneration and material degradation. Based on these results, we conclude that bare HASi can aid in bone regeneration but, with the combination of cells and PRP, the sequence of healing events are much faster in large segmental bone defects in weight-bearing areas in goats.

  5. "False" cytotoxicity of ions-adsorbing hydroxyapatite - Corrected method of cytotoxicity evaluation for ceramics of high specific surface area.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Katarzyna; Belcarz, Anna; Pazik, Robert; Sobierajska, Paulina; Han, Tomasz; Wiglusz, Rafal J; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2016-08-01

    An assessment of biomaterial cytotoxicity is a prerequisite for evaluation of its clinical potential. A material is considered toxic while the cell viability decreases under 70% of the control. However, extracts of certain materials are likely to reduce the cell viability due to the intense ions adsorption from culture medium (e.g. highly bioactive ceramics of high surface area). Thus, the standard ISO 10993-5 procedure is inappropriate for cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramics of high specific surface area because biomaterial extract obtained in this method (ions-depleted medium) is not optimal for cell cultures per se. Therefore, a simple test was designed as an alternative to ISO 10993-5 standard for cytotoxicity evaluation of the biomaterials of high surface area and high ions absorption capacity. The method, presented in this paper, included the evaluation of ceramics extract prepared according to corrected procedure. The corrected extract was found not cytotoxic (cell viability above 70%), suggesting that modified method for cytotoxicity evaluation of ions-adsorbing ceramics is more appropriate than ISO 10993-5 standard. For such biomaterials, the term "false" cytotoxicity is more suitable. Moreover, it was noted that NRU assay and microscopic observations should be recommended for cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramics of high surface area. PMID:27157729

  6. "False" cytotoxicity of ions-adsorbing hydroxyapatite - Corrected method of cytotoxicity evaluation for ceramics of high specific surface area.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Katarzyna; Belcarz, Anna; Pazik, Robert; Sobierajska, Paulina; Han, Tomasz; Wiglusz, Rafal J; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2016-08-01

    An assessment of biomaterial cytotoxicity is a prerequisite for evaluation of its clinical potential. A material is considered toxic while the cell viability decreases under 70% of the control. However, extracts of certain materials are likely to reduce the cell viability due to the intense ions adsorption from culture medium (e.g. highly bioactive ceramics of high surface area). Thus, the standard ISO 10993-5 procedure is inappropriate for cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramics of high specific surface area because biomaterial extract obtained in this method (ions-depleted medium) is not optimal for cell cultures per se. Therefore, a simple test was designed as an alternative to ISO 10993-5 standard for cytotoxicity evaluation of the biomaterials of high surface area and high ions absorption capacity. The method, presented in this paper, included the evaluation of ceramics extract prepared according to corrected procedure. The corrected extract was found not cytotoxic (cell viability above 70%), suggesting that modified method for cytotoxicity evaluation of ions-adsorbing ceramics is more appropriate than ISO 10993-5 standard. For such biomaterials, the term "false" cytotoxicity is more suitable. Moreover, it was noted that NRU assay and microscopic observations should be recommended for cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramics of high surface area.

  7. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. PMID:26354276

  8. Functionally Gradient Material Ceramics of Hydroxyapatite and Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering for Biocompatibility and Mechanical Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoe, Daisuke; Eda, Hokuto; Shinohara, Akiko; Nakata, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2: HA, is biocompatible with human hard tissue. Zirconia has mechanical strength and toughness. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a processing technique that makes it possible to prepare materials at low temperatures. Therefore, the objective of this study is to use the SPS method to prepare functionally gradient material (FGM) ceramics with the biocompatibility of HA and the strength of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-PSZ). Fine powders of HA and Y-PSZ (ZrO2 + 3 mol % Y2O3) were poured into the graphite mold and then subjected to SPS at 1100 °C for 10 min. The outer layer has a mixing ratio of 70 wt % HA : 30 wt % Y-PSZ and the other layers are deposited by gradually changing the mixing ratio of HA and Y-PAZ. Each layer in the obtained composite (1.5 mmφ × 1.7 mm) was approximately 0.25 mm thick. The measured compressive strength of the composite prepared by SPS at 1100 °C for 10 min was 950 MPa.

  9. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way.

  10. In vitro studies of composite bone filler based on poly(propylene fumarate) and biphasic α-tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite ceramic powder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Yang, Shu-Hua; Lin, Min-Huei; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2012-04-01

    While many different filler materials have been applied in vertebral augmentation procedures, none is perfect in all biomechanical and biological characteristics. To minimize possible shortages, we synthesized a new biodegradable, injectable, and premixed composite made from poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and biphasic α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP)/hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics powder and evaluated the material properties of the compound in vitro. We mixed the PPF cross-linked by N-vinyl pyrrolidinone and biphasic α-TCP/HAP powder in different ratios with benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. The setting time and temperature were recorded, although they could be manipulated by modulating the concentrations of hydroquinone and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Degradation, cytocompatibility, mechanical properties, and radiopacity were analyzed after the composites were cured by a cylindrical shape. We also compared the study materials with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and PPF with pure HAP particles. Results showed that lower temperature during curing process (38-44°C), sufficient initial mechanical compressive fracture strength (61.1±3.7MPa), and gradual degradation were observed in the newly developed bone filler. Radiopacity in Hounsfield units was similar to PMMA as determined by computed tomography scan. Both pH value variation and cytotoxicity were within biological tolerable limits based on the biocompatibility tests. Mixtures with 70% α-TCP/HAP powder were superior to other groups. This study indicated that a composite of PPF and biphasic α-TCP/HAP powder is a promising, premixed, injectable biodegradable filler and that a mixture containing 70% α-TCP/HAP exhibits the best properties.

  11. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  12. Characterization of porous hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Hing, K A; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    1999-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite has been considered for use in the repair of osseous defects for the last 20 years. Recent developments have led to interest in the potential of porous hydroxyapatite as a synthetic bone graft. However, despite considerable activity in this field, regarding assessment of the biological response to such materials, the basic materials characterization is often inadequate. This paper documents the characterization of the chemical composition, mechanical integrity, macro- and microstructure of a porous hydroxyapatite, Endobon (E. Merck GmbH), intended for the bone-graft market. Specimens possesed a range of apparent densities from 0.35 to 1.44 g cm(-3). Chemical analysis demonstrated that the natural apatite precursor of Endobon was not converted to pure hydroxyapatite, but retained many of the ionic substituents found in bone mineral, notably carbonate, sodium and magnesium ions. Investigation of the microstructure illustrated that the struts of the material were not fully dense, but had retained some traces of the network of osteocyte lacunae. Macrostructural analysis demonstrated the complex inter-relationship between the structural features of an open pore structure. Both pore size and connectivity were found to be inversely dependent on apparent density. Furthermore, measurement of pore aspect ratio and orientation demonstrated a relationship between apparent density and the degree of macrostructural anisotropy within the specimens, while, it was also noted that pore connectivity was sensitive to anisotropy. Compression testing demonstrated the effect of apparent density and macrostructural anisotropy on the mechanical properties. An increase in apparent density from 0.38 to 1.25 g cm(-3) resulted in increases in ultimate compressive stress and compressive modulus of 1 to 11 MPa and 0.2 to 3.1 GPa, respectively. Furthermore, anisotropic high density (> 0.9 g cm(-3)) specimens were found to possess lower compressive moduli than isotropic specimens

  13. Porous Hydroxyapatite and Aluminium-Oxide Ceramic Orbital Implant Evaluation Using CBCT Scanning: A Method for In Vivo Porous Structure Evaluation and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lukáts, Olga; Bujtár, Péter; Sándor, George K.; Barabás, József

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to define CBCT as a technique for postimplantation in vivo examination of porous hydroxyapatite and aluminium-oxide orbital implant shape, volume and density changes. Methods and Materials. CBCT was used to evaluate 30 enucleated patients treated with spherical polyglactin 910 wrapped hydroxyapatite and aluminum-oxide orbital implants. The mean duration of patient followup was 3.2 years or 1338 days with a range of 0.2 to 7.2 years or 79 to 2636 days in a population with an average age of 40.8 years. Results. The resolution of currently clinically used CBCT equipment allowed detailed structural observation of the orbital hydroxyapatite implants with some modifications. Volume and shape estimations were possible while density evaluation was more complicated compared to medical source computed tomography. The mean densities of the orbital implants were followed and a consistent gradual decrease identified from the beginning of implantation which was better defined after the applied correction procedure. Conclusion. CBCT with lower dosages of radiation exposure can be used to follow changes in implanted high-density porous structures. The density evaluation is possible with calibration modifications. Changes in orbital implant densities identified in this study may correspond to healing and maturation of soft tissues surrounding and penetrating the implants. PMID:22481940

  14. Nano-hydroxyapatite-coated metal-ceramic composite of iron-tricalcium phosphate: Improving the surface wettability, adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Surmeneva, Maria A; Kleinhans, Claudia; Vacun, Gabriele; Kluger, Petra Juliane; Schönhaar, Veronika; Müller, Michaela; Hein, Sebastian Boris; Wittmar, Alexandra; Ulbricht, Mathias; Prymak, Oleg; Oehr, Christian; Surmenev, Roman A

    2015-11-01

    Thin radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposited nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) films were prepared on the surface of a Fe-tricalcium phosphate (Fe-TCP) bioceramic composite, which was obtained using a conventional powder injection moulding technique. The obtained nano-hydroxyapatite coated Fe-TCP biocomposites (nano-HA-Fe-TCP) were studied with respect to their chemical and phase composition, surface morphology, water contact angle, surface free energy and hysteresis. The deposition process resulted in a homogeneous, single-phase HA coating. The ability of the surface to support adhesion and the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied using biological short-term tests in vitro. The surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP bioceramic composite showed an initial cell attachment after 24h of seeding, but adhesion, proliferation and growth did not persist during 14 days of culture. However, the HA-Fe-TCP surfaces allowed cell adhesion, and proliferation during 14 days. The deposition of the nano-HA films on the Fe-TCP surface resulted in higher surface energy, improved hydrophilicity and biocompatibility compared with the surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP. Furthermore, it is suggested that an increase in the polar component of the surface energy was responsible for the enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation in the case of the nano-HA-Fe-TCP biocomposites. PMID:26277713

  15. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-12-21

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes.

  16. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-01-01

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes. PMID:26703750

  17. Aesthetic recovery of alveolar atrophy following autogenous onlay bone grafting using interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramics (IP-CHA) and resorbable poly-L-lactic/polyglycolic acid screws: case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Onlay bone grafting techniques have some problems related to the limited volume of autogenous grafted bone and need for surgery to remove bone fixing screws. Here, we report a case of horizontal alveolar ridge atrophy following resection of a maxillary bone cyst, in which autogenous onlay bone grafting with interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramics (IP-CHA) and bioresorbable poly-L-lactic/polyglycolic acid (PLLA-PGA) screws was utilized. Case presentation A 51-year-old man had aesthetic complications related to alveolar atrophy following maxillary bone cyst extraction. We performed onlay grafting for aesthetic alveolar bone recovery using IP-CHA to provide adequate horizontal bone volume and PLLA-PGA screws for bone fixing to avoid later damage to host bone during surgical removal. During the operation, an autogenous cortical bone block was collected from the ramus mandibular and fixed to the alveolar ridge with PLLA-PGA screws, then the gap between the bone block and recipient bone was filled with a granular type of IP-CHA. Post-surgery orthopantomograph and CT scan findings showed no abnormal resorption of the grafted bone, and increased radiopacity, which indicated new bone formation in the area implanted with IP-CHA. Conclusion Our results show that IP-CHA and resorbable PLLA-PGA screws are useful materials for autogenous onlay bone grafting. PMID:24889647

  18. Bioactive ceramic composites sintered from hydroxyapatite and silica at 1,200 degrees C: preparation, microstructures and in vitro bone-like layer growth.

    PubMed

    Li, X W; Yasuda, H Y; Umakoshi, Y

    2006-06-01

    Bioceramic composites were synthesized by sintering the powders of hydroxyapatite (HAp) mixed directly with additive of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10 wt.%SiO(2), respectively, at 1,200( composite function)C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the phase transformation from HAp to tricalcium phosphate (TCP) comprising alpha-TCP and Si-TCP occurred and became more prominent with the addition of SiO(2) and the increase in SiO(2) content. The observations of their surface microstructures showed that the addition of SiO(2) suppressed the grain growth and promoted the formation of crystalline-glassy composites denoted HAp + TCP/Bioglass. As the SiO(2) content is as high as 5 wt.%, the composite made a feature of crystalline clusters with different sizes consisting of HAp and TCP grains surrounded by the matrix of glassy phase. Furthermore, the dependence of in vitro bioactivity of these composites on the SiO(2) content was biomimetically assessed by determining the changes in surface morphology, i.e., bone-like apatite layer growth, after soaking in an acellular stimulated body fluid (SBF) for 3 days at 36.5( composite function)C. It was found that the HAp-SiO(2) composites showed a much faster bone-like layer growth than pure HAp, and the propensity of composites to exhibit a better bioactivity was getting more notable with increasing SiO(2) content, except for the case of the highest content of 10 wt.%. It was believed that the formation of the bone-like layer on the surfaces of these bio-composites is closely related to the increasingly provided silanol groups and transformed TCP phase in materials associated with the content of SiO(2) added.

  19. Comparison of periodontal ligament cells responses to dense and nanophase hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weibin; Chu, Chenlin; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Huating

    2007-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite, a synthetic calcium phosphate ceramic, is used as a biomaterial for the restoration of human hard tissue as well as in techniques which aim to regenerate periodontal tissues. Generally, hydroxyapatite is believed to have osteoconductive effects and to be non-bioresorbable but not to induce to periodontal tissue regeneration. No report has been found on responses of periodontal ligament cells (PDLC), the main contributor to periodontal tissue regeneration, to nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible effects of nanophase powder of hydroxyapatite on proliferation of periodontal ligament cells. Using a sol-gel method, the nanophase hydroxyapatite powders were fabricated. These powders were proved to comprise nanoparticles by transmission electron microscope examination. The primary periodontal ligament cells were cultured on dense particle hydroxyapatite and nanometer particle hydroxyapatite. The effects on proliferation of periodontal ligament cells on dense and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite were examined in vitro using a methyl thiazolil tetracolium (MTT) test. The intercellular effects were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). In addition, the influence of the two materials on osteogenic differentiation was determined through measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity and flow cytometry. About 2, 3, and 4 days after treatment with nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, the proliferation activity of the PDLC increased significantly compared with those proliferating on dense hydroxyapatite and of control PDLC, but no significant difference was found between the PDLC proliferation on dense hydroxyapatite and the control PDLCs. After 3 and 5 days' incubation with nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased as compared to PDLCs incubated with dense hydroxyapatite and control

  20. Si-substituted hydroxyapatite nanopowders: Synthesis, thermal stability and sinterability

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Alessandra Cacciotti, Ilaria; Lombardi, Mariangela Montanaro, Laura

    2009-02-04

    Synthetic hydroxyapatites incorporating small amounts of Si have shown improved biological performances in terms of enhanced bone apposition, bone in-growth and cell-mediated degradation. This paper reports a systematic investigation on Si-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si 1.40 wt%) nanopowders produced following two different conventional wet methodologies: (a) precipitation of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and (b) titration of Ca(OH){sub 2}. The influence of the synthesis process on composition, thermal behaviour and sinterability of the resulting nanopowders is studied. Samples were characterised by electron microscopy, induced coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction and dilatometry. Semicrystalline Si-substituted hydroxyapatite powders made up of needle-like nanoparticles were obtained, the specific surface area ranged between 84 and 110 m{sup 2}/g. Pure and Si-substituted hydroxyapatite nanopowders derived from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O decomposed around 1000 deg. C. Si-substituted hydroxyapatite nanopowders obtained from Ca(OH){sub 2} were thermally stable up to 1200 deg. C and showed a distinct decreased thermal stability with respect to the homologous pure sample. Si-substituted hydroxyapatites exhibited higher sintering temperature and increased total shrinkage with respect to pure powders. Nanostructured dense ceramics were obtained by sintering at 1100 deg. C Si-substituted hydroxyapatites derived from Ca(OH){sub 2}.

  1. The effect of partially stabilized zirconia on the mechanical properties of the hydroxyapatite-polyethylene composites.

    PubMed

    Sadi, A Yari; Homaeigohar, S Sh; Khavandi, A R; Javadpour, J

    2004-08-01

    The effect of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) on the mechanical properties of the hydroxyapatite-high density polyethylene composites was studied by investigating the effect of hydroxyapatite and the simultaneous effect of hydroxyapatite and PSZ volume fractions on fracture strength, modulus of elasticity, and absorbed energy in the composite samples. The results showed a decrease in fracture strength, and absorbed energy with an increase in the volume fraction of hydroxyapatite content in the hydroxyapatite-polyethylene samples. Partial replacement of hydroxyapatite with PSZ particles was beneficial in the improvement of both the fracture strength and failure energy values in the composite samples. A transition from ductile to brittle behavior was observed as the volume fraction of ceramic filler particles increased in the samples.

  2. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  3. Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers.

    PubMed

    Tansavatdi, Kristina; Mangat, Devinder S

    2011-12-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers have unique advantages over other fillers in regards to duration of action and volume of product required for augmentation, especially in the midface and lower face. In this article, we describe our experience with calcium hydroxyapatite fillers and compare them with other available filler products.

  4. A process for the development of strontium hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, N.; Fayyaz, M.; Iqbal, W.; Irfan, M.; Alam, S.

    2014-06-01

    A procedure for the preparation of Strontium Hydroxyapatite is adapted to produce high purity and better homogeneity ceramic with good Crystallinity. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries. Ionic Strontium (Sr) in humans shares the same physiological pathway as calcium and can be deposited in the mineral structure of the bone. In the present study, a novel concept of preparing Sr-contained Hydroxyapatite bone cement by using a precipitation method is proposed to get an ideal biomaterial that possesses potential degradability and more excellent pharmacological effect. Chemical analysis, Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis and Thermogravimetric/ Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies were conducted on prepared Strontium Hydroxyapatite sample to characterize the incorporation of 15% Sr2+ into the crystal lattice of Hydroxyapatite. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into Hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. Thus, the formation of Sr-HAp was confirmed by Chemical Analysis, FT-IR and TGA/DSC results.

  5. Hydroxyapatite with environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, C. L.; Ciobanu, C. S.; Predoi, D.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Iconaru, S. L.

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to synthetize new nanoparticles based on methyltrimethoxysilane coated hydroxyapatite (MTHAp) for lead removal in aqueous solutions. The morphological and compositional analysis of MTHAp was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Removal experiments of Pb{sup 2+} ions were carried out in aqueous solutions with controlled concentration of Pb{sup 2+} and at fixed pH of 5. After the removal experiment of Pb{sup 2+} ions from solutions, porous hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were transformed into PbMTHAp-5 via the adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} ions followed by a cation exchange reaction. Our results demonstrate that the porous hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can be used as an adsorbent for removing Pb{sup 2+} ions from aqueous solution.

  6. Preparation and characterization of hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposites for bone implant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasan, Nanthini; Adzila, Sharifah; Suid, Mohd Syafiq; Gurubaran, P.

    2016-07-01

    In biomedical fields, synthetic scaffolds are being improved by using the ceramics, polymers and composites materials to avoid the limitations of allograft. Ceramic-polymer composites are appearing to be the most successful bone graft substitute in human body. The natural bones itself are well-known as composite of collagen and hydroxyapatite. In this research, precipitation method was used to synthesis hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) in various parameters. This paper describes the hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposite which suitable for use in bone defects or regeneration of bone through the characterizations which include FTIR, FESEM, EDS and DTA. In FTIR, the characteristi peaks of PO4-3 and OH- groups which corresponding to hydroxyapatite are existed in the mixing powders. The needle-size particle of hydroxyapatite/ alginate (HA/SA) are observed in FESEM in the range of 15.8nm-38.2nm.EDS confirmed the existence of HA/SA composition in the mixing powders. There is an endothermic peak which corresponds to the dehydration and the loss of physically adsorbed water molecules of the hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) powder which are described in DTA.

  7. Synthesis and properties of hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite (Fe3O4) particles for hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid ceramics consisting of hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 and ferrite Fe3O4 were synthesized using a two-stage procedure. The first stage included the synthesis of Fe3O4 ferrite particles by co-precipitation and the synthesis of hydroxyapatite. In the second stage, the magnetic hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite bioceramics were synthesized by a thorough mixing of the obtained powders of carbonated hydroxyapatite and Fe3O4 ferrite taken in a certain proportion, pressing into tablets, and annealing in a carbon dioxide atmosphere for 30 min at a temperature of 1200°C. The properties of the components and hybrid particles were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The saturation magnetization of the hybrid ceramic composite containing 20 wt % Fe3O4 was found to be 12 emu/g. The hybrid hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2)-ferrite Fe3O4 ceramics, which are promising for the use in magnetotransport and hyperthermia treatment, were synthesized and investigated for the first time.

  8. SEM analysis of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings obtained with induction preheating of titanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomina, Marina A.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.

    2015-03-01

    Production of biocompatible nano-ceramic coatings is one of the major goals in prospective materials technology, particularly, in biomedical items, e.g. intraosseous implants and joint endoprostheses. Ceramic coatings obtained by the existing methods do not have the required structural properties of biocompatibility, which causes quality reduction. It has been stated that thermal induction preheating of substrate ensures the required structural organization of hydroxyapatite coating, grain size and shape in particular.

  9. [Synthesis and characteristics of porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics].

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenxi; Jiang, Dazong

    2002-06-01

    The macroporous structure of human bone allows the ingrowth of the soft tissues and organic cells into the bone matrix, profits the development and metabolism of bone tissue, and adapts the bone to the change of load. There is great requirement for artificial biomimic porous bioactive ceramics with the similar structure of bone tissue that can be used clinically for repairing lost bone. Fine hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder produced by wet chemical reaction was mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), polyvinyl alcohol, methyl cellulose or other pores-making materials to form green cake. After drying at low temperature (below 100 degrees C) and decarbonizing at about 300 degrees C-400 degrees C, the spongy ceramic block was sintered at high temperature, thus, macroporous HAp bioceramic with interconnected pores and reasonable porosity and pore-diameter was manufactured. This kind of porous HAp bioceramics were intrinsically osteoinductive to a certain degree, but its outstanding property was that they can absorb human bone morphogenetic proteins and other bone growth factors to form composites, so that the macroporous HAp bioactive ceramic has appropriate feasibility for clinical application. From the point of biomedical application, the recent developments in synthesis and characteristics investigation of macroporous HAp are reviewed in this paper.

  10. Bio resorbability of the modified hydroxyapatite in Tris-HCL buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Izmailov, R. R.; Ghyngazov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The solubility of carbonated hydroxyapatite powders and granulated carbonated hydroxyapatite produced from the synovial biofluid model solution has been studied. The kinetic characteristics of dissolution were determined. It was found that the solubility of carbonated hydroxyapatite is higher as compared to that of hydroxyapatite. The impact of the organic matrix on the rate of sample dissolution was revealed. For HA-gelatin composites, as the gelatin concentration grows, the dissolution rate becomes greater, and a sample of 6.0 g / L concentration has higher resorbability. The results of the research can be used to study the kinetics of dissolution and the biocompatibility of ceramic materials for medicine, namely for reconstructive surgery, dentistry, and development of drug delivery systems.

  11. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  12. Surface Corrosion of Nanoscaled Hydroxyapatite During an In Vivo Experiment.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook; Hwang, Kyu Hong

    2015-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is widely used as a bioactive ceramics as it forms a chemical bond with bone. However, the drawback to using this material is its inferior mechanical properties. In this research, surface corrosion and disintegration of nanoscaled HA in a dog were studied, and the mechanism by which phase-pure HA dissolved in vivo was investigated. Biological properties of HA in vivo are affected by the grain-boundary dissolution followed by a surface corrosion and microstructural disintegration. This kind of dissolution process, apparently evidenced at the grain boundary, causes particle generation, which indicates that both long-term bone in-growth and mechanical properties can dramatically deteriorate. Implant dissolution by osteoclasts in vivo is also observed on the surface of hydroxyapatite. Implant surface showed an aggressive corrosion by an osteoclast resorption. Severe and deeper dissolution underwent close to osteoclast resulting in formation of smaller and more round particle shape.

  13. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  14. Accurate Fabrication of Hydroxyapatite Bone Models with Porous Scaffold Structures by Using Stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Chiaki; Tasaki, Satoko; Kirihara, Soshu

    2011-05-01

    Computer graphic models of bioscaffolds with four-coordinate lattice structures of solid rods in artificial bones were designed by using a computer aided design. The scaffold models composed of acryl resin with hydroxyapatite particles at 45vol. % were fabricated by using stereolithography of a computer aided manufacturing. After dewaxing and sintering heat treatment processes, the ceramics scaffold models with four-coordinate lattices and fine hydroxyapatite microstructures were obtained successfully. By using a computer aided analysis, it was found that bio-fluids could flow extensively inside the sintered scaffolds. This result shows that the lattice structures will realize appropriate bio-fluid circulations and promote regenerations of new bones.

  15. Ultrastructural comparison of hydroxyapatite and silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alexandra E; Best, Serena M; Bonfield, William

    2004-01-01

    Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) has been shown to lead to significantly increased rates of bone apposition when compared with phase-pure hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic implants (Patel N, et al. J Mater Sci Mater Med 2002;13:1199-1206). However, uncertainty remains about the mechanism by which Si increases the in vivo bioactivity. In this study, defect structures in Si-HA were observed and characterized for the first time using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Using tilting experiments and the g. b = 0 criterion for invisibility, the Burgers vectors of dislocations in phase-pure HA and 0.8 wt % Si-HA were characterized to be screw and mixed in character. Dislocations were observed in both pure HA and 0.8 wt % Si-HA with no significant difference in dislocation density between HA and Si-HA. However, our findings suggest that an increased number of triple junctions in Si-HA may have a significant role in increasing the solubility of the material and the subsequent rate at which bone apposes Si-HA ceramics.

  16. Towards the synthesis of hydroxyapatite/protein scaffolds with controlled porosities: bulk and interfacial shear rheology of a hydroxyapatite suspension with protein additives.

    PubMed

    Maas, Michael; Bodnar, Pedro Marcus; Hess, Ulrike; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds is essential for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering and replacement. One way to induce macroporosity, which is needed to support bone in-growth, is to use protein additives as foaming agents. Another reason to use protein additives is the potential to introduce a specific biofunctionality to the synthesized scaffolds. In this work, we study the rheological properties of a hydroxyapatite suspension system with additions of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LSZ) and fibrinogen (FIB). Both the rheology of the bulk phase as well as the interfacial shear rheology are studied. The bulk rheological data provides important information on the setting behavior of the thixotropic suspension, which we find to be faster with the addition of FIB and LSZ and much slower with BSA. Foam bubble stabilization mechanisms can be rationalized via interfacial shear rheology and we show that it depends on the growth of interfacial films at the suspension/air interface. These interfacial films support the stabilization of bubbles within the ceramic matrix and thereby introduce macropores. Due to the weak interaction of the protein molecules with the hydroxyapatite particles of the suspension, we find that BSA forms the most stable interfacial films, followed by FIB. LSZ strongly interacts with the hydroxyapatite particles and thus only forms thin films with very low elastic moduli. In summary, our study provides fundamental rheological insights which are essential for tailoring hydroxyapatite/protein suspensions in order to synthesize scaffolds with controlled porosities.

  17. [Experimental research on the effect of nanophase ceramics on osteoblasts functions].

    PubMed

    Wen, Bo; Chen, Zhiqing; Jiang, Yinshan; Yang, Zhengwen; Xu, Yongzhong

    2005-06-01

    In order to study the cytocompatibility of nanophase hydroxyapatite ceramic in vitro, we prepared hydroxyapatite by use of the wet chemistry techniques. The grain size of hydroxyapatite of interest to the present study was determined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy with image analysis software. Primary culture of osteoblast from rat calvaria was established. Protein content, synthesis of alkaline phosphatase and deposition of calcium-containing mineral by osteoblasts cultured on nanophase hydroxyapatite ceramics and on conventional hydroxyapatite ceramics for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days were examined. The results showed that the average surface grain size of the nanophase and that of the conventional HA compact formulations was 55 (nanophase) and 780 (conventional) nm, respectively. More importantly, compared to the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase and deposition of calcium-containing mineral by osteoblasts cultured on nanophase was significantly greater than that on conventional ceramics after 21 and 28 days. The cytocompatibility was significantly greater on nanophase HA than on conventional formulations of the same ceramic.

  18. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  19. Effect of Hydrothermal Treatment on Sinterability of Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, D.; Fujimori, H.; Goto, S.; Yamasaki, N.; Ioku, K.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2:HA, is the inorganic principle component of natural bones and teeth. It has been already suggested that the amount of OH ion in the crystal structure of HA is closely related to the biocompatibility. The amount of OH ion in current HA, however, has not been controlled. In order to prepare more functional HA ceramics, the amount of OH ion must be controlled. In this study, HA ceramics with different OH amount were prepared from fine HA crystals by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Fine powder of HA was treated hydrothermally at 200 deg. C for 24 h with pH 10 NH3 aqueous solution. The samples were pressed uniaxialy under 60 MPa, and then they were SPS at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for 10 min with the heating rate of 25 deg. C{center_dot}min-1. No phases other than HA were revealed by XRD for the starting samples after hydrothermal treatment and samples after sintering by SPS at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. The quantity of OH ion in HA ceramics sintered by SPS was decreased with increasing temperature of sintering. Transparent HA ceramics were prepared by SPS at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C.

  20. Hydroxyapatite in Physiological Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepko, Alexander; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2011-03-01

    A carbonated form of hydroxyapatite (HA) [ Ca 10 (PO4)6 (OH)2 ] is one of the most abundant materials in mammal bone. It crystallizes within the spaces between tropocollagen protein chains in an aqueous solution and strengthens the bone tissue. An emerging application of synthetic HA is bone repair and replacement. Bulk electronic and chemical properties of HA were studied theoretically recently. However, the absorption of H2 O molecules and amino acids of the tropocollagen chains at HA surfaces remains an area of active research. Using density functional theory we analyze the electronic properties and surface energetics of HA for different orientations and terminations and generate a theoretical surface phase diagram of HA. The reactivity of these surface models is analyzed using the frontier orbital approach. We find two dominant surfaces which are most stable over the widest chemical range. However, we expect them to show little surface reactivity. Using a HA slab with a highly reactive surface we build atomistic models of HA covered with up to one monolayer of water and analyze interactions between this surface and the water molecules.

  1. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  2. Synthesis and sintering of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powders by citric acid sol-gel combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yingchao; Li Shipu; Wang Xinyu; Chen Xiaoming

    2004-01-03

    The citric acid sol-gel combustion method has been used for the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) powder from calcium nitrate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and citric acid. The phase composition of HAP powder was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD). The morphology of HAP powder was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The HAP powder has been sintered into microporous ceramic in air at 1200 deg. C with 3 h soaking time. The microstructure and phase composition of the resulting HAP ceramic were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD, respectively. The physical characterization of open porosity and flexural strength have also been carried out.

  3. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel coated with a bioactive hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Ghaith, El-Sayed; Hodgson, Simon; Sharp, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Laser surface alloying is a powerful technique for improving the mechanical and chemical properties of engineering components. In this study, laser surface irradiation process employed in the surface modification off 316L stainless steel substrate using hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide to provide a composite ceramic layer for the suitability of applying this technology to improve the biocompatibility of medical alloys and implants. Fusion of the metal surface incorporating hydroxyapatite-titania ceramic particles using a 30 W Nd:YAG laser at different laser powers, 40, 50 and 70% power and a scan speed of 40 mm s(-1) was observed to adopt the optimum condition of ceramic deposition. Coatings were evaluated in terms of microstructure, surface morphology, composition biocompatibility using XRD, ATR-FTIR, SEM and EDS. Evaluation of the in vitro bioactivity by soaking the treated metal in SBF for 10 days showed the deposition of biomimetic apatite.

  4. Hydroxyapatite-titanium interface reaction induced by keV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.

    1992-03-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite bioceramic, 5-50 Å in thickness, have been deposited on ion cleaned titanium surfaces to study the chemical-physical adhesion of metal-ceramic interfaces of biomedical devices (orthopaedic and dentistry prosthesis). Film deposition was performed in ultrahigh vacuum condition (10 -10 mbar) using 5 keV argon sputtering of hydroxyapatite matrix; the film thickness was measured in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-titanium interface was irradiated with an electron beam of 0.5-5 keV energy and 0.2-2 A/cm 2 current density. During electron irradiation, Auger spectra show chemical shifts of phosphorus, titanium and oxygen peaks. The released electron energy induces modifications in the tetraedric phosphorus-oxygen groups with production of new chemical bonds between phosphorus, oxygen and titanium. Oxygen, for example, diffuses into the titanium interface forming titanium oxide. Chemical reactions induced by electron irradiation are driven by the metal-ceramic interface. Near the interface a strong and fast effect is observed while far from the interface a weak and slow effect occurs. Chemical reactions depend on the electron irradiation dose showing an inhibition threshold at about 10 19 e/cm 2 and, near the interface, a saturation condition at about 5 × 10 20 e/cm 2. Titanium-ceramic chemical reactions are inhibited if the substrate titanium surface is rich in oxide.

  5. Excimer laser deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Qian, F; Nagabushnam, V; Damodaran, R; Moudgil, B M

    1994-06-01

    We have demonstrated a new and simple in situ method to fabricate adherent and dense hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings at relatively low deposition temperatures (500-600 degrees C). Under optimum processing conditions, the HA coatings possess a nominal Ca:P ratio of 1.65 and exhibit a fully crystalline single-phase structure. This deposition technique is based on the application of a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength lambda = 248 nm, pulse duration tau = 25 x 10(-9) s) to ablate a dense stoichiometric HA target. The HA target was prepared by standard ceramic coprecipitation techniques followed by cold pressing and further sintering at 1200 degrees C in air. High substrate temperatures (> or = 600 degrees C) during film deposition led to phosphorus deficient coatings because of re-evaporation of phosphorus during the deposition process. The stabilization of various calcium and phosphorus phases in the film was controlled by a number of process parameters such as substrate temperature, chamber pressure and presence of water vapour in the chamber. This is particularly advantageous for production of HA coatings, since it is known that HA decomposes at high temperatures due to the uncertainty in the starting material stoichiometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to determine the structure-processing relationships. Qualitative scratch measurements were conducted to determine the adhesion strength of the films.

  6. Osteopontin, osteocalcin and OB-cadherin expression in Synthetic nanohydroxyapatite vs bovine hydroxyapatite cultured Osteoblastic-like cells.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, A; Mascitti, M; Orsini, G; Memè, L; Rocchetti, R; Tiriduzzi, P; Sampalmieri, F; Putignano, A; Procaccini, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have been applied in bone replacement for several decades due to their excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity, osteo-conductivity and mechanical strength. Several studies have demonstrated that porous hydroxyapatite (HA) is an excellent scaffold for osteogenic proliferation and differentiation of the osteoprogenitor cells. However, different methods of synthesis and production of HA ceramic-based materials may have considerable effect on the physical and biological properties. In the present work, two hydroxyapatite-based materials, a natural hydroxyapatite ceramic of bovine origin and a synthetic nano-cristalline hydroxyapatite were tested in vitro with MG63 cell line. The results displayed that both the materials demonstrated a good biocompatibility. The immunocytochemical stain revealed a different positivity of the osteogenic markers between the cultures with the biomaterials, and the control culture. Western blot data confirmed the immunocytochemical stain. Both the materials tested in the present study demonstrated a good biocompatibility with the osteoblastic cells allowing, at the same time, the osteogenic differentiation, and they may be useful in clinical use. PMID:25316140

  7. Enhanced functions of osteoblasts on nanophase ceramics.

    PubMed

    Webster, T J; Ergun, C; Doremus, R H; Siegel, R W; Bizios, R

    2000-09-01

    Select functions of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on nanophase (materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm) alumina, titania, and hydroxyapatite (HA) were investigated using in vitro cellular models. Compared to conventional ceramics, surface occupancy of osteoblast colonies was significantly less on all nanophase ceramics tested in the present study after 4 and 6 days of culture. Osteoblast proliferation was significantly greater on nanophase alumina, titania, and HA than on conventional formulations of the same ceramic after 3 and 5 days. More importantly, compared to conventional ceramics, synthesis of alkaline phosphatase and deposition of calcium-containing mineral was significantly greater by osteoblasts cultured on nanophase than on conventional ceramics after 21 and 28 days. The results of the present study provided the first evidence of enhanced long-term (on the order of days to weeks) functions of osteoblasts cultured on nanophase ceramics; in this manner, nanophase ceramics clearly represent a unique and promising class of orthopaedic/dental implant formulations with improved osseointegrative properties.

  8. Mechanical and biological properties of the micro-/nano-grain functionally graded hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changchun; Deng, Congying; Chen, Xuening; Zhao, Xiufen; Chen, Ying; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) open the promising approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, a novel functionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic with micrograin and nanograin structure was fabricated. Its mechanical properties were tailored by composition of micrograin and nanograin. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the graded HA ceramics had similar mechanical property compared to natural bones. Their cytocompatibility was evaluated via fluorescent microscopy and MTT colorimetric assay. The viability and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on ceramics indicated that this functionally graded HA ceramic had better cytocompatibility than conventional HA ceramic. This study demonstrated that functionally graded HA ceramics create suitable structures to satisfy both the mechanical and biological requirements of bone tissues.

  9. [Application of elemental microanalysis for estimation of osteoinduction and osteoconduction of hydroxyapatite bone implants].

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Aleksander; Pielka, Stanisław; Paluch, Danuta; Kuryszko, Jan; Staniszewska-Kuś, Jolanta; Solski, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics based on calcium phosphates, chemical compounds being natural constructive element of bones is now regarded to be one of better implantation materials in osseous surgery and stomatology. HAp is poorly soluble and slowly resorbing in tissues material. Easiness of connecting of hydroxyapatite ceramics with other materials creates possibilities to produce new composites of chemical compounds containing calcium and easier resorbing. An important and till now not fully known problem is influence of hydrodroxyapatite grafts on the processes leading to production of calcium and phosphorus ions responsive for mineralization of bone tissue around the graft. Proliferation of osteoblasts and rate of osseous trabeculas production depends, among others, concentration of calcium and phosphorus ions. The main target of this study was the comparative analysis of the bone mineralisation rate after implantation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and composites hydroxyapatite + beta tricalcium phosphate (HAp + TCP) and hydroxyapatite + calcium hydrosulfate (HAp + gypsum), on the basis of elemental microanalysis. Implantation studies were carried out on 24 rabbits. Sections were carried out 5, 9, 11 and 14 weeks after implantation of the tested materials. The carried out punctual analysis of the occurring elements and their topographic location (mapping) in bones after implantation showed essential differences among the tested grafts. Those differences were most significant after 5 and 14 weeks and depended on the rate of the tested materials resorption. On the basis of conducted macroscopic evaluation and scanning microscope assessment we can stated that the composite of HAp+TCP showed the best osteocunductive properties, while the best osteoinductive influence was shown by the composite HAp + gypsum.

  10. Ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  11. Ceramic burner

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, W.; Hebel, R.; Artelt, P.; Esfeld, G.; Jacob, A.

    1981-03-31

    Improvements in the mixing body and supporting structure of a molded-ceramic-brick burner enable the burner to withstand the vibrations induced during its operation. Designed for the combustion chambers of air heaters, the burner has a mixing body composed of layers of shaped ceramic bricks that interlock and are held together vertically by a ceramic holding bar. The mixing body is shaped like a mushroom - the upper layers have a larger radius than the lower ones.

  12. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  13. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  14. A new hydroxyapatite-based biocomposite for bone replacement.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Gazzarri, Matteo; Chiellini, Federica; Cannillo, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1970s, various types of ceramic, glass and glass-ceramic materials have been proposed and used to replace damaged bone in many clinical applications. Among them, hydroxyapatite (HA) has been successfully employed thanks to its excellent biocompatibility. On the other hand, the bioactivity of HA and its reactivity with bone can be improved through the addition of proper amounts of bioactive glasses, thus obtaining HA-based composites. Unfortunately, high temperature treatments (1200°C÷1300°C) are usually required in order to sinter these systems, causing the bioactive glass to crystallize into a glass-ceramic and hence inhibiting the bioactivity of the resulting composite. In the present study novel HA-based composites are realized and discussed. The samples can be sintered at a relatively low temperature (800 °C), thanks to the employment of a new glass (BG_Ca) with a reduced tendency to crystallize compared to the widely used 45S5 Bioglass®. The rich glassy phase, which can be preserved during the thermal treatment, has excellent effects in terms of in vitro bioactivity; moreover, compared to composites based on 45S5 Bioglass® having the same HA/glass proportions, the samples based on BG_Ca displayed an earlier response in terms of cell proliferation. PMID:23827547

  15. Nanofiber generation of hydroxyapatite and fluor-hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we produced hydroxyapatite (HA) and fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) bioceramics as a novel geometrical form, the nanoscale fiber, for the biomedical applications. Based on the sol-gel precursors of the apatites, an electrospinning technique was introduced to generate nanoscale fibers. The diameter of the fibers was exploited in the range of a few micrometers to hundreds of nanometers (1.55 microm-240 nm) by means of adjusting the concentration of the sols. Through the fluoridation of apatite, the solubility of the fiber was tailored and the fluorine ions were well released from the FHA. The HA and FHA nanofibers produced in this study are considered to find potential applications in the biomaterials and tissue engineering fields.

  16. Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction (MINE) device: Preparation and examination of drug affinity.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyńska, Monika; Tomczak, Rafał; Jezierska, Katarzyna; Voelkel, Adam; Jampílek, Josef

    2016-11-01

    Polymer-ceramic materials were placed in the in-needle device. Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction (MINE) device is an extraction device used in sample preparation step but, on the other hand, it can be a tool for examination of interactions between potential antiresorptive drugs and bones. MINE device was used as tool for determination of bisphosphonate affinity to hydroxyapatite. Spectra of prepared materials containing different proportion of the ceramic part were performed with the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The extraction of sodium risedronate as standard compound from simulated body fluids was carried out by pumping liquid samples through the MINE device. The amount of sodium risedronate in solutions was examined using UV-VIS spectroscopy. The sorption results of sodium risedronate obtained for monolithic materials containing different amount of hydroxyapatite were compared to the values determined for pure (bulk) hydroxyapatite. Sorption capacity for polymer-ceramic materials placed in the in-needle extraction device was about 0.39mg of sodium risedronate. The complete desorption process was carried out at the level over 95% using various eluents. The results of sorption-desorption experiments allow to deduce on the affinity of sodium risedronate to the ceramic part of sorbent (hydroxyapatite). PMID:27523998

  17. Synthesis and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T G; Choi, B W; Jankowski, A F

    2000-10-25

    A technique is developed to construct bulk hydroxyapatite (HAp) with different cellular structures. The technique involves the initial synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powder from an aqueous solution using water-soluble compounds and then followed by spray drying into agglomerated granules. The granules were further cold pressed and sintered into bulks at elevated temperatures. The sintering behavior of the HAp granules was characterized and compared with those previously reported. Resulting from the fact that the starting HAp powders were extremely fine, a relatively low activation energy for sintering was obtained. In the present study, both porous and dense structures were produced by varying powder morphology and sintering parameters. Porous structures consisting of open cells were constructed. Sintered structures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray tomography. In the present paper, hydroxyapatite coatings produced by magnetron sputtering on silicon and titanium substrates will also be presented. The mechanical properties of the coatings were measured using nanoindentation techniques and microstructures examined using transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Guided bone augmentation using ceramic space-maintaining devices: the impact of chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Anderud, Jonas; Abrahamsson, Peter; Jimbo, Ryo; Isaksson, Sten; Adolfsson, Erik; Malmström, Johan; Naito, Yoshihito; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate histologically, whether vertical bone augmentation can be achieved using a hollow ceramic space maintaining device in a rabbit calvaria model. Furthermore, the chemistry of microporous hydroxyapatite and zirconia were tested to determine which of these two ceramics are most suitable for guided bone generation. 24 hollow domes in two different ceramic materials were placed subperiosteal on rabbit skull bone. The rabbits were sacrificed after 12 weeks and the histology results were analyzed regarding bone-to-material contact and volume of newly formed bone. The results suggest that the effect of the microporous structure of hydroxyapatite seems to facilitate for the bone cells to adhere to the material and that zirconia enhance a slightly larger volume of newly formed bone. In conclusion, the results of the current study demonstrated that ceramic space maintaining devices permits new bone formation and osteoconduction within the dome. PMID:25792855

  19. In vitro studies of human and rat osteoclast activity on hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Monchau, F; Lefèvre, A; Descamps, M; Belquin-myrdycz, A; Laffargue, P; Hildebrand, H F

    2002-08-01

    Investigations on the ceramic degradation caused by osteoclasts are designed to assess osteoclast-ceramic interactions and to determine which ceramics are more suitable for use as bone substitute. This study investigated the resorptive activity of osteoclasts on ceramics presenting different solubility rates. Osteoclasts isolated from new-born rat and from human giant cell tumour were cultured on different bioceramics: hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium carbonate (calcite). Cytoskeletal was revealed by actin labelling and ceramic surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On all materials, the distribution of actin in typical ring was revealed. SEM examinations showed a clear difference in the shape and the depth of resorption lacunae on different ceramics. On pure HA, a superficial attack, clearly visible but very little extended. Numerous resorption lacunae, deep and well-delimited were observed on pure beta-TCP, but attacks less punctually were detected too. On pure calcite, an attack with form of spikes, very widespread but superficial was revealed. Degradation measurements revealed a significant increase of P release from the phosphocalcic ceramics and of Ca from all ceramics in the presence of osteoclasts. The both cell models found these characteristics, the rat osteoclasts were also an excellent model to study the ceramic resorption.

  20. Heat treatment's effects on hydroxyapatite powders in water vapor and air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, A.; Baştan, F. E.; Erdoǧan, G.; Üstel, F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is the main chemical constituent of bone tissue (~70%) as well as HA which is a calcium phosphate based ceramic material forms inorganic tissue of bone and tooth as hard tissues is used in production of prosthesis for synthetic bone, fractured and broken bone restoration, coating of metallic biomaterials and dental applications because of its bio compatibility. It is known that Hydroxyapatite decomposes with high heat energy after heat treatment. Therefore hydroxyapatite powders that heated in water vapor will less decomposed phases and lower amorphous phase content than in air atmosphere. In this study high purity hydroxyapatite powders were heat treated with open atmosphere furnace and water vapor atmosphere with 900, 1000, 1200 °C. Morphology of same powder size used in this process by SEM analyzed. Chemical structures of synthesized coatings have been examined by XRD. The determination of particle size and morphological structure of has been characterized by Particle Sizer, and SEM analysis, respectively. Weight change of sample was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) during heating and cooling.

  1. Comparison of in vivo dissolution processes in hydroxyapatite and silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Porter, A E; Patel, N; Skepper, J N; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    2003-11-01

    The incorporation of silicate into hydroxyapatite (HA) has been shown to significantly increase the rate of bone apposition to HA bioceramic implants. However, uncertainty remains about the mechanism by which silicate increases the in vivo bioactivity of HA. In this study, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to observe dissolution from HA, 0.8 wt% Si-HA and 1.5 wt% Si-HA implants after 6 and 12 weeks in vivo. Our observations confirmed that defects, in particular those involving grain boundaries, were the starting point of dissolution in vivo. Dissolution was observed to follow the order 1.5 wt% Si-HA>0.8 wt% Si-HA>pure HA and it was found to be particularly prevalent at grain boundaries and triple-junctions. These observations may help to explain the mechanism by which silicate ions increase the in vivo bioactivity of pure HA, and highlight the enhanced potential of these ceramics for biomedical applications.

  2. Histomorphological researches on large porous hydroxyapatite cylinder tubes with polylactic acid surface coating in different nonskeletal sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Huang, Peng; Weng, Jie; Zhi, Wei; Hu, Yonghe; Feng, Huaizhi; Yao, Yimin; Li, Shuo; Xia, Tian

    2012-05-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic cylinder tubes coated with polylactic acid on the exposed surfaces were implanted in four nonskeletal sites (omentum, peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur). Six months postoperatively, proper amount of Chinese ink was injected to dye the implanting areas. Decalcified and nondecalcified sections were observed under inverted microscope. The results showed that the soft tissues around the HA cylinder tubes in peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur groups appeared visible black. Some small blacked vascular architectures were also discernible. However in omentum group, only small number of blacked vessels existed. Histological observations indicated that vascularization and ossification occurred in peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur groups. In omentum group, there was no any sign of vascularization and ossification. A conclusion could be made in this study that excepting bones and muscles, parietal peritoneum could serve as a potential spot for culturing histoengineering hydroxyapatite (HA)-polylactic acid (PLA) ceramic bone substitutes.

  3. Histomorphological researches on large porous hydroxyapatite cylinder tubes with polylactic acid surface coating in different nonskeletal sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Huang, Peng; Weng, Jie; Zhi, Wei; Hu, Yonghe; Feng, Huaizhi; Yao, Yimin; Li, Shuo; Xia, Tian

    2012-05-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic cylinder tubes coated with polylactic acid on the exposed surfaces were implanted in four nonskeletal sites (omentum, peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur). Six months postoperatively, proper amount of Chinese ink was injected to dye the implanting areas. Decalcified and nondecalcified sections were observed under inverted microscope. The results showed that the soft tissues around the HA cylinder tubes in peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur groups appeared visible black. Some small blacked vascular architectures were also discernible. However in omentum group, only small number of blacked vessels existed. Histological observations indicated that vascularization and ossification occurred in peritoneum, vastus lateralis, and side of femur groups. In omentum group, there was no any sign of vascularization and ossification. A conclusion could be made in this study that excepting bones and muscles, parietal peritoneum could serve as a potential spot for culturing histoengineering hydroxyapatite (HA)-polylactic acid (PLA) ceramic bone substitutes. PMID:22344718

  4. Nanostructure of biocompatible titania/hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Steinhauer, Aleksey B.; Fomina, Marina A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes prospective composite biocompatible titania coatings modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from commercially pure titanium VT1-00. Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, crystalline structure, physical and mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by the combination of oxidation and surface modification with hydroxyapatite during induction heat treatment are defined.

  5. Joining of ceramics of different biofunction by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianguo . Center for Dental Technology and Biomaterials); Harmansson, L. ); Soeremark, R. . Dept. of Prosthodontics)

    1993-10-01

    Monolithic zirconia (Z) and zirconia-hydroxyapatite (Z/HA) composites were joined by cold isostatic pressing (CIP at 300 MPa) and subsequently by glass-encapsulated hot isostatic pressing (HIP at 1225 C, 1 h and 200 MPa). The physical and mechanical properties of the materials were measured. The fracture surface was studied using a light microscope. The results indicate a strength level of the joint similar to that of the corresponding composite material (Z/HA), 845 and 860 MPa, respectively. Similar experiments with monolithic alumina (A) and alumina-hydroxyapatite (A/HA) were carried out without success. Cracking occurred in the joint area during the cold isostatic pressing process. It seems that ceramics with high green strength and similar green density are essential when joining ceramics by combined CIP and HIP processes.

  6. Bioinspired Hydroxyapatite/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Composite with a Nacre-Mimetic Architecture by a Bidirectional Freezing Method.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Walsh, Flynn; Gludovatz, Bernd; Delattre, Benjamin; Huang, Caili; Chen, Yuan; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2016-01-01

    Using a bidirectional freezing technique, combined with uniaxial pressing and in situ polymerization, "nacre-mimetic" hydroxyapatite/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composites are developed by processing large-scale aligned lamellar ceramic scaffolds. Structural and mechanical characterization shows "brick-and-mortar" structures, akin to nacre, with interesting combinations of strength, stiffness, and work of fracture, which provide a pathway to making strong and tough lightweight materials.

  7. Bioinspired Hydroxyapatite/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Composite with a Nacre-Mimetic Architecture by a Bidirectional Freezing Method.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Walsh, Flynn; Gludovatz, Bernd; Delattre, Benjamin; Huang, Caili; Chen, Yuan; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2016-01-01

    Using a bidirectional freezing technique, combined with uniaxial pressing and in situ polymerization, "nacre-mimetic" hydroxyapatite/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composites are developed by processing large-scale aligned lamellar ceramic scaffolds. Structural and mechanical characterization shows "brick-and-mortar" structures, akin to nacre, with interesting combinations of strength, stiffness, and work of fracture, which provide a pathway to making strong and tough lightweight materials. PMID:26554760

  8. Phase stability and rapid consolidation of hydroxyapatite-zirconia nano-coprecipitates made using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Aqif A; Yan, Haixue; Viola, Giuseppe; Reece, Mike J; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Kenan; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2012-07-01

    A rapid and continuous hydrothermal route for the synthesis of nano-sized hydroxyapatite rods co-precipitated with calcium-doped zirconia nanoparticles using a superheated water flow at 450°C and 24.1 MPa as a crystallizing medium is described. Hydroxyapatite and calcium-doped zirconia phases in the powder mixtures could be clearly identified based on particle size and morphology under transmission electron microscopy. Retention of a nanostructure after sintering is crucial to load-bearing applications of hydroxyapatite-based ceramics. Therefore, rapid consolidation of the co-precipitates was investigated using a spark plasma sintering furnace under a range of processing conditions. Samples nominally containing 5 and 10 wt% calcium-doped zirconia and hydroxyapatite made with Ca:P solution molar ratio 2.5 showed excellent thermal stability (investigated using in situ variable temperature X-ray diffraction) and were sintered via spark plasma sintering to >96% sintered densities at 1000°C resulting in hydroxyapatite and calcium-doped zirconia as the only two phases. Mechanical tests of spark plasma sintering sintered samples (containing 10 wt% calcium-doped zirconia) revealed a three-pt flexural strength of 107.7 MPa and Weibull modulus of 9.9. The complementary nature of the spark plasma sintering technique and continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis (which results in retention of a nanostructure even after sintering at elevated temperatures) was hence showcased.

  9. Influence of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles in Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds on Proliferation of Primary Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki-Ghaleh, H.; Aghaie, E.; Nadernezhad, A.; Zargarzadeh, M.; Khakzad, A.; Shakeri, M. S.; Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y.; Siadati, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    Modern techniques for expanding stem cells play a substantial role in tissue engineering: the raw material that facilitates regeneration of damaged tissues and treats diseases. The environmental conditions and bioprocessing methods are the primary determinants of the rate of cultured stem cell proliferation. Bioceramic scaffolds made of calcium phosphate are effective substrates for optimal cell proliferation. The present study investigates the effects of two bioceramic scaffolds on proliferating cells in culture media. One scaffold was made of hydroxyapatite and the other was a mixture of hydroxyapatite and ferromagnetic material (Fe3O4 nanoparticles). Disk-shaped (10 mm × 2 mm) samples of the two scaffolds were prepared. Primary human fibroblast proliferation was 1.8- and 2.5-fold faster, respectively, when cultured in the presence of hydroxyapatite or ferrous nanoparticle/hydroxyapatite mixtures. Optical microscopy images revealed that the increased proliferation was due to enhanced cell-cell contact. The presence of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the ceramic scaffolds significantly increased cell proliferation compared to hydroxyapatite scaffolds and tissue culture polystyrene.

  10. Application of hydroxyapatite-sol as drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Kano, S; Yamazaki, A; Otsuka, R; Ohgaki, M; Akao, M; Aoki, H

    1994-01-01

    The application of hydroxyapatite-sol as a drug carrier is being developed. Hydroxyapatite-sol which is a suspension consisting of hydroxyapatite nano-crystals, was synthesized using an ultrasonic homogenizer. The size of the crystals was 40 x 15 x 10 mm3 on average and their specific surface area was 100 m2/g. An amount of a glycoside antibiotics adsorbed onto hydroxyapatite nano-crystals was measured. The drug adsorbed 0.2 mg per 1 mg of hydroxyapatite. The affect of the drug adsorbed onto the hydroxyapatite was investigated using cancer cells. The drug, adsorbed onto the hydroxyapatite nano-crystals, inhibited cancer cell growth.

  11. Structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas F.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief history of the field of materials sciences and goes on to expound the advantages of the fastest growing area in that field, namely ceramics. Since ceramics are moving to fill the demand for lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant materials, advancements will rely more on processing and modeling from the atomic scale up which is made possible by advanced analytical, computer, and processing techniques. All information is presented in viewgraph format.

  12. Microstructured microspheres of hydroxyapatite bioceramic.

    PubMed

    Sunny, M C; Ramesh, P; Varma, H K

    2002-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles having spherical geometry and 125-1000 microm in size range were prepared using a solid-in-water-in-oil (S/W/O) emulsion, cross-linking technique. An aqueous solution of chitosan containing different loading of HAP was dispersed as droplet in liquid paraffin using a stabilizing agent. Cross-linking of chitosan was induced by adding appropriate amount of glutaraldehyde saturated toluene. Chitosan microspheres containing HAP were sintered at 1150 degrees C to obtain pure HAP microspheres. The spheres thus produced were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The percentage yield and size distributions of the spheres were also determined.

  13. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  14. Interfacial stress transfer in a graphene nanosheet toughened hydroxyapatite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. G.; Chen, Y.; Su, J. N.; Liu, W. W.; Zhang, T. H.; Qi, F.; Wang, Y. G.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, graphene has emerged as potential reinforcing nanofiller in the composites for structural engineering due to its extraordinary high elastic modulus and mechanical strength. As recognized, the transfer of stress from a low modulus matrix to a high-modulus reinforcing graphene and the interfacial behavior at a graphene-matrix interface is the fundamental issue in these composites. In the case of graphene nanosheet (GNS) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) composite, this research presented analytical models and simulated that the number of graphene layers of GNSs has little effect on the maximum axial stress (˜0.35 GPa) and the maximum shear stress (˜0.14 GPa) at a GNS-HA interface, and the energy dissipation by GNS pull-out decreases with increasing the number of graphene layers due to weak bonding between them. Also, GNS-HA interfacial delamination and/or GNS rupture were also indentified to be the two key failure mechanisms. The computed results are expected to facilitate a better understanding of the interfacial behavior at a GNS-ceramic interface and to achieve tough ceramics reinforced with GNSs.

  15. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats

    PubMed Central

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 oC. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests. PMID:25893018

  16. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats.

    PubMed

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 (o)C. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests. PMID:25893018

  17. The role of disc-type crystal shape for micromechanical predictions of elasticity and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian; Dormieux, Luc

    2010-04-28

    The successful design of ceramic bone biomaterials is challenged by two competing requirements: on the one hand, such materials need to be stiff and strong, which would suggest a low porosity (of pore sizes in the 10-100 microm range) to be targeted; on the other hand, bone biomaterials need to be bioactive (in particular vascularized), which suggests a high porosity of such materials. Conclusively, reliable information on how porosity drives the stiffness and strength properties of ceramic bone biomaterials (tissue engineering scaffolds) is of great interest. In this context, mathematical models are increasingly being introduced into the field. Recently, self-consistent continuum micromechanics formulations have turned out as expressedly efficient and reliable tools to predict hydroxyapatite biomaterials' stiffness and strength, as a function of the biomaterial-specific porosity, and of the 'universal' properties of the individual hydroxyapatite crystals: their stiffness, strength and shape. However, the precise crystal shape can be suitably approximated by specific ellipsoidal shapes: while it was shown earlier that spherical shapes do not lead to satisfactory results, and that acicular shapes are an appropriate choice, we here concentrate on disc-type crystal shape as, besides needles, plates are often reported in micrographs of hydroxyapatite biomaterials. Disc-based model predictions of a substantial set of experimental data on stiffness and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials almost attain the quality of the very satisfactory needle-based models. This suggests that, as long as the crystal shape is clearly non-spherical, its precise shape is of secondary importance if stiffness and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials are predicted on the basis of continuum micromechanics, from their micromorphology and porosity.

  18. Enhanced osteoconductivity of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite by system instability.

    PubMed

    Sang Cho, Jung; Um, Seung-Hoon; Su Yoo, Dong; Chung, Yong-Chae; Hye Chung, Shin; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The effect of substituting sodium for calcium on enhanced osteoconductivity of hydroxyapatite was newly investigated. Sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was synthesized by reacting calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid with sodium nitrate followed by sintering. As a control, pure hydroxyapatite was prepared under identical conditions, but without the addition of sodium nitrate. Substitution of calcium with sodium in hydroxyapatite produced the structural vacancies for carbonate ion from phosphate site and hydrogen ion from hydroxide site of hydroxyapatite after sintering. The total system energy of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects calculated by ab initio methods based on quantum mechanics was much higher than that of hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was energetically less stable compared with hydroxyapatite. Indeed, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited higher dissolution behavior of constituent elements of hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-buffered deionized water compared with hydroxyapatite, which directly affected low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity by increasing the degree of apatite supersaturation in SBF. Actually, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited markedly improved low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity in SBF and noticeably higher osteoconductivity 4 weeks after implantation in calvarial defects of New Zealand white rabbits compared with hydroxyapatite. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences between hydroxyapatite and sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite on cytotoxicity as determined by BCA assay. Taken together, these results indicate that sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects has promising potential for use as a bone grafting material due to its enhanced osteoconductivity compared with hydroxyapatite.

  19. A new approach to enhancement of bone formation by electrically polarized hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Teng, N C; Nakamura, S; Takagi, Y; Yamashita, Y; Ohgaki, M; Yamashita, K

    2001-10-01

    An electrical field may affect osteogenesis. Since we found that hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics may be polarizable, we hypothesized that electrically polarized HA may foster production of new bone in vivo. Both polarized and non-polarized HA ceramics were inserted into the subperiosteum spaces at the parietal bone area of rats. After 2, 4, and 8 weeks, the implant sites were examined histologically. Morphometric analysis revealed that new bone formation was accelerated on the negatively charged surface of the polarized HA (N-surface) at 2 weeks. The newly formed bone approached maturation at 4 weeks and was thicker on the N-surface than in the controls. By 8 weeks, newly formed bone in the controls was almost the same as that on the N-surface. These findings suggest that polarized HA is biocompatible and that bone formation on the N-surface is enhanced in the early stage of bone healing. PMID:11706953

  20. Influence of pentavalent dopant addition to polarization and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Jharana; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Influence of pentavalent tantalum doping in bulk hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics has been investigated for polarizability and bioactivity. Phase analysis from X-ray diffraction measurement indicates that increasing dopant concentration decreased the amount of HAp phase and increased β-TCP and/or α-TCP phases during sintering at 1250 °C in a muffle furnace. Results from thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) measurements showed that doping hindered charge storage ability in HAp ceramics, and doped samples stored fewer charge compared to pure HAp. However, doping enhanced wettability of HAp samples, which was improved further due to polarization. In vitro human osteoblast cell-material interaction study revealed an increase in bioactivity due to dopant addition and polarization compared to pure HAp. This increase in bioactivity was attributed to the increase in wettability due to surface charge and dopant addition. PMID:23623133

  1. Synthesis, mechanical and biological characterization of ionic doped carbonated hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kannan, S; Vieira, S I; Olhero, S M; Torres, P M C; Pina, S; da Cruz e Silva, O A B; Ferreira, J M F

    2011-04-01

    The influence of ionic substituents in calcium phosphates intended for bone and tooth replacement biomedical applications is an important research topic, owing to the essential roles played by trace elements in biological processes. The present study investigates the mechanical and biological evaluation of ionic doped hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures which have been prepared by a simple aqueous precipitation method. Heat treating the resultant calcium phosphates in a carbonated atmosphere led to the formation of ionic doped carbonated hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures containing the essential ions of biological apatite. The structural analysis determined by Rietveld refinement confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite as the main phase, together with a considerable amount of β-tricalcium phosphate. Such phase assemblage is essentially due to the influence of substituted ions during synthesis. The results from mechanical tests proved that carbonate substitutions are detrimental for the mechanical properties of apatite-based ceramics. In vitro proliferation assays of osteoblastic-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cell line) to powders revealed that carbonate incorporation can either delay or accelerate MC3T3 proliferation, although reaching the same proliferation levels as control cells after 2 weeks in culture. Further, the powders enable pre-osteoblastic differentiation in a similar manner to control cells, as indirectly measured by ALP activity and Type-I collagen medium secretion. PMID:21146640

  2. Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite and related stationary phases increasingly play a role in the downstream processing of high-value biological materials, such as recombinant proteins, therapeutic antibodies and pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Chromatographic hydroxyapatite is an inorganic, ceramic material identical in composition, if not in structure, to calcium phosphate found in human bones and teeth. The interaction of hydroxyapatite with biomacromolecules is complex and highly dynamic, which can make predicting performance difficult, but also allows the design of very selective isolation processes. This review discusses the currently commercially available chromatographic materials, different retention mechanisms supported by these materials and differential exploitation for the design of highly specific isolation procedures. The state of the art of antibody purification by hydroxy- and fluoroapatite is reviewed together with tested routines for method development and implementation. Finally, the isolation of plasmid DNA is discussed, since the purification of DNA therapeutics at a sufficiently large scale is an emerging need in bioprocess development and perhaps the area in bioseparation where apatite chromatography can make its most important contribution to date.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Hydroxyapatite/Fullerenol Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Aleksandar; Ignjatovic, Nenad; Seke, Mariana; Jovic, Danica; Uskokovic, Dragan; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2015-02-01

    Fullerenols are polyhydroxylated, water soluble derivatives of fullerene C60, with potential application in medicine as diagnostic agents, antioxidants or nano drug carriers. This paper describes synthesis and physical characterization of a new nanocomposite hydroxyapatite/fullerenol. Surface of the nanocomposite hydroxyapatite/fullerenol is inhomogeneous with the diameter of the particles in the range from 100 nm to 350 nm. The ζ potential of this nanocomposite is ten times lower when compared to hydroxyapatite. Surface phosphate groups of hydroxyapatite are prone to forming hydrogen bonds, when in close contact with hydroxyl groups, which could lead to formation of hydrogen bonds between hydroxyapatite and hydroxyl groups of fullerenol. The surface of hydroxyapatite particles (-2.5 mV) was modified by fullerenol particles, as confirmed by the obtained ζ potential value of the nanocomposite biomaterial hydroxyapatite/fullerenol (-25.0 mV). Keywords: Hydroxyapatite, Fullerenol, Nanocomposite, Surface Analysis.

  4. Enhanced osteoclast-like cell functions on nanophase ceramics.

    PubMed

    Webster, T J; Ergun, C; Doremus, R H; Siegel, R W; Bizios, R

    2001-06-01

    Synthesis of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and formation of resorption pits by osteoclast-like cells, the bone-resorbing cells, on nanophase (that is, material formulations with grain sizes less than 100nm) alumina and hydroxyapatite (HA) were investigated in the present in vitro study. Compared to conventional (that is, grain sizes larger than 100 nm) ceramics, synthesis of TRAP was significantly greater in osteoclast-like cells cultured on nanophase alumina and on nanophase HA after 10 and 13 days, respectively. In addition, compared to conventional ceramics, formation of resorption pits was significantly greater by osteoclast-like cells cultured on nanophase alumina and on nanophase HA after 7, 10, and 13 days, respectively. The present study, therefore, demonstrated, for the first time, enhanced osteoclast-like cell function on ceramic surfaces with nanometer-size surface topography.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium substrate with titania interlayer.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been used to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic over titanium substrate with an interlayer of titania. PLD has been identified as a potential candidate for bioceramic coatings over metallic substrates to be used as orthopedic and dental implants because of better process control and preservation of phase identity of the coating component. However, direct deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium at elevated temperature results in the formation of natural oxide layer along with some perovskites like calcium titanate at the interface. This leads to easy debonding of ceramic layer from the metal and thereby affecting the adhesion strength. In the present study, adherent and stable HA coating over Ti6Al4V was achieved with the help of an interlayer of titania. The interlayer was made to a submicron level and HA was deposited consecutively to a thickness of around one micron by exposing to laser ablation at a substrate temperature of 400°C. The deposited phase was identified to be phase pure HA by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The mechanical behavior of coating evaluated by scratch test indicates that the adhesion strength of HA coating was improved with the presence of titania interlayer.

  6. Formation of a sodium bicarbonate cluster in the structure of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    Ceramic sodium-substituted carbonated hydroxyapatite has been synthesized using the method of the solid-phase reaction in the temperature range of 640-820°C in water vapor. It has been established that substitutions of Ca2+ ions in the cation and anion subsystems with Na+ ions and the PO{4/3-} and OH- groups with CO{3/2-} ions lead to a considerable acceleration of the shrinkage and synthesis of dense ceramics at substantially lower temperatures than in the case of unsubstituted hydroxyapatite. Sintering in water vapor leads to densification of carbonate groups in channel positions, which induces the appearance of orderings of A2 and B2 types (bands with wave numbers 867 and 865 cm-1 in IR spectra, respectively) as well as the protonation of carbonate groups both in A and B sites and the formation of sodium bicarbonate clusters (856 and 859 cm-1) in addition to carbonate ordering of A1 and B1 types (879 and 872 cm-1).

  7. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-08-04

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca{sub 9.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe{sup 3+} ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn{sup 2+} ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca{sup 2+} ions, indicate that the Mn{sup 2+} ion substitute into the Ca{sup 2+} sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites.

  8. Growth of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on silica gels.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Muñoz, E M; Huirache-Acuña, R; Velázquez, R; Alonso-Núñez, G; Eguía-Eguía, S

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were grown on the surface of silica gels. The synthesis of those nanoparticles was obtained by immersing silica gels in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 degrees C. The SBF was replaced every week to keep constant the Ca and P ion concentration and subsequent growth of hydroxyapatite was evaluated after 1-6 weeks of total soaking time in SBF. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the surface of silica gel samples and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray Diffractometry (XRD) analysis. These particles show a regular shape and uniform size every week, keeping within the nanoscale always. Both the size and morphology of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles obtained are the result of the use of different chemical additives in the synthesis of silica gels, since they affect the liquid-to-solid interface, and the growth could correspond to a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) process. A more detailed analysis, with higher magnifications, showed that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles are not solid spheres, showing a branched texture and their size depends on the scale and resolution of the measure instrument. PMID:21770224

  9. Characterisation of Suspension Precipitated Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, P. K.; Swain, P. K.; Patnaik, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a well-known biomaterial for coating on femoral implants, filling of dental cavity and scaffold for tissue replacement. Hydroxyapatite possess limited load bearing capacity due to their brittleness. In this paper, the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powders was prepared by dissolving calcium oxide in phosphoric acid, followed by addition of ammonia liquor in a beaker. The prepared solution was stirred by using magnetic stirrer operated at temperature of 80°C for an hour. This leads to the formation of hydroxyapatite precipitate. The precipitate was dried in oven for overnight at 100°C. The dried agglomerated precipitate was calcined at 800°C in conventional furnace for an hour. The influence of calcium oxide concentration and pH on the resulting precipitates was studied using BET, XRD and SEM. As result, a well-defined sub-rounded morphology of powders size of ∼41 nm was obtained with a salt concentration of 0.02 M. Finally, it can be concluded that small changes in the reaction conditions led to large changes in final size, shape and degree of aggregation of the hydroxyapatite particles.

  10. Investigating the addition of SiO₂-CaO-ZnO-Na₂O-TiO₂ bioactive glass to hydroxyapatite: Characterization, mechanical properties and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yatongchai, Chokchai; Placek, Lana M; Curran, Declan J; Towler, Mark R; Wren, Anthony W

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is widely investigated as an implantable material for hard tissue restoration due to its osteoconductive properties. However, hydroxyapatite in bulk form is limited as its mechanical properties are insufficient for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Attempts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite, by incorporating ceramic fillers, but the resultant composite materials require high sintering temperatures to facilitate densification, leading to the decomposition of hydroxyapatite into tricalcium phosphate, tetra-calcium phosphate and CaO phases. One method of improving the properties of hydroxyapatite is to incorporate bioactive glass particles as a second phase. These typically have lower softening points which could possibly facilitate sintering at lower temperatures. In this work, a bioactive glass (SiO2-CaO-ZnO-Na2O-TiO2) is incorporated (10, 20 and 30 wt%) into hydroxyapatite as a reinforcing phase. X-ray diffraction confirmed that no additional phases (other than hydroxyapatite) were formed at a sintering temperature of 560 ℃ with up to 30 wt% glass addition. The addition of the glass phase increased the % crystallinity and the relative density of the composites. The biaxial flexural strength increased to 36 MPa with glass addition, and there was no significant change in hardness as a function of maturation. The pH of the incubation media increased to pH 10 or 11 through glass addition, and ion release profiles determined that Si, Na and P were released from the composites. Calcium phosphate precipitation was encouraged in simulated body fluid with the incorporation of the bioactive glass phase, and cell culture testing in MC-3T3 osteoblasts determined that the composite materials did not significantly reduce cell viability.

  11. Investigating the addition of SiO₂-CaO-ZnO-Na₂O-TiO₂ bioactive glass to hydroxyapatite: Characterization, mechanical properties and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yatongchai, Chokchai; Placek, Lana M; Curran, Declan J; Towler, Mark R; Wren, Anthony W

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is widely investigated as an implantable material for hard tissue restoration due to its osteoconductive properties. However, hydroxyapatite in bulk form is limited as its mechanical properties are insufficient for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Attempts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite, by incorporating ceramic fillers, but the resultant composite materials require high sintering temperatures to facilitate densification, leading to the decomposition of hydroxyapatite into tricalcium phosphate, tetra-calcium phosphate and CaO phases. One method of improving the properties of hydroxyapatite is to incorporate bioactive glass particles as a second phase. These typically have lower softening points which could possibly facilitate sintering at lower temperatures. In this work, a bioactive glass (SiO2-CaO-ZnO-Na2O-TiO2) is incorporated (10, 20 and 30 wt%) into hydroxyapatite as a reinforcing phase. X-ray diffraction confirmed that no additional phases (other than hydroxyapatite) were formed at a sintering temperature of 560 ℃ with up to 30 wt% glass addition. The addition of the glass phase increased the % crystallinity and the relative density of the composites. The biaxial flexural strength increased to 36 MPa with glass addition, and there was no significant change in hardness as a function of maturation. The pH of the incubation media increased to pH 10 or 11 through glass addition, and ion release profiles determined that Si, Na and P were released from the composites. Calcium phosphate precipitation was encouraged in simulated body fluid with the incorporation of the bioactive glass phase, and cell culture testing in MC-3T3 osteoblasts determined that the composite materials did not significantly reduce cell viability. PMID:26116020

  12. PREFACE: Symposium 13: Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    Preface to Symposium 13 (Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics) of the International Congress on Ceramics III, 14-18 November 2010, Osaka, Japan Ceramic materials are now widely used in biomedical fields, such as applications of artificial bones, joints and teeth. The high potential of ceramics to exhibit biological functionality is expected to produce novel materials supporting biotechnology. These applications are governed by the interactions of materials and biological molecules. So far, 'bioceramics' is a type of biomaterial used for repairing damaged tissues. The orthopaedic application of bioceramics has advanced rapidly since the invention of Bioglass® that was found to encourage direct bonding with living bone. Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate ceramics are now popular bioceramics for use in artificial bones. While the bone-bonding behavior of materials was understood phenomenologically, very little has been known about the mechanism of either hard or soft tissue attachment or tissue growth on ceramic-based materials, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, ceramic composites and organic-inorganic hybrids. This symposium discussed the scientific understanding of the interface between biomedical materials and soft/hard tissues, and the design and construction of nanoscopic interfaces. It also involved establishment of biomimetic structures, characterization of natural life-related hard and soft tissues, and their formation mechanisms for a wide range of applications in biotechnology through 45 oral presentations including 5 invited lectures and 45 posters. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the organizers of this symposium in the ICC3 conference. I am also grateful to the invited speakers, all the participants and organizing committee of the ICC3. It is my great pleasure that this proceedings could be published as the fruit of this symposium's achievement, which includes the contributions in all aspect of scientific understanding and

  13. In vitro assessment of the biological response of Ti6Al4V implants coated with hydroxyapatite microdomains.

    PubMed

    Clavell, R Salvador; de Llano, J J Martín; Carda, C; Ribelles, J L Gómez; Vallés-Lluch, A

    2016-11-01

    Dental implantology is still an expanding field of scientific study because of the number of people that receive dental therapies throughout their lives worldwide. Recovery times associated to dental surgery are still long and demand strategies to improve integration of metallic devices with hard tissues. In this work, an in vitro ceramic coating is proposed to improve and accelerate osseointegration of titanium surfaces conceived to be used as dental implants or hip or knee prosthesis, shaped either as dishes or screws. Such coating consists of hydroxyapatite microdomains on the implant surfaces obtained in vitro by immersion of titanium alloy samples (Ti6Al4V) in a simulated body fluid. This titanium alloy is highly used in implant dentistry and trauma surgery, among other fields. Once the immersion times under physiological conditions yielding to different ceramic topographies on this alloy were set, the acellular coating time of major interest so as to optimize its biological development was determined. For this purpose, dental pulp mesenchymal cells were cultured on titanium coated surfaces with different hydroxyapatite outline, and cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology were followed through histological techniques and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that 4 days of acellular hydroxyapatite coating led to a significant cell adhesion on the titanium alloys at an early stage (6 h). Cells tended although to detach from the surface of the coating over time, but those adhered on domains of intricated topography or hydroxyapatite cauliflowers proliferated on them, leading to isolated large cell clusters. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2723-2729, 2016.

  14. Recent advances in research applications of nanophase hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kate; Tran, Phong A; Tran, Nhiem

    2012-07-16

    Hydroxyapatite, the main inorganic material in natural bone, has been used widely for orthopaedic applications. Due to size effects and surface phenomena at the nanoscale, nanophase hydroxyapatite possesses unique properties compared to its bulk-phase counterpart. The high surface-to-volume ratio, reactivities, and biomimetic morphologies make nano-hydroxyapatite more favourable in applications such as orthopaedic implant coating or bone substitute filler. Recently, more efforts have been focused on the possibility of combining hydroxyapatite with other drugs and materials for multipurpose applications, such as antimicrobial treatments, osteoporosis treatments and magnetic manipulation. To build more effective nano-hydroxyapatite and composite systems, the particle synthesis processes, chemistry, and toxicity have to be thoroughly investigated. In this Minireview, we report the recent advances in research regarding nano-hydroxyapatite. Synthesis routes and a wide range of applications of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles will be discussed. The Minireview also addresses several challenges concerning the biosafety of the nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of copper doped Ca-Li hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosova, M. A.; Kazin, P. E.; Tretyakov, Y. D.

    2012-08-01

    Hydroxyapapites M10(PO4)6(OH)2 (MHAP), where M is an alkaline earth metal, colored by incorporation of copper ions substituting protons, were discovered recently [1]. Now this kind of apatite-type materials can be used as inorganic pigments. Until now blue (BaHAP), violet (SrHAP) and wine-red (CaHAP) colors were achieved by the copper ions introduction [2]. The task of the present work was to study possibility of further M-ion substitution to affect the color and shift it toward the red-orange tint. Polycrystalline hydroxyapatites Ca10-xLix+yCuz(PO4)6O2H2-y-z-σ (Ca-LiHAP) were synthesized by solid state reaction at 1150 °C (ceramic method) and studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared absorption and diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy. Refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns by the Rietveld method shows that CaHAP unit cell parameters are a little bigger, than Ca-LiHAP ones. Small difference between unit cell parameters could be caused by two ways of the Li+ ions introduction: (1) at the Ca2+ sites (Ca-Li substitution); (2) into hexagonal channels (H-Li substitution). The Li ions doping changes the color of the copper doped CaHAP from wine-red to pink and red.

  16. Development and Characterization of Biphasic Hydroxyapatite/β-TCP Cements

    PubMed Central

    Gallinetti, Sara; Canal, Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ferreira, J

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) have relevant properties as synthetic bone grafts, such as tunable resorption, bioactivity, and intrinsic osteoinduction. However, they have some limitations associated to their condition of high-temperature ceramics. In this work self-setting Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Cements (BCPCs) with different HA/β-TCP ratios were obtained from self-setting α-TCP/β-TCP pastes. The strategy used allowed synthesizing BCPCs with modulated composition, compressive strength, and specific surface area. Due to its higher solubility, α-TCP was fully hydrolyzed to a calcium-deficient HA (CDHA), whereas β-TCP remained unreacted and completely embedded in the CDHA matrix. Increasing amounts of the non-reacting β-TCP phase resulted in a linear decrease of the compressive strength, in association to the decreasing amount of precipitated HA crystals, which are responsible for the mechanical consolidation of apatitic cements. Ca2+ release and degradation in acidic medium was similar in all the BCPCs within the timeframe studied, although differences might be expected in longer term studies once β-TCP, the more soluble phase was exposed to the surrounding media. PMID:25866411

  17. Monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  18. Preparation of irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hualin Zhai Linfeng; Li Yanhong; Shi Tiejun

    2008-06-03

    An irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite (meso-HA), Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, is successfully prepared from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} using surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results reveal that the positive head of CTAB is assembled on the surface precipitated HA and much NH{sub 4}{sup +} is enclosed in precipitated HA before calcination. Field scanning electron microscope (FSEM) reveals that there exist many interconnected pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment exhibits a mesoporous material type IV curve, and pore size distribution calculated from the desorption branch of the isotherms based on Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model shows that most pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton are sized at about 40 nm, but the pores are not uniform on the whole, owning to decomposition of the 'organic' CTAB templating structures and ammonium salt enclosed in the precipitated HA. The specific surface area of irregular meso-HA is calculated to be 37.6 m{sup 2}/g according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equation. Moreover, after polylactic acid/meso-HA (PLA/meso-HA) composites degraded 12 weeks in normal saline at 37 deg. C, the interconnected pores throughout the HA skeleton were enlarged and sized in micron degree, which resemble trabecular bone structure very much.

  19. Bonding behavior between two bioactive ceramics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T; Takagi, M; Shibuya, T; Takeuchi, H; Ono, M

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the chemical bonding mechanism between bioactive ceramics in vivo. Two experiments were performed. In the first experiment, rectangular specimens (5 mm X 5 mm X 25 mm) of apatite-wollastonite containing glass-ceramics (designated A.W-GC) were used. In the second experiment, plates (15 mm X 10 mm X 2 mm) of A.W-GC and three types of hydroxyapatite (designated HA) were used. The sintering temperature and porosity (%) of the three types of HA were 1200 degrees C (0.4%), 1000 degrees C (4.8%), and 800 degrees C (45%), respectively. In each experiment, two pairs of specimens of identical material, one bound with silk thread, the other not bound, were implanted subcutaneously into rats. In the first experiment, bonding of only bound specimens was observed at 3 and 6 months after implantation. The observation of interface by SEM-EPMA showed that a Ca-P-rich layer formed between the two specimens. In the second experiment, bonding of both bound and nonbound A.W-GC produced identical results 1 month after implantation. For HA sintered at 800 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, bonding was observed in every specimen. This phenomenon might be caused by the chemical change of hydroxyapatite occurring at different sintering temperatures. The Ca-P-rich layer was observed between two plates. These results suggest that self-repair of bioactive ceramic is possible under certain conditions. PMID:3667637

  20. Thickness of hydroxyapatite nanocrystal controls mechanical properties of the collagen-hydroxyapatite interface.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Gautieri, Alfonso; Nair, Arun K; Inbar, Hadass; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-01-31

    Collagen-hydroxyapatite interfaces compose an important building block of bone structures. While it is known that the nanoscale structure of this elementary building block can affect the mechanical properties of bone, a systematic understanding of the effect of the geometry on the mechanical properties of this interface between protein and mineral is lacking. Here we study the effect of geometry, different crystal surfaces, and hydration on the mechanical properties of collagen-hydroxyapatite interfaces from an atomistic perspective, and discuss underlying deformation mechanisms. We find that the presence of hydroxyapatite significantly enhances the tensile modulus and strength compared with a tropocollagen molecule alone. The stiffening effect is strongly dependent on the thickness of the mineral crystal until a plateau is reached at 2 nm crystal thickness. We observe no significant differences due to the mineral surface (Ca surface vs OH surface) or due to the presence of water. Our result shows that the hydroxyapatite crystal with its thickness confined to the nanometer size efficiently increases the tensile modulus and strength of the collagen-hydroxyapatite composite, agreeing well with experimental observations that consistently show the existence of extremely thin mineral flakes in various types of bones. We also show that the collagen-hydroxyapatite interface can be modeled with an elastic network model which, based on the results of atomistic simulations, provides a good estimate of the surface energy and other mechanical features. PMID:22208454

  1. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  2. Continuous microwave flow synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Goh, Yi-Fan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Lintang, Hendrik O; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2015-11-01

    We have successfully used continuous microwave flow synthesis (CMFS) technique for the template free synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite. The continuous microwave flow reactor consisted of a modified 2.45GHz household microwave, peristaltic pumps and a Teflon coil. This cost effective and efficient system was exploited to produce semi-crystalline phase pure nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Effect of microwave power, retention time and the concentration of reactants on the phase purity, degree of crystallinity and surface area of the final product was studied in detail. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the phase purity and composition of the product, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the effect of process parameters on the morphology of hydroxyapatite. The TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical particles at low microwave power; however the morphology of the particles changed to mesoporous needle and rod-like structure upon exposing the reaction mixture to higher microwave power and longer retention time inside the microwave. The in-vitro ion dissolution behavior of the as synthesized hydroxyapatite was studied by determining the amount of Ca(2+) ion released in SBF solution.

  3. Continuous microwave flow synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Goh, Yi-Fan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Lintang, Hendrik O; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2015-11-01

    We have successfully used continuous microwave flow synthesis (CMFS) technique for the template free synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite. The continuous microwave flow reactor consisted of a modified 2.45GHz household microwave, peristaltic pumps and a Teflon coil. This cost effective and efficient system was exploited to produce semi-crystalline phase pure nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Effect of microwave power, retention time and the concentration of reactants on the phase purity, degree of crystallinity and surface area of the final product was studied in detail. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the phase purity and composition of the product, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the effect of process parameters on the morphology of hydroxyapatite. The TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical particles at low microwave power; however the morphology of the particles changed to mesoporous needle and rod-like structure upon exposing the reaction mixture to higher microwave power and longer retention time inside the microwave. The in-vitro ion dissolution behavior of the as synthesized hydroxyapatite was studied by determining the amount of Ca(2+) ion released in SBF solution. PMID:26249601

  4. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution.

  5. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution. PMID:24191561

  6. Nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatites: synthesis and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Incorporation of Mg, S, and plant-essential micronutrients into the structure of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) may be advantageous for closed-loop systems, such as will be required on Lunar and Martian outposts, because these apatites can be used as slow-release fertilizers. Our objective was to synthesize HA with Ca, P, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Mo, B, and Cl incorporated into the structure, i.e., nutrient-substituted apatites. Hydroxyapatite, carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHA), nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatite (NHA), and nutrient-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite (NCHA) were synthesized by precipitating from solution. Chemical and mineralogical analysis of precipitated samples indicated a considerable fraction of the added cations were incorporated into HA, without mineral impurities. Particle size of the HA was in the 1 to 40 nm range, and decreased with increased substitution of nutrient elements. The particle shape of HA was elongated in the c-direction in unsubstituted HA and NHA but more spherical in CHA and NCHA. The substitution of cations and anions in the HA structure was confirmed by the decrease of the d[002] spacing of HA with substitution of ions with an ionic radius less than that of Ca or P. The DTPA-extractable Cu ranged from 8 to 8429 mg kg-1, Zn ranged from 57 to 1279 mg kg-1, Fe from 211 to 2573 mg kg-1, and Mn from 190 to 1719 mg kg-1, depending on the substitution level of each element in HA. Nutrient-substituted HA has the potential to be used as a slow-release fertilizer to supply micronutrients, S, and Mg in addition to Ca and P.

  7. Current status of ceramic coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lacefield, W R

    1998-01-01

    There are various ceramic coatings available for dental implants. From a commercial standpoint, plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most popular. These coatings are typically partially amorphous after processing and contain crystalline phases other than HA. Plasma-sprayed HA and the other bioactive ceramic coating materials have been shown to enhance bone apposition as compared with uncoated metal implants. Some of the other available materials include the bioglasses, other calcium phosphates such as fluorapatite and tricalcium phosphate, and the inert ceramics such as alumina. The plasma-spray process is not optimum for all types of ceramic coatings, because it is not suitable for coating porous surfaces; the exact control of structure and chemistry is difficult with this process, and bond strength is not as high as is desired for some applications. Alternative methods for coating include sol-gel processing, ion beam and radio frequency (RF) sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, hot isostatic pressing, and electrophoretic deposition. The use of osteoinductive agents in conjunction with ceramic-coated implants is of current interest, and the degree and type of bonding of these agents appear to vary with the composition of the ceramic coating. Because there seems to be no satisfactory means of incorporating osteoinductive agents into ceramic coatings during any of the conventional coating procedures, the best approach seems to be to diffuse the agents into the coating after processing. Other possibilities include the tethering of the agents to the surface of the ceramic by suitable organic molecules or the placing of the agent in some carrier material such as a cement, which is placed around the implants. PMID:10196808

  8. Superplastic ceramics and intermetallics and their potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    Recent advances in the basic understanding of superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics and intermetallics are reviewed. Fine-grained superplastic ceramics, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Y- or MgO-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Hydroxyapatite, {beta}-spodumene glass ceramics, Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-YTZP two-phase composites, SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Fe-Fe{sub 3}C composites, are discussed. Superplasticity in the nickel-base (e.g., Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Si) and titanium-base intermetallics (TiAl and T1{sub 3}Al), is described. Deformation mechanisms as well as microstructural requirements and effects such as grain size, grain growth, and grain-boundary phases, on the superplastic deformation behavior am addressed. Factors that control the superplastic tensile elongation of ceramics are discussed. Superplastic forming, and particularly biaxial gas-pressure forming, of several ceramics and intermetallics are presented with comments on the likelihood of commercial application.

  9. Specific proteins mediate enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanophase ceramics.

    PubMed

    Webster, T J; Ergun, C; Doremus, R H; Siegel, R W; Bizios, R

    2000-09-01

    Osteoblast, fibroblast, and endothelial cell adhesion on nanophase (that is, materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm) alumina, titania, and hydroxyapatite (HA) was investigated using in vitro cellular models. Osteoblast adhesion was significantly (p < 0.01) greater after 4 h on nanophase alumina, titania, and HA than it was on conventional formulations of the same ceramics. In contrast, compared to conventional alumina, titania, and HA, after 4 h fibroblast adhesion was significantly (p < 0.01) less on nanophase ceramics. Examination of the underlying mechanism(s) of cell adhesion on nanophase ceramics revealed that these ceramics adsorbed significantly (p < 0.01) greater quantities of vitronectin, which, subsequently, may have contributed to the observed select enhanced adhesion of osteoblasts. Select enhanced osteoblast adhesion was independent of surface chemistry and material phase but was dependent on the surface topography (specifically on grain and pore size) of nanophase ceramics. The capability of synthesizing and processing nanomaterials with tailored (through, for example, specific grain and pore size) structures and topographies to control select subsequent cell functions provides the possibility of designing the novel proactive biomaterials (that is, materials that elicit specific, timely, and desirable responses from surrounding cells and tissues) necessary for improved implant efficacy.

  10. ATR-FTIR measurements of albumin and fibrinogen adsorption: Inert versus calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boix, Marcel; Eslava, Salvador; Costa Machado, Gil; Gosselin, Emmanuel; Ni, Na; Saiz, Eduardo; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis, bone fracture, bone tumors and other musculoskeletal diseases affect millions of people across the world. Nowadays, inert and bioactive ceramics are used as bone substitutes or for bone regeneration. Their bioactivity is very much dictated by the way proteins adsorb on their surface. In this work, we compared the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on inert and calcium phosphates ceramics (CaPs) using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to follow in situ protein adsorption on these materials. To this effect, we developed a sol-gel technique to control the surface chemistry of an ATR-FTIR detector. Hydroxyapatite adsorbed more albumin and β-tricalcium phosphate adsorbed more fibrinogen. Biphasic calcium phosphate presented the lowest adsorption among CaP for both proteins, illustrating the effect of surface heterogeneities. Inert ceramics adsorbed a lower amount of both proteins compared with bioactive ceramics. A significant change was observed in the conformation of the adsorbed protein versus the surface chemistry. Hydroxyapatite produced a larger loss of α-helix structure on albumin and biphasic calcium phosphate reduced β-sheet percentage on fibrinogen. Inert ceramics produced large α-helix loss on albumin and presented weak interaction with fibrinogen. Zirconia did not adsorb albumin and titanium dioxide promoted huge denaturalization of fibrinogen.

  11. Ferroelectric Polarization in Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Thin Films on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, S. B.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Kholkin, A. L.; Wojtaś, M.; Gregor, M.; Gandhi, A. A.; Wang, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krause, M.; Plecenik, A.

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone- a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics.

  12. Control of the pore architecture in three-dimensional hydroxyapatite-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, Jesús; Cabañas, María Victoria; Peña, Juan; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogels (gellan or agarose) reinforced with nanocrystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (nCHA) were prepared by the GELPOR3D technique. This simple method is characterized by compositional flexibility; it does not require expensive equipment, thermal treatment, or aggressive or toxic solvents, and yields a three-dimensional (3D) network of interconnected pores 300-900 μm in size. In addition, an interconnected porosity is generated, yielding a hierarchical porous architecture from the macro to the molecular scale. This porosity depends on both the drying/preservation technology (freeze drying or oven drying at 37 circleC) and on the content and microstructure of the reinforcing ceramic. For freeze-dried samples, the porosities were approximately 30, 66 and below 3% for pore sizes of 600-900 μm, 100-200 μm and 50-100 nm, respectively. The pore structure depends much on the ceramic content, so that higher contents lead to the disappearance of the characteristic honeycomb structure observed in low-ceramic scaffolds and to a lower fraction of the 100-200-μm-sized pores. The nature of the hydrogel did not affect the pore size distribution but was crucial for the behavior of the scaffolds in a hydrated medium: gellan-containing scaffolds showed a higher swelling degree owing to the presence of more hydrophilic groups.

  13. Dental ceramics: An update.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Arvind; Shenoy, Nina

    2010-10-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed.

  14. Simple route for nano-hydroxyapatite properties expansion.

    PubMed

    Rojas, L; Olmedo, H; García-Piñeres, A J; Silveira, C; Tasic, L; Fraga, F; Montero, M L

    2015-09-01

    Simple surface modification of nano-hydroxyapatite, through acid-basic reactions, allows expanding the properties of this material. Introduction of organic groups such as hydrophobic alkyl chains, carboxylic acid, and amide or amine basic groups on the hydroxyapatite surface systematically change the polarity, surface area, and reactivity of hydroxyapatite without modifying its phase. Physical and chemical properties of the new derivative particles were analyzed. The biocompatibility of modified Nano-Hap on Raw 264.7 cells was also assessed. PMID:26481455

  15. Irradiation conditions for fiber laser bonding of HAp-glass ceramics with bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Yamada, Satoshi; Kanaoka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Orthopedic implants are widely used to repair bones and to replace articulating joint surfaces. It is important to develop an instantaneous technique for the direct bonding of bone and implant materials. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the laser bonding of bone with an implant material like ceramics. Ceramic specimens (10 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness) were sintered with hydroxyapatite and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass powders mixed in 40:60 wt% proportions. A small hole was bored at the center of a ceramic specimen. The ceramic specimen was positioned onto a bovine bone specimen and a 5 mm diameter area of the ceramic specimen was irradiated using a fiber laser beam (1070-1080 nm wavelength). As a result, the bone and the ceramic specimens bonded strongly under the irradiation conditions of a 400 W laser power and a 1.0 s exposure time. The maximum shear strength was 5.3 ± 2.3 N. A bonding substance that penetrated deeply into the bone specimen was generated around the hole in the ceramic specimen. On using the fiber laser, the ceramic specimen instantaneously bonded to the bone specimen. Further, the irradiation conditions required for the bonding were investigated.

  16. Preparation and characterization of collagen-hydroxyapatite/pectin composite.

    PubMed

    Wenpo, Feng; Gaofeng, Liang; Shuying, Feng; Yuanming, Qi; Keyong, Tang

    2015-03-01

    Pectin, a kind of plant polysaccharide, was introduced into collagen-hydroxyapatite composite system, and prepared collagen-hydroxyapatite/pectin (Col-HA/pectin) composite in situ. The structure of the composite was investigated by XRD, SEM, and FT-IR. The mechanical properties, water absorption, enzyme degradation, and cytotoxicity of the composite were investigated as well. The results show that the inorganic substance in the composite materials is hydroxyapatite in relatively low crystallinity. A new interface appeared by the interaction among hydroxyapatite and collagen-pectin, and formed smooth fine particles. The mechanical properties, water absorption, enzyme degradation, and cytotoxicity indicate a potential use in bone replacement for the new composite.

  17. Microstrain in hydroxyapatite carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Kealley, Catherine; Elcombe, Margaret; van Riessen, Arie

    2008-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation diffraction data were collected from hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube bioceramic composites to determine the crystallite size and to measure changes in non-uniform strain. Estimates of crystallite size and strain were determined by line-profile fitting of discrete peaks and these were compared with a Rietveld whole-pattern analysis. Overall the two analysis methods produced very similar numbers. In the commercial hydroxyapatite material, one reflection in particular, (0 2 3), has higher crystallite size and lower strain values in comparison with laboratory-synthesized material. This could indicate preferential crystal growth in the [0 2 3] direction in the commercial material. From the measured strains in the pure material and the composite, there was a degree of bonding between the matrix and strengthening fibres. However, increasing the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composite has increased the strain in the material, which is undesirable for biomedical implant applications.

  18. Reactive hydroxyapatite fillers for pectin biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Munarin, Fabiola; Petrini, Paola; Barcellona, Giulia; Roversi, Tommaso; Piazza, Laura; Visai, Livia; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a novel injectable biocomposite hydrogel is produced by internal gelation, using pectin as organic matrix and hydroxyapatite either as crosslinking agent and inorganic reinforcement. Tunable gelling kinetics and rheological properties are obtained varying the hydrogels' composition, with the final aim of developing systems for cell immobilization. The reversibility by dissolution of pectin-hydroxyapatite hydrogels is achieved with saline solutions, to possibly accelerate the release of the cells or active agents immobilized. Texture analysis confirms the possibility of extruding the biocomposites from needles with diameters from 20 G to 30 G, indicating that they can be implanted with minimally-invasive approaches, minimizing the pain during injection and the side effects of the open surgery. L929 fibroblasts entrapped in the hydrogels survive to the immobilization procedure and exhibit high cell viability. On the overall, these systems result to be suitable supports for the immobilization of cells for tissue regeneration applications.

  19. Biomineralization of nanoscale single crystal hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany; Wilson, Otto C; Gugssa, Ayelle; Anderson, Winston

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite particles which formed during the subcutaneous implantation of crab shell in Sprague-Dawley rats were studied using selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The initial SAED characterization evidence indicated the presence of an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. The electron dense nanophase particles which formed in the wound healing zone displayed broad diffuse rings which usually indicate a low crystalline order or amorphous phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed that these mineralized regions contained discrete single crystal particles less than 5nm in size. Micrographs taken at successively higher magnifications revealed very small nanoparticles with a hexagonal arrangement of ion channels with characteristic spacing of 0.54nm and 0.23nm. This study revealed that single crystal hydroxyapatite nanoparticles consisting of only a few unit cells formed via a biomineralization directed process. PMID:26249568

  20. Biomineralization of nanoscale single crystal hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany; Wilson, Otto C; Gugssa, Ayelle; Anderson, Winston

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite particles which formed during the subcutaneous implantation of crab shell in Sprague-Dawley rats were studied using selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The initial SAED characterization evidence indicated the presence of an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. The electron dense nanophase particles which formed in the wound healing zone displayed broad diffuse rings which usually indicate a low crystalline order or amorphous phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed that these mineralized regions contained discrete single crystal particles less than 5nm in size. Micrographs taken at successively higher magnifications revealed very small nanoparticles with a hexagonal arrangement of ion channels with characteristic spacing of 0.54nm and 0.23nm. This study revealed that single crystal hydroxyapatite nanoparticles consisting of only a few unit cells formed via a biomineralization directed process.

  1. Space-cutting model of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Sato, M; Takahashi, J

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of substitution of trace elements such as Mg2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ into the columnar Ca2+ positions of hydroxyapatite was examined by computer graphics with a personal computer and a space-cutting method. Data on the structural coordinates of the hydroxyapatite were put into a protein graphics program in Angstrom units. The connection of each element, with front and rear, was displayed by the shade-line erasing method, and the solidity of the image was expressed by the degree of lightness from the light source. The space-cutting model was obtained by selecting the cutting plane with three atoms in the crystal. Rotating the graphics freely around the X, Y and Z axes gives a view from any direction. The computer graphics suggested visually how the lattice dimensions expand with Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitution and contract with Mg2+ substitution.

  2. Chemical characterization of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Gibson, I R; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    1999-03-15

    Bioceramic specimens have been prepared by incorporating a small amount of silicon (0.4 wt %) into the structure of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HA] via an aqueous precipitation reaction to produce a silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA). The results of chemical analysis confirmed the proposed substitution of the silicon (or silicate) ion for the phosphorus (or phosphate) ion in hydroxyapatite. The Si-HA was produced by first preparing a silicon-substituted apatite (Si-Ap) by a precipitation process. A single-phase Si-HA was obtained by heating/calcining the as-prepared Si-Ap to temperatures above 700 degrees C; no secondary phases, such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), tetracalcium phosphate (TeCP), or calcium oxide (CaO), were observed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Although the X-ray diffraction patterns of Si-HA and stoichiometric HA appeared to be identical, refinement of the diffraction data revealed some small structural differences between the two materials. The silicon substitution in the HA lattice resulted in a small decrease in the a axis and an increase in the c axis of the unit cell. This substitution also caused a decrease in the number of hydroxyl (OH) groups in the unit cell, which was expected from the proposed substitution mechanism. The incorporation of silicon in the HA lattice resulted in an increase in the distortion of the PO4 tetrahedra, indicated by an increase in the distortion index. Analysis of the Si-HA by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated that although the amount of silicon incorporated into the HA lattice was small, silicon substitution appeared to affect the FTIR spectra of HA, in particular the P-O vibrational bands. The results demonstrate that phase-pure silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite may be prepared using a simple precipitation technique.

  3. Identification of hydroxyapatite crystals in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Halverson, P B; McCarty, D J

    1979-04-01

    A semiquantitative technique employing (14C) ethane-1-hydroxy 1, -1-diphosphonate (EHDP) binding has been used to detect crystals, presumably hydroxyapatite, in human synovial fluid samples which were handled to prevent the formation of artifactual mineral phase. Binding material was found in 29% of non-inflammatory and in none of inflammatory joint fluids. Nuclide binding material was strongly correlated with the presence of CPPD crystals and with radiographic evidence of cartilaginous degeneration. PMID:106859

  4. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  5. Properties of carbon nanotube-dispersed Sr-hydroxyapatite injectable material for bone defects.

    PubMed

    Raucci, M G; Alvarez-Perez, M; Giugliano, D; Zeppetelli, S; Ambrosio, L

    2016-03-01

    This study concerns the synthesis of gel materials based on carbon nanotubes dispersed strontium-modified hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) at different compositions obtained by sol-gel technology and their influence on human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, an evaluation of the influence of nanotubes and Strontium on physico-chemical, morphological, rheological and biological properties of hydroxyapatite gel was also performed. Morphological analysis (scanning electron microscopy) shows a homogeneous distribution of modified nanotubes in the ceramic matrix improving the bioactive properties of materials. The biological investigations proved that Sr-HA/carbon nanotube gel containing 0-20 mol (%) of Sr showed no toxic effect and promote the expression of early and late markers of osteogenic differentiation in cell culture performed in basal medium without osteogenic factors. Finally, the SrHA/carbon nanotube gels could have a good potential application as filler in bone repair and regeneration and may be used in the osteoporotic disease treatment. PMID:26816652

  6. Properties of carbon nanotube-dispersed Sr-hydroxyapatite injectable material for bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, M. G.; Alvarez-Perez, M.; Giugliano, D.; Zeppetelli, S.; Ambrosio, L.

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns the synthesis of gel materials based on carbon nanotubes dispersed strontium-modified hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) at different compositions obtained by sol–gel technology and their influence on human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, an evaluation of the influence of nanotubes and Strontium on physico-chemical, morphological, rheological and biological properties of hydroxyapatite gel was also performed. Morphological analysis (scanning electron microscopy) shows a homogeneous distribution of modified nanotubes in the ceramic matrix improving the bioactive properties of materials. The biological investigations proved that Sr-HA/carbon nanotube gel containing 0–20 mol (%) of Sr showed no toxic effect and promote the expression of early and late markers of osteogenic differentiation in cell culture performed in basal medium without osteogenic factors. Finally, the SrHA/carbon nanotube gels could have a good potential application as filler in bone repair and regeneration and may be used in the osteoporotic disease treatment. PMID:26816652

  7. Surface modification of yttria stabilized zirconia via polydopamine inspired coating for hydroxyapatite biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Norhidayu Muhamad; Hussain, Rafaqat; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    2014-12-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been widely used as biomedical implant due to its high strength and enhanced toughening characteristics. However, YSZ is a bioinert material which constrains the formation of chemical bonds with bone tissue following implantation. Inspired by the property of mussels, the surface of YSZ ceramics was functionalized by quinone-rich polydopamine to facilitate the biomineralization of hydroxyapatite. YSZ discs were first immersed in 2 mg/mL of stirred or unstirred dopamine solution at either 25 or 37 °C. The samples were then incubated in 1.5 simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7d. The effect of coating temperature for stirred and unstirred dopamine solutions during substrate grafting was investigated on the basis of chemical compositions, wettability and biomineralization of hydroxyapatite on the YSZ functionalized surface. The results revealed that the YSZ substrate grafted at 37 °C in stirred solution of dopamine possessed significantly improved hydrophilicity (water contact angle of 44.0 ± 2.3) and apatite-mineralization ability (apatite ratio of 1.78). In summary, the coating temperature and stirring condition during grafting procedure affected the chemical compositions of the films and thus influenced the formation of apatite layer on the substrate during the biomineralization process.

  8. Obtaining of biodegradable polylactide films and fibers filled hydroxyapatite for medical purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkina, D. N.; Shapovalova, Y. G.; Rasskazova, L. A.; Kurzina, I. A.; Filimoshkin, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Relevance of the work is due to the need for new materials that are used in medicine (orthopedics, surgery, dentistry, and others) as a substitute for natural bone tissue injuries, fractures, etc. The aim of presented work is developing of a method of producing biocompatible materials based on polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids and calcium phosphate ceramic (hydroxyapatite, HA) with homogeneous distribution of the inorganic component. Bioactive composites based on poly-L-lactide (PL) and hydroxyapatite with homogeneous distribution were prepared. The results of scanning electron microscopy confirm homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler in the polymer matrix. The positive effect of ultrasound on the homogeneity of the composites was determined. The rate of hydrolysis of composites was evaluated. The rate of hydrolysis of polylactide as an individual substance is 7 times lower than the rate of hydrolysis of the polylactide as a part of the composite. It was found that materials submarines HA composite and do not cause a negative response in the cells of the immune system, while contributing to anti-inflammatory cytokines released by cells.

  9. Production of porous hydroxyapatite by the gel-casting of foams and cytotoxic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, P; Binner, J G; Rogero, S O; Higa, O Z; Bressiani, J C

    2000-04-01

    This study presents the manufacture of highly porous hydroxyapatite by a novel technique that employs the foaming of suspensions prior to the in situ polymerization of organic monomers contained in the compositions. This method produces strong gelled bodies with up to 90% porosity that can withstand machining in the green state. Complex-shaped components can be obtained if the process comprises casting in one of the processing steps. The organic additives are eliminated at temperatures above 300 degrees C, and sintering is carried out for consolidation of the ceramic matrix. Spherical interconnected cells with sizes ranging from 20 to 1000 micrometer characterize the porous structure, depending on the specimen density. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on extracts from sintered HA foams based on a quantitative method of cell colony formation and the determination of cell death after indirect contact of the porous material with mammalian cells. This in vitro test of biological evaluation revealed that the original purity of the biomedical-grade hydroxyapatite powder was affected neither through processing nor by the employed reagents.

  10. Adsorption and conformational modification of fibronectin and fibrinogen adsorbed on hydroxyapatite. A QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montes Moraleda, Belén; San Román, Julio; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Luís M

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic frequently used for bone engineering/replacement. One of the parameters that influence the biological response to implanted materials is the conformation of the first adsorbed protein layer. In this work, the adsorption and conformational changes of two fibroid serum proteins; fibronectin and fibrinogen adsorbed onto four different hydroxyapatite powders are studied with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). Each of the calcined apatites adsorbs less protein than their corresponding synthesized samples. Adsorption on synthesized samples yields always an extended conformation whereas a reorganization of the layer is observed for the calcined samples. Fg acquires a "Side on" conformation in all the samples at the beginning of the experiment except for one of the synthesized samples where an "End-on" conformation is obtained during the whole experiment. The Extended conformation is the active conformation for Fn. This conformation is favored by apatites with large specific surface area (SSA) and on highly concentrated media. Apatite surface features should be considered in the selection or design of materials for bone regeneration, since it is possible to control the conformation mode of attachment of Fn and Fg by an appropriate selection of them. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2585-2594, 2016.

  11. Characterization of hydroxyapatite film with mixed interface by Ar+ ion beam enhanced deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Weng, J; Tong, W; Zuo, C; Zhang, X; Wang, P; Liu, Z

    1997-11-01

    Ar+ ion beam enhanced deposition (IBED) was used to produce a hydroxyapatite (HA) film on polished titanium substrates. In this study, the HA ceramic target was sputtered by an argon-ion beam with an energy of 1.5 KeV, and the sputtered film was intermittently bombarded by energetic argon-ions at 60 KeV. An effective Ca-Ti mixed layer produced by the energetic argon-ion bombardment was confirmed by using Auger electron spectroscopy. The characteristics of the deposited films were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. XRD analysis revealed that the as-deposited film was amorphous, and a hydroxyapatite-type structure was obtained from the post-heat treatment of the deposited films. SEM observations showed that no distinct difference in surface morphology was found between the as-deposited and heat-treated samples for Ar+ IBED films, suggesting a strongly bonded HA film on the titanium substrate. In comparison with the HA target, some chemistry alterations were brought about in the deposited films, such as the incorporation of CO3, the loss of the OH groups and some distortion of the phosphate lattice.

  12. Obtaining of biodegradable polylactide films and fibers filled hydroxyapatite for medical purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Lytkina, D. N. Shapovalova, Y. G. Rasskazova, L. A. Kurzina, I. A. Filimoshkin, A. G.

    2015-11-17

    Relevance of the work is due to the need for new materials that are used in medicine (orthopedics, surgery, dentistry, and others) as a substitute for natural bone tissue injuries, fractures, etc. The aim of presented work is developing of a method of producing biocompatible materials based on polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids and calcium phosphate ceramic (hydroxyapatite, HA) with homogeneous distribution of the inorganic component. Bioactive composites based on poly-L-lactide (PL) and hydroxyapatite with homogeneous distribution were prepared. The results of scanning electron microscopy confirm homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler in the polymer matrix. The positive effect of ultrasound on the homogeneity of the composites was determined. The rate of hydrolysis of composites was evaluated. The rate of hydrolysis of polylactide as an individual substance is 7 times lower than the rate of hydrolysis of the polylactide as a part of the composite. It was found that materials submarines HA composite and do not cause a negative response in the cells of the immune system, while contributing to anti-inflammatory cytokines released by cells.

  13. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen–hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Max M.; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W.; Wei, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen–hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen–HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen–HA scaffold (Healos®, Depuy). The in-house collagen–HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n=5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen–HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen–hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  14. Sol-gel derived fluor-hydroxyapatite biocoatings on zirconia substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kong, Young-Min; Bae, Chang-Jun; Noh, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2004-07-01

    Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) film was coated on a zirconia (ZrO(2)) substrate by a sol-gel method. An appropriate amount of F ions was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite (HA) during the preparation of the sols. The apatite phase began to crystallize after heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and increased in intensity above 500 degrees C. No decomposition was detected by X-ray diffraction analyses up to 800 degrees C, which illustrates the high thermal stability of the FHA films. The films showed a uniform and dense morphology with a thickness of approximately 1 microm after a precisely controlled heat treatment process. These FHA films adhered firmly to the zirconia substrate, representing notable adhesion strengths of approximately 70 MPa after heat treatment above 500 degrees C. The dissolution rate of the FHA coating layer varied according to the heat treatment temperature, which was closely related to the film crystallinity. The dissolution rate of the FHA film was lower than that of the HA film, suggesting the possibility of a functional gradient coating of HA and FHA. The MG63 cells seeded onto the FHA films proliferated in a similar manner to those seeded onto pure HA ceramic and a plastic control.

  15. Adsorption and conformational modification of fibronectin and fibrinogen adsorbed on hydroxyapatite. A QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montes Moraleda, Belén; San Román, Julio; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Luís M

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic frequently used for bone engineering/replacement. One of the parameters that influence the biological response to implanted materials is the conformation of the first adsorbed protein layer. In this work, the adsorption and conformational changes of two fibroid serum proteins; fibronectin and fibrinogen adsorbed onto four different hydroxyapatite powders are studied with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). Each of the calcined apatites adsorbs less protein than their corresponding synthesized samples. Adsorption on synthesized samples yields always an extended conformation whereas a reorganization of the layer is observed for the calcined samples. Fg acquires a "Side on" conformation in all the samples at the beginning of the experiment except for one of the synthesized samples where an "End-on" conformation is obtained during the whole experiment. The Extended conformation is the active conformation for Fn. This conformation is favored by apatites with large specific surface area (SSA) and on highly concentrated media. Apatite surface features should be considered in the selection or design of materials for bone regeneration, since it is possible to control the conformation mode of attachment of Fn and Fg by an appropriate selection of them. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2585-2594, 2016. PMID:27254464

  16. The hydroxyapatite orbital implant: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J L; Rhatigan, M; Sampath, R; Brammar, R; Sunderland, S; Leatherbarrow, B

    1996-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite orbital implant was first released for use as an orbital implant in humans in August 1989. It has been shown to be well tolerated, providing good motility of the artificial eye with a low complication rate when used as a primary implant. This prospective study evaluated the hydroxyapatite orbital implant used as both a primary and a secondary implant. Sixty patients were implanted between October 1992 and November 1994, 28 being implanted as a primary procedure at the time of enucleation or evisceration, and 32 as a secondary procedure. Seven patients underwent second-stage drilling and pegging of the implant. The mean follow-up time was 13 months (range 2-26 months). A standardised operative and post-operative protocol was followed. The patients were evaluated post-operatively for the amount of enophthalmos, degree of upper lid sulcus deformity, motility of the prosthesis, location of the implant in the socket, socket status and the presence or absence of discharge, position of the drill hole and coverage of the implant. Complications and their management were documented. Both patient and surgeon made a subjective assessment of cosmesis and the patient's satisfaction with the overall result was noted. The results of this study show the hydroxyapatite orbital implant to provide excellent motility of the artificial eye and good cosmesis with a low rate of complications when used both as a primary and as a secondary implant.

  17. Nano-hydroxyapatite composite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering--a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, significant development has been achieved in the construction of artificial bone with ceramics, polymers and metals. Nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) is widely used bioceramic material for bone graft substitute owing to its biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties. nHA with chitin, chitosan, collagen, gelatin, fibrin, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, polyamide, polyvinyl alcohol, polyurethane and polyhydroxybutyrate based composite scaffolds have been explored in the present review for bone graft substitute. This article further reviews the preparative methods, chemical interaction, biocompatibiity, biodegradation, alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization effect, mechanical properties and delivery of nHA-based nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration. The nHA based composite biomaterials proved to be promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25992432

  18. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  19. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  20. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  1. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  2. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  3. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration: a review of ceramics and polymers.

    PubMed

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect.

  4. Bone remodeling and hydroxyapatite resorption in coated primary hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tonino, Alphons J; van der Wal, Bart C H; Heyligers, Ide C; Grimm, Bernd

    2009-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings for THA promote bone ongrowth, but bone and coating are exposed to stress shielding-driven osteoclastic resorption. We asked: (1) if the resorption of hydroxyapatite coating and bone ongrowth correlated with demographics; (2) if the resorption related to the stem level; and (3) what happens to the implant-bone interface when all hydroxyapatite coating is resorbed? We recovered 13 femoral components from cadaveric specimens 3.3 to 11.2 years after uneventful primary THA. Three cross sections (proximal, medial, distal) of the hydroxyapatite-coated proximal implant sleeve were analyzed by measuring the percentage of residual hydroxyapatite and bone ongrowth on the implant perimeter. Hydroxyapatite resorption was independent of patient age but increased with time in vivo and mostly was gone after 8 years. Bone ongrowth was independent of time in vivo but decreased with aging patients. Only in the most proximal section did less residual hydroxyapatite correlate with less bone ongrowth. Hydroxyapatite resorption, which was more proximal than distal, showed no adverse effects on the implant-bone interface.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Xin; Zhitomirsky, Igor . E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca

    2007-04-15

    Cathodic electrophoretic deposition has been utilized for the fabrication of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates. The addition of chitosan to the hydroxyapatite suspensions promoted the electrophoretic deposition of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and resulted in the formation of composite coatings. The obtained coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that the deposit composition can be changed by a variation of the chitosan or hydroxyapatite concentration in the solutions. Experimental conditions were developed for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocomposites containing 40.9-89.8 wt.% hydroxyapatite. The method enabled the formation of adherent and uniform coatings of thicknesses up to 60 {mu}m. X-ray studies revealed that the preferred orientation of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix increases with decreasing hydroxyapatite content in the composite coatings. The obtained coatings provided the corrosion protection for the 316L stainless steel substrates00.

  6. Methods of synthesizing hydroxyapatite powders and bulk materials

    DOEpatents

    Luo, P.

    1999-01-12

    Methods are provided for producing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules of less than 8 {micro}m by a spray-drying process. Solid or hollow spheres or doughnuts can be formed by controlling the volume fraction and viscosity of the slurry as well as the spray-drying conditions. Methods of providing for homogeneous cellular structure hydroxyapatite granules are also provided. Pores or channels or varying size and number can be formed by varying the temperature at which a hydroxyapatite slurry formed in basic, saturated ammonium hydroxide is spray-dried. Methods of providing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules in ammonium hydroxide are also provided. The hydroxyapatite granules and bulk materials formed by these methods are also provided. 26 figs.

  7. Methods of synthesizing hydroxyapatite powders and bulk materials

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Ping

    1999-01-12

    Methods are provided for producing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules of less than 8 .mu.m by a spray-drying process. Solid or hollow spheres or doughnuts can be formed by controlling the volume fraction and viscosity of the slurry as well as the spray-drying conditions. Methods of providing for homogenous cellular structure hydroxyapatite granules are also provided. Pores or channels or varying size and number can be formed by varying the temperature at which a hydroxyapatite slurry formed in basic, saturated ammonium hydroxide is spray-dried. Methods of providing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules in ammonium hydroxide are also provided. The hydroxyapatite granules and bulk materials formed by these methods are also provided.

  8. Effect of zeta potentials on bovine serum albumin adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Nahoko; Sato, Toru; Maki, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to hydroxyapatite surfaces by means of zeta potential. The electrophoretic mobility of both hydroxyapatite and BSA were negative, with BSA itself less negative than hydroxyapatite. The zeta potential of the surface of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite was significantly more negative than that of hydroxyapatite alone (p<0.0001). The BSA histogram indicated two negative peaks, and the zeta potential of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite also showed two similar negative peaks. These results suggest that BSA adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces is related to electrostatic interaction. PMID:23903580

  9. Ultrastructure of regenerated bone mineral surrounding hydroxyapatite-alginate composite and sintered hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andre L; Barreto, Isabela C; Maciel, William Q; Rosa, Fabiana P; Rocha-Leão, Maria H; Werckmann, Jacques; Rossi, Alexandre M; Borojevic, Radovan; Farina, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    We report the ultrastructure of regenerated bone surrounding two types of biomaterials: hydroxyapatite-alginate composite and sintered hydroxyapatite. Critical defects in the calvaria of Wistar rats were filled with micrometer-sized spherical biomaterials and analyzed after 90 and 120 days of implantation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance microscopy, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy showed that hydroxyapatite of both biomaterials became more disordered after implantation in the rat calvaria, indicating that the biological environment induced modifications in biomaterials structure. We observed that the regenerated bone surrounding both biomaterials had a lamellar structure with type I collagen fibers alternating in adjacent lamella with angles of approximately 90°. In each lamella, plate-like apatite crystals were aligned in the c-axis direction, although a rotation around the c-axis could be present. Bone plate-like crystal dimensions were similar in regenerated bone around biomaterials and pre-existing bone in the rat calvaria. No epitaxial growth was observed around any of the biomaterials. A distinct mineralized layer was observed between new bone and hydroxyapatite-alginate biomaterial. This region presented a particular ultrastructure with crystallites smaller than those of the bulk of the biomaterial, and was possibly formed during the synthesis of alginate-containing composite or in the biological environment after implantation. Round nanoparticles were observed in regions of newly formed bone. The findings of this work contribute to a better understanding of the role of hydroxyapatite based biomaterials in bone regeneration processes at the nanoscale.

  10. Microstructure and composition of biosynthetically synthesised hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Medina Ledo, Hilda; Thackray, Ania C; Jones, Ian P; Marquis, Peter M; Macaskie, Lynne E; Sammons, Rachel L

    2008-11-01

    Biosynthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) manufactured utilising the bacterium Serratia sp. NCIMB40259 was characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED). SEM/EDX showed that the non-sintered material consisted mainly of calcium-deficient HA (CDHA) with a Ca/P ratio of 1.61 +/- 0.06 and crystal size (from TEM) of 50 +/- 10 nm. ED analysis of non-sintered powder showed resolvable ring patterns ascribed to (0002), (1122) and (0006) planes of crystalline HA. The crystallinity of the samples improved with heat treatment from approximately 9.4% (non-sintered) to 53% (1,200 degrees C). Samples heated at 600 degrees C and sintered at 1,200 degrees C were identified by XRD and FTIR as mainly CDHA with some sodium calcium phosphate in the sintered samples. Ca/P ratios (SEM/EDX) were 1.62 and 1.52, respectively. Single crystal spot patterns characteristic of HA were seen with commercial HA and Serratia HA heated at 600 degrees C. After sintering at 1,200 degrees C the material consisted of needle-like crystals with a length between 86 and 323 nm (from TEM) or 54-111 nm (from XRD) and lattice parameters of a = 9.441 A and c = 6.875 A. This study indicated that the material produced by Serratia bacteria was initially mainly nanophase calcium deficient hydroxyapatite, which sintered to a more highly crystalline form. With further refinements the method could be used as an inexpensive route for hydroxyapatite production for biomaterials applications.

  11. Thermal effect on thermoluminescence response of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Medina, J; Sandoval-Cedeño, K J; Barrera-Villatoro, A; Lemus-Ruiz, J; Rivera Montalvo, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of the thermoluminescence (TL) induced by gamma radiation in synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) obtained by the precipitation method, using Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4 and calcined at different temperatures. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. TL response as a function of gamma radiation dose was in a wide range, where intensity was enhanced in the sample annealed at 900°C, which tricalcium diphosphate (TCP) phase appear. Fading of the TL was also studied.

  12. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  13. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical) of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale) ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully take advantage of the promising nanometer size effects that nanoceramics can provide when added to polymers, it is critical to uniformly disperse them in a polymer matrix. This is critical since ceramic nanoparticles inherently have a strong tendency to form larger agglomerates in a polymer matrix which may compromise their properties. Therefore, in this study, model ceramic nanoparticles, specifically titania and hydroxyapatite (HA), were dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid) using high-power ultrasonic energy. The mechanical properties of the resulting PLGA composites with well-dispersed ceramic (either titania or HA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with composites with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that well-dispersed ceramic nanoparticles (titania or HA) in PLGA improved mechanical properties compared with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles even though the weight percentage of the ceramics was the same. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoceramics in PLGA enhanced the tensile modulus, tensile strength at yield, ultimate tensile strength, and compressive modulus compared with the more agglomerated nanoceramics in PLGA. In summary, supplemented by previous studies that demonstrated greater osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions on well-dispersed nanophase ceramics in polymers, the present study demonstrated that the combination of PLGA with well-dispersed nanoceramics enhanced mechanical properties necessary for load-bearing orthopedic/dental applications. PMID:20463945

  14. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-04-15

    Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical) of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale) ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully take advantage of the promising nanometer size effects that nanoceramics can provide when added to polymers, it is critical to uniformly disperse them in a polymer matrix. This is critical since ceramic nanoparticles inherently have a strong tendency to form larger agglomerates in a polymer matrix which may compromise their properties. Therefore, in this study, model ceramic nanoparticles, specifically titania and hydroxyapatite (HA), were dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid) using high-power ultrasonic energy. The mechanical properties of the resulting PLGA composites with well-dispersed ceramic (either titania or HA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with composites with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that well-dispersed ceramic nanoparticles (titania or HA) in PLGA improved mechanical properties compared with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles even though the weight percentage of the ceramics was the same. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoceramics in PLGA enhanced the tensile modulus, tensile strength at yield, ultimate tensile strength, and compressive modulus compared with the more agglomerated nanoceramics in PLGA. In summary, supplemented by previous studies that demonstrated greater osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions on well-dispersed nanophase ceramics in polymers, the present study demonstrated that the combination of PLGA with well-dispersed nanoceramics enhanced mechanical properties necessary for load-bearing orthopedic/dental applications.

  15. Study of hydroxyl carbonate apatite formation on bioactive glass coated dental ceramics by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, G. A.; Savu, B.; Sandulescu, I.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Koidis, P.

    2007-03-01

    Some dental ceramics were coated with a bioactive glass and resulted the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. After immersion in a solution with ion concentrations similar to those of human blood plasma the development of hydroxy carbonate apatite layer on the surface of bioactive glass may be observed. The objective of this study was to investigate structural surface changes of bioactive glass, after exposure in a simulated body fluid for a different number of days. The roughness and topography of the hydroxyapatite surface were investigated by Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy. The chemical composition was analyzed by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy measurements.

  16. Electric field-assisted sintering of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tien Bich

    As the main inorganic component of bone, hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca 10(PO4)6(OH)2) should be an ideal candidate in biomaterials selection. When grain sizes are in the nanometric regime, protein adsorption and cell adhesion are enhanced, while strength, hardness, and wear resistance are improved. Unfortunately, low phase stability, poor sinterability, and a tendency towards exaggerated grain coarsening challenge full densification of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite by conventional sintering methods. The field-assisted sintering technique (FAST) has successfully consolidated a variety of nanocrystalline metals and ceramics in dramatically reduced times. The sintering enhancements observed during FAST can be attributed to thermal and athermal effects. The rapid heating rates (up to ˜1000ºC/min) afforded by FAST contribute a significant thermal effect. Since fast heating rates reduce powder exposure to sub-sintering temperatures, non-densifying surface diffusion is limited. The athermal effects of FAST are less well understood and can include plasma generation, dielectric breakdown, particle surface cleaning, grain boundary pinning, and space charge effects. Applying the field-assisted sintering technique to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite yielded surprising results. Deviations from conventional densification behavior were observed, with dehydroxylation identified as the most deleterious process to densification as well as mechanical and biological performance. Since hydroxyapatite is not a stable phase at high temperatures and low water partial pressure atmospheres, desintering due to dehydroxylation-related pore formation became apparent during Stage III sintering. In fact, the degree of desintering and pore formation increased with the extent of Stage III sintering and grain growth. The atomic rearrangements taking place during grain boundary migration are believed to favor the formation of more-stable oxyapatite through hydroxyapatite dehydroxylation. This behavior was

  17. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Ouis, M A; Azooz, M A; ElBatal, H A; El-Bassyouni, G T

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680cm(-1) after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  18. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Ouis, M A; Azooz, M A; ElBatal, H A; El-Bassyouni, G T

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680cm(-1) after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content. PMID:26204506

  19. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Ouis, M. A.; Azooz, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.; El-Bassyouni, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680 cm-1 after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  20. Osteogenic commitment of mesenchymal stem cells in apatite nanorod-aligned ceramics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Zhihui; Li, Yanyan; Hong, Youliang

    2014-12-24

    It is significant to process the clinically used biomaterials into a scaffold with specific nanotopographies, which can act as physical cues to regulate the osteogenic commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, hydroxyapatite (HAP) was considered as the processed objective and a facile, hydrothermal method was developed to grow the vertically oriented HAP nanorods in porous HAP ceramics. Experiments demonstrated that the formation of the HAP nanorods in porous ceramics was decided by a novel epitaxial growth mechanism and length of nanorods could be well-controlled by the growth time. Cell experiments demonstrated that such novel stereotopographical cues could regulate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage, thereby displaying that the porous ceramics with the HAP nanorods-aligned stereotopographies have a good prospect for applications in regenerative medicine of hard tissues.

  1. Similar healthy osteoclast and osteoblast activity on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and nanoparticles of tri-calcium phosphate compared to natural bone.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Adam K; Lamberti, Francis V; Moulton, Julia N; Geilich, Benjamin M; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies to determine osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions on nanocrystalline compared to micron crystalline ceramics, there have been few studies which have examined osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB [RANK]). This is despite the fact that osteoclasts are an important part of maintaining healthy bone since they resorb bone during the bone remodeling process. Moreover, while it is now well documented that bone formation is enhanced on nanoceramics compared to micron ceramics, some have pondered whether osteoblast functions (such as osteoprotegerin and RANK ligand [RANKL]) are normal (ie, non-diseased) on such materials compared to natural bone. For these reasons, the objective of the present in vitro study was to determine various functions of osteoclasts and osteoblasts on nanocrystalline and micron crystalline hydroxyapatite as well as tri-calcium phosphate materials and compare such results to cortical and cancellous bone. Results showed for the first time similar osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and RANK) and osteoblast activity (osteoprotegerin and RANKL) on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite compared to natural bone, whereas osteoclast and osteoblast functions on micron crystalline versions of these ceramics were much different than natural bone. In this manner, this study provides additional evidence that nanocrystalline calcium phosphates can serve as suitable synthetic analogs to natural bone to improve numerous orthopedic applications. It also provides the first data of healthy osteoclast and osteoblast functions on nanocrystalline calcium phosphates compared to natural bone.

  2. Similar healthy osteoclast and osteoblast activity on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and nanoparticles of tri-calcium phosphate compared to natural bone

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Adam K; Lamberti, Francis V; Moulton, Julia N; Geilich, Benjamin M; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies to determine osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions on nanocrystalline compared to micron crystalline ceramics, there have been few studies which have examined osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB [RANK]). This is despite the fact that osteoclasts are an important part of maintaining healthy bone since they resorb bone during the bone remodeling process. Moreover, while it is now well documented that bone formation is enhanced on nanoceramics compared to micron ceramics, some have pondered whether osteoblast functions (such as osteoprotegerin and RANK ligand [RANKL]) are normal (ie, non-diseased) on such materials compared to natural bone. For these reasons, the objective of the present in vitro study was to determine various functions of osteoclasts and osteoblasts on nanocrystalline and micron crystalline hydroxyapatite as well as tri-calcium phosphate materials and compare such results to cortical and cancellous bone. Results showed for the first time similar osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and RANK) and osteoblast activity (osteoprotegerin and RANKL) on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite compared to natural bone, whereas osteoclast and osteoblast functions on micron crystalline versions of these ceramics were much different than natural bone. In this manner, this study provides additional evidence that nanocrystalline calcium phosphates can serve as suitable synthetic analogs to natural bone to improve numerous orthopedic applications. It also provides the first data of healthy osteoclast and osteoblast functions on nanocrystalline calcium phosphates compared to natural bone. PMID:25506216

  3. Hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticles coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ilisei, Simona; Luca, Constantin

    2014-02-01

    The present paper is focused on a study regarding the possibility of obtaining hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticle coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold. The method applied is based on a combined strategy involving hydroxyapatite biomimetic deposition on polyurethane surface using a Supersaturated Calcification Solution (SCS), combined with silver ions reduction and in-situ crystallization processes on hydroxyapatite-polyurethane surface by sample immersing in AgNO3 solution. The morphology, composition and phase structure of the prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The data obtained show that a layer of hydroxyapatite was deposited on porous polyurethane support and the silver nanoparticles (average size 34.71 nm) were dispersed among and even on the hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane surface acts as a reducer and a stabilizing agent for silver ions. The surface plasmon resonance peak in UV-Vis absorption spectra showed an absorption maximum at 415 nm, indicating formation of silver nanoparticles. The hydroxyapatite-silver polyurethane scaffolds were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the obtained data were indicative of good antibacterial properties of the materials.

  4. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  5. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  6. Silk as a biocohesive sacrificial binder in the fabrication of hydroxyapatite load bearing scaffolds.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Stephanie L; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Schmidt, Daniel F; Lo, Tim J; Kaplan, David L

    2014-08-01

    Limitations of current clinical methods for bone repair continue to fuel the demand for a high strength, bioactive bone replacement material. Recent attempts to produce porous scaffolds for bone regeneration have been limited by the intrinsic weakness associated with high porosity materials. In this study, ceramic scaffold fabrication techniques for potential use in load-bearing bone repairs have been developed using naturally derived silk from Bombyx mori. Silk was first employed for ceramic grain consolidation during green body formation, and later as a sacrificial polymer to impart porosity during sintering. These techniques allowed preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds that exhibited a wide range of mechanical and porosity profiles, with some displaying unusually high compressive strength up to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa. Results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a wide range of compressive strengths and moduli (8.7 ± 2.7 MPa to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa and 0.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 8.6 ± 0.3 GPa) with total porosities of up to 62.9 ± 2.7% depending on the parameters used for fabrication. Moreover, HA-silk scaffolds could be molded into large, complex shapes, and further machined post-sinter to generate specific three-dimensional geometries. Scaffolds supported bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation, with no signs of cytotoxicity. Therefore, silk-fabricated HA scaffolds show promise for load bearing bone repair and regeneration needs.

  7. Silk as a biocohesive sacrificial binder in the fabrication of hydroxyapatite load bearing scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Stephanie L.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Schmidt, Daniel; Lo, Tim J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations of current clinical methods for bone repair continue to fuel the demand for a high strength, bioactive bone replacement material. Recent attempts to produce porous scaffolds for bone regeneration have been limited by the intrinsic weakness associated with high porosity materials. In this study, ceramic scaffold fabrication techniques for potential use in load-bearing bone repairs have been developed using naturally derived silk from Bombyx mori. Silk was first employed for ceramic grain consolidation during green body formation, and later as a sacrificial polymer to impart porosity during sintering. These techniques allowed preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds that exhibited a wide range of mechanical and porosity profiles, with some displaying unusually high compressive strength up to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa. Results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a wide range of compressive strengths and moduli (8.7 ± 2.7 MPa to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa and 0.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 8.6 ± 0.3 GPa) with total porosities of up to 62.9 ± 2.7% depending on the parameters used for fabrication. Moreover, HA-silk scaffolds could be molded into large, complex shapes, and further machined post-sinter to generate specific three-dimensional geometries. Scaffolds supported bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation, with no signs of cytotoxicity. Therefore, silk-fabricated HA scaffolds show promise for load bearing bone repair and regeneration needs. PMID:24881027

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on nanostructured titanium towards drug eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Rajesh P; Mohan, Nimmy; Yokogawa, Y; Varma, Harikrishna

    2013-07-01

    Titania nanotubes grown on titanium substrates by electrochemical anodization in glycerol-ammonium fluoride-water system were used to develop efficient drug carrying implants upon coating hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic. The nanostructured surfaces achieved by anodization were caped with HA crystallites by pulsed laser deposition. The implant substrates were studied for their drug carrying capacity using gentamicin as a model. The nano-tubular surface with HA coating had better drug loading capacity of about 800 μg/cm(2) gentamicin while the bare anodized substrate carried less than 660 μg/cm(2). The HA coating alone stored as low as 68 μg/cm(2) and released the drug within the initial burst period itself. The ceramic coated anodized substrates were found to be more efficient in controlled delivery for longer than 160 h with a drug release of 0.5 μg/cm(2) even towards the end. The substrate with nanostructuring alone delivered the whole drug within 140 h. This study proposes the application of laser deposition of HA over nanostructured titanium, which proves to be promising towards controlled drug eluting bioceramic coated metallic prostheses.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on nanostructured titanium towards drug eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Rajesh P; Mohan, Nimmy; Yokogawa, Y; Varma, Harikrishna

    2013-07-01

    Titania nanotubes grown on titanium substrates by electrochemical anodization in glycerol-ammonium fluoride-water system were used to develop efficient drug carrying implants upon coating hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic. The nanostructured surfaces achieved by anodization were caped with HA crystallites by pulsed laser deposition. The implant substrates were studied for their drug carrying capacity using gentamicin as a model. The nano-tubular surface with HA coating had better drug loading capacity of about 800 μg/cm(2) gentamicin while the bare anodized substrate carried less than 660 μg/cm(2). The HA coating alone stored as low as 68 μg/cm(2) and released the drug within the initial burst period itself. The ceramic coated anodized substrates were found to be more efficient in controlled delivery for longer than 160 h with a drug release of 0.5 μg/cm(2) even towards the end. The substrate with nanostructuring alone delivered the whole drug within 140 h. This study proposes the application of laser deposition of HA over nanostructured titanium, which proves to be promising towards controlled drug eluting bioceramic coated metallic prostheses. PMID:23623112

  10. Development and characterization of hydroxyapatite/β-TCP/chitosan composites for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Amin; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Ali, M Azam; Sun, Zhifa; Gould, Maree

    2015-11-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics that mimic bone composition provide interesting possibilities for the advancement in bone tissue engineering. The present study reports on a chitosan composite reinforced by hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells and cross-linked using tripolyphosphate (TPP). The ratios of the ceramic components in composites were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/CH, w/w %). Biodegradation rate, structural properties and in-vitro degradation of the bone-like composite scaffolds were investigated. The optimum amount of TPP required for composite was 2.5% and glycerol was used as plasticizer at an optimized concentration of 1%. Tripolyphosphate cross-linked chitosan composites were developed by freezing and lyophilisation. The Young's modulus of the scaffolds was increased from 4kPa to 17kPa and the porosity of composites dropped from 85 to 68% by increasing the HA/β-TCP ratio. After 28days in physiological solution, bone-like composite scaffolds with a higher ratio of HA/β-TCP (e.g. 40/30/30) showed about 2% lower biodegradation in comparison to scaffolds with a lower ratio of HA/β-TCP (i.e. 20/10/70). The obtained data suggest that the chitosan based bone-like composites could be potential candidates for biomedical applications. PMID:26249618

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  12. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  13. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  14. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  15. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  16. Hydroxyapatite surface-induced peptide folding.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Lisa A; Beebe, Thomas P; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-04-25

    Herein, we describe the design and surface-binding characterization of a de novo designed peptide, JAK1, which undergoes surface-induced folding at the hydroxyapatite (HA)-solution interface. JAK1 is designed to be unstructured in buffered saline solution, yet undergo HA-induced folding that is largely governed by the periodic positioning of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues within the primary sequence of the peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the peptide remains unfolded and monomeric in solution under normal physiological conditions; however, CD spectroscopy indicates that in the presence of hydroxyapatite, the peptide avidly binds to the mineral surface adopting a helical structure. Adsorption isotherms indicate nearly quantitative surface coverage and Kd = 310 nM for the peptide-surface binding event. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with the adsorption isotherm data suggests that JAK1 binds to HA, forming a self-limiting monolayer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HA surfaces to trigger the intramolecular folding of designed peptides and represents the initial stages of defining the design rules that allow HA-induced peptide folding.

  17. Inflammatory response to nano- and microstructured hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gemma; Espanol, Montserrat; Xia, Wei; Persson, Cecilia; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact) and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact). Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate's microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials.

  18. Nano hydroxyapatite structures influence early bone formation.

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Luiz; Arvidsson, Anna; Andersson, Martin; Kjellin, Per; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2008-11-01

    In a study model that aims to evaluate the effect of nanotopography on bone formation, micrometer structures known to alter bone formation, should be removed. Electropolished titanium implants were prepared to obtain a surface topography in the absence of micro structures, thereafter the implants were divided in two groups. The test group was modified with nanosize hydroxyapatite particles; the other group was left uncoated and served as control for the experiment. Topographical evaluation demonstrated increased nanoroughness parameters for the nano-HA implant and higher surface porosity compared to the control implant. The detected features had increased size and diameter equivalent to the nano-HA crystals present in the solution and the relative frequency of the feature size and diameter was very similar. Furthermore, feature density per microm(2) showed a decrease of 13.5% on the nano-HA implant. Chemical characterization revealed calcium and phosphorous ions on the modified implants, whereas the control implants consisted of pure titanium oxide. Histological evaluation demonstrated significantly increased bone formation to the coated (p < 0.05) compared to uncoated implants after 4 weeks of healing. These findings indicate for the first time that early bone formation is dependent on the nanosize hydroxyapatite features, but we are unaware if we see an isolated effect of the chemistry or of the nanotopography or a combination of both.

  19. Hydroxyapatite surface-induced peptide folding.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Lisa A; Beebe, Thomas P; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-04-25

    Herein, we describe the design and surface-binding characterization of a de novo designed peptide, JAK1, which undergoes surface-induced folding at the hydroxyapatite (HA)-solution interface. JAK1 is designed to be unstructured in buffered saline solution, yet undergo HA-induced folding that is largely governed by the periodic positioning of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues within the primary sequence of the peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the peptide remains unfolded and monomeric in solution under normal physiological conditions; however, CD spectroscopy indicates that in the presence of hydroxyapatite, the peptide avidly binds to the mineral surface adopting a helical structure. Adsorption isotherms indicate nearly quantitative surface coverage and Kd = 310 nM for the peptide-surface binding event. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with the adsorption isotherm data suggests that JAK1 binds to HA, forming a self-limiting monolayer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HA surfaces to trigger the intramolecular folding of designed peptides and represents the initial stages of defining the design rules that allow HA-induced peptide folding. PMID:17397165

  20. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Roveri, Norberto; Iafisco, Michele

    2010-01-01

    By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical–physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical–physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical–physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications. PMID:24198477

  1. Ceramic brush seals development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: ceramic brush seals, research and development, manufacturing, brazed assembly development, controlling braze flow, fiber selection, and braze results.

  2. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  3. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  4. Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Coatings with Incorporated Detonationally Generated Nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Dimitrova, R.; Spassov, T.; Krasteva, N.; Mitev, D.

    2010-01-21

    We studied the effect of the substrate chemistry on the morphology of hydroxyapatite-detonational nanodiamond composite coatings grown by a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated simulated body fluid). When detonational nanodiamond particles were added to the solution, the morphology of the grown for 2 h composite particles was porous but more compact then that of pure hydroxyapatite particles. The nanodiamond particles stimulated the hydroxyapatite growth with different morphology on the various substrates (Ti, Ti alloys, glasses, Si, opal). Biocompatibility assay with MG63 osteoblast cells revealed that the detonational nanodiamond water suspension with low and average concentration of the detonational nanodiamond powder is not toxic to living cells.

  5. In-situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in-situ deposition of hydroxyaptite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure. PMID:25110359

  6. Direct formation of nanophase hydroxyapatite on cathodically polarized electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shirkhanzadeh, M

    1998-02-01

    Ultrafine-grained, nanophase coatings of hydroxyapatite were synthesized by electrocrystallization from dilute electrolytes ([Ca]=6.1 x 10-4 M, [phosphate]=3.6 x 10-4 M) at pH values comparable with the biological pH. At these comparatively low supersaturations, hydroxyapatite is shown to be precipitated without the formation of a precursor phase. A description of the sequence of events occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface is given to explain the mechanism involved in the direct formation of nanophase hydroxyapatite on polarized electrodes.

  7. An X-ray electron study of nanodisperse hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, I. V.; Teterin, Yu. A.; Rudin, V. N.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Maslakov, K. I.; Severin, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    Two states of surface valence electrons localized on faces with different molecular reliefs were observed for nanodisperse hydroxyapatite. Thermal treatment of nanocrystals caused a shift Δ E b = 0.5 eV of the spectrum of valence electrons on molecularly rough faces and a shift of 0.8 eV of the spectrum from smooth faces. Similar electron spectrum shifts were observed for sorption, in particular, of sodium succinate. These results are of importance for the diagnostics of various hydroxyapatite kinds, since hydroxyapatite is a constituent mineral component of living organisms, and for the synthesis of medicines with enhanced biological activity used in treatment of various bone diseases.

  8. Structural studies of magnesium doped hydroxyapatite coatings after osteoblast culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, W.; Bombalska, A.; Burdyńska, S.; Jedyński, M.; Prokopiuk, A.; Budner, B.; Ślósarczyk, A.; Zima, A.; Menaszek, E.; Ścisłowska-Czarnecka, A.; Niedzielski, K.

    2010-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite and magnesium modified hydroxyapatite were deposited on nitrited Ti6Al4V substrates by use of pulsed laser deposition technique. Three target materials consisting of non-modified and magnesium modified hydroxyapatite with Mg content of 0.6 wt.% and 1.8 wt.% were ablated using an ArF excimer laser. The obtained coatings were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, FTIR and AFM methods in order to determine the influence of magnesium on their phase and chemical composition, crystallinity, surface morphology and biological properties. Doping with low concentration of Mg does not significantly influence the HA morphology but improves osteoblast adhesion as compared to pure HA.

  9. Cytotoxicity of hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and fluor-hydroxyapatite: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Theiszova, M; Jantova, S; Letasiova, S; Palou, M; Cipak, L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of two formulations of hydroxyapatite (HA), namely fluorapatite (FA) and fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA). HA is used as carrier material for antibiotics or anticancer drugs during treatment of bone metastasis. Negative control, represented by HA, was included for comparative purposes. Leukemia cells were used as a model cell line, and the effect of eluates of tested biomaterials on cell proliferation/viability and mechanism of antiproliferative activity were assessed. Study design attempted to reveal the toxicity of tested biomaterials with an emphasis to decide if tested biomaterials have promise for further studies in vivo. Results showed that eluates of FA and FHA inhibit the growth of leukemia cells and induce programmed cell death through mitochondrial/caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent pathway. Due to these differences compare to HA, it is concluded that FA and FHA have promise for evaluation of their behaviour in vivo.

  10. Some ceramic options

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.M.; Aguilar, P.C.; Zievers, E.C.

    1993-06-01

    Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective means of removing particulates to levels exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) in high temperature applications. The traditional {open_quotes}hard{close_quotes} ceramic filter elements, typically formed form granules however, have shown to be susceptible to failure from physical shock, thermal stress, and chemical attack. Additionally, these hard, dense candles can be costly and present internal filter design problems due to their relatively high weight. A good deal has been written about to use to porous ceramics in the filtration of high temperature gases for removal of particulate matter. Unlike the dense, granular ceramic filter elements, vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCF) filters represent an attractive alternative. Composed of commercially available chopped ceramic fibers and utilizing existing vacuum forming technology, low cost filter elements with excellent physical and thermal shock resistance are now available. The ceramic fiber filter {open_quotes}skeleton{close_quotes} can be {open_quotes}post-treated{close_quotes} with refractory materials to enhance strength and chemical resistance, as well as to change permeability to suit a particular application. Also, because the ceramic fiber skeleton has greater porosity and is composed of low density materials, the final product is significantly lighter in weight than the traditional dense ceramic elements, making overall filter design an easier task. The use of ceramics extends beyond that of filter elements, however. Ceramics in the form of refractory have long been used to protect metal structures from high temperature and abrasion, and an extensive body of literature deals with this subject.

  11. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  12. Evaluation of the capacity of mosaic-like porous ceramics with designed pores to support osteoconduction.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Kay; Kato, Tomotaka; Hattori, Koji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    Under osteoconductive conditions, porous calcium phosphate ceramics are known to induce new bone formation within their pores. A critical aspect of the design of porous ceramics is the geometrical features of their pores, with regard to promoting bone formation and mass transfer management in pore networks. However, the pore geometries of common porous ceramics lack clear details. Further, the connections between pores are hard to characterize and thus have not been thoroughly researched. To address these issues, we have developed an original method for fabricating porous ceramics, which we have termed "mosaic-like ceramics fabrication (MLCF)." Using MLCF, pore geometries can be designed and fabricated by each unit, and a network covering all the pores can be fabricated. Furthermore, MLCF can be used to build porous ceramics with custom-made shapes. In this study, we assessed the osteogenic influences of MLCF products (MLPC) composed of hydroxyapatite units on the differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Two types of commercial porous artificial bone were used as positive controls. MLPC was superior in osteogenic potential, and proved to be a reliable scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Furthermore, this study succeeded in defining the important geometries for osteoconduction.

  13. Topography, wetting, and corrosion responses of electrodeposited hydroxyapatite and fluoridated hydroxyapatite on magnesium.

    PubMed

    Assadian, Mahtab; Jafari, Hassan; Ghaffari Shahri, Seyed Morteza; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah; Almasi, Davood

    2016-08-12

    In this study, different types of calcium-phosphate phases were coated on NaOH pre-treated pure magnesium. The coating was applied by electrodeposition method in order to provide higher corrosion resistance and improve biocompatibility for magnesium. Thickness, surface morphology and topography of the coatings were analyzed using optical, scanning electron and atomic-force microscopies, respectively. Composition and chemical bonding, crystalline structures and wettability of the coatings were characterized using energy-dispersive and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and contact angle measurement, respectively. Degradation behavior of the coated specimens was also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and immersion tests. The experiments proved the presence of a porous coating dominated by dicalcium-phosphate dehydrate on the specimens. It was also verified that the developed hydroxyapatite was crystallized by alkali post-treatment. Addition of supplemental fluoride to the coating electrolyte resulted in stable and highly crystallized structures of fluoridated hydroxyapatite. The coatings were found effective to improve biocompatibility combined with corrosion resistance of the specimens. Noticeably, the fluoride supplemented layer was efficient in lowering corrosion rate and increasing surface roughness of the specimens compared to hydroxyapatite and dicalcium-phosphate dehydrates layers. PMID:27567782

  14. Preparation and characterization of collagen-hydroxyapatite/pectin composite.

    PubMed

    Wenpo, Feng; Gaofeng, Liang; Shuying, Feng; Yuanming, Qi; Keyong, Tang

    2015-03-01

    Pectin, a kind of plant polysaccharide, was introduced into collagen-hydroxyapatite composite system, and prepared collagen-hydroxyapatite/pectin (Col-HA/pectin) composite in situ. The structure of the composite was investigated by XRD, SEM, and FT-IR. The mechanical properties, water absorption, enzyme degradation, and cytotoxicity of the composite were investigated as well. The results show that the inorganic substance in the composite materials is hydroxyapatite in relatively low crystallinity. A new interface appeared by the interaction among hydroxyapatite and collagen-pectin, and formed smooth fine particles. The mechanical properties, water absorption, enzyme degradation, and cytotoxicity indicate a potential use in bone replacement for the new composite. PMID:25485944

  15. Formation of pyrophosphate on hydroxyapatite with thioesters as condensing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    'Energy-rich' thioesters are shown to act as condensing agents in the formation of pyrophosphate on hydroxyapatite in the presence of water at ambient temperature. The yield of pyrophosphate based on thioester ranges from 2.5% to 11.4% and depends upon the pH and concentration of reactants. Reaction of 0.130 M hydroxyapatite suspended in a solution of 0.08 M sodium phosphate and 0.20 M imidazole hydrochloride (pH 7.0) with 0.10 M N,S-diacetylcysteamine for 6 days gives the highest yield of pyrophosphate (11.4%). Pyrophosphate formation requires the presence of hydroxyapatite, sodium phosphate and the thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteamine. The related thioester, N,S-diacetylcysteine, also yields pyrophosphate in reactions on hydroxyapatite.

  16. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  17. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  18. Formation of hydroxyapatite in various aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Jacqueline Lee

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2, is important in the field of biomaterials as it is the mineral component of bones and teeth. Biological apatites do not maintain an exact composition and are usually calcium-deficient, represented as Ca(10- x)(HPO 4)x(PO4)(6-x)(OH)(2-x), where x ranges from 0 to 1, with various ion substitutions. Formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites (CDHAp) from solid calcium phosphate precursor materials was performed at physiologic temperature (37°C) in a variety of aqueous solutions. Two cement systems were utilized in these experiments: tetralcium phosphate (TetCP) with dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). The kinetics, solution chemistry, phase evolution, and microstructure of the developed apatites were analyzed as appropriate. Reaction of beta-TCP in ammonium fluoride solutions formed HAp substituted with fluoride and calculated to be deficient in calcium. A new ratio of TetCP to DCPA was used with solutions of sodium bicarbonate to form a calcium-deficient carbonate hydroxyapatite. The capacity for sodium dihydrogen phosphate to buffer pH increases and enhance reaction kinetics in this system was also explored. Formation of a highly crystalline CDHAp was achieved by hydrolyzing beta-TCP in water for extended time periods. Lattice parameters were among the features characterized for this apatite. The hydrolysis of beta-TCP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and simulated body fluids (SBF) was also investigated; use of SBF was found to completely inhibit formation of HAp in this system while reaction in PBS was slow in comparison to water. The effects of filler materials on the mechanical properties of a calcium phosphate cement were examined using the TetCP/DCPA system. Dense aggregates were not found to decrease compressive strength in comparison to the cement alone. The use of aggregates was found to improve the compressive strength of cement formed using NaHCO3 solution as a

  19. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Billy L.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Stinton, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  20. Nanophase hydroxyapatite as a biomaterial in advanced hard tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Siti Maisurah; Sharif Zein, Sharif Hussein; Othman, Mohd Roslee; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A

    2013-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a biocompatible material that is extensively used in the replacement and regeneration of bone material. In nature, nanostructured hydroxyapatite is the main component present in hard body tissues. Hence, the state of the art in nanotechnology can be exploited to synthesize nanophase hydroxyapatite that has similar properties with natural hydroxyapatite. Sustainable methods to mass-produce synthetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles are being developed to meet the increasing demand for these materials and to further develop the progress made in hard tissue regeneration, especially for orthopedic and dental applications. This article reviews the current developments in nanophase hydroxyapatite through various manufacturing techniques and modifications.

  1. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  2. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  3. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  4. Suspension thermal spraying of hydroxyapatite: microstructure and in vitro behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bolelli, Giovanni; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sola, Antonella; Stiegler, Nico; Müller, Philipp; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer; Altomare, Lina; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In cementless fixation of metallic prostheses, bony ingrowth onto the implant surface is often promoted by osteoconductive plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. The present work explores the use of the innovative High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) process to coat Ti substrates with thin homogeneous hydroxyapatite coatings. The HVSFS hydroxyapatite coatings studied were dense, 27-37μm thick, with some transverse microcracks. Lamellae were sintered together and nearly unidentifiable, unlike conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Crystallinities of 10%-70% were obtained, depending on the deposition parameters and the use of a TiO2 bond coat. The average hardness of layers with low (<24%) and high (70%) crystallinity was ≈3.5GPa and ≈4.5GPa respectively. The distributions of hardness values, all characterised by Weibull modulus in the 5-7 range, were narrower than that of conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite, with a Weibull modulus of ≈3.3. During soaking in simulated body fluid, glassy coatings were progressively resorbed and replaced by a new, precipitated hydroxyapatite layer, whereas coatings with 70% crystallinity were stable up to 14days of immersion. The interpretation of the precipitation behaviour was also assisted by surface charge assessments, performed through Z-potential measurements. During in vitro tests, HA coatings showed no cytotoxicity towards the SAOS-2 osteoblast cell line, and surface cell proliferation was comparable with proliferation on reference polystyrene culture plates.

  5. In situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiping

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile chemical precipitation method is reported for effective in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. Display Omitted Highlights: ► It is a facile and effective method for deposition of HA on GR nanosheets. ► It avoids the use of harmful reducing agents like hydrazine, NaBH{sub 4} etc. ► GR nanosheets were produced using bio-compatible, ethylenediamine. ► The graphitic structure of synthesized GR nanosheets was high ordered. ► The ratio of Ca to P in HA was 1.64, which is close to ratio in natural bone. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure.

  6. Novel doped hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Oktar, F. N.; Stan, G. E.; Popescu-Pelin, G.; Serban, N.; Luculescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel ovine and bovine derived hydroxyapatite thin films on titanium substrates by pulsed laser deposition for a new generation of implants. The calcination treatment applied to produce the hydroxyapatite powders from ovine/bovine bones was intended to induce crystallization and to prohibit the transmission of diseases. The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Pull-off adherence and profilometry measurements were also carried out. X-ray diffraction ascertained the polycrystalline hydroxyapatite nature of the powders and films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy evidenced the vibrational bands characteristic to a hydroxyapatite material slightly carbonated. The micrographs of the films showed a uniform distribution of spheroidal particulates with a mean diameter of ∼2 μm. Pull-off measurements demonstrated excellent bonding strength values between the hydroxyapatite films and the titanium substrates. Because of their physical-chemical properties and low cost fabrication from renewable resources, we think that these new coating materials could be considered as a prospective competitor to synthetic hydroxyapatite used for implantology applications.

  7. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures. PMID:25280036

  8. Hydroxyapatite deposition disease of the joint.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Eamonn S; McCarthy, Geraldine M

    2003-06-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals include partially carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate. They may form deposits, which are frequently asymptomatic but may give rise to a number of clinical syndromes including calcific periarthritis, Milwaukee shoulder syndrome, and osteoarthritis, in and around joints. Recent data suggest that magnesium whitlockite, another form of BCP, may play a pathologic role in arthritis. Data from the past year have provided further understanding of the mechanisms by which BCP crystals induce inflammation and degeneration. There remains no specific treatment to modify the effects of BCP crystals. Although potential drugs are being identified as the complex pathophysiology of BCP crystals is unraveled, much work remains to be done in order to translate research advances to date into tangible clinical benefits. PMID:12744814

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of porous hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, C; Peng, K W

    2003-09-01

    Bioactive porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold was fabricated using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique in the present work. Bulk HA scaffold was achieved by repeated deposition. The green scaffold was sintered at 1200 degrees C to 82% of the theoretical density. Scanning electron microscopy examination and mercury porosimetry measurement have shown that the porosity remains interconnected and a range of pore size from several microns to hundreds of microns was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed and confirmed that there is no HA decomposition during the sintering process. Mechanical characterization has also shown that the EPD scaffold possesses excellent properties. Cell culturing experiment was carried out and the result shows that the scaffold bioactivity is not only dependent on the interconnectivity of the pores, but also the pore size.

  10. Hydroxyapatite motility implants in ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cowper, T R

    1995-03-01

    For the past 5 years, an increasing number of ophthalmologists have been using hydroxyapatite (HA) motility implants after uncomplicated enucleation or evisceration of the eye. Unlike previous implant materials, HA promotes fibrovascular ingrowth and seemingly true integration of the motility implant to the residual ocular structures. As a result, a more stable defect and greater movement of the overlying prosthesis is produced. In addition, the problems of long-term orbital implant migration and the vexing postenucleation socket syndrome are thought to be minimized. This article briefly reviews the history and development of orbital implants and HA implant surgical and prosthetic procedures. It is concluded that HA implant rehabilitation is indicated after most uncomplicated enucleations or eviscerations where there is small likelihood of complication.

  11. Hydroxyapatite chromatography of phage-display virions.

    PubMed

    Smith, George P; Gingrich, Todd R

    2005-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite column chromatography can be used to purify filamentous bacteriophage--the phage most commonly used for phage display. Virions that have been partially purified from culture supernatant by two cycles of precipitation in 2% polyethylene glycol are adsorbed onto the matrix at a density of at least 7.6 x 10(13) virions (about 3 mg) per milliliter of packed bed volume in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; 0.15 M NaCl, 5 mM NaH2PO4, pH-adjusted to 7.0 with NaOH). The matrix is washed successively with wash buffer I(150 mM NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), wash buffer II (2.55 M NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and wash buffer I; after which virions are desorbed in desorption buffer (150 mM NaCl, 200 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and the matrix is stripped with stripping buffer (150 mM NaCl, 1 Mphosphate, pH 7.0). About half of the applied virions are recovered in desorption buffer. Western blot analysis shows that they have undetectable levels of host-derived protein contaminants that are present in the input virions and in virions purified by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation--the method most commonly used to prepare virions in high purity. Hydroxyapatite chromatography is thus an attractive alternative method for purifying filamentous virions, particularly when the scale is too large for ultracentrifugation to be practical. PMID:16382907

  12. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel coatings with tunable surface exposure of hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Villain, Arthur; Ku, David N; Corté, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient bone anchoring is a major limitation of artificial substitutes for connective osteoarticular tissues. The use of coatings containing osseoconductive ceramic particles is one of the actively explored strategies to improve osseointegration and strengthen the bone-implant interface for general tissue engineering. Our hypothesis is that hydroxyapatite (HA) particles can be coated robustly on specific assemblies of PVA hydrogel fibers for the potential anchoring of ligament replacements. A simple dip-coating method is described to produce composite coatings made of microscopic hydroxyapatite (HA) particles dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix. The materials are compatible with the requirements for implant Good Manufacturing Practices. They are applied to coat bundles of PVA hydrogel fibers used for the development of ligament implants. By means of optical and electronic microscopy, we show that the coating thickness and surface state can be adjusted by varying the composition of the dipping solution. Quantitative analysis based on backscattered electron microscopy show that the exposure of HA at the coating surface can be tuned from 0 to over 55% by decreasing the weight ratio of PVA over HA from 0.4 to 0.1. Abrasion experiments simulating bone-implant contact illustrate how the coating cohesion and wear resistance increase by increasing the content of PVA relative to HA. Using pullout experiments, we find that these coatings adhere well to the fiber bundles and detach by propagation of a crack inside the coating. These results provide a guide to select coated implants for anchoring artificial ligaments. PMID:25482413

  13. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel coatings with tunable surface exposure of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Moreau, David; Villain, Arthur; Ku, David N; Corté, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient bone anchoring is a major limitation of artificial substitutes for connective osteoarticular tissues. The use of coatings containing osseoconductive ceramic particles is one of the actively explored strategies to improve osseointegration and strengthen the bone-implant interface for general tissue engineering. Our hypothesis is that hydroxyapatite (HA) particles can be coated robustly on specific assemblies of PVA hydrogel fibers for the potential anchoring of ligament replacements. A simple dip-coating method is described to produce composite coatings made of microscopic hydroxyapatite (HA) particles dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix. The materials are compatible with the requirements for implant Good Manufacturing Practices. They are applied to coat bundles of PVA hydrogel fibers used for the development of ligament implants. By means of optical and electronic microscopy, we show that the coating thickness and surface state can be adjusted by varying the composition of the dipping solution. Quantitative analysis based on backscattered electron microscopy show that the exposure of HA at the coating surface can be tuned from 0 to over 55% by decreasing the weight ratio of PVA over HA from 0.4 to 0.1. Abrasion experiments simulating bone-implant contact illustrate how the coating cohesion and wear resistance increase by increasing the content of PVA relative to HA. Using pullout experiments, we find that these coatings adhere well to the fiber bundles and detach by propagation of a crack inside the coating. These results provide a guide to select coated implants for anchoring artificial ligaments. PMID:25482413

  14. The analysis of biomedical hydroxyapatite powders and hydroxyapatite coatings on metallic medical implants by near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, A. M.; Melia, C. D.; Davies, M. C.; Anderson, D.; Hastings, G.; Morrey, S.; Domingos-Sandos, J.; Barbosa, M.

    1993-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the application of Fourier transform Raman (FTR) spectroscopy to the in situ analysis of the inorganic bioceramic hydroxyapatite in both powder form and as a thermally sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on metals currently employed in medical implants for orthopaedic surgery. The derivation of the FTR spectrum of hydroxyapatite is attempted by the analysis of the pure powders of its known constituents. The FTR spectra of hydroxyapatite powders sintered up to 1300°C suggest significant structural changes in the region of 1250°C. The FTR spectra of coated metal systems clearly distinguish between samples of differing crystallinity and provide some information on the effect of the coating process on the hydroxyapatite material. The preliminary examination of hydroxyapatite coated dental screws shows a change in the nature of the hydroxyapatite coating on recovery after clinical use.

  15. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  16. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  17. Ceramics for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Levine, Stanley R.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Structural ceramics were under nearly continuous development for various heat engine applications since the early 1970s. These efforts were sustained by the properties that ceramics offer in the areas of high-temperature strength, environmental resistance, and low density and the large benefits in system efficiency and performance that can result. The promise of ceramics was not realized because their brittle nature results in high sensitivity to microscopic flaws and catastrophic fracture behavior. This translated into low reliability for ceramic components and thus limited their application in engines. For structural ceramics to successfully make inroads into the terrestrial heat engine market requires further advances in low cost, net shape fabrication of high reliability components, and improvements in properties such as toughness, and strength. These advances will lead to very limited use of ceramics in noncritical applications in aerospace engines. For critical aerospace applications, an additional requirement is that the components display markedly improved toughness and noncatastrophic or graceful fracture. Thus the major emphasis is on fiber-reinforced ceramics.

  18. Effects of chronic passive smoking on the regeneration of rat femoral defects filled with hydroxyapatite and stimulated by laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Franco, G R; Laraia, I O; Maciel, A A W; Miguel, N M; Dos Santos, G R; Fabrega-Carvalho, C A; Pinto, C A L; Pettian, M S; Cunha, M R

    2013-07-01

    Defects associated with bone mass loss are frequently treated by autogenous bone grafting. However, synthetic biomaterials such as calcium phosphate ceramics can substitute autologous grafts as long as they are biocompatible with bone tissue. In addition, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is used to enhance bone regeneration by stimulating the local microcirculation and increasing the synthesis of collagen by bone cells. However, bone health is fundamental for osseointegration of the graft and bone repair. In this respect, excessive tobacco consumption can compromise expected outcomes because of its deleterious effects on bone metabolism that predispose to the development of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of bone defects implanted with biomaterial and stimulated by LLLT in rats submitted to passive cigarette smoking. Porous hydroxyapatite granules were implanted into critical-size defects induced experimentally in the distal epiphysis of the right femur of 20 female Wistar rats submitted to passive smoking for 8 months in a smoking box. The defect site was irradiated with a gallium-arsenide laser at an intensity of 5.0 J/cm2. The animals were divided into four groups: control (non-smoking) rates submitted (G2) or not (G1) to laser irradiation, and smoking rats submitted (G4) or not (G3) to laser irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 8 weeks after biomaterial implantation. The right femurs were removed for photodocumentation, radiographed, and processed for routine histology. The results showed good radiopacity of the implant site and of the hydroxyapatite granules. Histologically, formation of new trabecular bone was observed adjacent to the hydroxyapatite granules in G1 and G2. In G3 and G4, the granules were surrounded mainly by connective tissue. In conclusion, passive smoking compromised bone neoformation in the defects and the LLLT protocol was not adequate to stimulate local osteogenesis.

  19. Effects of chronic passive smoking on the regeneration of rat femoral defects filled with hydroxyapatite and stimulated by laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Franco, G R; Laraia, I O; Maciel, A A W; Miguel, N M; Dos Santos, G R; Fabrega-Carvalho, C A; Pinto, C A L; Pettian, M S; Cunha, M R

    2013-07-01

    Defects associated with bone mass loss are frequently treated by autogenous bone grafting. However, synthetic biomaterials such as calcium phosphate ceramics can substitute autologous grafts as long as they are biocompatible with bone tissue. In addition, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is used to enhance bone regeneration by stimulating the local microcirculation and increasing the synthesis of collagen by bone cells. However, bone health is fundamental for osseointegration of the graft and bone repair. In this respect, excessive tobacco consumption can compromise expected outcomes because of its deleterious effects on bone metabolism that predispose to the development of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of bone defects implanted with biomaterial and stimulated by LLLT in rats submitted to passive cigarette smoking. Porous hydroxyapatite granules were implanted into critical-size defects induced experimentally in the distal epiphysis of the right femur of 20 female Wistar rats submitted to passive smoking for 8 months in a smoking box. The defect site was irradiated with a gallium-arsenide laser at an intensity of 5.0 J/cm2. The animals were divided into four groups: control (non-smoking) rates submitted (G2) or not (G1) to laser irradiation, and smoking rats submitted (G4) or not (G3) to laser irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 8 weeks after biomaterial implantation. The right femurs were removed for photodocumentation, radiographed, and processed for routine histology. The results showed good radiopacity of the implant site and of the hydroxyapatite granules. Histologically, formation of new trabecular bone was observed adjacent to the hydroxyapatite granules in G1 and G2. In G3 and G4, the granules were surrounded mainly by connective tissue. In conclusion, passive smoking compromised bone neoformation in the defects and the LLLT protocol was not adequate to stimulate local osteogenesis. PMID:23340234

  20. Initial bone matrix formation at the hydroxyapatite interface in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, J D; van Blitterswijk, C A; Davies, J E

    1995-01-01

    Dense, sintered, slip-cast hydroxyapatite rods were implanted transfemorally in young adult rats. The femora were excised after 2 and 4 weeks and, following fixation, either embedded in methyl methacrylate for light microscopy, decalcified and prepared for transmission electron microscopy, or freeze fractured in liquid nitrogen for scanning electron microscopic analysis. The latter was performed on the two tissue fragments that remained after freeze fracturing, from which the first contained the implants and the second comprised tissue that had been immediately adjacent to the hydroxyapatite rods. Undecalcified light microscopic sections revealed extensive bone tissue formation around and in contact with the hydroxyapatite rods. The initial bone matrix apposed to the implant surface, as demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy, was either composed of globular deposits or an organized network of collagen fibers. The deposits, which ranged in size from 0.1-1.1 microns, fused to form a cement-like matrix to which collagen fibers were attached. Degradation of the hydroxyapatite surface resulted in the presence of unidirectionally aligned crystallites, with which the newly formed bone matrix was closely associated. Ultrastructural analysis of the bone-hydroxyapatite interface with transmission electron microscopy revealed a 50-600-nm-wide collagen-free granular zone, comprising one or more 40-100-nm-thick electron-dense layer(s). These structural arrangements most probably partially represent the globular deposits and proteinaceous material adsorbed onto and partially in the degrading hydroxyapatite surface. Although the latter change in surface topography may have enhanced bonding of the cement-like matrix to the hydroxyapatite, the cause for this change in topography and the type of bond formed are, at present, unknown. PMID:7713963

  1. Fabrication and cellular biocompatibility of porous carbonated biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics with a nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Chen, Xuening; Guo, Bo; Wang, Xinlong; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2009-01-01

    Microwave heating was applied to fabricate interconnective porous structured bodies by foaming as-synthesized calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (Ca-deficient HA) precipitate containing H(2)O(2). The porous bodies were sintered by a microwave process with activated carbon as the embedding material to prepare nano- and submicron-structured ceramics. By comparison, conventional sintering was used to produce microstructured ceramics. The precursor particles and bulk ceramics were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mechanical testing. TEM micrographs and assessment of the size distribution showed that the needle-like precursor particles are on the nanoscale. SEM observation indicated that the ceramics formed by microwave sintering presented a structure of interconnective pores, with average grain sizes of approximately 86 and approximately 167nm. XRD patterns and FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of carbonated biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and the mechanical tests showed that the ceramics formed by microwave sintering had a compressive strength comparable to that obtained by conventional methods. Rat osteoblasts were cultured on the three kinds of BCP ceramics to evaluate their biocompatibility. Compared with the microscale group formed by conventional sintering, MTT assay and ALP assay showed that nanophase scaffolds promoted cell proliferation and differentiation respectively, and SEM observation showed that the nanoscale group clearly promoted cell adhesion. The results from this study suggest that porous carbonated biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics with a nanostructure promote osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, porous carbonated BCP ceramics with a nanostructure are simple and quick to prepare using microwaves and compared with those produced by conventional

  2. Dry mechanochemical synthesis of hydroxyapatites from dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium oxide: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    El Briak-BenAbdeslam, Hassane; Mochales, Carolina; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Nurit, Josiane; Planell, Josep A; Boudeville, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have been used successfully as synthetic bone substitutes in orthopedics, dentistry, and maxillofacial surgery. One way of preparing these ceramics is the sintering of a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), which can be obtained in different ways. Mechanochemistry is one possible means of synthesizing CDHA, with an expected molar calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) ratio +/- 0.005. The grinding can be carried out under dry or wet conditions. To optimize the experimental conditions of CDHA preparation by dry mechanosynthesis and for a better understanding of the DCPD/CaO mechanochemical reaction, we performed a kinetic study in which some of the experimental parameters were varied. Carried out with two different vertical rotating ball mills, this kinetic study showed that (1) experiments are reproducible and give as a final product a hydroxyapatite powder, formed of nano-sized crystals of around 20 nm, with a controlled Ca/P ratio; (2) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD and the time for complete reaction are in direct proportion to the mass of the ground powder; but (3) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD is independent of the Ca/P ratio while the time for complete reaction increases exponentially with the Ca/P ratio; and (4) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD corresponds to the time for complete reaction solely for Ca/P = 1.5. These observations suggest a reaction mechanism in two well differentiated stages: (First stage) CaO reacts with DCPD to give first an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with a low Ca/P ratio that transforms into CDHA when its Ca/P ratio reaches 1.5. At the same time, CaO is hydrated into Ca(OH)(2) by the water produced by the reaction. (Second stage) If the Ca/P > 1.5 in the initial mixture, the excess Ca(OH)(2) is added to CDHA 1.5 by reacting with the HPO(4) group of CDHA until its Ca/P ratio reaches the expected value. The slower the reaction, the higher the Ca/P in the initial mixture.

  3. Dry mechanochemical synthesis of hydroxyapatites from dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium oxide: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    El Briak-BenAbdeslam, Hassane; Mochales, Carolina; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Nurit, Josiane; Planell, Josep A; Boudeville, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have been used successfully as synthetic bone substitutes in orthopedics, dentistry, and maxillofacial surgery. One way of preparing these ceramics is the sintering of a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), which can be obtained in different ways. Mechanochemistry is one possible means of synthesizing CDHA, with an expected molar calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) ratio +/- 0.005. The grinding can be carried out under dry or wet conditions. To optimize the experimental conditions of CDHA preparation by dry mechanosynthesis and for a better understanding of the DCPD/CaO mechanochemical reaction, we performed a kinetic study in which some of the experimental parameters were varied. Carried out with two different vertical rotating ball mills, this kinetic study showed that (1) experiments are reproducible and give as a final product a hydroxyapatite powder, formed of nano-sized crystals of around 20 nm, with a controlled Ca/P ratio; (2) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD and the time for complete reaction are in direct proportion to the mass of the ground powder; but (3) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD is independent of the Ca/P ratio while the time for complete reaction increases exponentially with the Ca/P ratio; and (4) the time for complete disappearance of DCPD corresponds to the time for complete reaction solely for Ca/P = 1.5. These observations suggest a reaction mechanism in two well differentiated stages: (First stage) CaO reacts with DCPD to give first an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with a low Ca/P ratio that transforms into CDHA when its Ca/P ratio reaches 1.5. At the same time, CaO is hydrated into Ca(OH)(2) by the water produced by the reaction. (Second stage) If the Ca/P > 1.5 in the initial mixture, the excess Ca(OH)(2) is added to CDHA 1.5 by reacting with the HPO(4) group of CDHA until its Ca/P ratio reaches the expected value. The slower the reaction, the higher the Ca/P in the initial mixture. PMID

  4. Bioactive ceramic-reinforced composites for bone augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used to repair the human body for millennia, but it is only since the 1970s that man-made composites have been used. Hydroxyapatite (HA)-reinforced polyethylene (PE) is the first of the ‘second-generation’ biomaterials that have been developed to be bioactive rather than bioinert. The mechanical properties have been characterized using quasi-static, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness testing, and these studies have allowed optimization of the production method. The in vitro and in vivo biological properties have been investigated with a range of filler content and have shown that the presence of sufficient bioactive filler leads to a bioactive composite. Finally, the material has been applied clinically, initially in the orbital floor and later in the middle ear. From this initial combination of HA in PE other bioactive ceramic polymer composites have been developed. PMID:20591846

  5. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  7. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Experiments with ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, E. K.; Rollins, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes the procedures and techniques used in the application of a ceramic coating and the evaluation of test parts through observation of the cracks that occur in this coating due to loading.

  10. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Ceramic heat pipe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Ceramic materials used in conventional brickwork heat exchanger configurations increase allowable temperatures; however, joint leakage problems limit use of these designs. Ceramic tube heat exchanger designs reduce these problems but still require sliding joints and compliant tube end seals. Ceramic heat pipe based recuperator designs eliminate the sealing problems that limited the high temperature heat recovery installations. Heat pipe recuperators offer high corrosion and abrasion resistance, high temperature capability, reduced leakage, element redundancy, and simplified replacement and cleaning. The development of ceramic heat pipe recuperator elements involves the selection and test of materials and fabrication techniques having production potential, evaluation of technology in subscale tests, design and test of components for full scale recuperator applications, and demonstration of heat pipes in subscale and full scale recuperator installation.

  12. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  13. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  14. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  15. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  16. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphases is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  17. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.E.

    1982-11-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphasis is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  18. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  20. NANOSTRUCTURED CERAMICS AND COMPOSITES FOR REFRACTORY APPLICATIONS IN COAL GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Brown

    2005-01-31

    A class of ceramics, capable of exhibiting low coefficients of thermal expansion and catalytic properties was investigated. Investigations were directed towards nanoengineering of NZP ceramics and NZP-based composites by chemical means by controlling their compositions and processing variables. NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (NZP) was synthesized by combining water-soluble precursors leading to the precipitation of a gel that was dried, calcined, pressed into pellets, then fired at 850 C. Without chemical additives, the resulting ceramic comprised pores ranging in size from approximately 25 to 50 nm and a surface area of about 30m{sup 2}/g. Hydroxyapatite, which has a needle-like morphology, was mechanically mixed with the calcined gel to template NZP crystallization. What resulted was a coarsening of the pore structure and a decrease in surface area. When copper nitrate was added to the solution during synthesis, the resulting ceramic underwent shrinkage upon firing as well as an increase in strength. HAp and copper additions combined resulted in 40% volume shrinkage and a doubling of the tensile strength to 16MPa. A very different type of porosity was achieved when silica was partly substituted for phosphorous in the NZP structure. Na{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}P)O{sub 12} (NASCION) was synthesized in the same manner as NZP, but the fired ceramic possessed a reticulated pore structure comprising large cavities ranging in size from 5 to 50 {micro}m. The NASCION ceramic either shrank or expanded upon firing depending on when the silica was added during synthesis. When the silica precursor (amorphous, precipitated silica) was added before the calcining step, the pressed pellets expanded during firing, whereas they shrank when the silica was added after the gel was calcined. The observed dilation increased with increasing calcining temperature and particle size, up to 26%. The contraction of the ceramic when fired increased with increasing calcining temperature and a

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway.

  2. Effect of collagen on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Ou, Keng-Liang; Chung, Ren-Jei; Tsai, Fu-Yi; Liang, Pei-Yu; Huang, Shih-Wei; Chang, Shou-Yi

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of bioactive coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates were investigated using instrumented nanoindentation. The aim was to observe the differences in the mechanical properties before and after immersion in collagen solution. The hydroxyapatite coatings were prepared through two processes: self-assembly in simulated body fluid and a hydrothermal method. Sintered hydroxyapatite disks were used as controls. The test samples were then incubated in a dilute collagen solution for 24 hours to produce composite coatings. The materials were investigated using XRD, SEM and nanoindentation. The results showed that the grain sizes of the hydroxyapatite coatings formed using two processes were 1 μm and 10 μm, respectively. The Young's modulus of the pure hydroxyapatite, the disk and the coatings, was 3.6 GPa. After collagen incubation treatment, the composites had a Young's modulus of 7.5 GPa. The results also showed that the strengthening phenomena of collagen were more obvious for homogeneous and small-grain hydroxyapatite coatings. These results suggest that there are similarities between these HAp/collagen composited and natural composite materials, such as teeth and bones.

  3. New Bismuth-Substituted Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles for Bone Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Bargan, Ana Maria; Luca, Constantin

    2015-11-01

    New bismuth-substituted hydroxyapatite [Ca10- x Bi x (PO4)6(OH)2 where x = 0-2.5] nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method from aqueous solutions. The structural properties of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray analysis, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. The results confirm that bismuth ions have been incorporated into the hydroxyapatite lattice. The prepared nanocrystalline powders consisted of hydroxyapatite as single phase with hexagonal structure, crystal sizes smaller than 60 nm and (Bi + Ca)/P atomic ratio of around 1.67. The hydroxyapatite samples doped with Bi have mesoporous textures with pores size of around 2 nm and specific surface area in the range of 12-25 m2/g. The Bi-substituted hydroxyapatite powders are more effective against Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria than Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  4. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  5. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  6. Hydroxyapatite and urate crystal induced cytokine release by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, W H; Dieppe, P A; Elson, C J; Bradfield, J W

    1989-01-01

    Destructive osteoarthritis is characterised by rapidly progressive joint destruction associated with intra-articular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. The possible role of such crystals in the pathogenesis of this condition was investigated by testing the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate the production of bone resorbing activity from mouse peritoneal macrophages. Urate crystals were used for comparison. Culture supernatants were tested for bone resorbing activity using the mouse calvarial bone resorption assay, for interleukin 1 using a standard lymphocyte activation assay, and for prostaglandin E2 by radioimmunoassay. Culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with hydroxyapatite crystals contained dialysable bone resorbing activity, high concentrations of prostaglandin E2, but no interleukin 1 like activity. The production of the bone resorbing agent was prevented by culturing macrophages with hydroxyapatite crystals in the presence of indomethacin. By contrast, culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with urate crystals contained bone resorbing activity, which was only partly removed by dialysis, and interleukin 1 like activity. The latter was shown to be increased in culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with urate crystals in the presence of indomethacin, while production of bone resorbing activity was partially inhibited. It is considered that the bone resorbing activity liberated from macrophages stimulated by hydroxyapatite crystals can be explained by the presence of prostaglandin E2 alone, whereas the activity liberated by urate crystals is due to both prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1. PMID:2545171

  7. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lijia; Duan, Xin; Xiang, Zhou; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/β-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede osteoinduction by CP. Overall, our results may shed light on clear mechanism study of bone induction in the future.

  8. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  9. Industry turns to ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Constance, J.

    1990-03-01

    Developments in the area of ceramic composites, which can be used to construct stronger, lighter weight, and more fuel-efficient aircraft, are examined. Ceramic composites are applicable aircraft braking systems, hypersonic fuselage skins, engine parts, and missile guidance fins. The production and testing of new ceramic composites are discussed. Consideration is given to the production of ceramic composites of an alumina or aluminum nitride matrix; developing glass ceramic matrix composites and silicon nitride matrix composites; and improving synthesis and processing technology to enhance the reliability of ceramic composites.

  10. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  11. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  12. Production of hydroxyapatite from waste mussel shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mark I.; Barakat, Haneen; Patterson, Darrell Alec

    2011-10-01

    This work describes the formation of Hydroxyaptite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, from waste mussel shells from the New Zealand aquaculture industry. The raw shells are first calcined to produce lime (CaO) and then reacted in a purpose built reactor to form the Hydroxyapatite (HA) in a low temperature batch process. The calcination was studied in terms of the effects of temperature, heating rate, holding time, nitrogen flow rate and particle size. The crystals formed in the batch reactor were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Optimised conditions in the calcination stage resulted in powder with around 95% conversion to lime. The as-produced HA showed poor crystallinity and the presence of impurities, although both of these features were improved by a suitable post heat treatment process. The post treated material showed good crystallinity and was comparable to commercially produced material. Preliminary biocompatibility experiments showed that the HA stimulated cell growth and promoted mineralization. The production of HA from mussel shells in a room temperature, ambient pressure process is not only a sustainable use of waste material, but also from an industrial point of view the process has considerable potential for reducing costs associated with both starting materials and energy.

  13. Hydroxyapatite growth on cotton fibers modified chemically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela Caselis, J. L.; Reyes Cervantes, E.; Landeta Cortés, G.; Agustín Serrano, R.; Rubio Rosas, E.

    2014-09-01

    We have prepared carboxymethyl cellulose fibers (CMC) by chemically modifying cotton cellulose with monochloroacetic acid and calcium chloride solution. This modification favored the growth of hydroxyapatite (HAP) on the surface of the CMC fibers in contact with simulated body fluid solutions (SBF). After soaking in SBF for periods of 7, 14 and 21 days, formation of HAP was observed. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that crystallinity, crystallite size, and growth of HAP increased with the soaking time. The amount of HAP deposited on CMC fibers increased greatly after 21 days of immersion in the SBF, while the substrate surface was totally covered with hemispherical aggregates with the size of the order of 2 microns. Elemental analysis showed the presence of calcium and phosphate, with calcium/phosphate atomic ratio of 1.54. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy bands confirmed the presence of HAP. The results suggest that cotton modified by calcium treatment has a nucleating ability and can accelerate the nucleation of HAP crystals.

  14. Bone formation on synthetic precursors of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, O; Nakamura, M; Miyasaka, Y; Kagayama, M; Sakurai, M

    1991-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reaction of skeletal tissue to various synthetic calcium phosphate (Ca-P) compounds in vivo. Five synthetic Ca-P compounds were implanted into the subperiosteal area of the calvaria of 7-week-old BALB/c mice for one to 15 weeks. Synthetic compounds were dicalcium phosphate (DCP), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatile (HA). Implanted DCP, OCP and ACP were found to be converted to apatitic phase by x-ray microdiffraction analysis using undecalcified specimens. Structure of bone was found out on all of Ca-P compounds eventually at late stage under the light microscope, but the rate of bone formation calculated from a number of experiments varied on respective synthetic Ca-P compound. It was high as 80% for DCP, OCP and ACP, but was low as 5.6% for Ca-deficient HA, and no reaction was found for HA at the stage of 3 weeks. Fine filaments and granular materials in the newly formed bone matrix were detected at 7 days around the remnants of OCP particles which already converted to apatitic phase by ultrastructural study of decalcified specimens. These structures were very similar to the components of bone nodules seen in intramembranous osteogenesis. It is postulated that the precursors of HA have an important role in intramembranous osteogenesis.

  15. Biodegradable magnesium-hydroxyapatite metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank; Feyerabend, Frank; Maier, Petra; Fischer, Jens; Störmer, Michael; Blawert, Carsten; Dietzel, Wolfgang; Hort, Norbert

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with adjustable corrosion rates and suitable mechanical properties. An approach to this challenge might be the application of metal matrix composite (MMC) based on magnesium alloys. In this study, a MMC made of magnesium alloy AZ91D as a matrix and hydroxyapatite (HA) particles as reinforcements have been investigated in vitro for mechanical, corrosive and cytocompatible properties. The mechanical properties of the MMC-HA were adjustable by the choice of HA particle size and distribution. Corrosion tests revealed that HA particles stabilised the corrosion rate and exhibited more uniform corrosion attack in artificial sea water and cell solutions. The phase identification showed that all samples contained hcp-Mg, Mg(17)Al(12), and HA before and after immersion. After immersion in artificial sea water CaCO3 was found on MMC-HA surfaces, while no formation of CaCO3 was found after immersion in cell solutions with and without proteins. Co-cultivation of MMC-HA with human bone derived cells (HBDC), cells of an osteoblasts lineage (MG-63) and cells of a macrophage lineage (RAW264.7) revealed that RAW264.7, MG-63 and HBDC adhere, proliferate and survive on the corroding surfaces of MMC-HA. In summary, biodegradable MMC-HA are cytocompatible biomaterials with adjustable mechanical and corrosive properties.

  16. Characterization of hydroxyapatite by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lugo, V; Hernández, J Sanchez; Arellano-Jimenez, Ma J; Hernández-Tejeda, P H; Recillas-Gispert, S

    2005-12-01

    The obtention of hydroxyapatite (HAp) is reported using brushite (CaHPO4.2H2O) and the skeleton of a starfish (Mellita eduardobarrosoi sp. nov.), primarily composed of magnesian calcite ((Ca,Mg)CO3) as precursors. Stoichiometric amounts of both were reacted under hydrothermal conditions: a pressure of 5.8 MPa and a temperature of 200 degrees C for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 h of reaction times. The samples obtained were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Two defined populations of HAp fibers were found: A bundle of fibers 75 mum in length and 1-13 mum in diameter, and a second bundle of fibers 5 mum in length and less than 0.5 mum in diameter. Furthermore, an increase in HAp formation and a Ca/P ratio as a function of reaction time were observed. The growth mechanism of HAp is also discussed. PMID:17481330

  17. Characterization of Hydroxyapatite by Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Lugo, V.; Sanchez Hernández, J.; Arellano-Jimenez, Ma. J.; Hernández-Tejeda, P. H.; Recillas-Gispert, S.

    2005-12-01

    The obtention of hydroxyapatite (HAp) is reported using brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O) and the skeleton of a starfish (Mellita eduardobarrosoi sp. nov.), primarily composed of magnesian calcite ((Ca,Mg)CO3) as precursors. Stoichiometric amounts of both were reacted under hydrothermal conditions: a pressure of 5.8 MPa and a temperature of 200°C for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 h of reaction times. The samples obtained were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Two defined populations of HAp fibers were found: A bundle of fibers 75 [mu]m in length and 1 13 [mu]m in diameter, and a second bundle of fibers 5 [mu]m in length and less than 0.5 [mu]m in diameter. Furthermore, an increase in HAp formation and a Ca/P ratio as a function of reaction time were observed. The growth mechanism of HAp is also discussed.

  18. Ion exchange in hydroxyapatite with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    Naturally occurring hydroxyapatite, Ca5(PO4)3(OH) (HAP), is the main inorganic component of bone matrix, with synthetic analogues finding applications in bioceramics and catalysis. An interesting and valuable property of both natural and synthetic HAP is the ability to undergo cationic and anionic substitution. The lanthanides are well-suited for substitution for the Ca(2+) sites within HAP, because of their similarities in ionic radii, donor atom requirements, and coordination geometries. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the thermodynamics of ion exchange in HAP with a representative series of lanthanide ions, La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), reporting the association constant (Ka), ion-exchange thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG), and binding stoichiometry (n). We also probe the nature of the La(3+):HAP interaction by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), in support of the ITC results. PMID:25594577

  19. All-ceramic alternatives to conventional metal-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E A

    1998-03-01

    In the search for the ultimate esthetic restorative material, many new all-ceramic systems have been introduced to the market. One such system, In-Ceram, is primarily crystalline in nature, whereas all other forms of ceramics used in dentistry consist primarily of a glass matrix with a crystalline phase as a filler. In-Cream can be used to make all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial denture frameworks. Three forms of In-Ceram, based on alumina, spinal (a mixture of alumina and magnesia), or zirconia, make it possible to fabricate frameworks of various translucencies by using different processing techniques. This article discusses clinical indications and contraindications for the use of In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Spinell all-ceramic restorations. Particular attention is given to cement considerations using several clinical examples.

  20. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  1. Recent Advances in Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Containing Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Michel, John; Penna, Matthew; Kochen, Juan; Cheung, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Modern day tissue engineering and cellular therapies have gravitated toward using stem cells with scaffolds as a dynamic modality to aid in differentiation and tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most studied stem cells used in combination with scaffolds. These cells differentiate along the osteogenic lineage when seeded on hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds and can be used as a therapeutic option to regenerate various tissues. In recent years, the combination of hydroxyapatite and natural or synthetic polymers has been studied extensively. Due to the interest in these scaffolds, this review will cover the wide range of hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds used with MSCs for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Further, in order to maintain a progressive scope of the field this review article will only focus on literature utilizing adult human derived MSCs (hMSCs) published in the last three years. PMID:26106425

  2. [IN VIVO EVALUATION OF POLYCAPROLACTONE-HYDROXYAPATITE SCAFFOLD BIOCOMPATIBILITY].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Kozadaev, M N; Bogomolova, N V; Matveeva, O V; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A; Sal'kovskii, Yu E; Lyubun, G P

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatibility is one of the main and very important properties for scaffolds. The aim of the present study was to investigate cells population dynamics in vivo in the process of original polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffold colonization, as well as tissue reactions to the implantation to assess the biocompatibility of the matrix. It has been found that tissue reactive changes in white rats subside completely up to the 21st day after subcutaneous polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffold implantation. Matrix was actively colonized by connective tissue cells in the period from the 7th to the 21st day of the experiment. However, intensive scaffold vascularization started from the 14th day after implantation. These findings suggest a high degree of the polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffold biocompatiblilitye.

  3. Recent Advances in Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Containing Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Michel, John; Penna, Matthew; Kochen, Juan; Cheung, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Modern day tissue engineering and cellular therapies have gravitated toward using stem cells with scaffolds as a dynamic modality to aid in differentiation and tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most studied stem cells used in combination with scaffolds. These cells differentiate along the osteogenic lineage when seeded on hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds and can be used as a therapeutic option to regenerate various tissues. In recent years, the combination of hydroxyapatite and natural or synthetic polymers has been studied extensively. Due to the interest in these scaffolds, this review will cover the wide range of hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds used with MSCs for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Further, in order to maintain a progressive scope of the field this review article will only focus on literature utilizing adult human derived MSCs (hMSCs) published in the last three years.

  4. Microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vineet; Lyne, Dina V; Barragan, Marilyn; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Bioceramic mixtures of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are widely used for bone regeneration because of their excellent cytocompatibility, osteoconduction, and osteoinduction. Therefore, we hypothesized that incorporation of a mixture of TCP and HAp in microsphere-based scaffolds would enhance osteogenesis of rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) compared to a positive control of scaffolds with encapsulated bone-morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating TCP and HAp mixtures in two different ratios (7:3 and 1:1) were fabricated with the same net ceramic content (30 wt%) to evaluate how incorporation of these ceramic mixtures would affect the osteogenesis in rBMSCs. Encapsulation of TCP/HAp mixtures impacted microsphere morphologies and the compressive moduli of the scaffolds. Additionally, TCP/HAp mixtures enhanced the end-point secretion of extracellular matrix components relevant to bone tissue compared to the "blank" (PLGA-only) microsphere-based scaffolds as evidenced by the biochemical, gene expression, histology, and immunohistochemical characterization. Moreover, the TCP/HAp mixture groups even surpassed the BMP-2 positive control group in some instances in terms of matrix synthesis and gene expression. Lastly, gene expression data suggested that the rBMSCs responded differently to different TCP/HAp ratios presented to them. Altogether, it can be concluded that TCP/HAp mixtures stimulated the differentiation of rBMSCs toward an osteoblastic phenotype, and therefore may be beneficial in gradient microsphere-based scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration. PMID:27272903

  5. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N′-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, Tg, and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite. These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of

  6. Production of zinc substituted hydroxyapatite using various precipitation routes.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, David; Best, Serena M

    2013-04-01

    Substituted hydroxyapatites have been investigated for use as bone grafts and have been investigated for many years. Zinc is of interest due to its potential to reduce bone resorption and antibacterial properties. However, it has proven problematic to substitute biologically significant levels of zinc into the crystal structure through wet chemical routes, whilst retaining the high temperature phase stability required for processing. The aim of this study is to investigate two different precipitation routes used to synthesize zinc substituted hydroxyapatite and to explore the effects of ammonia used in the reactions on the levels of zinc substituted into the crystal lattice. It was found that considerable amounts of ammonia are required to maintain a pH sufficiently high for the production of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite using a reaction between calcium nitrate, zinc nitrate and ammonium phosphate. X-ray fluorescence analysis showed that a significant proportion of the zinc added did not substitute into the hydroxyapatite lattice. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the existence of a zinc-ammonia complex that, it is proposed, inhibits zinc substitution for calcium. It was found that by reacting orthophosphoric acid with calcium nitrate and zinc nitrate, the volume of ammonia required in the reaction was reduced and higher levels of zinc substitution were achieved, with up to 0.58 wt% incorporated into the hydroxyapatite lattice. The resulting products were found to be stoichiometric hydroxyapatite and did not appear to contain any extraneous calcium phosphate phases after heat treatment up to 1100 °C. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis revealed that the effect of substituting zinc into the HA lattice was to decrease the a-lattice parameter whilst increasing the c-lattice. Transmission electron microscopy also showed that the incorporation of zinc reduced both the length and width of the precipitated crystals.

  7. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease.

  8. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  9. Structural and Magnetic Studies on Nano-crystalline Biocompatible Glass/Glass-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothiyal, G. P.; Sharma, K.; Dixit, A.; Srinivasan, A.

    2010-12-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics have been derived from bulk CaO-P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O3 glass system containing different additives like MgO, ZnO etc. by controlled crystallization. Phase formation and magnetic behaviour of glass-ceramics samples have been studied using XRD and SQUID magnetometer. The microstructure as seen by scanning electron microscopy exhibits nano sized particles. Nanocrystalline hematite and magnetite along with bone mineral phases constitute the major crystalline phases. Saturation magnetization increases with increase in amount of iron oxide since the volume fraction of magnetite has also increased. Addition of ZnO leads to increase in the saturation magnetization. In vitro response in simulated body fluid shows the formation of hydroxyapatite like layer implying the bioactive nature of the samples.

  10. Fundamental tribological properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.

  11. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  12. Microstructure and properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamano, K.

    1984-01-01

    The history of research into the microstructure and properties of ceramic ware is discussed; methods of producing ceramics with particular characteristics are investigated. Bubbles, sintering, cracks, and electron microscopy are discussed.

  13. Localized drugs delivery hydroxyapatite microspheres for osteoporosis therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ko, I. H.; Jeon, S.-H.; Chae, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the preparation of hydroxyapatite microspheres for local drugs delivery. The formation of the hydroxyapatite microspheres was initiated by enzymatic decomposition of urea and accomplished by emulsification process (water-in-oil). The microspheres obtained were sintered at 500°C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that the microspheres have various porous with random size, which maximizes the surface area. Cytotoxicity was not observed after sintering. Osteoporosis drugs, alendronate and BMP-2, were loaded into HAp microspheres and the releases of both molecules showed sustained releasing profiles.

  14. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  15. Ceramic combustor mounting

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  16. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  17. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  18. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  20. Dental ceramics coated with bioactive glass: Surface changes after exposure in a simulated body fluid under static and dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, L.; Kontonasaki, E.; Zorba, T.; Chatzistavrou, X.; Pavlidou, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Sklavounos, S.; Koidis, P.

    2003-07-01

    Bioactive materials develop a strong bond with living tissues through a carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite layer, similar to that of bone. The fabrication of a thin bioactive glass coating on dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, could provide a bioactive surface, which in combination with a tissue regenerative technique could lead to periodontal tissues attachment. The aim of this study was the in vitro investigation of the surface structure changes of dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, coated with a bioactive glass heat-treated at 950 °C, after exposure in a simulated body fluid (SBF) under two different soaking conditions. Coating of dental ceramics with a bioactive glass resulted in the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. The growth of a well-attached carbonate apatite layer on their surface after immersion in a simulated body fluid is well evidenced under both experimental conditions, although in static environment the rate of apatite growth is constant and the grown layers seem to be more dense and compact compared with the respective layers observed on specimens under dynamic conditions.

  1. Inflammatory response and bone healing capacity of two porous calcium phosphate ceramics in critical size cortical bone defects.

    PubMed

    Chatterjea, Anindita; van der Stok, Johan; Danoux, Charlène B; Yuan, Huipin; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Weinans, Harrie; de Boer, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, two open porous calcium phosphate ceramics, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), and hydroxyapatite (HA) were compared in a critical-sized femoral defect in rats. Previous comparisons of these two ceramics showed significantly greater osteoinductive potential of β-TCP upon intramuscular implantation and a better performance in a spinal fusion model in dogs. Results of the current study also showed significantly more bone formation in defects grafted with β-TCP compared to HA; however, both the ceramics were not capable of increasing bone formation to such extend that it bridges the defect. Furthermore, a more pronounced degradation of β-TCP was observed as compared to HA. Progression of inflammation and initiation of new bone formation were assessed for both materials at multiple time points by histological and fluorochrome-based analyses. Until 12 days postimplantation, a strong inflammatory response in absence of new bone formation was observed in both ceramics, without obvious differences between the two materials. Four weeks postimplantation, signs of new bone formation were found in both β-TCP and HA. At 6 weeks, inflammation had subsided in both ceramics while bone deposition continued. In conclusion, the two ceramics differed in the amount of bone formed after 8 weeks of implantation, whereas no differences were found in the duration of the inflammatory phase after implantation or initiation of new bone formation.

  2. A novel squid pen chitosan/hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate composite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Amin; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Sun, Zhifa; Ali, Azam; Gould, Maree

    2015-10-01

    Squid pen chitosan was used in the fabrication of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells were used as the calcium phosphate source. The composite was prepared using 2.5% tripolyphosphate (TPP) and 1% glycerol as a cross-linker and plasticizer, respectively. The weight percent (wt.%) ratios of the ceramic components in the composite were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/Chi). The biodegradation rate and structural properties of the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microCT(μCT) results indicated that the composites have a well defined lamellar structure with an average pore size of 200 μm. The porosity of the composites decreased from 88 to 56% by increasing the ratio of HA/β-TCP from 30 to 70%. After 28 days of incubation in a physiological solution, the scaffolds were degraded by approximately 30%. In vitro investigations showed that the composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. The obtained data suggests that the squid pen chitosan composites are potential candidates for bone regeneration.

  3. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  4. Electrospinning biomedical nanocomposite fibers of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Knowles, J C

    2006-12-01

    Development of fibrous matrices of bioceramic-biopolymer nanocomposite offers great potential in the field of bone regeneration and tissue engineering. However, in order to produce electrospun fibers with homogeneous structure, it is essential for the ceramic powder to be fine and to remain stable in suspension. Herein, we developed a novel method whereby the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) was kept in suspension in biopolymer poly(lactic acid) (PLA). The strategy was to introduce a surfactant hydroxysteric acid (HSA) between the hydrophilic HA powder and the hydrophobic chloroform-dissolved PLA. The HA nanopowder was dispersed effectively in HSA and mixed homogeneously with PLA. Continuous and uniform fibers were generated successfully with diameters of approximately 1-2 microm, and featured a well-developed nanocomposite structure of HA nanopowder-dispersed PLA. Initial cellular assays showed excellent cell attachment and proliferation and also enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase at 7 days of culturing. The HA-PLA nanocomposite fibers may be potentially useful in tissue engineering applications, particularly as three-dimensional substrates for bone growth.

  5. Microwave processed nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite: Simultaneous enhancement of mechanical and biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Dasgupta, Sudip; Tarafder, Solaiman; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Despite excellent bioactivity of hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics, poor mechanical strength has limited its applications primarily to coatings and other non-load bearing areas as bone grafts. Using synthesized HA nanopowder, dense compacts with grain sizes in nanometers to micrometers were processed via microwave sintering between 1000 and 1150 °C for 20 minutes. Here we demonstrate that mechanical properties, such as compressive strength, hardness and indentation fracture toughness of HA compacts increased with a decrease in grain size. HA with 168± 86 nm grain size showed the highest compressive strength of 395±42 MPa, hardness of 8.4±0.4 GPa and indentation fracture toughness of 1.9 ±0.2 MPam1/2. To study the in vitro biological properties, HA compacts with grain size between 168 nm and 1.16 µm were assessed for in vitro bone cell-materials interactions with human osteoblast cell line. Vinculin protein expression for cell attachment and bone cell proliferation using MTT assay showed surfaces with finer grains provided better bone cell-materials interactions than coarse grained samples. Our results indicate simultaneous improvements in mechanical and biological properties in microwave sintered HA compacts with nanoscale grain size. PMID:20230922

  6. Development of metal/hydroxyapatite composite surface coatings. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.

    1992-01-01

    Metal/ceramic composites containing calcium phosphates have shown considerable success in enhancing bone growth into implants, thereby providing cementless fixation. Calcium phosphate occurs in various phases. The extent of compatibility of the composites to the hosts depend upon the phase of the calcium phosphate. A crystalline phase known as hydroxyapatite (HA) which naturally occurs in bones and teeth of animals has proved to enhance bone growth. This work involved development of a composite that will retain both the biological properties of HA and the mechanical properties of the metal. In this method, HA was codeposited electrolytically on a metal substrate in a metal matrix to provide adequate adhesion to the substrate. Codeposited HA on the surface was characterized using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to ensure that HA structure remained unaltered throughout the conditions employed during the process. The development of the composite was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 consisted of codeposition of HA in a single metal matrix, characterization of HA and testing the viability of the process to all substrate geometry. In the second phase, a process was developed to electrolytically deposit cobalt, chromium, molybdenum alloy (vitallium) and then codeposit HA in that alloy matrix on substrates. The plated alloy was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and compared with similar analyses for cast vitallium alloy. The deposited alloy was also tested for corrosion and substrate adhesion.

  7. Functional hydroxyapatite bioceramics with excellent osteoconductivity and stern-interface induced antibacterial ability.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Gao, Jianyong; Wang, Ming; Shao, Yiran; Wang, Liping; Wang, Dalin; Zhu, Yingchun

    2016-04-01

    The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramics are crucial in medical applications. However, it is still a challenge to control HAp with antibacterial ability while maintaining other biological properties in the development of bioactive bone implants. Herein, we report functional silver ion substituted HAp bioceramics with excellent osteoconductivity and efficient antibacterial activity and propose a stern-interface induced antibacterial mechanism of such bioactive ceramics. In this antibacterial process, the concentration of Ag(+) at the stern-interface of Ag/HAp bioceramics is nearly 5 times higher than that in the bulk solution due to the trace dopant Ag(+) enrichment in the stern layer of the electric double layer at the negatively charged surface of Ag/HAp bioceramics. Trace Ag-doping in HAp induces a positive shift of zeta potential and increase of hydrophilicity, which may help inhibit bacterial proliferation. The positive osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of ultra-trace doped Ag/HAp are also demonstrated through actin cytoskeleton staining, MTT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays. This work may enlighten us on the artificial design of novel smart anti-infective bone grafts using ultra-trace functional elements and also suggest its potential applications in orthopedic surgery and bone osseointegration. PMID:26883734

  8. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, A.; Braic, M.; Azem, F. Ak; Titorencu, I.; Braic, V.; Pruna, V.; Kiss, A.; Parau, A. C.; Birlik, I.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  9. Characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites consolidated by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Yeon; Han, Young-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Jang, Byung-Koog; Kim, Sukyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pure HA and 1, 3, 5, and 10 vol% multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWNT-) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) were consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The relative density of pure HA increased with increasing sintering temperature, but that of the MWNT/HA composite reached almost full density at 900°C, and then decreased with further increases in sintering temperature. The relative density of the MWNT/HA composites increased with increasing MWNT content due to the excellent thermal conductivity of MWNTs. The grain size of MWNT/HA composites decreased with increasing MWNT content and increased with increasing sintering temperature. Pull-out toughening of the MWNTs of the MWNT/HA composites was observed in the fractured surface, which can be used to predict the improvement of the mechanical properties. On the other hand, the existence of undispersed or agglomerate MWNTs in the MWNT/HA composites accompanied large pores. The formation of large pores increased with increasing sintering temperature and MWNT content. The addition of MWNT in HA increased the hardness and fracture toughness by approximately 3~4 times, despite the presence of large pores produced by un-dispersed MWNTs. This provides strong evidence as to why the MWNTs are good candidates as reinforcements for strengthening the ceramic matrix. The MWNT/HA composites did not decompose during SPS sintering. The MWNT-reinforced HA composites were non-toxic and showed a good cell affinity and morphology in vitro for 1 day.

  10. Hydroxyapatite/polylactide biphasic combination scaffold loaded with dexamethasone for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Son, Jun-Sik; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; Appleford, Mark; Oh, Sunho; Ong, Joo L; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2011-12-15

    This study presents a novel design of a ceramic/polymer biphasic combination scaffold that mimics natural bone structures and is used as a bone graft substitute. To mimic the natural bone structures, the outside cortical-like shells were composed of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) with a hollow interior using a polymeric template-coating technique; the inner trabecular-like core consisted of porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLA) that was loaded with dexamethasone (DEX) and was directly produced using a particle leaching/gas forming technique to create the inner diameter of the HA scaffold. It was observed that the HA and PLA parts of the fabricated HA/PLA biphasic scaffold contained open and interconnected pore structures, and the boundary between both parts was tightly connected without any gaps. It was found that the structure of the combination scaffold was analogous to that of natural bone based on micro-computed tomography analysis. Additionally, the dense, uniform apatite layer was formed on the surface of the HA/PLA biphasic scaffold through a biomimetic process, and DEX was successfully released from the PLA of the biphasic scaffold over a 1-month period. This release caused human embryonic palatal mesenchyme cells to proliferate, differentiate, produce ECM, and form tissue in vitro. Therefore, it was concluded that this functionally graded scaffold is similar to natural bone and represents a potential bone-substitute material.

  11. Electrospun nylon 6/zinc doped hydroxyapatite membrane for protein separation: Mechanism of fouling and blocking model.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Hamid; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Salahi, Esmaeil; Tayebifard, Ali; Rahimipour, Mohamad Reza; Keyanpour-Rad, Mansour; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-02-01

    Development of composite nanofibrous membrane via electrospinning a polymer with ceramic nanoparticles (NPs) for application in protein separation systems is explored during this study. Positively charged zinc doped hydroxyapatite (xZH) NPs were prepared in three different compositions via chemical precipitation method. Herein, we created a positively charged surface containing nanoparticles on electrospun Nylon-6 nanofibers (NFs) to improve the separation and selectivity properties for adsorption of negatively charged protein, namely bovine serum albumin (BSA). The decline in permeate flux was analyzed using the framework of classical blocking models and fitting, demonstrated that the transition of fouling mechanisms was dominated during the filtration process. The standard blocking model provided the best fit of the experimental results during the mid-filtration period. The membrane decorated by NPs containing 4at.% zinc cations not only provided maximum BSA separation but also capable of separating higher amounts of BSA molecules (even after 1h filtration) than the pure Nylon membrane. Protein separation was achieved through this membrane with the incorporation of NPs that had high zeta potential (+5.9±0.2mV) and lower particle area (22,155nm(2)). The developed membrane has great potential to act as a high efficiency membrane for capturing BSA. PMID:26652392

  12. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  13. Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Hydroxyapatite Composites Consolidated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Yeon; Han, Young-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Jang, Byung-Koog; Kim, Sukyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pure HA and 1, 3, 5, and 10 vol% multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWNT-) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) were consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The relative density of pure HA increased with increasing sintering temperature, but that of the MWNT/HA composite reached almost full density at 900°C, and then decreased with further increases in sintering temperature. The relative density of the MWNT/HA composites increased with increasing MWNT content due to the excellent thermal conductivity of MWNTs. The grain size of MWNT/HA composites decreased with increasing MWNT content and increased with increasing sintering temperature. Pull-out toughening of the MWNTs of the MWNT/HA composites was observed in the fractured surface, which can be used to predict the improvement of the mechanical properties. On the other hand, the existence of undispersed or agglomerate MWNTs in the MWNT/HA composites accompanied large pores. The formation of large pores increased with increasing sintering temperature and MWNT content. The addition of MWNT in HA increased the hardness and fracture toughness by approximately 3~4 times, despite the presence of large pores produced by un-dispersed MWNTs. This provides strong evidence as to why the MWNTs are good candidates as reinforcements for strengthening the ceramic matrix. The MWNT/HA composites did not decompose during SPS sintering. The MWNT-reinforced HA composites were non-toxic and showed a good cell affinity and morphology in vitro for 1 day. PMID:24724100

  14. Suspension Rheology, Porosity and Mechanical Strength of Porous Hydroxyapatite Obtained by Gel-casting and Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Ocampo, Jazmín; Escobar Jaramillo, Mateo; Escobar Sierra, Diana; Ossa Orozco, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    The gel-casting technique (GC) and infiltration of polymer foam combined with gel-casting (IG) were used to produce hydroxyapatite porous bodies. Due to the fact that the process begins with the preparation of the suspensions, it is necessary to know the rheological properties of the ceramic slurry. This is a critical factor needed to optimize the mechanical strength of the porous body obtained. Therefore, the rheological behavior of various HA slurries was assessed. 40 and 50% solids and three different monomers were evaluated. Subsequently, the compressive strength and porosity of the porous bodies obtained were evaluated. The results revealed that the chemical composition of each monomer can affect the dispersion and rheological properties of the suspension, which directly affects the mechanical properties of the porous bodies. The porous bodies obtained by the GC technique showed strengths higher than those obtained by IG compression. The control executed over the rheology of the suspension was more effective in bodies produced by GC, because IG pyrolysis of polyurethane foam also influenced the mechanical properties of the final product.

  15. Development and optimisation of hydroxyapatite-ß-TCP functionally gradated biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Gasik, Michael; Keski-Honkola, Anu; Bilotsky, Yevgen; Friman, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Use of hydroxyapatite (HAP) for biomaterials is widely established, often in a combination with titanium alloy substrates in orthopaedic and other implants. Porous HAP-based coatings undergo sintering and heat treatment processes to achieve proper level of density yet avoiding undesirable reactions and phase changes. Thermal expansion mismatch between constituents may also lead to cracking of the coating due to excessive thermal stresses. Thus control of mechanical properties and stress state in the coating during the whole processing cycle represents some challenges when trying to combine conflicting objectives. In this work a method of optimisation of mechanical behaviour of an FGM biomaterial coating or scaffold composed of HAP and beta-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP) is considered. For coating on titanium-based substrates which have anatase (TiO2) top layer, thermodynamic equilibrium was analysed and the "safe" compositional path was found to ensure preservation of original ceramic phases during processing. Experimental studies of HAP-TCP sintering kinetics of different compositions were carried out with dilatometry to obtain true shrinkage curves and thermal expansion functions. These data were integrated with thermo-mechanical calculations of stresses and strains in HAP-ß-TCP FGM during processing, which were optimised with respect to minimal stresses, stresses derivatives and curvatures. The beneficial effect of compositional gradation on behaviour of these materials is shown.

  16. Direct writing of porous tissue scaffolds based on Vaseline-doped hydroxyapatite inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Yun; Li, Long-Tu; Li, Bo

    2015-05-01

    A novel type of 40 vol.% hydroxyapatite (HAp), Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, suspension doped with Vaseline was developed, and porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds were fabricated by using a direct ink writing (DIW) method. The preparation of the HAp inks and the principles of the DIW technique were investigated. The microporosity of the scaffold wall increased after introducing the Vaseline, whereas macroporosity can be produced by varying the DIW technique. The micromorphology test results show that the samples sintered at 1150°C for 2 h formed ceramics with a set amount of pores, which benefit cell growth by providing more locations for cells to attach and proliferate. Under a microscope, the proliferations of human liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells can be observed on the 3D HAp scaffolds. The DIW method has the advantages of a rapid process, ease of design and high precision control, potentially inspiring the design and application of biomaterials and scaffolds.

  17. Lightweight ceramic insulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for manufacturing a low density ceramic powder which can be formed to make a lightweight material for insulation or other construction. The ceramic product made from the process has a final density of less than 25 to about 1 percent of the theoretical weight of the ceramic powder. The ceramic product is lightweight and can be made to withstand high temperatures greater than 1400 C.

  18. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  19. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A review is presented of Lewis Research Center efforts to develop nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterizing advanced ceramic materials. Various approaches involved the use of analytical ultrasonics to characterize monolythic ceramic microstructures, acousto-ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic matrix composites, damage monitoring in impact specimens by microfocus X-ray radiography and scanning ultrasonics, and high resolution computed X-ray tomography to identify structural features in fiber reinforced ceramics.

  1. The response of peritoneal macrophages after implantation of several ceramics as measured by the change of ectoenzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Otto, B; Ogilvie, A

    1998-06-01

    The bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics with various calcium: phosphorus ratios: Ca/P = 1.67 (hydroxyapatite, HA), Ca/P = 1.6 and Ca/P = 1.5 (tricalcium phosphate, beta-TCP), the bioinert aluminium oxide ceramic (Al2O3) and the toxic calcium oxide ceramic (CaO) have been investigated with respect to their ability to activate peritoneal macrophages of NMRI-mice and with respect to their influence on the extracellular nucleotide degradation of these macrophages. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of ceramic particles in an isotone salt solution (phosphate-buffered saline = PBS), we observed that the peritoneal macrophages were only slightly activated into the responsive state, independent of the type of ceramic. 5'Nucleotidase (5'N) ectoenzyme hydrolyses adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and a decrease of its activity is a general biochemical marker of activated macrophages. This ectoenzyme activity was slightly reduced after ceramic implantation. The lacking rise of the extracellular diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A)-catabolism by the macrophage ectoenzyme alkaline phosphodiesterase I (APD) demonstrated that the peritoneal macrophages did not completely reach the responsive state. After the implantation of calcium phosphate ceramics the extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-reduction was slightly diminished. After the implantation of tricalcium phosphate ceramic about 30% more peritoneal exsudate cells (PEC) were obtained from the peritoneal cavity than after injections of pure PBS (used as non-inflammatory control). Similar to the phenomena following the injection of thioglycollate (Tg, inflammation producing control agent) a slightly but not significantly increased proportion of pseudopodia-building cells was observed after the implantation of the ceramic with Ca/P = 1.6.

  2. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Sheen, S.H.

    1992-12-08

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable is described with composite ceramic ends, or a U-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting. 7 figs.

  3. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  4. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  5. Reaction of the dental pulp to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Jaber, L; Mascrès, C; Donohue, W B

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the action of hydroxyapatite (HA) (Osteogen HA Resorb, GBD Marketing Group Inc., Valley Stream, N.Y.) on the dental pulp of rats. Four upper molar pulps in 45 rats were exposed and capped with synthetic HA (Osteogen) with a stereoscopic microscope. Pulps capped with calcium hydroxide (Dycal, L.D. Caulk Co., Milford, Del.) served as controls. The cavities were filled with amalgam, and the molars on each side of the maxilla were protected by the placement of a pedodontic steel crown. Pulp inflammation and dentin repair were compared by histologic observations and computer image analysis after 7, 14, and 28 days. After 7 days a partial acute pulpitis were observed in specimens treated with Osteogen or Dycal. Reparative dentin formation along the pulp walls was also seen. After 14 days the pulpitis was more extensive in the Osteogen-treated teeth than in the control teeth. Dentin formation as measured by morphometric analysis was more pronounced in Osteogen-treated teeth. Neo-odontoblasts were observed after the use of both materials. After 28 days an acute inflammatory reaction was still evident in the Osteogen-treated group. A complete dentinal bridge was observed more frequently with Dycal than with Osteogen. Despite the putative abilities of HA to be osteoconductive, osteogenic, and dentinogenic, the results of this study indicate that it should not be used as a pulp-capping agent because of its tendency to cause scattered dystrophic calcification in the dental pulp, which could interfere with future endodontic treatment. PMID:1318535

  6. Hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, M T; Brown, P W

    1998-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was hydrolysed in water and in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution at temperatures from 25-60 degrees C. Hydrolysis was incomplete in water. At 25 degrees C, DCPD partially hydrolysed to hydroxyapatite (HAp). Formation of HAp is indicative of incongruent DCPD dissolution. At the higher temperatures, hydrolysis to HAp was more extensive and was accompanied by the formation of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Both of these processes are endothermic. When hydrolysis was carried out in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution, heat absorption was greater at any given temperature than for hydrolysis in water. Complete hydrolysis to HAp occurred in this solution. The hydrolysis of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution was also endothermic. The complete conversion of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution would not be expected if the only effect of this solution was to cause DCPD dissolution to become congruent. Because of the buffering capacity of a dibasic sodium phosphate solution, DCPD hydrolysed completely to HAp. Complete conversion to HAp was accompanied by the conversion of dibasic sodium phosphate to monobasic sodium phosphate. The formation of DCP was not observed indicating that the sodium phosphate solution precluded the DCPD-to-DCP dehydration reaction. In addition to affecting the extent of hydrolysis, reaction in the sodium phosphate solution also caused a morphological change in the HAp which formed. HAp formed by hydrolysis in water was needle-like to globular while that formed in the sodium phosphate solution exhibited a florette-like morphology.

  7. Hydroxyapatite-reinforced collagen tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert J.

    Scaffolds have been fabricated from a wide variety of materials and most have showed some success, either as bone graft substitutes or as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, all current scaffold compositions and architectures suffer from one or more flaws including poor mechanical properties, lack of biological response, nondegradability, or a scaffold architecture not conducive to osteointegration. Biomimetic approaches to scaffold design using the two main components of bone tissue, collagen and hydroxyapatite, resulted in scaffolds with superior biological properties but relatively poor mechanical properties and scaffold architecture. It was hypothesized that by optimizing scaffold composition and architecture, HA-collagen bone tissue engineering scaffolds could provide both an excellent biological response along with improved structural properties. The mechanical properties of freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds, the most common type of porous HA-collagen material, were first shown to be increased by the addition of HA reinforcements, but scaffold stiffness still fell far short of the desired range. Based on limitations inherent in the freeze-dried process, a new type of leached-porogen scaffold fabrication process was developed. Proof-of-concept scaffolds demonstrated the feasibility of producing leached-porogen HA-collagen materials, and the scaffold architecture was optimized though careful selection of porogen particle size and shape along with an improved crosslinking technique. The final scaffolds exhibited substantially increased compressive modulus compared to previous types HA-collagen scaffolds, while the porosity, pore size, and scaffold permeability were tailored to be suitable for bone tissue ingrowth. An in vitro study demonstrated the capacity of the leached-porogen scaffolds to serve as a substrate for the differentiation of osteoblasts and subsequent production of new bone tissue. The new leached-porogen scaffold HA-collagen scaffolds were

  8. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  9. Erosion of composite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    The theoretical basis to describe solid-particle erosion of monolithic ceramics is well developed. In many cases, the models can account for the impact velocity, impact angle and erodent-size dependencies of the steady-state erosion rate. In addition, the models account for effects of materials parameters such as fracture toughness and hardness. Steady-state erosion measurements on a wide variety of composite ceramics, including SiC whisker-reinforced Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] containing Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] or SiC whiskers, Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]-stabilized ZrO[sub 2] reinforced with SiC whiskers, and duplex-microstructure Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] have been reported. The theories developed for monolithic ceramics are, however, less successful in describing the results for composites.

  10. Erosion of composite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    The theoretical basis to describe solid-particle erosion of monolithic ceramics is well developed. In many cases, the models can account for the impact velocity, impact angle and erodent-size dependencies of the steady-state erosion rate. In addition, the models account for effects of materials parameters such as fracture toughness and hardness. Steady-state erosion measurements on a wide variety of composite ceramics, including SiC whisker-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} containing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} or SiC whiskers, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} reinforced with SiC whiskers, and duplex-microstructure Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been reported. The theories developed for monolithic ceramics are, however, less successful in describing the results for composites.

  11. Whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, D.A.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1996-06-03

    The process for making an in-situ whisker reinforced glass-ceramic that is up to 1.5 times as strong as conventional glass-ceramics was developed at Virginia Tech and patented in 1993. This technology has been identified as having commercial potential for use in high temperature heat exchanger applications for the electric power generation field by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT). This technology was licensed by MATVA, Inc., a small Virginia business, for further development. In particular, the goal of this project was to develop a property database and conduct initial testing of heat exchanger prototypes to demonstrate its potential application. This final report describes how the glass precursor was formed, physical properties of the glass-ceramic, techniques for making heat exchanger prototypes.

  12. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  13. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  14. Adhesion between biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite: Relevance to synthetic bone-like materials and tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neuendorf, R E; Saiz, E; Tomsia, A P; Ritchie, R O

    2008-09-01

    Many studies are currently underway on the quest to make synthetic bone-like materials with composites of polymeric materials and hydroxyapatite (HA). In the present work, we use wetting experiments and surface tension measurements to determine the work of adhesion between biodegradable polymers and HA, with specific reference to the role of humid environments. All the polymers are found to exhibit low contact angles (ceramic with work of adhesion values ranging between 48Jm(-2) for poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and 63Jm(-2) for polylactide; these values are associated with physical bonding across the organic/inorganic interface. The corresponding mechanical fracture strengths, measured using four-point bending tests of HA-polymer-HA bonds, scale directly with the results from the wetting experiments. Short-time aging (up to 30h) in a humid environment, however, has a dramatic influence on such HA/polymer interfacial strengths; specifically, water diffusion through the organic/inorganic interface and degradation of the polymer results in a marked decrease, by some 80-90%, in the bond strengths. These results cast doubt on the use of biodegradable polymers/ceramic composites for load-bearing synthetic bone-like materials, as desired optimal mechanical properties are unlikely to be met in realistic physiological environments.

  15. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  16. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, Elizabeth; Anderson, Marc

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  17. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  18. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  19. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  20. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Why ceramic engines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Oil is still a problem for the U.S. and its allies. Transportation uses 61 percent of U.S. oil and its share is increasing, so more efficient technology should be concentrated there. Trucks' share of oil use is increasing because they are already much more efficient than autos. The primary truck opportunities are streamlining, more efficient engines, and shifting freight to railroads. More efficient engines are possible using ceramics to allow elimination of cooling systems and better use of waste exhaust heat. A 60 percent improvement seems possible if ceramics can be made tough enough and durable enough.

  2. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  3. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  4. Mechanism of Zn stabilization in hydroxyapatite and hydrated (0 0 1) surfaces of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Matos, M; Terra, J; Ellis, D E

    2010-04-14

    A basic understanding of Zn incorporation on bulk and hydrated (0 0 1) surfaces of hydroxyapatite (HA) is attained through electronic structure calculations which use a combined first principles density functional (DFT) and extended Hückel tight binding (EHTB) methodology. A Zn substituted hydroxyapatite relaxed structure is obtained through a periodic cell DFT geometry optimization method. Electronic structure properties are calculated by using both cluster DFT and periodic cell EHTB methods. Bond order calculations show that Zn preference for the Ca2 vacancy, near the OH channel and with greater structural flexibility, is associated with the formation of a four-fold (bulk) and nearly four-fold (surface) coordination, as in ZnO. When occupying the octahedral Ca1 vacancy, Zn remains six-fold in the bulk, but coordination decreases to five-fold in the surface. In the bulk and surface, Zn2 is found to be more covalent than Zn1, due to a decrease in bond lengths at the four-fold site, which approach the 1.99 Å ZnO value. Zn is however considerably less bound in the biomaterial than in the oxide, where calculated bond orders are twice as large as in HA. Surface phosphate groups (PO(4)) and hydroxide ions behave as compact individual units as in the bulk; no evidence is found for the presence of HPO(4). Ca-O bond orders decrease at the surface, with a consequent increase in ionicity. Comparison between DFT and EHTB results show that the latter method gives a good qualitative account of charge and bonding in these systems. PMID:21389531

  5. Ceramics: rationale for material selection.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Edward A; Whiteman, Yair Y

    2010-01-01

    All imaginable types of materials and techniques, from very conservative ceramic restorations to very complex restorations of either metal or high-strength crystalline ceramics veneered with porcelain, have been introduced and tried throughout the years, with varying levels of success. However, there is considerable misinformation and a general lack of published rational treatment planning guidelines about when to use the ceramics available in dentistry. This article provides a systematic process for treatment planning with ceramic materials. Specific guidelines are outlined for the appropriate clinical conditions for using the various ceramic materials.

  6. Nanostructured glass-ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-08-01

    Glass-ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications.

  7. Facilitated transport of copper with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated packed column experiments were conducted to investigate the facilitated transport of Cu with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) at different pore water velocities (0.22-2.2 cm min–1), solution pH (6.2-9.0), and fraction of Fe oxide coating on grain surfaces (', 0-0.36). The facilitated tr...

  8. Complications of motility peg placement for porous hydroxyapatite orbital implants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C-J; Liao, S-L; Jou, J-R; Kao, S C S; Hou, P-K; Chen, M-S

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the complications associated with pegging of porous hydroxyapatite orbital implants. Methods: Complications associated with pegging were retrospectively reviewed from the charts of 100 of 133 patients with hydroxyapatite implantation from 1993 to 2000. Results: 48 (48%) of the 100 hydroxyapatite implanted patients who had undergone pegging were found to have problems with their pegs, including discharge (45.8%), peg falling out (20.8%), pyogenic granulomas (16.7%), popping peg (14.6%), hydroxyapatite visible around peg hole (8.3%), part of peg shaft visible (6.2%), peg drilled off centre (6.2%), peg drilled at an angle (4.2%), and excess movement of peg (4.2%). The standard peg fell out statistically more often than the peg and sleeve system (Yates's corrected χ2, p=0.038). There was a trend towards complications of the peg with use of a standard peg (versus sleeved peg) (p=0.226). Conclusions: There are several potential complications of pegging. Most complications are minor and can be managed successfully. PMID:11914206

  9. Bone-Like Hydroxyapatite Formation in Human Blood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titov, Anatoly T.; Larionov, Peter M.; Ivanova, Alexandra S.; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.; Chernyavskiy, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the mechanism of mineralization, when hydroxyapatite (HAP) is formed in blood plasma. These observations were substantiated by in vitro simulation of HAP crystallization in the plasma of healthy adults in a controllable quasi-physiological environment (T = 37°C, pH = 7.4) and at concentrations of dissolved Ca…

  10. Accelerated Nucleation of Hydroxyapatite Using an Engineered Hydrophobin Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Melanie; Facey, Sandra J; Henkes, Thorsten M; Subkowski, Thomas; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Calcium phosphate mineralization is of particular interest in dental repair. A biomimetic approach using proteins or peptides is a highly promising way to reconstruct eroded teeth. In this study, the screening of several proteins is described for their binding and nucleating activities toward hydroxyapatite. Out of 27 tested candidates, only two hydrophobin fusion proteins showed binding abilities to hydroxyapatite in a mouthwash formulation and an increased nucleation in artificial saliva. Using a semirational approach, one of the two candidates (DEWA_5), a fusion protein consisting of a truncated section of the Bacillus subtilis synthase YaaD, the Aspergillus nidulans hydrophobin DEWA, and the rationally designed peptide P11-4 described in the literature, could be further engineered toward a faster mineral formation. The variants DEWA_5a (40aaYaaD-SDSDSD-DEWA) and DEWA_5b (40aaYaaD-RDRDRD-DEWA) were able to enhance the nucleation activity without losing the ability to form hydroxyapatite. In the case of variant DEWA_5b, an additional increase in the binding toward hydroxyapatite could be achieved. Especially with the variant DEWA_5a, the protein engineering of the rationally designed peptide sequence resulted in a resemblance of an amino acid motif that is found in nature. The engineered peptide resembles the amino acid motif in dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major proteins involved in dentinogenesis. PMID:27010648

  11. Peculiarities of hydroxyapatite/nanodiamond composites as novel implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramatarova, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Pecheva, E.; Spassov, T.; Dimitrova, M.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite/detonation nanodiamond composites are created on silica glass and cover glass by simple soaking process in an open deposition type set-up. The supersaturated solution (simulated body fluid, SBF) is prepared in a way to resemble the composition of human blood plasma. The composite growth is carried out through the addition of detonation nanodiamond particles to the SBF. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy are used to determine the surface morphology and the structure of the hydroxyapatite /detonation nanodiamond composite layers. The applied methods provide evidence that the nanodiamond surface functional groups interact strongly with the biological solution. The detonation nanodiamond surface is chemically multifunctional (surface OH, C-O-H, C = C, C-O-C and C = O groups exist), so that the hydroxyapatite is grown both by physical adsorption and chemical interaction. The OH- groups are regarded to play an important role in the hydroxyapatite growth on a diamond's surface from SBF, as they charge it negatively and attract Ca2+ ions, which in turn attract PO43- ions, thus forming apatite nuclei.

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfei; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Shengmin

    2014-06-01

    Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method were used to coat stainless steel plates by electrophoretic deposition in n-butanol with triethanolamine as a dispersant. The effect of zinc concentration in the synthesis on the morphology and microstructure of coatings was investigated. It is found that the deposition current densities significantly increase with the increasing zinc concentration. The zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is inferred that hydroxyapatite and triethanolamine predominate in the chemical composition of coatings. With the increasing Zn/Ca ratios, the contents of triethanolamine decrease in the final products. The triethanolamine can be burnt out by heat treatment. The tests of adhesive strength have confirmed good adhesion between the coatings and substrates. The formation of new apatite layer on the coatings has been observed after 7days of immersion in a simulated body fluid. In summary, the results show that dense, uniform zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings are obtained by electrophoretic deposition when the Zn/Ca ratio reaches 5%.

  13. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  14. Periodontal regeneration with stem cells-seeded collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeping; Yin, Xing; Ye, Qingsong; He, Wulin; Ge, Mengke; Zhou, Xiaofu; Hu, Jing; Zou, Shujuan

    2016-07-01

    Re-establishing compromised periodontium to its original structure, properties and function is demanding, but also challenging, for successful orthodontic treatment. In this study, the periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds, seeded with bone marrow stem cells, was investigated in a canine labial alveolar bone defect model. Bone marrow stem cells were isolated, expanded and characterized. Porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold were prepared. Attachment, migration, proliferation and morphology of bone marrow stem cells, co-cultured with porous collagen-hydroxyapatite or cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite, were evaluated in vitro. The periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold with or without bone marrow stem cells was tested in six beagle dogs, with each dog carrying one sham-operated site as healthy control, and three labial alveolar bone defects untreated to allow natural healing, treated with bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant, respectively. Animals were euthanized at 3 and 6 months (3 animals per group) after implantation and the resected maxillary and mandibular segments were examined using micro-computed tomography scan, H&E staining, Masson's staining and histometric evaluation. Bone marrow stem cells were successfully isolated and demonstrated self-renewal and multi-potency in vitro. The porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite had average pore sizes of 415 ± 20 µm and 203 ± 18 µm and porosity of 69 ± 0.5% and 50 ± 0.2%, respectively. The attachment, proliferation and migration of bone marrow stem cells were satisfactory on both porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Implantation of bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in

  15. Ceramic transactions: Ceramic joining. Volume 77

    SciTech Connect

    Reimanis, I.E.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1997-11-01

    The advent of new materials for engineering applications almost always brings a new challenge: how will these new materials be joined to a larger engineering structure? New ceramic materials are being developed for a wide variety of applications in areas such as power generation, energy conversion, automotive and aerospace, with specific applications including heat exchangers, fuel cells, turbocharger rotors, combustor liners, and for many other applications. Typically the new materials will be exposed to more hostile environments with respect to temperature, corrosion, and stress than materials in the past, and thus, many of the conventional joining techniques developed for less hostile environments do not work. Understanding fundamental issues in joining enables the development of new techniques to be able to utilize new materials. A previous DOE workshop defined fundamental and critical issues in ceramic joining and classified them into four general areas: joining techniques; joint failure; residual stress; and characterization and testing. The present international symposium is an effort to discuss some of these fundamental issues and to define areas for future research. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for articles from this symposium.

  16. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  17. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  18. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  19. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  20. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  1. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  4. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  5. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  6. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  7. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  8. Ectopic osteoid and bone formation by three calcium-phosphate ceramics in rats, rabbits and dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liao; Zhang, Bi; Bao, Chongyun; Habibovic, Pamela; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics with specific physicochemical properties have been shown to induce de novo bone formation upon ectopic implantation in a number of animal models. In this study we explored the influence of physicochemical properties as well as the animal species on material-induced ectopic bone formation. Three bioceramics were used for the study: phase-pure hydroxyapatite (HA) sintered at 1200°C and two biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics, consisting of 60 wt.% HA and 40 wt.% TCP (β-Tricalcium phosphate), sintered at either 1100°C or 1200°C. 108 samples of each ceramic were intramuscularly implanted in dogs, rabbits, and rats for 6, 12, and 24 weeks respectively. Histological and histomorphometrical analyses illustrated that ectopic bone and/or osteoid tissue formation was most pronounced in BCP sintered at 1100°C and most limited in HA, independent of the animal model. Concerning the effect of animal species, ectopic bone formation reproducibly occurred in dogs, while in rabbits and rats, new tissue formation was mainly limited to osteoid. The results of this study confirmed that the incidence and the extent of material-induced bone formation are related to both the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate ceramics and the animal model.

  9. New bioactive glass-ceramic: synthesis and application in PMMA bone cement composites.

    PubMed

    Abd Samad, Hamizah; Jaafar, Mariatti; Othman, Radzali; Kawashita, Masakazu; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2011-01-01

    In present study, a new composition of glass-ceramic was synthesized based on the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass system. Heat treatment of glass powder was carried out in 2 stages: 600 °C as the nucleation temperature and different temperature on crystallization at 850, 950 and 1000 °C. The glass-ceramic heat-treated at 950 °C was selected as bioactive filler in commercial PMMA bone cement; (PALACOS® LV) due to its ability to form 2 high crystallization phases in comparison with 850 and 1000 °C. The results of this newly glass-ceramic filled PMMA bone cement at 0-16 wt% of filler loading were compared with those of hydroxyapatite (HA). The effect of different filler loading on the setting properties was evaluated. The peak temperature during the polymerization of bone cement decreased when the liquid to powder (L/P) ratio was reduced. The setting time, however, did not show any trend when filler loading was increased. In contrast, dough time was observed to decrease with increased filler loading. Apatite morphology was observed on the surface of the glass-ceramic and selected cement after bioactivity test.

  10. New bioactive glass-ceramic: synthesis and application in PMMA bone cement composites.

    PubMed

    Abd Samad, Hamizah; Jaafar, Mariatti; Othman, Radzali; Kawashita, Masakazu; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2011-01-01

    In present study, a new composition of glass-ceramic was synthesized based on the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass system. Heat treatment of glass powder was carried out in 2 stages: 600 °C as the nucleation temperature and different temperature on crystallization at 850, 950 and 1000 °C. The glass-ceramic heat-treated at 950 °C was selected as bioactive filler in commercial PMMA bone cement; (PALACOS® LV) due to its ability to form 2 high crystallization phases in comparison with 850 and 1000 °C. The results of this newly glass-ceramic filled PMMA bone cement at 0-16 wt% of filler loading were compared with those of hydroxyapatite (HA). The effect of different filler loading on the setting properties was evaluated. The peak temperature during the polymerization of bone cement decreased when the liquid to powder (L/P) ratio was reduced. The setting time, however, did not show any trend when filler loading was increased. In contrast, dough time was observed to decrease with increased filler loading. Apatite morphology was observed on the surface of the glass-ceramic and selected cement after bioactivity test. PMID:22182792

  11. Ceramic Laser Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  12. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  13. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  14. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joseph L.; Hung, Cheng-Hung

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

  15. Oxidation and Corrosion of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites are candidates for numerous applications in high temperature environments with aggressive gases and possible corrosive deposits. There is a growing realization that high temperature oxidation and corrosion issues must be considered. There are many facets to these studies, which have been extensively covered in some recent reviews. The focus of this paper is on current research, over the past two years. In the authors' view, the most important oxidation and corrosion studies have focused on four major areas during this time frame. These are; (I) Oxidation of precursor-based ceramics; (II) Studies of the interphase material in ceramic matrix composites; (III) Water vapor interactions with ceramics, particularly in combustion environments; and (IV) Development of refractory oxide coatings for silicon-based ceramics. In this paper, we shall explore the most current work in each of these areas.

  16. Hydroxyapatite nanorods: soft-template synthesis, characterization and preliminary in vitro tests.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nga Kim; Leoni, Matteo; Maniglio, Devid; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite nanorods are excellent candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, hydroxyapatite nanorods resembling bone minerals were produced by using soft-template method with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Composite hydroxyapatite/poly(D, L)lactic acid films were prepared to evaluate the prepared hydroxyapatite nanorods in terms of cell affinity. Preliminary in vitro experiments showed that aspect ratio and film surface roughness play a vital role in controlling adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblast cell line MG 63. The hydroxyapatite nanorods with aspect ratios in the range of 5.94-7 were found to possess distinctive properties, with the corresponding hydroxyapatite/poly(D, L)lactic acid films promoting cellular confluence and a fast formation of collagen fibers as early as after 7 days of culture.

  17. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  18. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  19. Outcomes following ossicular chain reconstruction with composite prostheses: hydroxyapatite-polyethylene vs. hydroxyapatite-titanium.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yoav; Bojrab, Dennis I

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare the results of ossicular chain reconstruction (OCR) with two types of composite prosthesis: a hydroxyapatite-polyethylene (HAPEX) implant and a hydroxyapatite-titanium (HATi) prosthesis. We reviewed the records of 222 patients-104 males and 118 females, aged 8 to 79 years (mean: 39.7)-who had undergone OCR for ossicular chain dysfunction and who met our eligibility criteria. In addition to demographic data and the type of prosthesis, we compiled information on pre- and postoperative audiometric findings, the underlying diagnosis, the timing of surgery (primary, planned, or revision), the type of surgery (tympanoplasty alone, tympanoplasty with antrotomy, intact-canal-wall tympanomastoidectomy, or canal-wall-down tympanomastoidectomy), the extent of reconstruction (partial or total), the use of the malleus, the use of a tragal cartilage graft, and evidence of extrusion. Of the 222 patients, 46 had undergone insertion of either a partial (n = 36) or total (n = 10) ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP and TORP, respectively) made with HAPEX, and 176 had received a PORP (n = 101) or TORP (n = 75) made with HATi. Postoperatively, the mean air-bone gap (ABG) was 14.0 dB in the HAPEX group and 14.7 dB in the HATi group, which was not a significant difference (p = 0.61). Postoperative success (ABG ≤20 dB) with PORP was obtained in 30 of the 36 patients in the HAPEX group (83.3%) and in 87 of the 101 patients in the HATi group (86.1%), while success with TORP was achieved in 7 of 10 HAPEX patients (70.0%) and 56 of 75 HATi patients (74.7%); there was no significant difference in either PORP or TORP success rates between the HAPEX and HATi groups (p = 0.32). A significantly better hearing result was obtained when the malleus was used in reconstruction (p = 0.035), but the use of tragal cartilage led to a significantly worse outcome (p = 0.026). Revision surgery was associated with a significantly worse postoperative result (p

  20. Synthesis of nano-bioactive glass-ceramic powders and its in vitro bioactivity study in bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabian, Nima; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood

    2011-07-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have proved to be able to chemically bond to living bone due to the formation of an apatite-like layer on its surface. The aim of this work was preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic by sol-gel method. Nano-bioglass-ceramic material was crushed into powder and its bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of hydroxyapatite layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The obtained nano-bioactive glass-ceramic was analyzed before and after contact with BSA solution. This study used scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to examine its morphology, crystallinity and composition. The TEM images showed that the NBG particles size were 10-40 nm. Bioactivity of nanopowder was confirmed by SEM and XRD due to the presence of a rich bone-like apatite layer. Therefore, this nano-BSA-bioglass-ceramic composite material is promising for medical applications such as bone substitutes and drug carriers.

  1. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  2. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  3. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  4. Seal between metal and ceramic conduits

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2015-02-03

    A seal between a ceramic conduit and a metal conduit of an ion transport membrane device consisting of a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a single gasket body, and a single compliant interlayer.

  5. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  6. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.

    1997-01-01

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  7. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  8. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  9. Laser in Ceramics Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Bajrang; Jain, Pankaj

    LASER, an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation have unique properties, Which make it differ from ordinary light such as it is highly coherent, monochromatic, negligible divergence and scattering loss and a intense beam of electromagnetic radiation or light. It also occur in a wide range of wavelength/frequency (from Ultraviolet to Infrared), energy/power and beam-mode/configurations ; Due to these unique properties, it have use in wide application of ceramic processing for industrial manufacturing, fabrication of electronic circuit such as marking, serializing, engraving, cutting, micro-structuring because laser only produces localized heating, without any contact and thermal stress on the any part during processing. So there is no risk of fracturing that occurs during mechanical sawing and also reduce Cost of processing. The discussion in this paper highlight the application of laser in ceramics processing.

  10. Laser machining of ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Laudel, A.

    1980-01-01

    The Kansas City Division of The Bendix Corporation manufactures hybrid microcircuits (HMCs) using both thin film and thick film technologies. Laser machining is used to contour the ceramic substrates and to drill holes in the ceramic for frontside-backside interconnections (vias) and holes for mounting components. A 1000 W CO/sub 2/ type laser is used. The laser machining process, and methods used for removing protruding debris and debris from holes, for cleaning the machined surfaces, and for refiring are described. The laser machining process described consistently produces vias, component holes and contours with acceptable surface quality, hole locations, diameter, flatness and metallization adhesion. There are no cracks indicated by dipping in fluorescent dye penetrant and the substances are resistant to repeated thermal shock.

  11. Ceramic composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  12. Ceramic fabrication R D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project is separated into three tasks. The first task is a design and modeling effort to be carried out by MSE, Inc. The purpose of this task is to develop and analyze designs for various cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) components, including an MHD electrode for strategic defense initiative (SDI) applications and a high stress, low cost, reinforced ceramic component for armor applications. The MHD electrode design is substantially completed. A layered structure composed of molybdenum disilicide graded with quartz glass has been designed and analyzed using finite element methods. The design demonstrates the fabrication capabilities of the CCF process. The high stress, armor application component will be silicon carbide reinforced alumina in thick plates. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [FTIR and XRD analysis of hydroxyapatite from fossil human and animal teeth in Jinsha Relict, Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-min; Zhang, Qing; Bai, Song; Wang, Cheng-shan

    2007-12-01

    Diagenetic effect during burial on the hydroxyapatite in enamel and dentin from fossil human and animal teeth was examined, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For the enamel and dentin of all fossil teeth, XRD patterns exhibit bulge line and overlap between major reflections of hydroxyapatite, and the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite is low. For each infrared spectrum, H2O and OH(-) have distinct peaks of absorbance, and PO4(3-) and CO3(2-) ions have intensive infrared vibration modes at the fundamental wave numbers. The component of hydroxyapatite of all fossil teeth is similar to the modern biological hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, the index (PCI) which reflects the hydroxyapatite crystallinity of each sample ranges from 2.4 to 4.0 while the index (BPI) reflecting the amount of type B carbonate to phosphate indicates that the values of CO3(2-) content in hydroxyapatite are rather high, accordingly the crystallinity of all fossil hydroxyapatites are poor. It could be concluded that little alteration of hydroxyapatites from fossil human and animal teeth occurred in the process of diagenesis in Jinsha Relict, Chengdu, China.

  14. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D3, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence.

  15. Hydroxyapatite/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) double coating on magnesium for enhanced corrosion resistance and coating flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji-Hoon; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Sae-Mi; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite was deposited on pure magnesium (Mg) with a flexible poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer to reduce the corrosion rate of Mg and enhance coating flexibility. The poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer was uniformly coated on Mg by a spraying method, followed by hydroxyapatite deposition on the poly(ε-caprolactone) using an aerosol deposition method. In scanning electron microscopy observations, inorganic/organic composite-like structure was observed between the hydroxyapatite and poly(ε-caprolactone) layers, resulting from the collisions of hydroxyapatite particles into the poly(ε-caprolactone) matrix at the initial stage of the aerosol deposition. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg was examined using potentiodynamic polarization tests. The hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating remarkably improved the corrosion resistance of Mg in Hank's solution. In the in vitro cell tests, the coated Mg showed better cell adhesion compared with the bare Mg due to the reduced corrosion rate and enhanced biocompatibility. The stability and flexibility of hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy inspections after the coated Mg was deformed. The hydroxyapatite coating on the poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer revealed enhanced coating stability and flexibility without cracking or delamination during bending and stretching compared with the hydroxyapatite single coating. These results demonstrated that the hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating significantly improved the surface corrosion resistance of Mg and enhanced coating flexibility for use of Mg as a biodegradable implant.

  16. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Amanda; Gdowik, Agnieszka; Perzanowski, Marcin; Kąc, Sławomir; Szaraniec, Barbara; Suchanek, Mateusz; Marszałek, Marta

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA)(2-) and (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions.

  17. Development of lattice-inserted 5-Fluorouracil-hydroxyapatite nanoparticles as a chemotherapeutic delivery system.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Jung-Chih; Wu, Yu-Chun; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Lin, Feng-Huei; Tang, Tzu-Piao

    2015-10-01

    Developing an effective vehicle for cancer treatment, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were fabricated for drug delivery. When 5-Fluorouracil, a major chemoagent, is combined with hydroxyapatite nanocarriers by interclay insertion, the modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have superior lysosomal degradation profiles, which could be leveraged as controlled drug release. The decomposition of the hydroxyapatite nanocarriers facilitates the release of 5-Fluorouracil into the cytoplasm causing cell death. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with/without 5-Fluorouracil were synthesized and analyzed in this study. Their crystallization properties and chemical composition were examined by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. The 5-Fluorouracil release rate was determined by UV spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite-5-Fluorouracil extraction solution was assessed using 3T3 cells via a WST-8 assay. The effect of hydroxyapatite-5-Fluorouracil particles which directly work on the human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells was evaluated by a lactate dehydrogenase assay via contact cultivation. A 5-Fluorouracil-absorbed hydroxyapatite particles were also tested. Overall, hydroxyapatite-5-Fluorouracils were prepared using a co-precipitation method wherein 5-Fluorouracil was intercalated in the hydroxyapatite lattice as determined by X-ray diffraction. Energy dispersive scanning examination showed the 5-Fluorouracil content was higher in hydroxyapatite-5-Fluorouracil than in a prepared absorption formulation. With 5-Fluorouracil insertion in the lattice, the widths of the a and c axial constants of the hydroxyapatite crystal increased. The extraction solution of hydroxyapatite-5-Fluorouracil was nontoxic to 3T3 cells, in which 5-Fluorouracil was not released in a neutral phosphate buffer solution. In contrast, at a lower pH value (2.5), 5-Fluorouracil was released by the acidic decomposition of hydroxyapatite. Finally, the results of the lactate

  18. Structure of Biocompatible Coatings Produced from Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles by Detonation Spraying.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, Valentyna; Strutynska, Nataliia; Vorona, Igor; Zatovsky, Igor; Dzhagan, Volodymyr; Lemishko, Sergiy; Epple, Matthias; Prymak, Oleg; Baran, Nikolai; Ishchenko, Stanislav; Slobodyanik, Nikolai; Prylutskyy, Yuriy; Klyui, Nickolai; Temchenko, Volodymyr

    2015-12-01

    Detonation-produced hydroxyapatite coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The source material for detonation spraying was a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite powder. The coatings consisted of tetracalcium phosphate and apatite. The ratio depended slightly on the degree of crystallinity of the initial powder and processing parameters of the coating preparation. The tetracalcium phosphate phase was homogeneous; the apatite phase contained defects localized on the sixfold axis and consisted of hydroxyapatite and oxyapatite. Technological factors contributing to the transformation of hydroxyapatite powder structure during coating formation by detonation spraying are discussed. PMID:26625888

  19. Structure of Biocompatible Coatings Produced from Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles by Detonation Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Valentyna; Strutynska, Nataliia; Vorona, Igor; Zatovsky, Igor; Dzhagan, Volodymyr; Lemishko, Sergiy; Epple, Matthias; Prymak, Oleg; Baran, Nikolai; Ishchenko, Stanislav; Slobodyanik, Nikolai; Prylutskyy, Yuriy; Klyui, Nickolai; Temchenko, Volodymyr

    2015-12-01

    Detonation-produced hydroxyapatite coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The source material for detonation spraying was a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite powder. The coatings consisted of tetracalcium phosphate and apatite. The ratio depended slightly on the degree of crystallinity of the initial powder and processing parameters of the coating preparation. The tetracalcium phosphate phase was homogeneous; the apatite phase contained defects localized on the sixfold axis and consisted of hydroxyapatite and oxyapatite. Technological factors contributing to the transformation of hydroxyapatite powder structure during coating formation by detonation spraying are discussed.

  20. On the assessment of hydroxyapatite fluoridation by means of Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, M.; Valiente, M.; Lacharmoise, P. D.; Reparaz, J. S.; Goni, A. R.

    2010-06-28

    Hydroxyapatite is the main mineral component of bones and teeth. Fluorapatite, a bioceramic that can be obtained from hydroxyapatite by chemical substitution of the hydroxide ions with fluoride, exhibits lower mineral solubility and larger mechanical strength. Despite the widespread use of fluoride against caries, a reliable technique for unambiguous assessment of fluoridation in in vitro tests is still lacking. Here we present a method to probe fluorapatite formation in fluoridated hydroxyapatite by combining Raman scattering with thermal annealing. In synthetic minerals, we found that effectively fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite transforms into fluorapatite only after heat treatment, due to the high activation energy for this first order phase transition.

  1. On the assessment of hydroxyapatite fluoridation by means of Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, M.; Lacharmoise, P. D.; Reparaz, J. S.; Goñi, A. R.; Valiente, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main mineral component of bones and teeth. Fluorapatite, a bioceramic that can be obtained from hydroxyapatite by chemical substitution of the hydroxide ions with fluoride, exhibits lower mineral solubility and larger mechanical strength. Despite the widespread use of fluoride against caries, a reliable technique for unambiguous assessment of fluoridation in in vitro tests is still lacking. Here we present a method to probe fluorapatite formation in fluoridated hydroxyapatite by combining Raman scattering with thermal annealing. In synthetic minerals, we found that effectively fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite transforms into fluorapatite only after heat treatment, due to the high activation energy for this first order phase transition.

  2. Testing Ceramics for Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Adaptation of diesel engine allows prestressed ceramic materials evaluated under realistic pressure, temperature, and stress without introducing extraneous stress. Ceramic specimen part of prechamber of research engine. Specimen held in place by clamp, introduces required axial compressive stress. Specimen -- cylindrical shell -- surrounded by chamber vented or pressurized to introduce requisite radial stress in ceramic. Pressure chamber also serves as safety shield in case speimen disintegrates. Materials under consideration as cylinder liners for diesel engines.

  3. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Joel

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  4. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Flandermeyer, Brian K.

    1993-02-02

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  5. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Flandermeyer, Brian K.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  6. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  7. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  8. Joined ceramic product

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L [West Richland, WA

    2001-08-21

    According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

  9. Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  11. [Pharmaceutical ceramics by Buthaud].

    PubMed

    Devaux, G; Arléry, S

    1977-01-01

    In 1928 in Bordeaux, the ceramics manufacturer René Buthaud (1886-1986) created, in the neo-classical style that is typical of his work, four large pharmacists' jars, for display in a city dispensary. These pieces are presented here, each one decorated differently, with the back showing variations on the theme of the serpent and the front the design of tall, unclothed women holding objects Symbolic of the pharmceutical art.

  12. Multifracture of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Weitsman, Y.J.; Zhu, H.

    1992-03-01

    This work presents a mechanistic model for the multifracture process of uniaxially reinforced fibrous ceramic composites under monotonically increasing tension parallel to the fiber direction. The model employs an energy criterion to account for the progression of matrix cracks, bridged by intact fibers, and Weibull failure statistics to relate the failure of the fibers. Consideration is given to the interactions between the foregoing failure processes as well as to the effects of various material parameters on the response of the composite.

  13. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  14. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  15. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  16. Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Seema; Batra, Uma; Kohli, Suchita

    2011-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 °C and sintered to different temperatures (200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C, 1000 °C and 1200 °C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 °C to 1000 °C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 °C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 °C. Photomicrograph of

  17. Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Seema; Batra, Uma; Kohli, Suchita

    2011-12-12

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed

  18. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Nocerino, Nunzia; Fulgione, Andrea; Iannaccone, Marco; Tomasetta, Laura; Ianniello, Flora; Martora, Francesca; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Capuano, Federico; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA). We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications. PMID:24623976

  19. Antimicrobial and cytotoxicity evaluation of aliovalent substituted hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Sumathi; Gopal, Buvaneswari

    2014-06-01

    Aliovalent ion substituted hydroxyapatite of formulae BiNaCa3(PO4)3OH, Bi0.5M0.5Ca4(PO4)3OH (M = K, Ag) were synthesized and characterized. Antimicrobial properties of these synthesized materials were studied quantitatively by spread plate method against the microorganisms Escherichia coli (gram negative bacteria), Staphylococcus aureus (gram positive bacteria) and Candida albicans (yeast). Among the substituted hydroxyapatite compounds bismuth and silver substituted compound of formula Bi0.5Ag0.5Ca4(PO4)3OH shown excellent activity against all the three organisms. Cytotoxicity study was carried out against mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cell line in two different concentrations 10 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL by MTT assay method.

  20. Hydroxyapatite: Vibrational spectra and monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepko, Alexander; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-02-01

    Fundamental studies of biomaterials are necessary to deepen our understanding of their degradation and to develop cure for related illnesses. Biomineral hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 is the main mineral constituent of mammal bone, and its synthetic analogues are used in biomedical applications. The mineral can be found in either hexagonal or monoclinic form. The transformation between these two phases is poorly understood, but knowing its mechanism may be critical to reversing processes in bone related to aging. Using density functional theory, we investigate the mechanisms of the phase transformation and estimate the transition temperature to be 680 K in fair agreement with the experimental temperature of 470 K. We also report the heat capacity of hydroxyapatite and a peculiarity in its phonon dispersion that might allow for non-destructive measurements of the crystal composition with applications in preventive medical screening for bone mineral loss.

  1. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite prepared under various pH conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Mary Saral, A.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has sovereign biomedical application due to its excellent biocompatibility, chemical and crystallographic similitude with natural human bone. In this present work, we discussed about the role of pH in the synthesis of calcium phosphate compound using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate as starting materials by chemical precipitation method assisted with ultrasonic irradiation technique. 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG600) is added along with the precursors under various pH condition of 7, 9 and 11 respectively. The functional group analysis, crystallized size and fraction of crystallized size are confirmed using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern. Morphological observations are done by scanning electron microscope. The results revealed the presence of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite at pH above 9.

  2. Phosphonate-hydroxyapatite hybrid compounds prepared by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agougui, H.; Aissa, A.; Maggi, S.; Debbabi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHAp) was prepared in the presence of two alkylphosphonates, the tert-butyl phosphonic acid TBPOH and the 2-carboxyletylphosphonic acid 2-CEPA, by hydrothermal method at 120 °C for 15 h. The modification of hydroxyapatite by grafting organic moieties is confirmed by IR and NMR MAS ( 1H and 31P) spectroscopy and chemical analysis. X-ray powder diffraction patterns show that the incorporation of organic moieties induces a significant loss of the material crystallinity and a clear increase of the unit cell lattice parameter a as function of 2-CEPA grafting rate. The specific surface area (SSA) increases with increasing phosphonate amount especially for 2-CEPA. All techniques show the lower reactivity of TBPOH due to the steric effects of tert-butyl, whereas the 2-CEPA with a linear chain and double acidic functions is more reactive and can replace the OH - groups of the apatitic structure.

  3. Comparison of Electrical Properties between Fluoroapatite and Hydroxyapatite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghzizil, A.; El Herch, N.; Bouhaouss, A.; Lorente, G.; Macquete, J.

    2001-01-01

    By appropriate modifications of existing precipitation methods, apatite samples of formula M10(PO4)6X2 (M=Ca, Pb, Ba and X=F, OH) were prepared at 80°C. Samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, infrared, 31P NMR, SEM, and chemical analysis. By comparing the effect of fluoride and hydroxide ions on ionic conductivity measurements, it was concluded that the fluorinated materials (MFAp) were better conductors than other hydroxyapatites (MHAp). The F- and H+ ions are the main charge carriers, respectively, in fluoroapatite and in hydroxyapatite compounds. The most pronounced effect on the conduction properties was observed in the lead apatite material. These results should provide important physico-chemical information for ionic diffusion of the roles played by fluoride in inhibiting dental caries.

  4. Sorption behavior of fluoride ions from aqueous solutions by hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Reyes, M; Solache-Ríos, M

    2010-08-15

    The effects of pH, contact time, fluoride-ion concentration, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by hydroxyapatite were studied. Equilibrium was reached in 16 h of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions was in the pH(eq) range between 5 and 7.3. The highest efficiency in the sorption system was determined by using 0.01 g of hydroxyapatite and 25 mL of solution. The pseudo-second order model described the kinetic sorption processes, and the Freundlich model, the sorption isotherm process. These results indicated that the mechanism was chemisorption on a heterogeneous material. Fluoride ions were partially desorbed using an alkaline solution.

  5. Structural properties of silver doped hydroxyapatite and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, C S; Iconaru, S L; Pasuk, I; Vasile, B S; Lupu, A R; Hermenean, A; Dinischiotu, A; Predoi, D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a novel hydroxyapatite-based material with high biocompatibility. The structural properties of the samples were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the characteristic peaks of hydroxyapatite in each sample. Other phases or impurities were not observed. The scanning electron microscopy observations suggest that the doping components have no influence on the surface morphology of the samples, which reveals a homogeneous aspect of the synthesized particles for all samples. The presence of calcium (Ca), phosphor (P), oxygen (O) and silver (Ag) in the Ag:HAp is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy analyses. Nanocrystalline silver doped HAp stimulated viability and potentiated the activation of murine macrophages.

  6. Modification of the supramolecular structure of collagen with nanodisperse hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloskova, E. V.; Berdnikova, L. K.; Poluboyarov, V. A.; Gur'yanova, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of nanodisperse particles of hydroxyapatite on the structure of films based on collagen with a molecular mass of 360 kDa was studied. When coatings formed, the collagen macromolecules aggregated into spherulites; modification led to structural changes related to the decomposition of the spherulite structure and the formation of a grain structure. The variation of the physicomechanical properties of film materials directly depends on the size of the structural units.

  7. Repairing the hole in hydroxyapatite orbital implants following peg removal.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D R

    2000-01-01

    Pegging hydroxyapatite implants may lead to improved prosthetic eye movement but may also be associated with complications that may occasionally require peg removal. Removing the peg and leaving the peg hole to spontaneously granulate in, is one technique to deal with the remaining implant hole. The author describes a simple technique to fill the peg hole that provides a smooth implant-conjunctival-prosthesis interface and may potentially allow repegging.

  8. In vivo assessments of bioabsorbable AZ91 magnesium implants coated with nanostructured fluoridated hydroxyapatite by MAO/EPD technique for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-03-01

    Although magnesium (Mg) is a unique biodegradable metal which possesses mechanical property similar to that of the natural bone and can be an attractive material to be used as orthopedic implants, its quick corrosion rate restricts its actual clinical applications. To control its rapid degradation, we have modified the surface of magnesium implant using fluoridated hydroxyapatite (FHA: Ca10(PO4)6OH2-xFx) through the combined micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) techniques, which was presented in our previous paper. In this article, the biocompatibility examinations were conducted on the coated AZ91 magnesium alloy by implanting it into the greater trochanter area of rabbits. The results of the in vivo animal test revealed a significant enhancement in the biocompatibility of FHA/MAO coated implant compared to the uncoated one. By applying the FHA/MAO coating on the AZ91 implant, the amount of weight loss and magnesium ion release in blood plasma decreased. According to the histological results, the formation of the new bone increased and the inflammation decreased around the implant. In addition, the implantation of the uncoated AZ91 alloy accompanied by the release of hydrogen gas around the implant; this release was suppressed by applying the coated implant. Our study exemplifies that the surface coating of magnesium implant using a bioactive ceramic such as fluoridated hydroxyapatite may improve the biocompatibility of the implant to make it suitable as a commercialized biomedical product.

  9. Laser microfabrication of hydroxyapatite-osteoblast-like cell composites.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, A; Narayan, R J; Harris, M L; Qadri, S B; Modi, R; Chrisey, D B

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a novel approach for layer-by-layer growth of tissue-engineered materials using a direct writing process known as matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW). Unlike conventional cell-seeding methods, this technique provides the possibility for cell-material integration prior to artificial tissue fabrication. This process also provides greater flexibility in selection and processing of scaffold materials. In addition, MAPLE DW offers rapid computer-controlled deposition of mesoscopic voxels at high spatial resolutions. We have examined MAPLE DW processing of zirconia and hydroxyapatite scaffold materials that can provide a medical device with nearly inert and bioactive implant-tissue interfaces, respectively. We have also demonstrated codeposition of hydroxyapatite, MG 63 osteoblast-like cells, and extracellular matrix using MAPLE DW. We have shown that osteoblast-like cells remain viable and retain the capacity for proliferation when codeposited with bioceramic scaffold materials. Our results on MG 63-hydroxyapatite composites can be extended to develop other integrated cell-scaffold structures for medical and dental applications.

  10. Controlled synthesis and thermal stability of hydroxyapatite hierarchical microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ruixue; Chen, Kezheng; Liao, Zhongmiao; Meng, Nan

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite hierarchical microstructures have been synthesized by a facile method. ► The morphology and size of the building units of 3D structures can be controlled. ► The hydroxyapatite with 3D structure is morphologically and structurally stable up to 800 °C. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) hierarchical microstructures with novel 3D morphology were prepared through a template- and surfactant-free hydrothermal homogeneous precipitation method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the morphology and composition of the synthesized products. Interestingly, the obtained HAp with 3D structure is composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanorods or two-dimensional (2D) nanoribbons, and the length and morphology of these building blocks can be controlled through controlling the pH of the reaction. The building blocks are single crystalline and have different preferential orientation growth under different pH conditions. At low pH values, octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase formed first and then transformed into HAp phase due to the increased pH value caused by the decomposition of urea. The investigation on the thermal stability reveals that the prepared HAp hierarchical microstructures are morphologically and structurally stable up to 800 °C.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe substrates with and without buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelea, V.; Ristoscu, C.; Chiritescu, C.; Ghica, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Cornet, A.

    2000-12-01

    We present a method for processing hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe substrates. The films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in vacuum at room temperature, using a KrF∗ excimer laser. The amorphous as-deposited HA films were recrystallized in ambient air by a thermal treatment at 550°C. The best results have been obtained when inserting a buffer layer of ceramic materials (TiN, ZrO2 or Al2O3). The films were characterized by complementary techniques: grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), SAED, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation. The samples with buffer interlayer preserve the stoichiometry are completely recrystallized and present better mechanical characteristics as compared with that without buffer interlayer.

  12. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  13. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of nano-hydroxyapatite biomaterials prepared by microwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Rosmamuhamadani; Arawi, Ainaa Zafirah Omar; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Mahat, Mohd Muzamir; Jais, Umi Sarah

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite, (HA, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), is an attractive and widely utilized bio-ceramic material for orthopedic and dental implants because of its close resemblance of native tooth and bone crystal structure. Synthetic HA exhibits excellent osteoconductive properties. Osteoconductivity means the ability to provide the appropriate scaffold or template for bone formation. Calcium phosphate biomaterials [(HA), tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) and biphasic calcium phosphate (HA/TCP)] with appropriate three-dimensional geometry are able to bind and concentrate endogenous bone morphogenetic proteins in circulation, and may become osteoinductive and can be effective carriers of bone cell seeds. This HA can be used in bio-implants as well as drug delivery application due to the unique properties of HA. Biomaterials synthesized from the natural species like mussel shells have additional benefits such as high purity, less expensive and high bio compatibility. In this project, HA-nanoparticles of different crystallite size were prepared by microwave synthesis of precursors. High purity CaO was extracted from the natural mussel shells for the synthesis of nano HA. Dried nano HA powders were analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique for the determination of crystal structure and impurity content. Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) investigation was employed for the morphological investigation of nano HA powders. From the results obtained, it was concluded that by altering the irradiation time, nano HA powders of different crystallite sizes and morphologies could be produced. Crystallite sizes calculated from the XRD patterns are found to be in the range of 10-55 nm depending on the irradiation time.

  15. Osteogenic cell response to 3-D hydroxyapatite scaffolds developed via replication of natural marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S A; Choi, S Y; McKechnie, Melanie; Burke, G; Dunne, N; Walker, G; Cunningham, E; Buchanan, F

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to autograft, however scaffold optimisation is required to maximize bone ingrowth. In designing scaffolds, pore architecture is important and there is evidence that cells prefer a degree of non-uniformity. The aim of this study was to compare scaffolds derived from a natural porous marine sponge (Spongia agaricina) with unique architecture to those derived from a synthetic polyurethane foam. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds of 1 cm(3) were prepared via ceramic infiltration of a marine sponge and a polyurethane (PU) foam. Human foetal osteoblasts (hFOB) were seeded at 1 × 10(5) cells/scaffold for up to 14 days. Cytotoxicity, cell number, morphology and differentiation were investigated. PU-derived scaffolds had 84-91% porosity and 99.99% pore interconnectivity. In comparison marine sponge-derived scaffolds had 56-61% porosity and 99.9% pore interconnectivity. hFOB studies showed that a greater number of cells were found on marine sponge-derived scaffolds at than on the PU scaffold but there was no significant difference in cell differentiation. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that Si ions were released from the marine-derived scaffold. In summary, three dimensional porous constructs have been manufactured that support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation but significantly more cells were seen on marine-derived scaffolds. This could be due both to the chemistry and pore architecture of the scaffolds with an additional biological stimulus from presence of Si ions. Further in vivo tests in orthotopic models are required but this marine-derived scaffold shows promise for applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26704539

  16. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Monnamme; Akinlabi, Esther; Shukla, Mukul; Pityana, Sisa

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti-6Al-4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti-6Al-4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti-6Al-4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti-6Al-4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic-ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications.

  17. Bone Regeneration Using Hydroxyapatite Sponge Scaffolds with In Vivo Deposited Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Reiza Dolendo; Padalhin, Andrew Reyes; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2015-11-01

    There is currently an increased interest in studying the extracellular matrix (ECM) and its potential applications for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The ECM plays an important role by providing adhesive substrates to cells during migration, morphogenesis, differentiation, and homeostasis by signaling biochemical and biomechanical cues to cells. In this study, the ECM was incorporated into hydroxyapatite by implanting sponge replica scaffolds in subcutaneous pockets in rats, and the implants were tested for bone regeneration potential. The resulting scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, DNA and RNA quantification, tissue staining, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, compressive strength testing, porosity, and pore size distribution analysis using bare scaffolds as a control reference. Biocompatibility was assessed using MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and in vivo studies were carried out by implanting decellularized scaffolds in 11 mm radial defects in New Zealand rabbits for 4 and 8 weeks to determine the effect of the in vivo deposited ECM. Material characterization indicated that a 2-week decellularized scaffold was the best among the samples, with an evenly distributed ECM visible on hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections, a compressive strength of 2.53 ± 0.68 MPa, a porosity of 58.08 ± 3.32% and a pore size distribution range of 10-150 μm. In vivo results showed no severe inflammation, with increased cell infiltration followed by dense matrix deposition after 4 weeks and new bone formation at 8 weeks. The results indicate that incorporation of an in vivo deposited ECM into ceramic scaffolds can potentially improve bone regeneration.

  18. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Monnamme; Akinlabi, Esther; Shukla, Mukul; Pityana, Sisa

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti-6Al-4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti-6Al-4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti-6Al-4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti-6Al-4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic-ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications. PMID:25175204

  19. Ca,P-rich layer formed on high-strength bioactive glass-ceramic A-W.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, T; Ito, S; Huang, Z T; Hayashi, T; Sakka, S; Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T

    1990-03-01

    Glass-ceramic A-W, containing crystalline apatite and wollastonite in a MgO-CaO-SiO2 glassy matrix shows high bioactivity as well as high mechanical strength, but other ceramics containing the same kinds of crystalline phases in different glassy matrices do not show the same bioactivity. In order to investigate the bone-bonding mechanism of this type of glass-ceramic, surface structural changes of the glass-ceramics after exposure to simulated body fluid were analyzed with various techniques. A solution with ion concentrations which are almost equal to those of the human blood plasma was used as the simulated body fluid, instead of Tris-buffer solution hitherto used. For analyzing the surface structural changes, thin-film x-ray diffraction was used in addition to conventional techniques. It was found that a bioactive glass-ceramic forms a Ca, P-rich layer on its surface in the fluid but nonbioactive ones do not, and that the Ca, P-rich layer consists of carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite of small crystallites and/or defective structure. These findings were common to those of Bioglass-type glasses. So, we conclude that the essential condition for glass and glass-ceramic to bond to bone is the formation of the surface apatite layer in the body environment but it is not essential to contain apatite within the material. Bioactivity of glass and glass-ceramic can be evaluated in vitro by examining the formation of the surface apatite layer in the simulated body fluid described above.

  20. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    DOEpatents

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  1. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  2. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-09-06

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  3. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-01-01

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  4. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Janovicz, M. A.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Development testing activities on the 1900 F-configuration ceramic parts were completed, 2070 F-configuration ceramic component rig and engine testing was initiated, and the conceptual design for the 2265 F-configuration engine was identified. Fabrication of the 2070 F-configuration ceramic parts continued, along with burner rig development testing of the 2070 F-configuration metal combustor in preparation for 1132 C (2070 F) qualification test conditions. Shakedown testing of the hot engine simulator (HES) rig was also completed in preparation for testing of a spin rig-qualified ceramic-bladed rotor assembly at 1132 C (2070 F) test conditions. Concurrently, ceramics from new sources and alternate materials continued to be evaluated, and fabrication of 2070 F-configuration ceramic component from these new sources continued. Cold spin testing of the critical 2070 F-configuration blade continued in the spin test rig to qualify a set of ceramic blades at 117% engine speed for the gasifier turbine rotor. Rig testing of the ceramic-bladed gasifier turbine rotor assembly at 108% engine speed was also performed, which resulted in the failure of one blade. The new three-piece hot seal with the nickel oxide/calcium fluoride wearface composition was qualified in the regenerator rig and introduced to engine operation wiwth marginal success.

  5. Modification of the structure and composition of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 ceramic coatings by changing the deposition conditions in O2 and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Kolesnikov, D.; Goncharov, I.; Yakovin, S.; Georgieva, V.

    2014-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) is a material considered to be used to form structural matrices in the mineral phase of bone, dentin and enamel. HAp ceramic materials and coatings are widely applied in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to increase the tissue response to the implant surface and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions affect considerably the structure and bio-functionality of the HAp coatings. We focused our research on developing deposition methods allowing a precise control of the structure and stoichiometric composition of HAp thin films. We found that the use of O2 as a reactive gas improves the quality of the sputtered hydroxyapatite coatings by resulting in the formation of films of better stoichiometry with a fine crystalline structure.

  6. Comparison of the Weibull characteristics of hydroxyapatite and strontium doped hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Yatongchai, Chokchai; Wren, Anthony W; Curran, Declan J; Hornez, Jean-Christophe; Mark R, Towler

    2013-05-01

    The effects of two strontium (Sr) additions, 5% and 10% of the total calcium (Ca) content, on the phase assemblage and Weibull statistics of hydroxyapatite (HA) are investigated and compared to those of undoped HA. Sintering was carried out in the range of 900-1200 °C in steps of 1000 °C in a conventional furnace. Sr content had little effect on the mean particulate size. Decomposition of the HA phase occurred with Sr incorporation, while β-TCP stabilization was shown to occur with 10% Sr additions. Porosity in both sets of doped samples was at a comparable level to porosity in the undoped HA samples, however the 5% Sr-HA samples displayed the greatest reduction in porosity with increasing temperature while the porosity of the 10% Sr-HA samples remain relatively constant over the full sintering temperature range. The undoped HA samples displayed the greatest Weibull strengths and the porosity was determined to be the major controlling factor. However, with the introduction of decompositional phases in the Sr-HA samples, the dependence of strength on porosity is reduced and the phase assemblage becomes the more dominant factor for Weibull strength. The Weibull modulus is relatively independent of the porosity in the undoped HA samples. The 5% Sr-HA samples experience a slight increase in Weibull modulus with porosity, indicating a possible relationship between the parameters. However the 10% Sr-HA samples show the highest Weibull modulus with a value of approximately 15 across all sintering temperatures. It is postulated that this is due to the increased amount of surface and lattice diffusion that these samples undergo, which effectively smooths out flaws in the microstructure, due to a saturation of Sr content occurring in grain boundary movement. PMID:23524073

  7. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  8. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  9. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  10. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, J. Lambert

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

  11. TRANSFORMATION TOUGHENING IN CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A. G.; Marshall, D. B.; Burlingame, N. H.

    1980-12-01

    The origin of transformation toughening in ceramics is examined using two separate approaches: one based on the stress field ahead of the crack and the other on the changes in thermodynamic potential during a crack increment. Both approaches yield essentially similar predictions of trends in toughness with particle size, temperature, composition, etc. The stress intensity analysis provides fully quantitative predictions of the toughness. These indicate that the shielding of the crack by the transformation zone only develops in the presence of a transformed wake, leading to R-curve behavior.

  12. Ceramic heat pipe wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidenberg, Benjamin (Inventor); Swanson, Theodore (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A wick for use in a capillary loop pump heat pipe is disclosed. The wick material is an essentially uniformly porous, permeable, open-cell, silicon dioxide/aluminum oxide inorganic ceramic foam having a silica fiber ratio, by weight, of about 78 to 22, respectively, a density of 6 lbs/cu ft, and an average pore size of less than 5 microns. A representative material having these characteristics is Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Inc.'s HTP 6-22. This material is fully compatible with the freons and anhydrous ammonia and allows for the use of these very efficient working fluids, and others, in capillary loops.

  13. TRIS buffer in simulated body fluid distorts the assessment of glass-ceramic scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Rohanová, Dana; Boccaccini, Aldo Roberto; Yunos, Darmawati Mohamad; Horkavcová, Diana; Březovská, Iva; Helebrant, Aleš

    2011-06-01

    The paper deals with the characterisation of the bioactive phenomena of glass-ceramic scaffold derived from Bioglass® (containing 77 wt.% of crystalline phases Na(2)O·2CaO·3SiO(2) and CaO·SiO(2) and 23 wt.% of residual glass phase) using simulated body fluid (SBF) buffered with tris-(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (TRIS). A significant effect of the TRIS buffer on glass-ceramic scaffold dissolution in SBF was detected. To better understand the influence of the buffer, the glass-ceramic scaffold was exposed to a series of in vitro tests using different media as follows: (i) a fresh liquid flow of SBF containing tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane; (ii) SBF solution without TRIS buffer; (iii) TRIS buffer alone; and (iv) demineralised water. The in vitro tests were provided under static and dynamic arrangements. SBF buffered with TRIS dissolved both the crystalline and residual glass phases of the scaffold and a crystalline form of hydroxyapatite (HAp) developed on the scaffold surface. In contrast, when TRIS buffer was not present in the solutions only the residual glassy phase dissolved and an amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca-P) phase formed on the scaffold surface. It was confirmed that the TRIS buffer primarily dissolved the crystalline phase of the glass-ceramic, doubled the dissolving rate of the scaffold and moreover supported the formation of crystalline HAp. This significant effect of the buffer TRIS on bioactive glass-ceramic scaffold degradation in SBF has not been demonstrated previously and should be considered when analysing the results of SBF immersion bioactivity tests of such systems.

  14. Characterization and inhibitive study of gel-grown hydroxyapatite crystals at physiological temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Bharat; Joshi, Mihir; Vaidya, Ashok

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite is very useful for various biomedical applications, due to its chemical similarity with mineralized bone of human. Hydroxyapatite is also responsible for arthropathy (joint disease). In the present study, the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals was carried out by using single-diffusion gel growth technique in silica hydro gel media, at physiological temperature. The growth of hydroxyapatite crystals under slow and controlled environment in gel medium can be simulated in a simple manner to the growth in human body. The crystals, formed in the Liesegang rings, were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR and dielectric study. The diffusion study is also carried out for the hydroxyapatite crystals using the moving boundary model. The inhibitive influence of various Ayurvedic medicinal plant extracts such as Boswellia serrata gum resin , Tribulus terrestris fruits, Rotula aquatica roots, Boerhaavia diffusa roots and Commiphora wightii, on the growth of hydroxyapatite was studied. Roots of R. aquatica and B. diffusa show some inhibition of the hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro. This preclinical study will be helpful to design the therapy for prevention of hydroxyapatite-based ailments.

  15. FORMATION OF CHLOROPYROMORPHITE IN A LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOIL AMENDED WITH HYDROXYAPATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate conversion of soil Pb to pyromorphite, a Pb contaminated soil collected adjacent to a historical smelter was reacted with hydroxyapatite in a traditional incubation experiment and in a dialysis system in which the soil and hydroxyapatite solids were separated by a dia...

  16. Containment of uranium in the proposed Egyptian geologic repository for radioactive waste using hydroxyapatite.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Sanchez, Charles Anthony; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A.; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2004-04-01

    Currently, the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority is designing a shallow-land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. To insure containment and prevent migration of radionuclides from the site, the use of a reactive backfill material is being considered. One material under consideration is hydroxyapatite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which has a high affinity for the sorption of many radionuclides. Hydroxyapatite has many properties that make it an ideal material for use as a backfill including low water solubility (K{sub sp}>10{sup -40}), high stability under reducing and oxidizing conditions over a wide temperature range, availability, and low cost. However, there is often considerable variation in the properties of apatites depending on source and method of preparation. In this work, we characterized and compared a synthetic hydroxyapatite with hydroxyapatites prepared from cattle bone calcined at 500 C, 700 C, 900 C and 1100 C. The analysis indicated the synthetic hydroxyapatite was similar in morphology to 500 C prepared cattle hydroxyapatite. With increasing calcination temperature the crystallinity and crystal size of the hydroxyapatites increased and the BET surface area and carbonate concentration decreased. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of each material to sorb uranium. Sorption of U was strong regardless of apatite type indicating all apatite materials evaluated. Sixty day desorption experiments indicated desorption of uranium for each hydroxyapatite was negligible.

  17. Containment of uranium in the proposed Egyptian geologic repository for radioactive waste using hydroxyapatite.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Sanchez, Charles Anthony; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A.; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-08-01

    Currently, the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority is designing a shallow-land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. To insure containment and prevent migration of radionuclides from the site, the use of a reactive backfill material is being considered. One material under consideration is hydroxyapatite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which has a high affinity for the sorption of many radionuclides. Hydroxyapatite has many properties that make it an ideal material for use as a backfill including low water solubility (K{sub sp} > 10{sup -40}), high stability under reducing and oxidizing conditions over a wide temperature range, availability, and low cost. However, there is often considerable variation in the properties of apatites depending on source and method of preparation. In this work, we characterized and compared a synthetic hydroxyapatite with hydroxyapatites prepared from cattle bone calcined at 500 C, 700 C, 900 C and 1100 C. The analysis indicated the synthetic hydroxyapatite was similar in morphology to 500 C prepared cattle hydroxyapatite. With increasing calcination temperature the crystallinity and crystal size of the hydroxyapatites increased and the BET surface area and carbonate concentration decreased. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of each material to sorb uranium. Sorption of U was strong regardless of apatite type indicating all apatite materials evaluated. Sixty day desorption experiments indicated desorption of uranium for each hydroxyapatite was negligible.

  18. Synthesis and release of trace elements from hollow and porous hydroxyapatite spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Grandfield, Kathryn; Schwenke, Almut; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-07-01

    It is known that organic species regulate fabrication of hierarchical biological forms via solution methods. However, in this study, we observed that the presence of inorganic ions plays an important role in the formation and regulation of biological spherical hydroxyapatite formation. We present a mineralization method to prepare ion-doped hydroxyapatite spheres with a hierarchical structure that is free of organic surfactants and biological additives. Porous and hollow strontium-doped hydroxyapatite spheres were synthesized via controlling the concentration of strontium ions in a calcium and phosphate buffer solution. Similarly, fluoride and silicon-doped hydroxyapatite spheres were synthesized. While spherical particle formation was attainable at low and high temperature for Sr-doped hydroxyapatite, it was only possible at high temperature in the F/Si-doped system. The presence of inorganic ions not only plays an important role in the formation and regulation of biological spherical hydroxyapatite, but also could introduce pharmaceutical effects as a result of trace element release. Such ion release results showed a sustained release with pH responsive behavior, and significantly influenced the hydroxyapatite re-precipitation. These ion-doped hydroxyapatite spheres with hollow and porous structure could have promising applications as bone/tooth materials, drug delivery systems, and chromatography supports.

  19. Influence of Starting Powders on Hydroxyapatite Coatings Fabricated by Room Temperature Spraying Method.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Hahn, Byung Dong; Yoon, Seog Young

    2015-08-01

    Three types of raw materials were used for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite coatings by using the room temperature spraying method and their influence on the microstructure and in vitro characteristics were investigated. Starting hydroxyapatite powders for coatings on titanium substrate were prepared by a heat treatment at 1100 °C for 2 h of bovine bone, bone ash, and commercial hydroxyapatite powders. The phase compositions and Ca/P ratios of the three hydroxyapatite coatings were similar to those of the raw materials without decomposition or formation of a new phase. All hydroxyapatite coatings showed a honeycomb structure, but their surface microstructures revealed different features in regards to surface morphology and roughness, based on the staring materials. All coatings consisted of nano-sized grains and had dense microstructure. Inferred from in vitro experiments in pure water, all coatings have a good dissolution-resistance and biostability in water.

  20. Influence of Starting Powders on Hydroxyapatite Coatings Fabricated by Room Temperature Spraying Method.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Hahn, Byung Dong; Yoon, Seog Young

    2015-08-01

    Three types of raw materials were used for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite coatings by using the room temperature spraying method and their influence on the microstructure and in vitro characteristics were investigated. Starting hydroxyapatite powders for coatings on titanium substrate were prepared by a heat treatment at 1100 °C for 2 h of bovine bone, bone ash, and commercial hydroxyapatite powders. The phase compositions and Ca/P ratios of the three hydroxyapatite coatings were similar to those of the raw materials without decomposition or formation of a new phase. All hydroxyapatite coatings showed a honeycomb structure, but their surface microstructures revealed different features in regards to surface morphology and roughness, based on the staring materials. All coatings consisted of nano-sized grains and had dense microstructure. Inferred from in vitro experiments in pure water, all coatings have a good dissolution-resistance and biostability in water. PMID:26369193