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Sample records for hygrothermorheologically simple linear

  1. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  2. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  3. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  4. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  5. A VBA-based Simulation for Teaching Simple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gregory Todd; Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Kari

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the name, simple linear regression presents a number of conceptual difficulties, particularly for introductory students. This article describes a simulation tool that provides a hands-on method for illuminating the relationship between parameters and sample statistics.

  6. Linear Surprisal and Simple Birth, Death and Immigration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, T.; Honda, T.; Matsuzaki, H.; Ishii, C.

    1987-02-01

    In the conservative Hamiltonian systems, once a distribution of maximal entropy (subject to constraints) is achieved, the exact solution of the Liouville equation is one of the maximal entropy (subject to other constraint conditions), at any moment after that. This is stated in terms of surprisal analysis (a constrained statistical analysis motivated by information-theoretical considerations) as follows : If once the surprisal of a state happens to be linear as a function of measured dynamical variables, it remains linear as a function of the set of dynamical variables which are coupled to the initially measured ones. Taking advantage of this (the preservation of linear surprisal) an investigation is made to incorporate the idea of maximal entropy procedure in the framework of stochastic process. The subject of consideration was limited to the class of ``general birth and death process''. Among the family of stochastic processes belonging to this class the ``simple birth, death and immigration process'' was found to fulfill the necessary and sufficient conditions for the preservation of linear surprisal, so that to be appropriate in describing the states of maximal entropy governed by the Liouville equation.

  7. Simple and multiple linear regression: sample size considerations.

    PubMed

    Hanley, James A

    2016-11-01

    The suggested "two subjects per variable" (2SPV) rule of thumb in the Austin and Steyerberg article is a chance to bring out some long-established and quite intuitive sample size considerations for both simple and multiple linear regression. This article distinguishes two of the major uses of regression models that imply very different sample size considerations, neither served well by the 2SPV rule. The first is etiological research, which contrasts mean Y levels at differing "exposure" (X) values and thus tends to focus on a single regression coefficient, possibly adjusted for confounders. The second research genre guides clinical practice. It addresses Y levels for individuals with different covariate patterns or "profiles." It focuses on the profile-specific (mean) Y levels themselves, estimating them via linear compounds of regression coefficients and covariates. By drawing on long-established closed-form variance formulae that lie beneath the standard errors in multiple regression, and by rearranging them for heuristic purposes, one arrives at quite intuitive sample size considerations for both research genres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Simple circuit provides adjustable voltage with linear temperature variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moede, L. W.

    1964-01-01

    A bridge circuit giving an adjustable output voltage that varies linearly with temperature is formed with temperature compensating diodes in one leg. A resistor voltage divider adjusts to temperature range across the bridge. The circuit is satisfactory over the temperature range of minus 20 degrees centigrade to plus 80 degrees centigrade.

  9. Simple eigenvalue formula for the Coulomb-plus-linear potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Richard L.

    1984-07-01

    The eigenvalues Enl(λ) of the Hamiltonian H=-Δ-1r+λr are analyzed with the help of potential envelopes and kinetic potentials. The result is the following simple approximate eigenvalue formula: λ={2(νE)3-νE2[(1+3ν2E)12-1]}μ[(1+3ν2E)12-1]3, where E>=-14ν2 is a lower bound to Enl(λ) if ν=μ=(n+l), an upper bound if ν=μ=(2n+l-12), and a good approximation when ν=(n+l) and μ=(1.794n+l-0.418).

  10. Pair potentials for simple metallic systems: Beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. A.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Chester, G. V.

    2010-06-01

    The formalism of electron response theory is extended to second order in a perturbing pseudopotential, and the consequences for effective ionic pair potentials of simple metals under standard conditions are then examined. Inclusion of second-order response terms in the pair potentials leads to the potential minima for sodium, magnesium, aluminum, and metallic silicon being located quite close to the experimental nearest-neighbor distances in the respective crystalline solids. Second-order effects are found to become increasingly important with higher valence. As a test case, it is also found that, for an assumed metallic form of hydrogen, inclusion of second-order response terms is insufficient to reproduce the experimental intramolecular distance under standard conditions: higher-order response terms are necessary to obtain the correct (Heitler-London-type) result. For any element treatable by response methods, the results further show that neglect of even one of the second-order response terms may significantly impact the determination of the pair potential.

  11. Does linear separability really matter? Complex visual search is explained by simple search

    PubMed Central

    Vighneshvel, T.; Arun, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Visual search in real life involves complex displays with a target among multiple types of distracters, but in the laboratory, it is often tested using simple displays with identical distracters. Can complex search be understood in terms of simple searches? This link may not be straightforward if complex search has emergent properties. One such property is linear separability, whereby search is hard when a target cannot be separated from its distracters using a single linear boundary. However, evidence in favor of linear separability is based on testing stimulus configurations in an external parametric space that need not be related to their true perceptual representation. We therefore set out to assess whether linear separability influences complex search at all. Our null hypothesis was that complex search performance depends only on classical factors such as target-distracter similarity and distracter homogeneity, which we measured using simple searches. Across three experiments involving a variety of artificial and natural objects, differences between linearly separable and nonseparable searches were explained using target-distracter similarity and distracter heterogeneity. Further, simple searches accurately predicted complex search regardless of linear separability (r = 0.91). Our results show that complex search is explained by simple search, refuting the widely held belief that linear separability influences visual search. PMID:24029822

  12. Does linear separability really matter? Complex visual search is explained by simple search.

    PubMed

    Vighneshvel, T; Arun, S P

    2013-09-12

    Visual search in real life involves complex displays with a target among multiple types of distracters, but in the laboratory, it is often tested using simple displays with identical distracters. Can complex search be understood in terms of simple searches? This link may not be straightforward if complex search has emergent properties. One such property is linear separability, whereby search is hard when a target cannot be separated from its distracters using a single linear boundary. However, evidence in favor of linear separability is based on testing stimulus configurations in an external parametric space that need not be related to their true perceptual representation. We therefore set out to assess whether linear separability influences complex search at all. Our null hypothesis was that complex search performance depends only on classical factors such as target-distracter similarity and distracter homogeneity, which we measured using simple searches. Across three experiments involving a variety of artificial and natural objects, differences between linearly separable and nonseparable searches were explained using target-distracter similarity and distracter heterogeneity. Further, simple searches accurately predicted complex search regardless of linear separability (r = 0.91). Our results show that complex search is explained by simple search, refuting the widely held belief that linear separability influences visual search.

  13. Using Simple Linear Regression to Assess the Success of the Montreal Protocol in Reducing Atmospheric Chlorofluorocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Following the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) recommendation to use real data, an example is presented in which simple linear regression is used to evaluate the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric concentration of chlorofluorocarbons. This simple set of data, obtained from a public archive, can…

  14. Using Simple Linear Regression to Assess the Success of the Montreal Protocol in Reducing Atmospheric Chlorofluorocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Following the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) recommendation to use real data, an example is presented in which simple linear regression is used to evaluate the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric concentration of chlorofluorocarbons. This simple set of data, obtained from a public archive, can…

  15. Geometrically-linear and nonlinear analysis of linear viscoelastic composites using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerand, Daniel C.

    Over the past several decades, the use of composite materials has grown considerably. Typically, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are modeled as being linear elastic. However, it is well-known that polymers are viscoelastic in nature. Furthermore, the analysis of complex structures requires a numerical approach such as the finite element method. In the present work, a triangular flat shell element for linear elastic composites is extended to model linear viscoelastic composites. Although polymers are usually modeled as being incompressible, here they are modeled as compressible. Furthermore, the macroscopic constitutive properties for fiber-reinforced composites are assumed to be known and are not determined using the matrix and fiber properties along with the fiber volume fraction. Hygrothermo-rheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Both the temperature and moisture are taken to be prescribed. Hence, the heat energy generated by the viscoelastic deformations is not considered. When the deformations and rotations are small under an applied load history, the usual engineering stress and strain measures can be used and the time history of a viscoelastic deformation process is determined using the original geometry of the structure. If, however, sufficiently large loads are applied, the deflections and rotations will be large leading to changes in the structural stiffness characteristics and possibly the internal loads carried throughout the structure. Hence, in such a case, nonlinear effects must be taken into account and the appropriate stress and strain measures must be used. Although a geometrically-nonlinear finite element code could always be used to compute geometrically-linear deformation processes, it is inefficient to use such a code for small deformations, due to

  16. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  17. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  18. Valid statistical approaches for analyzing sholl data: Mixed effects versus simple linear models.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Machelle D; Sethi, Sunjay; Lein, Pamela J; Keil, Kimberly P

    2017-03-01

    The Sholl technique is widely used to quantify dendritic morphology. Data from such studies, which typically sample multiple neurons per animal, are often analyzed using simple linear models. However, simple linear models fail to account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data, which can lead to faulty inferences. Mixed effects models account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data; thus, these models more accurately estimate the standard deviation of the parameter estimate, which produces more accurate p-values. While mixed models are not new, their use in neuroscience has lagged behind their use in other disciplines. A review of the published literature illustrates common mistakes in analyses of Sholl data. Analysis of Sholl data collected from Golgi-stained pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of male and female mice using both simple linear and mixed effects models demonstrates that the p-values and standard deviations obtained using the simple linear models are biased downwards and lead to erroneous rejection of the null hypothesis in some analyses. The mixed effects approach more accurately models the true variability in the data set, which leads to correct inference. Mixed effects models avoid faulty inference in Sholl analysis of data sampled from multiple neurons per animal by accounting for intra-class correlation. Given the widespread practice in neuroscience of obtaining multiple measurements per subject, there is a critical need to apply mixed effects models more widely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Constitutive models for linear compressible viscoelastic flows of simple liquids at nanometer length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debadi; Sader, John E.

    2015-05-01

    Simple bulk liquids such as water are commonly assumed to be Newtonian. While this assumption holds widely, the fluid-structure interaction of mechanical devices at nanometer scales can probe the intrinsic molecular relaxation processes in a surrounding liquid. This was recently demonstrated through measurement of the high frequency (20 GHz) linear mechanical vibrations of bipyramidal nanoparticles in simple liquids [Pelton et al., "Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 244502 (2013)]. In this article, we review and critically assess the available constitutive equations for compressible viscoelastic flows in their linear limits—such models are required for analysis of the above-mentioned measurements. We show that previous models, with the exception of a very recent proposal, do not reproduce the required response at high frequency. We explain the physical origin of this recent model and show that it recovers all required features of a linear viscoelastic flow. This constitutive equation thus provides a rigorous foundation for the analysis of vibrating nanostructures in simple liquids. The utility of this model is demonstrated by solving the fluid-structure interaction of two common problems: (1) a sphere executing radial oscillations in liquid, which depends strongly on the liquid compressibility and (2) the extensional mode vibration of bipyramidal nanoparticles in liquid, where the effects of liquid compressibility are negligible. This highlights the importance of shear and compressional relaxation processes, as a function of flow geometry, and the impact of the shear and bulk viscosities on nanometer scale flows.

  20. Simple linear models of scanning impedance imaging for fast reconstruction of relative conductivity of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Travis E; Liu, Hongze; Hawkins, Aaron R; Schultz, Stephen M

    2006-11-01

    Scanning impedance imaging (SH) uses a noncontacting electrical probe held at a known voltage and scanned over a thin sample on a ground plane in a conductive medium to obtain images of current. The current image is related in a nonlinear way to the conductivity of the sample. This paper develops the theory behind SII showing how the measured current relates to the desired conductivity. Also included is the development of a simplified, linear model that is effective in explaining many of the experimental results. Good agreement of the linear model with step-response data over an insulator is shown. The linear model shows that the current is a blurred version of the conductivity. Simple deblurring methods can, therefore, be applied to obtain relative conductivity images from the raw current data. Raw SII data from a flower-petal and a leaf sample are shown as well as relative conductivity images deblurred using the linear model.

  1. A simple linearization of the self-shrinking generator by means of cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Fúster-Sabater, Amparo; Pazo-Robles, M Eugenia; Caballero-Gil, Pino

    2010-04-01

    In this work, it is shown that the output sequence of a well-known cryptographic generator, the so-called self-shrinking generator, can be obtained from a simple linear model based on cellular automata. In fact, such a cellular model is a linear version of a nonlinear keystream generator currently used in stream ciphers. The linearization procedure is immediate and is based on the concatenation of a basic structure. The obtained cellular automata can be easily implemented with FPGA logic. Linearity and symmetry properties in such automata can be advantageously exploited for the analysis and/or cryptanalysis of this particular type of sequence generator. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SERF: A Simple, Effective, Robust, and Fast Image Super-Resolver From Cascaded Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanting; Wang, Nannan; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong

    2016-09-01

    Example learning-based image super-resolution techniques estimate a high-resolution image from a low-resolution input image by relying on high- and low-resolution image pairs. An important issue for these techniques is how to model the relationship between high- and low-resolution image patches: most existing complex models either generalize hard to diverse natural images or require a lot of time for model training, while simple models have limited representation capability. In this paper, we propose a simple, effective, robust, and fast (SERF) image super-resolver for image super-resolution. The proposed super-resolver is based on a series of linear least squares functions, namely, cascaded linear regression. It has few parameters to control the model and is thus able to robustly adapt to different image data sets and experimental settings. The linear least square functions lead to closed form solutions and therefore achieve computationally efficient implementations. To effectively decrease these gaps, we group image patches into clusters via k-means algorithm and learn a linear regressor for each cluster at each iteration. The cascaded learning process gradually decreases the gap of high-frequency detail between the estimated high-resolution image patch and the ground truth image patch and simultaneously obtains the linear regression parameters. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves superior performance with lower time consumption than the state-of-the-art methods.

  3. On Development of a Problem Based Learning System for Linear Algebra with Simple Input Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Hisashi

    2011-08-01

    Learning how to express a matrix using a keyboard inputs requires a lot of time for most of college students. Therefore, for a problem based learning system for linear algebra to be accessible for college students, it is inevitable to develop a simple method for expressing matrices. Studying the two most widely used input methods for expressing matrices, a simpler input method for expressing matrices is obtained. Furthermore, using this input method and educator's knowledge structure as a concept map, a problem based learning system for linear algebra which is capable of assessing students' knowledge structure and skill is developed.

  4. Simple linear technique for the measurement of space-time coupling in ultrashort optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Dorrer, Christophe; Walmsley, Ian A

    2002-11-01

    We demonstrate a simple sensitive linear technique that quantifies the spatiotemporal coupling in the electric field of an ultrashort optical pulse. The space-time uniformity of the field can be determined with only time-stationary filters and square-law integrating detectors, even if it is impossible to measure the temporal electric field in this way. A degree of spatiotemporal uniformity is defined and can be used with the demonstrated diagnostic to quantify space-time coupling. Experimental measurements of space-time coupling due to linear and nonlinear focusing, refraction, and diffraction are presented.

  5. Mining Distance Based Outliers in Near Linear Time with Randomization and a Simple Pruning Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bay, Stephen D.; Schwabacher, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Defining outliers by their distance to neighboring examples is a popular approach to finding unusual examples in a data set. Recently, much work has been conducted with the goal of finding fast algorithms for this task. We show that a simple nested loop algorithm that in the worst case is quadratic can give near linear time performance when the data is in random order and a simple pruning rule is used. We test our algorithm on real high-dimensional data sets with millions of examples and show that the near linear scaling holds over several orders of magnitude. Our average case analysis suggests that much of the efficiency is because the time to process non-outliers, which are the majority of examples, does not depend on the size of the data set.

  6. A simple parameterization for quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analytic approximation of the radiation quality factor (Q) as a function of linear energy transfer for use in radiation protection calculations. The paper also presents estimated quality factors in water for protons over a broad range of incident energies. It is shown that the quality factors are less than unity for all proton energies greater than 13 MeV.

  7. About simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of special exact solutions of Veselov-Novikov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    New exact solutions, nonstationary and stationary, of Veselov-Novikov (VN) equation in the forms of simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of arbitrary number N of exact special solutions u{sup (n)}, n= 1, Horizontal-Ellipsis , N are constructed via Zakharov and Manakov {partial_derivative}-dressing method. Simple nonlinear superpositions are represented up to a constant by the sums of solutions u{sup (n)} and calculated by {partial_derivative}-dressing on nonzero energy level of the first auxiliary linear problem, i.e., 2D stationary Schroedinger equation. It is remarkable that in the zero energy limit simple nonlinear superpositions convert to linear ones in the form of the sums of special solutions u{sup (n)}. It is shown that the sums u=u{sup (k{sub 1})}+...+u{sup (k{sub m})}, 1 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To k{sub 1} < k{sub 2} < Horizontal-Ellipsis < k{sub m} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To N of arbitrary subsets of these solutions are also exact solutions of VN equation. The presented exact solutions include as superpositions of special line solitons and also superpositions of plane wave type singular periodic solutions. By construction these exact solutions represent also new exact transparent potentials of 2D stationary Schroedinger equation and can serve as model potentials for electrons in planar structures of modern electronics.

  8. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  9. A simple-shear rheometer for linear viscoelastic characterization of vocal fold tissues at phonatory frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Roger W.; Rodriguez, Maritza L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies reporting the linear viscoelastic shear properties of the human vocal fold cover or mucosa have been based on torsional rheometry, with measurements limited to low audio frequencies, up to around 80 Hz. This paper describes the design and validation of a custom-built, controlled-strain, linear, simple-shear rheometer system capable of direct empirical measurements of viscoelastic shear properties at phonatory frequencies. A tissue specimen was subjected to simple shear between two parallel, rigid acrylic plates, with a linear motor creating a translational sinusoidal displacement of the specimen via the upper plate, and the lower plate transmitting the harmonic shear force resulting from the viscoelastic response of the specimen. The displacement of the specimen was measured by a linear variable differential transformer whereas the shear force was detected by a piezoelectric transducer. The frequency response characteristics of these system components were assessed by vibration experiments with accelerometers. Measurements of the viscoelastic shear moduli (G′ and G″) of a standard ANSI S2.21 polyurethane material and those of human vocal fold cover specimens were made, along with estimation of the system signal and noise levels. Preliminary results showed that the rheometer can provide valid and reliable rheometric data of vocal fold lamina propria specimens at frequencies of up to around 250 Hz, well into the phonatory range. PMID:18681608

  10. Linear and nonlinear density response functions for a simple atomic fluid.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Benjamin A; Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D; Snook, Ian K

    2013-07-28

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the linear and nonlinear density response functions for simple fluids under the influence of spatially periodic external fields. Using a direct Fourier space decomposition of the instantaneous microscopic density for the perturbed fluid we can clearly identify the distinct order of response. Using a single component sinusoidal longitudinal force for a set of wavelengths and amplitudes we show that in the linear response regime the proportionality between the external field amplitude and the density perturbation can be used to determine the linear density response function, and hence the pair correlation function, static liquid structure factor, and lowest order direct correlation function. We show also that for large external field amplitudes a single component external field can be used to determine the form for lowest order and second lowest order nonlinear response functions for restricted regions of the total response function spaces.

  11. A simple frequency sweep linearization method for FM density profile reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Adi; Hu, Jianqiang; Doyle, Edward; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hong; Zhou, Chu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Mingyuan; Lan, Tao; Xie, Jinglin; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan

    2015-11-01

    Frequency modulated, continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry is widely used to measure the electron density profile on fusion devices. To ensure the output intermediate frequency signal is proportional to the propagation delay time, the frequency sweep should be linearized, especially for reflectometry with sweeping periods of only a few microseconds. We introduce a simple dynamic calibration technique to linearize the frequency sweep based on digital complex demodulation methods, without using a Fourier transform, which would induce a trade-off between frequency and time resolution. The technique is convenient as it can be done in the same conditions as for plasma measurements. The method is in use on the EAST profile reflectometer, and results will be presented. Work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under 11475173, National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Development Program of China under 2013GB106002 and 2014GB109002, and US DOE Grants DE- SC0010424 and DE-SC0010469.

  12. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    DOE PAGES

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-08-16

    In this paper, simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a2 to a1, with a11a2/λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE 11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293(a2-a1)4/amore » $$2\\atop{1}$$1a$$2\\atop{2}$$. These formulae are accurate when a2≲2a1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a2≤4a1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a2≤2.12a1 and less than 0.1 % when a2≤1.53a1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Finally, parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a2/a1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication.« less

  13. Improving Students’ Science Process Skills through Simple Computer Simulations on Linear Motion Conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, P.; Suryani, A.; Kaniawati, I.; Suhendi, E.; Samsudin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the development of students’ science process skills (SPS) on linear motion concept by utilizing simple computer simulation. In order to simplify the learning process, the concept is able to be divided into three sub-concepts: 1) the definition of motion, 2) the uniform linear motion and 3) the uniformly accelerated motion. This research was administered via pre-experimental method with one group pretest-posttest design. The respondents which were involved in this research were 23 students of seventh grade in one of junior high schools in Bandung City. The improving process of students’ science process skill is examined based on normalized gain analysis from pretest and posttest scores for all sub-concepts. The result of this research shows that students’ science process skills are dramatically improved by 47% (moderate) on observation skill; 43% (moderate) on summarizing skill, 70% (high) on prediction skill, 44% (moderate) on communication skill and 49% (moderate) on classification skill. These results clarify that the utilizing simple computer simulations in physics learning is be able to improve overall science skills at moderate level.

  14. Simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces with variable acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D; Rathkopf, J

    1998-12-23

    A simple model is described for predicting the time evolution of the half-width h of a planar mixing layer between two immiscible incompressible fluids driven by an arbitrary time-dependent variable acceleration history a(l)a (t): The model is based on a heuristic expression for the kinetic energy per unit area of the mixing layer. This expression is based on that for the kinetic energy of a linearly perturbed interface, but with a dynamically renormalized wavelength which becomes proportional to h in the nonlinear regime. An equation of motion for h is then derived by means of Lagrange's equations. This model reproduces the known linear growth rates of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities, as well as the quadratic RT and power-law RM growth laws in the nonlinear regime. The time exponent in the RM power law depends on the rate of kinetic energy dissipation. In the case of zero dissipation, this exponent reduces to 2/3 in agreement with elementary scaling arguments. A conservative numerical scheme is proposed to solve the model equations, and is used to perform calculations that agree well with published mixing data from linear electric motor experiments. Considerations involved in implementing the model in hydrodynamics codes are briefly discussed.

  15. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-08-16

    In this paper, simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a2 to a1, with a11a2/λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE 11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293(a2-a1)4/a$2\\atop{1}$1a$2\\atop{2}$. These formulae are accurate when a2≲2a1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a2≤4a1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a2≤2.12a1 and less than 0.1 % when a2≤1.53a1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Finally, parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a2/a1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication.

  16. Chicken barn climate and hazardous volatile compounds control using simple linear regression and PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Bakar, M. A. A.; Shukor, S. A. A.; Saad, F. S. A.; Kamis, M. S.; Mustafa, M. H.; Khalid, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    The hazardous volatile compounds from chicken manure in chicken barn are potentially to be a health threat to the farm animals and workers. Ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) produced in chicken barn are influenced by climate changes. The Electronic Nose (e-nose) is used for the barn's air, temperature and humidity data sampling. Simple Linear Regression is used to identify the correlation between temperature-humidity, humidity-ammonia and ammonia-hydrogen sulphide. MATLAB Simulink software was used for the sample data analysis using PID controller. Results shows that the performance of PID controller using the Ziegler-Nichols technique can improve the system controller to control climate in chicken barn.

  17. Performance evaluation of simple linear iterative clustering algorithm on medical image processing.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jinyu; Wei, Benzheng; Yin, Yilong; Xi, Xiaoming; Zheng, Yuanjie

    2014-01-01

    Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC) algorithm is increasingly applied to different kinds of image processing because of its excellent perceptually meaningful characteristics. In order to better meet the needs of medical image processing and provide technical reference for SLIC on the application of medical image segmentation, two indicators of boundary accuracy and superpixel uniformity are introduced with other indicators to systematically analyze the performance of SLIC algorithm, compared with Normalized cuts and Turbopixels algorithm. The extensive experimental results show that SLIC is faster and less sensitive to the image type and the setting superpixel number than other similar algorithms such as Turbopixels and Normalized cuts algorithms. And it also has a great benefit to the boundary recall, the robustness of fuzzy boundary, the setting superpixel size and the segmentation performance on medical image segmentation.

  18. Entropy analysis reveals a simple linear relation between laser speckle and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Chao, Zhen; Zhang, Yiguang; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic laser speckles contain motion information of scattering particles which can be estimated by laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA). In this work, an entropy-based method was proposed to provide a more robust estimation of motion speed. An in vitro flow simulation experiment confirmed a simple linear relation between entropy, exposure time, and speed. A multimodality optical imaging setup is developed to validate the advantages of the entropy method based on laser speckle imaging, green light imaging, and fluorescence imaging. The entropy method overcomes traditional LASCA with less noisy interference, and extracts more visible and detailed vasculatures in vivo. Furthermore, the entropy method provides a more accurate estimation and a stable pattern of blood flow activations in the rat's somatosensory area under multitrial hand paw stimulations.

  19. State-space models’ dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Lewis, Mark A.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results.

  20. State-space models' dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems.

    PubMed

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M; Derocher, Andrew E; Lewis, Mark A; Jonsen, Ian D; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-05-25

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results.

  1. State-space models’ dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems

    PubMed Central

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Lewis, Mark A.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results. PMID:27220686

  2. Simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in spherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1999-08-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting linear and nonlinear mixing at an unstable planar fluid interface subjected to an arbitrary time-dependent variable acceleration history [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E {bold 58}, 5834 (1998)]. Here we present an analogous model for describing the mixing of two adjacent spherical fluid shells of different density resulting from an arbitrary time-dependent mean interface radius R(t). As in the planar case, the model is based on a heuristic expression for the kinetic energy of the system. This expression is based on that for the kinetic energy of a linearly perturbed interface, but with a dynamically renormalized effective wavelength which becomes proportional to the half-width a(t) of the mixing layer in the nonlinear regime. An equation of motion for s=R{sup 2}a is then derived from Lagrange{close_quote}s equations. This evolution equation properly reduces to Plesset{close_quote}s equation for small perturbations, and to the previous planar model in the limit of very large R. The conservation properties of the model are established, and a suitable numerical scheme which preserves these properties is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. A computer tool for a minimax criterion in binary response and heteroscedastic simple linear regression models.

    PubMed

    Casero-Alonso, V; López-Fidalgo, J; Torsney, B

    2017-01-01

    Binary response models are used in many real applications. For these models the Fisher information matrix (FIM) is proportional to the FIM of a weighted simple linear regression model. The same is also true when the weight function has a finite integral. Thus, optimal designs for one binary model are also optimal for the corresponding weighted linear regression model. The main objective of this paper is to provide a tool for the construction of MV-optimal designs, minimizing the maximum of the variances of the estimates, for a general design space. MV-optimality is a potentially difficult criterion because of its nondifferentiability at equal variance designs. A methodology for obtaining MV-optimal designs where the design space is a compact interval [a, b] will be given for several standard weight functions. The methodology will allow us to build a user-friendly computer tool based on Mathematica to compute MV-optimal designs. Some illustrative examples will show a representation of MV-optimal designs in the Euclidean plane, taking a and b as the axes. The applet will be explained using two relevant models. In the first one the case of a weighted linear regression model is considered, where the weight function is directly chosen from a typical family. In the second example a binary response model is assumed, where the probability of the outcome is given by a typical probability distribution. Practitioners can use the provided applet to identify the solution and to know the exact support points and design weights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Linearized self-consistent quasiparticle GW method: Application to semiconductors and simple metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutepov, A. L.; Oudovenko, V. S.; Kotliar, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present a code implementing the linearized quasiparticle self-consistent GW method (LQSGW) in the LAPW basis. Our approach is based on the linearization of the self-energy around zero frequency which differs it from the existing implementations of the QSGW method. The linearization allows us to use Matsubara frequencies instead of working on the real axis. This results in efficiency gains by switching to the imaginary time representation in the same way as in the space time method. The all electron LAPW basis set eliminates the need for pseudopotentials. We discuss the advantages of our approach, such as its N3 scaling with the system size N, as well as its shortcomings. We apply our approach to study the electronic properties of selected semiconductors, insulators, and simple metals and show that our code produces the results very close to the previously published QSGW data. Our implementation is a good platform for further many body diagrammatic resummations such as the vertex-corrected GW approach and the GW+DMFT method. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/cpchkfty4w.1 Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License Programming language: Fortran 90 External routines/libraries: BLAS, LAPACK, MPI (optional) Nature of problem: Direct implementation of the GW method scales as N4 with the system size, which quickly becomes prohibitively time consuming even in the modern computers. Solution method: We implemented the GW approach using a method that switches between real space and momentum space representations. Some operations are faster in real space, whereas others are more computationally efficient in the reciprocal space. This makes our approach scale as N3. Restrictions: The limiting factor is usually the memory available in a computer. Using 10 GB/core of memory allows us to study the systems up to 15 atoms per unit cell.

  5. Beyond simple linear mixing models: process-based isotope partitioning of ecological processes.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Kiona; Tucker, Colin; Cable, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes are valuable tools for partitioning the components contributing to ecological processes of interest, such as animal diets and trophic interactions, plant resource use, ecosystem gas fluxes, streamflow, and many more. Stable isotope data are often analyzed with simple linear mixing (SLM) models to partition the contributions of different sources, but SLM models cannot incorporate a mechanistic understanding of the underlying processes and do not accommodate additional data associated with these processes (e.g., environmental covariates, flux data, gut contents). Thus, SLM models lack predictive ability. We describe a process-based mixing (PBM) model approach for integrating stable isotopes, other data sources, and process models to partition different sources or process components. This is accomplished via a hierarchical Bayesian framework that quantifies multiple sources of uncertainty and enables the incorporation of process models and prior information to help constrain the source-specific proportional contributions, thereby potentially avoiding identifiability issues that plague SLM models applied to "too many" sources. We discuss the application of the PBM model framework to three diverse examples: temporal and spatial partitioning of streamflow, estimation of plant rooting profiles and water uptake profiles (or water sources) with extension to partitioning soil and ecosystem CO2 fluxes, and reconstructing animal diets. These examples illustrate the advantages of the PBM modeling approach, which facilitates incorporation of ecological theory and diverse sources of information into the mixing model framework, thus enabling one to partition key process components across time and space.

  6. A Simple Method on Generating any Bi-Photon Superposition State with Linear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Wei, Jie; Wang, Qin

    2017-04-01

    We present a simple method on the generation of any bi-photon superposition state using only linear optics. In this scheme, the input states, a two-mode squeezed state and a bi-photon state, meet on a beam-splitter and the output states are post-selected with two threshold single-photon detectors. We carry out corresponding numerical simulations by accounting for practical experimental conditions, calculating both the Wigner function and the state fidelity of those generated bi-photon superposition states. Our simulation results demonstrate that not only distinct nonclassical characteristics but also very high state fidelities can be achieved even under imperfect experimental conditions. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61475197, 61590932, 11274178, the Natural Science Foundation of the Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions under Grant No. 15KJA120002, the Outstanding Youth Project of Jiangsu Province under Grant No. BK20150039, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions under Grant No. YX002001

  7. Equivalencing MAT and GRE Scores Using Simple Linear Transformation and Regression Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Dona M.; Stock, William A.

    1980-01-01

    Graduate Record Examination and Miller Analogies Test scores were equated using linear transformation and regression methods. Standard deviations of regression equivalence scores were consistently smaller than those actually obtained in the sample, whereas standard deviations of linear equivalence scores were the same as those in the sample.…

  8. Simple estimation of linear 1+1 D tsunami run-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, M.; Campos, J. A.; Riquelme, S.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical expression is derived concerning the linear run-up for any given initial wave generated over a sloping bathymetry. Due to the simplicity of the linear formulation, complex transformations are unnecessay, because the shoreline motion is directly obtained in terms of the initial wave. This analytical result not only supports maximum run-up invariance between linear and non-linear theories, but also the time evolution of shoreline motion and velocity. The results exhibit good agreement with the non-linear theory. The present formulation also allows computing the shoreline motion numerically from a customised initial waveform, including non-smooth functions. This is useful for numerical tests, laboratory experiments or realistic cases in which the initial disturbance might be retrieved from seismic data rather than using a theoretical model. It is also shown that the real case studied is consistent with the field observations.

  9. Simple estimation of linear 1+1 D long wave run-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    An analytical solution is derived concerning the linear run-up for any given initial wave generated over a sloping bathymetry. Due to the simplicity of the linear formulation, complex transformations are unnecessary, hence the shoreline motion is directly obtained in terms of the initial wave. This result not only supports maximum run-up invariance between linear and non-linear theories, but also the time evolution of shoreline motion and velocity, exhibiting good agreement with the non-linear theory. The present formulation also allows quantyfing the shoreline motion numerically from a customised initial waveform, including non-smooth functions. This is useful for numerical tests, laboratory experiments or realistic cases in which the initial disturbance might be retrieved from seismic data rather than using a theoretical model. It is also shown that the run-up calculation for the real case studied is consistent with the field observations.

  10. Unital and multiplicatively spectrum-preserving surjections between semi-simple commutative Banach algebras are linear and multiplicative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Osamu; Miura, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    Let T be a surjective map from a unital semi-simple commutative Banach algebra A onto a unital commutative Banach algebra B. Suppose that T preserves the unit element and the spectrum [sigma](fg) of the product of any two elements f and g in A coincides with the spectrum [sigma](TfTg). Then B is semi-simple and T is an isomorphism. The condition that T is surjective is essential: An example of a non-linear and non-multiplicative unital map from a commutative C*-algebra into itself such that [sigma](TfTg)=[sigma](fg) holds for every f,g are given. We also show an example of a surjective unital map from a commutative C*-algebra onto itself which is neither linear nor multiplicative such that [sigma](TfTg)[subset of][sigma](fg) holds for every f,g.

  11. Simple estimation of linear 1+1 D long wave run-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Mauricio

    2017-05-01

    An analytical solution is derived concerning the linear run-up for any given initial wave generated over a sloping bathymetry. Due to the simplicity of the linear formulation, complex transformations are unnecessary, hence the shoreline motion is directly obtained in terms of the initial wave. This result supports not only maximum run-up invariance between linear and nonlinear theories but also the time evolution of shoreline motion and velocity, exhibiting good agreement with the nonlinear theory. The present formulation also allows quantifying the shoreline motion numerically from a customized initial waveform, including non-smooth functions. This is useful for numerical tests, laboratory experiments or realistic cases in which the initial disturbance might be retrieved from seismic data rather than using a theoretical model. It is also shown that the run-up calculation for the real case studied is consistent with the field observations.

  12. High linearity current communicating passive mixer employing a simple resistor bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongjiang, Liu; Guiliang, Guo; Yuepeng, Yan

    2013-03-01

    A high linearity current communicating passive mixer including the mixing cell and transimpedance amplifier (TIA) is introduced. It employs the resistor in the TIA to reduce the source voltage and the gate voltage of the mixing cell. The optimum linearity and the maximum symmetric switching operation are obtained at the same time. The mixer is implemented in a 0.25 μm CMOS process. The test shows that it achieves an input third-order intercept point of 13.32 dBm, conversion gain of 5.52 dB, and a single sideband noise figure of 20 dB.

  13. Simple Linear and Curvilinear Relationships of Leader Style and School Climate to Principal Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    The hypothesis guiding the study was that work motivation attitudes, behavior, and perceptions of others--as leader style concepts--and school climate--as a situational construct--are linearly and curvilinearly related to subordinate, superordinate, self, and organizational effectiveness criteria. A total of 179 principals, 996 teachers, and 41…

  14. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  15. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  16. The Multifaceted Variable Approach: Selection of Method in Solving Simple Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahir, Salma; Cavanagh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the solution strategies used by two groups of Year 8 students as they solved linear equations. The experimental group studied algebra following a multifaceted variable approach, while the comparison group used a traditional approach. Students in the experimental group employed different solution strategies,…

  17. Simple linear filtering of time series data on a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Franklin, R

    1982-01-01

    A program is presented for the Texas Instruments SR-52 programmable calculator which computes simple moving averages of time series data. Design and programming emphasis was placed on ease of use and time savings. The output from this program is useful in determining the shape of time-ordered sequences of data. The technique used for internally reordering the data after each individual calculation is explained is some detail as it may be useful in any program of an algorithm involving a moving window on a sequence of data.

  18. A simple method of calculating pulse amplitudes and shapes arising from reflection from linear segments

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A. Jr.

    1988-01-02

    A new formulation for the amplitude and pulse shape from reflections from a linear segment for a bistatic planar geometry is presented. The formulation is useful in calculating reverberation from high intensity signals in an deep ocean basin where long range propagation can occur. This reverberation is important in calculating the acoustic interference to sonar arising from the detonation of nuclear or large chemical explosives, and for modeling long range active sonar. The reflections computed with the new formulation are significantly different from those of earlier versions of the reverberation model, with pulses generally shorter and more intense, leading to predictions of louder but more sporadic reverberation than previously estimated. 9 refs

  19. A simple model for electrical charge in globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes in solution

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a model for calculating the net and effective electrical charge of globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes such as proteins and DNA, given the concentration of monovalent salt and pH in solution. The calculation is based on a numerical solution of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using a finite element discretized continuum approach. The model simultaneously addresses the phenomena of charge regulation and renormalization, both of which underpin the electrostatics of biomolecules in solution. We show that while charge regulation addresses the true electrical charge of a molecule arising from the acid-base equilibria of its ionizable groups, charge renormalization finds relevance in the context of a molecule’s interaction with another charged entity. Writing this electrostatic interaction free energy in terms of a local electrical potential, we obtain an “interaction charge” for the molecule which we demonstrate agrees closely with the “effective charge” discussed in charge renormalization and counterion-condensation theories. The predictions of this model agree well with direct high-precision measurements of effective electrical charge of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids and disordered proteins in solution, without tunable parameters. Including the effective interior dielectric constant for compactly folded molecules as a tunable parameter, the model captures measurements of effective charge as well as published trends of pKa shifts in globular proteins. Our results suggest a straightforward general framework to model electrostatics in biomolecules in solution. In offering a platform that directly links theory and experiment, these calculations could foster a systematic understanding of the interrelationship between molecular 3D structure and conformation, electrical charge and electrostatic interactions in solution. The model could find particular relevance in situations where molecular crystal structures are not

  20. A simple model for electrical charge in globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a model for calculating the net and effective electrical charge of globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes such as proteins and DNA, given the concentration of monovalent salt and pH in solution. The calculation is based on a numerical solution of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using a finite element discretized continuum approach. The model simultaneously addresses the phenomena of charge regulation and renormalization, both of which underpin the electrostatics of biomolecules in solution. We show that while charge regulation addresses the true electrical charge of a molecule arising from the acid-base equilibria of its ionizable groups, charge renormalization finds relevance in the context of a molecule's interaction with another charged entity. Writing this electrostatic interaction free energy in terms of a local electrical potential, we obtain an "interaction charge" for the molecule which we demonstrate agrees closely with the "effective charge" discussed in charge renormalization and counterion-condensation theories. The predictions of this model agree well with direct high-precision measurements of effective electrical charge of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids and disordered proteins in solution, without tunable parameters. Including the effective interior dielectric constant for compactly folded molecules as a tunable parameter, the model captures measurements of effective charge as well as published trends of pKa shifts in globular proteins. Our results suggest a straightforward general framework to model electrostatics in biomolecules in solution. In offering a platform that directly links theory and experiment, these calculations could foster a systematic understanding of the interrelationship between molecular 3D structure and conformation, electrical charge and electrostatic interactions in solution. The model could find particular relevance in situations where molecular crystal structures are not available or

  1. A novel synchronization scheme with a simple linear control and guaranteed convergence time for generalized Lorenz chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chun-Fu; Sun, Yeong-Jeu; Wang, Wen-June

    2012-12-01

    In this study, exponential finite-time synchronization for generalized Lorenz chaotic systems is investigated. The significant contribution of this paper is that master-slave synchronization is achieved within a pre-specified convergence time and with a simple linear control. The designed linear control consists of two parts: one achieves exponential synchronization, and the other realizes finite-time synchronization within a guaranteed convergence time. Furthermore, the control gain depends on the parameters of the exponential convergence rate, the finite-time convergence rate, the bound of the initial states of the master system, and the system parameter. In addition, the proposed approach can be directly and efficiently applied to secure communication. Finally, four numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and correctness of the obtained results.

  2. A simple algorithm for the offline recalibration of eye-tracking data through best-fitting linear transformation.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Street, Chris N H; Beesley, Tom; Shanks, David R

    2015-12-01

    Poor calibration and inaccurate drift correction can pose severe problems for eye-tracking experiments requiring high levels of accuracy and precision. We describe an algorithm for the offline correction of eye-tracking data. The algorithm conducts a linear transformation of the coordinates of fixations that minimizes the distance between each fixation and its closest stimulus. A simple implementation in MATLAB is also presented. We explore the performance of the correction algorithm under several conditions using simulated and real data, and show that it is particularly likely to improve data quality when many fixations are included in the fitting process.

  3. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature–conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility. PMID:26664063

  4. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature-conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility.

  5. Validation of a simple analytical model for in-air outputfactor calculation for SL-15 Philips-Elekta linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ali, Maha A; Emam, Ismail

    A simple aralytical approach to model extrafocal radiation (EFR) and monitor chamber backscatter (MBS)-and consequently collimator scattar factor-is investigated. The model has been applied to 6 and 10 MV photon beams produced by a Philips-Elekta SL-15 medical linear accelerator. Both EFR and MBS are determined simultaneously using conventional measured data at the isocenter and the calculated in-air output factors (S(c)) were in good agreement with the measured values. When the square field size changes from 4x4 to 40x40 cm(2), the total intensities of EFR were 17.6% and 13%, while the MBS contributions to S(c) were 0.1% and 0.2% for 6 and 10 mv, respectively. The model was also used to calculate S(c) for symmetric or asymmetric rectangular jaws-defined fields with an accuracy of less than 0.2% at extended or shortened source detector distances Moreover, the model was verified for both very small field sizes (2x2 cm(2) down to 0.6x0.6 cm(2)) and for field sizes defined by micro multi-leaf collimator to check its applicability for stereotactic radiotherapy dose calculations. A simple programme is designed to facilitate the calculation process of S(c) for a medical linear accelerator at different situations either for commissioning or verification of the model at different energies.

  6. Quasi-linear pH gradients for chromatofocusing using simple buffer mixtures: local equilibrium theory and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Bates, R C; Frey, D D

    1998-07-24

    Chromatofocusing utilizes internally generate, retained pH gradients to focus proteins into narrow chromatographic bands. One of the characteristics of current chromatofocusing methods is that they use expensive polyampholyte buffers containing large numbers of ill-defined components in order to generate linear or quasi-linear pH gradients. In addition to being costly to use, polyampholyte buffers also tend to associate with proteins and often yield irreproducible gradient shapes. In order to avoid the various difficulties associated with the use of polyampholyte buffers, this study investigates the use of mixtures of simple buffering species to generate quasi-linear pH gradients on a weak-base ion-exchange column packing. The ability of these gradients to separate protein mixtures was also investigated. To optimize the conditions used, a computer simulation method using a local equilibrium model developed that predicts the shape of the pH gradient. Several experiments were performed that demonstrate the usefulness of the method and the accuracy of the model.

  7. Some Considerations on Simple Non-Linear Magnetic Analysis-Based Optimum Design of Multi-Pole Permanent Magnet Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Yoshiaki; Kosaka, Takashi; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    This paper presents a simple non-linear magnetic analysis-based optimum design of a multi-pole permanent magnet machine as an assistant design tool of 3D-FEM. The proposed analysis is based on the equivalent magnetic circuit and the air gap permeance model between the stator and rotor teeth of the motor, taking into account the local magnetic saturation in the pointed end of teeth. The availability of the proposed analysis is verified by comparing with 3D-FEM analysis from the standpoints of the torque calculation accuracy for the variations of design free parameter and the computation time. After verification, the proposed analysis-based optimum design of the dimensions of permanent magnet is examined, by which the minimization of magnet volume is realized while keeping torque/current ratio at the specified value.

  8. Assessment of the spatial occurrence of childhood leukaemia mortality using standardized rate ratios with a simple linear Poisson model.

    PubMed

    Aickin, M; Chapin, C A; Flood, T J; Englender, S J; Caldwell, G G

    1992-08-01

    Reports of a suspected cluster of childhood leukaemia cases in West Central Phoenix have led to a number of epidemiological studies in the geographical area. We report here on a death certificate-based mortality study, which indicated an elevated rate ratio of 1.95 during 1966-1986, using the remainder of the Phoenix standard metropolitan statistical area (SMSA) as a comparison region. In the process of analysing the data from this study, a methodology for dealing with denominator variability in a standardized mortality ratio was developed using a simple linear Poisson model. This new approach is seen as being of general use in the analysis of standardized rate ratios (SRR), as well as being particularly appropriate for cluster investigations.

  9. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Christopher A.; Benner, W. Henry

    2001-10-31

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOF MS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Dm vs. mass data where Dm is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to a CHCA matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied.

  10. Estimation of Gravity Parameters Related to Simple Geometrical Structures by Developing an Approach Based on Deconvolution and Linear Optimization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfahani, J.; Tlas, M.

    2015-10-01

    An easy and practical method for interpreting residual gravity anomalies due to simple geometrically shaped models such as cylinders and spheres has been proposed in this paper. This proposed method is based on both the deconvolution technique and the simplex algorithm for linear optimization to most effectively estimate the model parameters, e.g., the depth from the surface to the center of a buried structure (sphere or horizontal cylinder) or the depth from the surface to the top of a buried object (vertical cylinder), and the amplitude coefficient from the residual gravity anomaly profile. The method was tested on synthetic data sets corrupted by different white Gaussian random noise levels to demonstrate the capability and reliability of the method. The results acquired show that the estimated parameter values derived by this proposed method are close to the assumed true parameter values. The validity of this method is also demonstrated using real field residual gravity anomalies from Cuba and Sweden. Comparable and acceptable agreement is shown between the results derived by this method and those derived from real field data.

  11. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-07

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  12. Application of a simple first-order, non-linear rainfall-runoff model in watersheds of varying permafrost coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, W. Robert; Hinzman, Larry

    2010-05-01

    coverage. As the storage capacity changes throughout the summer period, a simple, first-order, non-linear differential equation describing the storage-discharge relationship is developed for each month of the summer thaw period (typically June - September). These monthly relationships are then combined to form a single storage-discharge relationship that changes smoothly throughout the summer period. By allowing the storage-discharge relationship to vary with time, the changes in runoff due to changes in the active layer development are represented. Storage-discharge relationships and results of stream flow simulations will be presented for headwater basins of varying permafrost coverage and size in both the zones of continuous and discontinuous permafrost.

  13. Simple quasi-analytical holonomic homogenization model for the non-linear analysis of in-plane loaded masonry panels: Part 1, meso-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, G.; Bertolesi, E.

    2017-07-01

    A simple quasi analytical holonomic homogenization approach for the non-linear analysis of masonry walls in-plane loaded is presented. The elementary cell (REV) is discretized with 24 triangular elastic constant stress elements (bricks) and non-linear interfaces (mortar). A holonomic behavior with softening is assumed for mortar. It is shown how the mechanical problem in the unit cell is characterized by very few displacement variables and how homogenized stress-strain behavior can be evaluated semi-analytically.

  14. A Simple Piece of Apparatus to Aid the Understanding of the Relationship between Angular Velocity and Linear Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsal, Yasin

    2011-01-01

    One of the subjects that is confusing and difficult for students to fully comprehend is the concept of angular velocity and linear velocity. It is the relationship between linear and angular velocity that students find difficult; most students understand linear motion in isolation. In this article, we detail the design, construction and…

  15. A Simple Piece of Apparatus to Aid the Understanding of the Relationship between Angular Velocity and Linear Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsal, Yasin

    2011-01-01

    One of the subjects that is confusing and difficult for students to fully comprehend is the concept of angular velocity and linear velocity. It is the relationship between linear and angular velocity that students find difficult; most students understand linear motion in isolation. In this article, we detail the design, construction and…

  16. A simple device to couple linear array transducers to neonate heads for ultrasonic scanning of the brain.

    PubMed

    Smith, W L; Franklin, T D; Katakura, K; Patrick, J T; Fry, F J; Eggleton, R C

    1980-12-01

    A plastisol coupler has been designed that improves acoustical coupling for linear array ultrasound transducers. This device improves both ease in scanning and image quality in real-time scanning of the infant brain.

  17. Linear Polarization, Circular Polarization, and Depolarization of Gamma-ray Bursts: A Simple Case of Jitter Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2017-04-01

    Linear and circular polarizations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected recently. We adopt a simplified model to investigate GRB polarization characteristics in this paper. A compressed two-dimensional turbulent slab containing stochastic magnetic fields is considered, and jitter radiation can produce the linear polarization under this special magnetic field topology. Turbulent Faraday rotation measure (RM) of this slab makes strong wavelength-dependent depolarization. The jitter photons can also scatter with those magnetic clumps inside the turbulent slab, and a nonzero variance of the Stokes parameter V can be generated. Furthermore, the linearly and circularly polarized photons in the optical and radio bands may suffer heavy absorptions from the slab. Thus we consider the polarized jitter radiation transfer processes. Finally, we compare our model results with the optical detections of GRB 091018, GRB 121024A, and GRB 131030A. We suggest simultaneous observations of GRB multi-wavelength polarization in the future.

  18. Analytical calculation of critical perturbation amplitudes and critical densities by non-linear stability analysis of a simple traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, D.; Moussaid, M.

    2009-06-01

    Driven many-particle systems with nonlinear interactions are known to often display multi-stability, i.e. depending on the respective initial condition, there may be different outcomes. Here, we study this phenomenon for traffic models, some of which show stable and linearly unstable density regimes, but areas of metastability in between. In these areas, perturbations larger than a certain critical amplitude will cause a lasting breakdown of traffic, while smaller ones will fade away. While there are common methods to study linear instability, non-linear instability had to be studied numerically in the past. Here, we present an analytical study for the optimal velocity model with a stepwise specification of the optimal velocity function and a simple kind of perturbation. Despite various approximations, the analytical results are shown to reproduce numerical results very well.

  19. Challenge from the simple: some caveats in linearization of the Boyle-van't Hoff and Arrhenius plots.

    PubMed

    Katkov, Igor I

    2008-10-01

    Some aspects of proper linearization of the Boyle-van't Hoff (BVH) relationship for calculation of the osmotically inactive volume v(b), and Arrhenius plot (AP) for the activation energy E(a) are discussed. It is shown that the commonly used determination of the slope and the intercept (v(b)), which are presumed to be independent from each other, is invalid if the initial intracellular molality m(0) is known. Instead, the linear regression with only one independent parameter (v(b)) or the Least Square Method (LSM) with v(b) as the only fitting LSM parameter must be applied. The slope can then be calculated from the BVH relationship as the function of v(b). In case of unknown m(0) (for example, if cells are preloaded with trehalose, or electroporation caused ion leakage, etc.), it is considered as the second independent statistical parameter to be found. In this (and only) scenario, all three methods give the same results for v(b) and m(0). AP can be linearized only for water hydraulic conductivity (L(p)) and solute mobility (omega(s)) while water and solute permeabilities P(w) identical withL(p)RT and P(s) identical withomega(s)RT cannot be linearized because they have pre-exponential factor (RT) that depends on the temperature T.

  20. Improving validation methods for molecular diagnostics: application of Bland-Altman, Deming and simple linear regression analyses in assay comparison and evaluation for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Misyura, Maksym; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Kulasignam, Vathany; Zhang, Tong; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Stockley, Tracy L

    2017-07-26

    A standard approach in test evaluation is to compare results of the assay in validation to results from previously validated methods. For quantitative molecular diagnostic assays, comparison of test values is often performed using simple linear regression and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), using R(2) as the primary metric of assay agreement. However, the use of R(2) alone does not adequately quantify constant or proportional errors required for optimal test evaluation. More extensive statistical approaches, such as Bland-Altman and expanded interpretation of linear regression methods, can be used to more thoroughly compare data from quantitative molecular assays. We present the application of Bland-Altman and linear regression statistical methods to evaluate quantitative outputs from next-generation sequencing assays (NGS). NGS-derived data sets from assay validation experiments were used to demonstrate the utility of the statistical methods. Both Bland-Altman and linear regression were able to detect the presence and magnitude of constant and proportional error in quantitative values of NGS data. Deming linear regression was used in the context of assay comparison studies, while simple linear regression was used to analyse serial dilution data. Bland-Altman statistical approach was also adapted to quantify assay accuracy, including constant and proportional errors, and precision where theoretical and empirical values were known. The complementary application of the statistical methods described in this manuscript enables more extensive evaluation of performance characteristics of quantitative molecular assays, prior to implementation in the clinical molecular laboratory. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. The analysis of non-linear dynamic behavior (including snap-through) of postbuckled plates by simple analytical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1988-01-01

    Static postbuckling and nonlinear dynamic analysis of plates are usually accomplished by multimode analyses, although the methods are complicated and do not give straightforward understanding of the nonlinear behavior. Assuming single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the static postbuckling displacement and nonlinear dynamic responses of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. Regions with softening and hardening spring behavior are identified. Also, the highly nonlinear motion of snap-through and its effects on the overall dynamic response can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Theoretical results are compared with experimental results obtained using a buckled aluminum panel, using discrete frequency and broadband point excitation. Some important effects of the snap-through motion on the dynamic response of the postbuckled plates are found.

  2. Polarization-dependent effects in point-by-point fiber Bragg gratings enable simple, linearly polarized fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Robert J; Steel, M J; Marshall, Graham D; Fuerbach, Alexander; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas; Withford, Michael J

    2009-04-13

    Fiber Bragg gratings inscribed with a femtosecond laser using the point-by-point (PbP) technique have polarization dependent grating strength (PDGS) and exhibit birefringence. In this paper we quantify the dependence of these two properties on the ellipticity, position in the core and size of the micro-voids at the center of each refractive index modulation. We demonstrate that the effective modal index for type II gratings written with a femtosecond laser using the PbP method must be lower than that of the pristine fiber, and for the first time associate an axis with a polarization such that the long axis of the elliptically-shaped index modulations corresponds to the slow axis of the gratings. We exploit the PDGS of two gratings used as frequency-selective feedback elements as well as appropriate coiling, to realize a linearly-polarized fiber laser with a low birefringence fiber cavity. We show that the polarization-dependent grating strength is a function of the writing pulse energy and that only gratings optimized for this property will linearly polarize the fiber laser. The fiber lasers have high extinction ratios (>30 dB) for fiber lengths of up to 10 m and very stable polarized output powers (<0.5% amplitude fluctuations) in the range of 20-65 mW at 1540 nm. This method of polarization discrimination allows the realization of highly robust and simplified linearly polarized fiber lasers.

  3. Simple Procedure to Compute the Inductance of a Toroidal Ferrite Core from the Linear to the Saturation Regions

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Rosa Ana; Pleite, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    We propose a specific procedure to compute the inductance of a toroidal ferrite core as a function of the excitation current. The study includes the linear, intermediate and saturation regions. The procedure combines the use of Finite Element Analysis in 2D and experimental measurements. Through the two dimensional (2D) procedure we are able to achieve convergence, a reduction of computational cost and equivalent results to those computed by three dimensional (3D) simulations. The validation is carried out by comparing 2D, 3D and experimental results. PMID:28809283

  4. Simple Procedure to Compute the Inductance of a Toroidal Ferrite Core from the Linear to the Saturation Regions.

    PubMed

    Salas, Rosa Ana; Pleite, Jorge

    2013-06-17

    We propose a specific procedure to compute the inductance of a toroidal ferrite core as a function of the excitation current. The study includes the linear, intermediate and saturation regions. The procedure combines the use of Finite Element Analysis in 2D and experimental measurements. Through the two dimensional (2D) procedure we are able to achieve convergence, a reduction of computational cost and equivalent results to those computed by three dimensional (3D) simulations. The validation is carried out by comparing 2D, 3D and experimental results.

  5. Quality assurance evaluation of a simple linear protocol for the treatment of impending status epilepticus in a pediatric emergency department 2 years postimplementation.

    PubMed

    Tourigny-Ruel, Geneviève; Diksic, Dubravka; Mok, Elise; McGillivray, David

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a simple linear midazolam-based protocol for the management of impending status epilepticus in children up to 18 years of age. This is a descriptive, quality assessment, retrospective chart review of children presenting with the chief complaint of seizure disorder in the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care pediatric hospital and a triage category of resuscitation or urgent from April 1, 2009, to August 31, 2011. In children with at least one seizure episode in the ED treated according to the linear protocol, three main outcomes were assessed: compliance, effectiveness, and complications. Of the 128 children meeting the above study criteria, 68 had at least one seizure episode in the ED, and treatment was required to terminate at least one seizure episode in 46 of 68 patients (67.6%). Fifty-five seizure episodes were treated in the 46 patients: 51 of 55 seizure episodes were treated with midazolam (92.7%) and 4 of 55 with lorazepam or diazepam (7.3%). Of those treated with midazolam, 86.3% (44 of 51) were successfully treated with one or two doses of midazolam. The median seizure duration for all treated patients was 6 minutes. Of the 42 patients treated with midazolam, 7 required either continuous positive airway pressure or intubation, and two patients were treated for hypotension. One patient died of pneumococcal meningitis. This simple linear protocol is an effective and safe regimen for the treatment of impending status epilepticus in children.

  6. Some consequences of assuming simple patterns for the treatment effect over time in a linear mixed model.

    PubMed

    Bamia, Christina; White, Ian R; Kenward, Michael G

    2013-07-10

    Linear mixed models are often used for the analysis of data from clinical trials with repeated quantitative outcomes. This paper considers linear mixed models where a particular form is assumed for the treatment effect, in particular constant over time or proportional to time. For simplicity, we assume no baseline covariates and complete post-baseline measures, and we model arbitrary mean responses for the control group at each time. For the variance-covariance matrix, we consider an unstructured model, a random intercepts model and a random intercepts and slopes model. We show that the treatment effect estimator can be expressed as a weighted average of the observed time-specific treatment effects, with weights depending on the covariance structure and the magnitude of the estimated variance components. For an assumed constant treatment effect, under the random intercepts model, all weights are equal, but in the random intercepts and slopes and the unstructured models, we show that some weights can be negative: thus, the estimated treatment effect can be negative, even if all time-specific treatment effects are positive. Our results suggest that particular models for the treatment effect combined with particular covariance structures may result in estimated treatment effects of unexpected magnitude and/or direction. Methods are illustrated using a Parkinson's disease trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Implementation of a simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2000-10-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting the time evolution of the width of the mixing layer at an unstable fluid interface [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E 58, 5834 (1998); ibid. 61, 5339 (2000)]. The ordinary differential equations of this model have been heuristically generalized into partial differential equations suitable for implementation in multicomponent hydrodynamics codes. The central ingredient in this generalization is a nun-diffusional expression for the species mass fluxes. These fluxes describe the relative motion of the species, and thereby determine the local mixing rate and spatial distribution of mixed fluid as a function of time. The generalized model has been implemented in a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code. The model equations and implementation procedure are summarized, and comparisons with experimental mixing data are presented.

  8. A simple recipe for setting up the flux equations of cyclic and linear reaction schemes of ion transport with a high number of states: The arrow scheme.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ulf-Peter; Rauh, Oliver; Schroeder, Indra

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of flux equations or current-voltage relationships in reaction kinetic models with a high number of states can be very cumbersome. Here, a recipe based on an arrow scheme is presented, which yields a straightforward access to the minimum form of the flux equations and the occupation probability of the involved states in cyclic and linear reaction schemes. This is extremely simple for cyclic schemes without branches. If branches are involved, the effort of setting up the equations is a little bit higher. However, also here a straightforward recipe making use of so-called reserve factors is provided for implementing the branches into the cyclic scheme, thus enabling also a simple treatment of such cases.

  9. A simple recipe for setting up the flux equations of cyclic and linear reaction schemes of ion transport with a high number of states: The arrow scheme

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ulf-Peter; Rauh, Oliver; Schroeder, Indra

    2016-01-01

    abstract The calculation of flux equations or current-voltage relationships in reaction kinetic models with a high number of states can be very cumbersome. Here, a recipe based on an arrow scheme is presented, which yields a straightforward access to the minimum form of the flux equations and the occupation probability of the involved states in cyclic and linear reaction schemes. This is extremely simple for cyclic schemes without branches. If branches are involved, the effort of setting up the equations is a little bit higher. However, also here a straightforward recipe making use of so-called reserve factors is provided for implementing the branches into the cyclic scheme, thus enabling also a simple treatment of such cases. PMID:26646356

  10. The design and analysis of simple low speed flap systems with the aid of linearized theory computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose here is to show how two linearized theory computer programs in combination may be used for the design of low speed wing flap systems capable of high levels of aerodynamic efficiency. A fundamental premise of the study is that high levels of aerodynamic performance for flap systems can be achieved only if the flow about the wing remains predominantly attached. Based on this premise, a wing design program is used to provide idealized attached flow camber surfaces from which candidate flap systems may be derived, and, in a following step, a wing evaluation program is used to provide estimates of the aerodynamic performance of the candidate systems. Design strategies and techniques that may be employed are illustrated through a series of examples. Applicability of the numerical methods to the analysis of a representative flap system (although not a system designed by the process described here) is demonstrated in a comparison with experimental data.

  11. A simple linear model for estimating ozone AOT40 at forest sites from raw passive sampling data.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Marco; Cristofolini, Fabiana; Cristofori, Antonella; Gerosa, Giacomo; Gottardini, Elena

    2012-08-01

    A rapid, empirical method is described for estimating weekly AOT40 from ozone concentrations measured with passive samplers at forest sites. The method is based on linear regression and was developed after three years of measurements in Trentino (northern Italy). It was tested against an independent set of data from passive sampler sites across Italy. It provides good weekly estimates compared with those measured by conventional monitors (0.85 ≤R(2)≤ 0.970; 97 ≤ RMSE ≤ 302). Estimates obtained using passive sampling at forest sites are comparable to those obtained by another estimation method based on modelling hourly concentrations (R(2) = 0.94; 131 ≤ RMSE ≤ 351). Regression coefficients of passive sampling are similar to those obtained with conventional monitors at forest sites. Testing against an independent dataset generated by passive sampling provided similar results (0.86 ≤R(2)≤ 0.99; 65 ≤ RMSE ≤ 478). Errors tend to accumulate when weekly AOT40 estimates are summed to obtain the total AOT40 over the May-July period, and the median deviation between the two estimation methods based on passive sampling is 11%. The method proposed does not require any assumptions, complex calculation or modelling technique, and can be useful when other estimation methods are not feasible, either in principle or in practice. However, the method is not useful when estimates of hourly concentrations are of interest.

  12. A linear model for rotors produced by trapped lee waves with a simple representation of boundary layer friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Miguel A. C.

    2017-04-01

    A linear model is used to diagnose the onset of rotors in flow over 2D ridges, for atmospheres that are neutrally stratified near the surface and stably stratified aloft, with a sharp temperature inversion in between, where trapped lee waves may propagate. This is achieved by coupling an inviscid two-layer mountain-wave model with a bulk boundary-layer model. The full model shows some ability to detect flow stagnation as a function of key input parameters, such as the Froude number and the height of the inversion, by comparison with results from numerical simulations and laboratory experiments carried out by previous authors. The effect of a boundary layer is essential to correctly predict flow stagnation, as the inviscid version of the model severely overestimates the dimensionless critical mountain height necessary for stagnation to occur. An improved model that includes only the effects of mean flow deceleration and amplification of the velocity perturbation within the boundary layer predicts flow stagnation much better in the most non-hydrostatic cases treated here, where waves appear to be directly forced by the orography. However, in the most hydrostatic case, only the full model, taking into account the feedback of the boundary layer on the inviscid flow, satisfactorily predicts flow stagnation, although the corresponding stagnation condition is unable to discriminate between rotors and hydraulic jumps. This is due to the fact that the trapped lee waves associated with the rotors are not forced directly by the orography in this case, but rather seem to be generated indirectly by nonlinear processes. This mechanism is, to a certain extent, mimicked by the modified surface boundary condition adopted in the full model, where an "effective orography" that differs from the real one forces the trapped lee waves. Versions of the model not including this feedback severely underestimate the amplitude of the trapped lee waves in the most hydrostatic case, partly

  13. Entropic potential field formed for a linear-motor protein near a filament: Statistical-mechanical analyses using simple models.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Yoshidome, Takashi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2010-07-28

    We report a new progress in elucidating the mechanism of the unidirectional movement of a linear-motor protein (e.g., myosin) along a filament (e.g., F-actin). The basic concept emphasized here is that a potential field is entropically formed for the protein on the filament immersed in solvent due to the effect of the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The entropic potential field is strongly dependent on geometric features of the protein and the filament, their overall shapes as well as details of the polyatomic structures. The features and the corresponding field are judiciously adjusted by the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the protein, hydrolysis of ATP into adenosine diphosphate (ADP)+Pi, and release of Pi and ADP. As the first step, we propose the following physical picture: The potential field formed along the filament for the protein without the binding of ATP or ADP+Pi to it is largely different from that for the protein with the binding, and the directed movement is realized by repeated switches from one of the fields to the other. To illustrate the picture, we analyze the spatial distribution of the entropic potential between a large solute and a large body using the three-dimensional integral equation theory. The solute is modeled as a large hard sphere. Two model filaments are considered as the body: model 1 is a set of one-dimensionally connected large hard spheres and model 2 is a double helical structure formed by two sets of connected large hard spheres. The solute and the filament are immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent. The major findings are as follows. The solute is strongly confined within a narrow space in contact with the filament. Within the space there are locations with sharply deep local potential minima along the filament, and the distance between two adjacent locations is equal to the diameter of the large spheres constituting the filament. The potential minima form a ringlike domain in model 1

  14. A simple linear catchment-response model for investigating sediment efflux associated with climate and land use change in Goodwin Creek, MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Thompson, S. E.; Hassan, M. A.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Erosion and sediment transport are influenced by hydrological regime (rainfall-runoff), catchment properties (vegetation, topography, soil properties), management practices (land use), and their interactions. Here, we use a simple linear catchment response model to describe sediment transport in the Goodwin Creek catchment. The model includes two linear stores, one for the hillslope and one for the fluvial network. The hillslope store is supplied with sediments from upland erosion, with event-driven mobilization occurring over the effective duration of each storm. Some of the mobilized sediments are redeposited on the hillslope and the remainder is transferred to the river network. Additional sediment supply to the network occurs from the channel via bank erosion. Suspended sediment transport and deposition are considered along river channels in order to determine the timing and magnitude of sediment efflux from the catchment. In environments dominated by hillslope erosion, sediment delivery ratio (the ratio between upland erosion and sediment yield at the outlet) is expected to be closely related to catchment hydrological response. However, fluvial storage obscures this relationship by modulating the morphodynamic response to primary hydrological and geomorphological drivers. We used the model to distinguish the relative influence of climate forcing, hydrological response and land use practices on sediment transport and delivery in the Goodwin Creek catchment, where sediment and channel dynamics have been monitored in fourteen sub-catchments for over twenty years. These sub-catchments include a range of channel sizes and a diversity of management practices over the length of the data record. Our results suggest that hillslope processes dominate the delivery ratio in smaller catchments but that channel processes become more important at larger spatial scales. Furthermore, although climate variability could explain a large proportion of the variability in sediment

  15. High-performance chromatofocusing using linear and concave pH gradients formed with simple buffer mixtures. I. Effect of buffer composition on the gradient shape.

    PubMed

    Bates, R C; Kang, X; Frey, D D

    2000-08-18

    Numerical calculations together with simplified analytical relations based on local equilibrium theory are used to determine the factors which govern the shape of the gradient formed during chromatofocusing when simple mixtures of buffering species are employed to produce linear or concave pH gradients. The numerical and analytical development is also used to determine the relation between the gradient shape and the buffering capacities of the adsorbed and liquid phases. Experiments which verify the theoretical methods are described where internally generated, retained pH gradients of various shapes are formed using high-performance chromatography columns. The resulting experimental and theoretical basis can be employed as means for the selection of the buffer composition for use in chromatofocusing.

  16. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of the rheological and structural properties of linear and branched molecules. Simple shear and poiseuille flows; instabilities and slip.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Tejas, Jorge; Alvarado, Juan F J; González-Alatorre, Guillermo; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Sanchez, Isaac C; Macias-Salinas, Ricardo; Manero, Octavio

    2005-08-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are performed for linear and branched chain molecules to study their rheological and structural properties under simple shear and Poiseuille flows. Molecules are described by a spring-monomer model with a given intermolecular potential. The equations of motion are solved for shear and Poiseuille flows with Lees and Edward's [A. W. Lees and S. F. Edwards, J. Phys. C 5, 1921 (1972)] periodic boundary conditions. A multiple time-scale algorithm extended to nonequilibrium situations is used as the integration method, and the simulations are performed at constant temperature using Nose-Hoover [S. Nose, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 511 (1984)] dynamics. In simple shear, molecules with flow-induced ellipsoidal shape, having significant segment concentrations along the gradient and neutral directions, exhibit substantial flow resistance. Linear molecules have larger zero-shear-rate viscosity than that of branched molecules, however, this behavior reverses as the shear rate is increased. The relaxation time of the molecules is associated with segment concentrations directed along the gradient and neutral directions, and hence it depends on structure and molecular weight. The results of this study are in qualitative agreement with other simulation studies and with experimental data. The pressure (Poiseuille) flow is induced by an external force F(e) simulated by confining the molecules in the region between surfaces which have attractive forces. Conditions at the boundary strongly influence the type of the slip flow predicted. A parabolic velocity profile with apparent slip on the wall is predicted under weakly attractive wall conditions, independent of molecular structure. In the case of strongly attractive walls, a layer of adhered molecules to the wall produces an abrupt distortion of the velocity profile which leads to slip between fluid layers with magnitude that depends on the molecular structure. Finally, the molecular deformation

  17. High-performance chromatofocusing using linear and concave pH gradients formed with simple buffer mixtures. II. Separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, X; Bates, R C; Frey, D D

    2000-08-18

    The separation of proteins using high-performance chromatofocusing with linear or concave pH gradients formed using simple mixtures of buffering species in the elution buffer is investigated experimentally. The separation achieved is comparable to that using polyampholyte elution buffers with these types of systems. More specifically, protein band widths at one half of the band height in the range between 0.1 and 0.025 pH units were observed, and good resolution was achieved of protein variants differing by a single amino acid residue in separation times of 30 min or less. An especially useful elution buffer is investigated that contains only four buffering species and that produces a linear pH gradient in the range between pH 9.5 and 6.0 when used together with a particular high-performance column packing made specifically for chromatofocusing. This elution buffer and column packing combination is evaluated by using it for the chromatofocusing of equine myoglobin and human hemoglobin variants. Additional applications are described in which a polyethyleneimine derivatized silica column packing and a pH gradient that is concave in shape are used for the separation of proteins in an E. coli cell lysate.

  18. Simple quasi-analytical holonomic homogenization model for the non-linear analysis of in-plane loaded masonry panels: Part 2, structural implementation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, G.; Bertolesi, E.

    2017-07-01

    The simple quasi analytical holonomic homogenization approach for the non-linear analysis of in-plane loaded masonry presented in Part 1 is here implemented at a structural leveland validated. For such implementation, a Rigid Body and Spring Mass model (RBSM) is adopted, relying into a numerical modelling constituted by rigid elements interconnected by homogenized inelastic normal and shear springs placed at the interfaces between adjoining elements. Such approach is also known as HRBSM. The inherit advantage is that it is not necessary to solve a homogenization problem at each load step in each Gauss point, and a direct implementation into a commercial software by means of an external user supplied subroutine is straightforward. In order to have an insight into the capabilities of the present approach to reasonably reproduce masonry behavior at a structural level, non-linear static analyses are conducted on a shear wall, for which experimental and numerical data are available in the technical literature. Quite accurate results are obtained with a very limited computational effort.

  19. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hack, Christopher A; Benner, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Delta(m) vs. mass data where Delta(m) is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to the alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alphaCHCA) matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied. Published in 2002 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Ovary-drip transformation: a simple method for directly generating vector- and marker-free transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) with a linear GFP cassette transformation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aifu; Su, Qiao; An, Lijia

    2009-03-01

    The presence of selectable marker genes and vector backbone sequences has affected the safe assessment of transgenic plants. In this study, the ovary-drip method for directly generating vector- and selectable marker-free transgenic plants was described, by which maize was transformed with a linear GFP cassette (Ubi-GFP-nos). The key features of this method center on the complete removal of the styles and the subsequent application of a DNA solution directly to the ovaries. The movement of the exogenous DNA was monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled DNA, which showed that the time taken by the exogenous DNA to enter the ovaries was shortened compared to that of the pollen-tube pathway. This led to an improved transformation frequency of 3.38% compared to 0.86% for the pollen-tube pathway as determined by PCR analysis. The use of 0.05% surfactant Silwet L-77 + 5% sucrose as a transformation solution further increased the transformation frequency to 6.47%. Southern blot analysis showed that the transgenic plants had low transgene copy number and simple integration pattern. Green fluorescence was observed in roots and immature embryos of transgenic plants by fluorescence microscopy. Progeny analysis showed that GFP insertions were inherited in T(1) generation. The ovary-drip method would become a favorable choice for directly generating vector- and marker-free transgenic maize expressing functional genes of agronomic interest.

  1. Type I error rates of rare single nucleotide variants are inflated in tests of association with non-normally distributed traits using simple linear regression methods.

    PubMed

    Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Sung, Heejong; Sabourin, Jeremy A; Justice, Cristina M; Sorant, Alexa J M; Wilson, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of (a) the minor allele frequency of the single nucleotide variant (SNV), (b) the degree of departure from normality of the trait, and (c) the position of the SNVs on type I error rates were investigated in the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 19 whole exome sequence data. To test the distribution of the type I error rate, 5 simulated traits were considered: standard normal and gamma distributed traits; 2 transformed versions of the gamma trait (log10 and rank-based inverse normal transformations); and trait Q1 provided by GAW 19. Each trait was tested with 313,340 SNVs. Tests of association were performed with simple linear regression and average type I error rates were determined for minor allele frequency classes. Rare SNVs (minor allele frequency < 0.05) showed inflated type I error rates for non-normally distributed traits that increased as the minor allele frequency decreased. The inflation of average type I error rates increased as the significance threshold decreased. Normally distributed traits did not show inflated type I error rates with respect to the minor allele frequency for rare SNVs. There was no consistent effect of transformation on the uniformity of the distribution of the location of SNVs with a type I error.

  2. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  3. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  4. Circular and linear polarization inverse SAR imaging of simple deterministic targets and statistically known randomly rough surfaces using constant and varying illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, J. W.; Porco, R. L.; Hartman, G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to study mechanisms of scattering and their relative contributions to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR images, a special measurement facility has been constructed. It can be used to generate images in which the target is illuminated from a constant direction as the receiver is rotated in azimuth, and the target is illuminated from various directions as the receiver is rotated in azimuth. The imaging system performance is discussed, and images obtained using both approaches are compared, for a variety of simple targets and statistically known randomly rough surfaces.

  5. Circular and linear polarization inverse SAR imaging of simple deterministic targets and statistically known randomly rough surfaces using constant and varying illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, J. W.; Porco, R. L.; Hartman, G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to study mechanisms of scattering and their relative contributions to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR images, a special measurement facility has been constructed. It can be used to generate images in which the target is illuminated from a constant direction as the receiver is rotated in azimuth, and the target is illuminated from various directions as the receiver is rotated in azimuth. The imaging system performance is discussed, and images obtained using both approaches are compared, for a variety of simple targets and statistically known randomly rough surfaces.

  6. Extending the simple linear regression model to account for correlated responses: an introduction to generalized estimating equations and multi-level mixed modelling.

    PubMed

    Burton, P; Gurrin, L; Sly, P

    1998-06-15

    Much of the research in epidemiology and clinical science is based upon longitudinal designs which involve repeated measurements of a variable of interest in each of a series of individuals. Such designs can be very powerful, both statistically and scientifically, because they enable one to study changes within individual subjects over time or under varied conditions. However, this power arises because the repeated measurements tend to be correlated with one another, and this must be taken into proper account at the time of analysis or misleading conclusions may result. Recent advances in statistical theory and in software development mean that studies based upon such designs can now be analysed more easily, in a valid yet flexible manner, using a variety of approaches which include the use of generalized estimating equations, and mixed models which incorporate random effects. This paper provides a particularly simple illustration of the use of these two approaches, taking as a practical example the analysis of a study which examined the response of portable peak expiratory flow meters to changes in true peak expiratory flow in 12 children with asthma. The paper takes the reader through the relevant practicalities of model fitting, interpretation and criticism and demonstrates that, in a simple case such as this, analyses based upon these model-based approaches produce reassuringly similar inferences to standard analyses based upon more conventional methods.

  7. Linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactants in a simple test to detect refractory organic carbon (ROC): Attribution of recalcitrants to impurities in LAS

    SciTech Connect

    Koelbener, P.; Baumann, U.; Leisinger, T.; Cook, A.M. |

    1995-04-01

    The standard procedure to examine the biodegradability of a (group of) compound(s) in a trickling filter is a continuous-flow system. In this test, nondegraded metabolites from a commercial linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant are detected. This procedure has now been augmented by two phases in closed cycle to give a test for refractory organic carbon (ROC test). First, the concentration of nondegraded metabolites was increased by readdition of LAS to the solution being cycled through the filter. Second, the concentrated residues were further recycled till the net dissolved organic carbon (DOC) stabilized at a finite value and the net released CO{sub 2} stabilized at about zero. The organic compounds remaining at this phase of the experiment were considered recalcitrant and could be examined by global (e.g., DOC) and specific (e.g., HPLC) assays. Four different commercial preparations of LAS were examined, as were the (4-sulfophenyl)undecane homologue (C{sub 11}-LAS), the (4-sulfophenyl)dodecane homologue (C{sub 12}-LAS), and some related compounds. The four commercial LAS preparations contained different levels if impurities which were largely dialkyltetralinesulfonates (DATS) and branched-chain alkylbenzenesulfonates (bABS). The refractory organic carbon (ROC) remaining after biodegradation varied from 3 to 14%. The results were a characteristic of the LAS under study and were independent of the source of the biomass used in the experiment. Residues were examined by HPLC, and 50 to 100 peaks were observed, which were usually characteristic of the LAS studied. No peak has been conclusively identified. The authors consider the recalcitrants to represent carboxylated DATS and carboxylated bABS.

  8. A simple, stable, and accurate linear tetrahedral finite element for transient, nearly, and fully incompressible solid dynamics: A dynamic variational multiscale approach [A simple, stable, and accurate tetrahedral finite element for transient, nearly incompressible, linear and nonlinear elasticity: A dynamic variational multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Scovazzi, Guglielmo; Carnes, Brian; Zeng, Xianyi; Rossi, Simone

    2015-11-12

    Here, we propose a new approach for the stabilization of linear tetrahedral finite elements in the case of nearly incompressible transient solid dynamics computations. Our method is based on a mixed formulation, in which the momentum equation is complemented by a rate equation for the evolution of the pressure field, approximated with piece-wise linear, continuous finite element functions. The pressure equation is stabilized to prevent spurious pressure oscillations in computations. Incidentally, it is also shown that many stabilized methods previously developed for the static case do not generalize easily to transient dynamics. Extensive tests in the context of linear and nonlinear elasticity are used to corroborate the claim that the proposed method is robust, stable, and accurate.

  9. A simple, stable, and accurate linear tetrahedral finite element for transient, nearly, and fully incompressible solid dynamics: A dynamic variational multiscale approach [A simple, stable, and accurate tetrahedral finite element for transient, nearly incompressible, linear and nonlinear elasticity: A dynamic variational multiscale approach

    DOE PAGES

    Scovazzi, Guglielmo; Carnes, Brian; Zeng, Xianyi; ...

    2015-11-12

    Here, we propose a new approach for the stabilization of linear tetrahedral finite elements in the case of nearly incompressible transient solid dynamics computations. Our method is based on a mixed formulation, in which the momentum equation is complemented by a rate equation for the evolution of the pressure field, approximated with piece-wise linear, continuous finite element functions. The pressure equation is stabilized to prevent spurious pressure oscillations in computations. Incidentally, it is also shown that many stabilized methods previously developed for the static case do not generalize easily to transient dynamics. Extensive tests in the context of linear andmore » nonlinear elasticity are used to corroborate the claim that the proposed method is robust, stable, and accurate.« less

  10. Simple Examples of Non Linear Truss Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    d .r. a.."+ ny c C... Prepared for OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Arlington, VA 22217 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Chicago Branch Office 536 South Clark St...AGENCY MAMIE A ADONE3(iI dif~Iferu Coad,,JUm 0118..) 13. SECURITY CLA33. (*I this iopof) OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Unclassified Chicago Branch off ice i...ELSIIAII/ONAON 536 South Clark St. SHO~ Q= I -hie k!:i 17. 0I3?RsaUTION STATEMENT (of Me .htad sats.,d lie blook 20. It d1ifforen boaRopore) Is

  11. Simple Saucers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    With standardized English Language Arts exams on the horizon, the author thought a game of Antonyms would provide not only a quick language arts activity for her sixth graders, but also a nice segue to an art lesson in contrast. In this article, she describes a project, a simple saucer on a pedestal base, which required students to demonstrate…

  12. Simple Saucers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    With standardized English Language Arts exams on the horizon, the author thought a game of Antonyms would provide not only a quick language arts activity for her sixth graders, but also a nice segue to an art lesson in contrast. In this article, she describes a project, a simple saucer on a pedestal base, which required students to demonstrate…

  13. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h) and H = U(h) # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h) by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  14. Resistors Improve Ramp Linearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    Simple modification to bootstrap ramp generator gives more linear output over longer sweep times. New circuit adds just two resistors, one of which is adjustable. Modification cancels nonlinearities due to variations in load on charging capacitor and due to changes in charging current as the voltage across capacitor increases.

  15. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  16. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  17. Ranking Forestry Investments With Parametric Linear Programming

    Treesearch

    Paul A. Murphy

    1976-01-01

    Parametric linear programming is introduced as a technique for ranking forestry investments under multiple constraints; it combines the advantages of simple tanking and linear programming as capital budgeting tools.

  18. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  19. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Valeev, Edward F.; Neese, Frank

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  20. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  1. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  2. A simple, compact, and efficient diode-side-pumped linear intracavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG rod laser with 50 ns pulse width and 124 W green output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sunil K.; Mukhopadhyay, Pranab K.; Singh, Amarjeet; Kandasamy, Ranganathan; Oak, Shrikant M.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed an efficient and high power repetitively Q-switched diode-pumped intracavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG/LiB3O5 based green laser capable of generating 124 W of average green power with 50 ns pulse duration in a highly compact and robust linear cavity configuration. The pump to green beam conversion efficiency is 16.8% and the overall wall-plug efficiency is 8.3%. The long term power stability is excellent with ±0.4 W variation at the maximum output power and ±2% amplitude fluctuation with ±2.9 ns timing jitter. The M2 parameter of the green beam was measured to be ˜27. This, combined with the short pulse duration and the high average power, makes this laser ideal for pumping ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser amplifier systems and for micromachining applications.

  3. Cohomological invariants of central simple algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkurjev, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We determine the indecomposable degree 3 cohomological invariants of tuples of central simple algebras with linear relations. Equivalently, we determine the degree 3 reductive cohomological invariants of all split semisimple groups of type A.

  4. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA{close_quote}s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Linear control design for guaranteed stability of uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a linear control design algorithm based on the elemental perturbation bounds developed recently is presented for a simple second order linear uncertain system satisfying matching conditions. The proposed method is compared with Guaranteed Cost Control (GCC), Multistep Guaranteed Cost Control (MGCC) and the Matching Condition (MC) methods and is shown to give guaranteed stability with lesser values for the control gains than some of the existing methods for the example considered.

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  7. Linear Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenough, Justin

    Elastic waves propagating in simple media manifest a surprisingly rich collection of phenomena. Although some can't withstand the complexities of Earth's structure, the majority only grow more interesting and more important as remote sensing probes for seismologists studying the planet's interior. To fully mine the information carried to the surface by seismic waves, seismologists must produce accurate models of the waves. Great strides have been made in this regard. Problems that were entirely intractable a decade ago are now routinely solved on inexpensive workstations. The mathematical representations of waves coded into algorithms have grown vastly more sophisticated and are troubled by many fewer approximations, enforced symmetries, and limitations. They are far from straightforward, and seismologists using them need a firm grasp on wave propagation in simple media. Linear Elastic Waves, by applied mathematician John G. Harris, responds to this need.

  8. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Characterizations of linear sufficient statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. C., Jr.; Redner, R.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition is developed such that there exists a continous linear sufficient statistic T for a dominated collection of totally finite measures defined on the Borel field generated by the open sets of a Banach space X. In particular, corollary necessary and sufficient conditions are given so that there exists a rank K linear sufficient statistic T for any finite collection of probability measures having n-variate normal densities. In this case a simple calculation, involving only the population means and covariances, determines the smallest integer K for which there exists a rank K linear sufficient statistic T (as well as an associated statistic T itself).

  10. Simple source for large linear cluster photonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilnyak, Y.; Aharon, N.; Istrati, D.; Megidish, E.; Retzker, A.; Eisenberg, H. S.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental realization of many-body entangled states is one of the main goals of quantum technology as these states are a key resource for quantum computation and quantum sensing. However, increasing the number of photons in an entangled state has been proved to be a painstakingly hard task. This is a result of the nondeterministic emission of current photon sources and the distinguishability between photons from different sources. Moreover, the generation rate and the complexity of the optical setups hinder scalability. Here we present a scheme that is compact, requires a very modest number of components, and avoids the distinguishability issues by using only one single-photon source. States of any number of photons are generated with the same configuration, with no need for increasing the optical setup. The basic operation of this scheme is experimentally demonstrated, and its sensitivity to imperfections is considered.

  11. Super-linear Precision in Simple Neural Population Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Fiete, Ila

    2015-03-01

    A widely used tool for quantifying the precision with which a population of noisy sensory neurons encodes the value of an external stimulus is the Fisher Information (FI). Maximizing the FI is also a commonly used objective for constructing optimal neural codes. The primary utility and importance of the FI arises because it gives, through the Cramer-Rao bound, the smallest mean-squared error achievable by any unbiased stimulus estimator. However, it is well-known that when neural firing is sparse, optimizing the FI can result in codes that perform very poorly when considering the resulting mean-squared error, a measure with direct biological relevance. Here we construct optimal population codes by minimizing mean-squared error directly and study the scaling properties of the resulting network, focusing on the optimal tuning curve width. We then extend our results to continuous attractor networks that maintain short-term memory of external stimuli in their dynamics. Here we find similar scaling properties in the structure of the interactions that minimize diffusive information loss.

  12. Simple taper: Taper equations for the field forester

    Treesearch

    David R. Larsen

    2017-01-01

    "Simple taper" is set of linear equations that are based on stem taper rates; the intent is to provide taper equation functionality to field foresters. The equation parameters are two taper rates based on differences in diameter outside bark at two points on a tree. The simple taper equations are statistically equivalent to more complex equations. The linear...

  13. Crossing simple resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  14. SIMPLE: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Frank L.

    Symbolic Interactive Matrix Processing Language (SIMPLE) is a conversational matrix-oriented source language suited to a batch or a time-sharing environment. The two modes of operation of SIMPLE are conversational mode and programing mode. This program uses a TAURUS time-sharing system and cathode ray terminals or teletypes. SIMPLE performs all…

  15. Simple Elbow Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2015-11-01

    Simple elbow dislocation refers to those elbow dislocations that do not involve an osseous injury. A complex elbow dislocation refers to an elbow that has dislocated with an osseous injury. Most simple elbow dislocations are treated nonoperatively. Understanding the importance of the soft tissue injury following a simple elbow dislocation is a key to being successful with treatment.

  16. Origin of nonsaturating linear magnetoresistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ott, Christian; Weber, Heiko B.

    2017-01-01

    The observation of nonsaturating classical linear magnetoresistivity has been an enigmatic phenomenon in solid-state physics. We present a study of a two-dimensional ohmic conductor, including local Hall effect and a self-consistent consideration of the environment. An equivalent-circuit scheme delivers a simple and convincing argument why the magnetoresistivity is linear in strong magnetic field, provided that current and biasing electric field are misaligned by a nonlocal mechanism. A finite-element model of a two-dimensional conductor is suited to display the situations that create such deviating currents. Besides edge effects next to electrodes, charge carrier density fluctuations are efficiently generating this effect. However, mobility fluctuations that have frequently been related to linear magnetoresistivity are barely relevant. Despite its rare observation, linear magnetoresitivity is rather the rule than the exception in a regime of low charge carrier densities, misaligned current pathways and strong magnetic field.

  17. Non-linear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, P.

    The mathematical pendulum is used to provide a survey of free and forced oscillations in damped and undamped systems. This simple model is employed to present illustrations for and comparisons between the various approximation schemes. A summary of the Liapunov stability theory is provided. The first and the second method of Liapunov are explained for autonomous as well as for nonautonomous systems. Here, a basic familiarity with the theory of linear oscillations is assumed. La Salle's theorem about the stability of invariant domains is explained in terms of illustrative examples. Self-excited oscillations are examined, taking into account such oscillations in mechanical and electrical systems, analytical approximation methods for the computation of self-excited oscillations, analytical criteria for the existence of limit cycles, forced oscillations in self-excited systems, and self-excited oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. Attention is given to Hamiltonian systems and an introduction to the theory of optimal control is provided.

  18. Preconditioned quantum linear system algorithm.

    PubMed

    Clader, B D; Jacobs, B C; Sprouse, C R

    2013-06-21

    We describe a quantum algorithm that generalizes the quantum linear system algorithm [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)] to arbitrary problem specifications. We develop a state preparation routine that can initialize generic states, show how simple ancilla measurements can be used to calculate many quantities of interest, and integrate a quantum-compatible preconditioner that greatly expands the number of problems that can achieve exponential speedup over classical linear systems solvers. To demonstrate the algorithm's applicability, we show how it can be used to compute the electromagnetic scattering cross section of an arbitrary target exponentially faster than the best classical algorithm.

  19. Simple aging in molecular glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niss, Kristine

    2015-03-01

    The glass transition takes place when the structural (alpha) relaxation freezes in and the liquid enters a non-equilibrium solid state. This usually happens when the relaxation time, τ, reaches a timescale of 1000 seconds, and τ = 1000 s is pragmatically used as a definition of the glass transition temperature Tg. However, if the glass is studied on a long enough time scale then relaxation is still seen as physical aging. Aging is a non-linear signature of the alpha relaxation in which the relaxation dynamics changes as a function of how far the system has relaxed. If the system is studied well below Tg then equilibrium will not be achieved, but just below or around Tg it is possible to systematically monitor the non-linear relaxation all the way to equilibrium. We have developed a micro crystat which is optimized for making fast changes in temperature and keeping temperature stable over days and even weeks. Combining this micro cryostat with a small dielectric cell it is possible to monitor non-linear relaxation in a dynamical range of more than 4 decades from 10 seconds to a 105 seconds. The aging is monitored after a fast temperature jump. This means that the aging itself is isotherm, and the data therefore directly shows, how the relaxation-rate changes as volume and structure change on the isotherm. We have studied several molecular liquids and find that the data to a very large extend can be understood in terms of a TNM formalism. This implies time-aging-time superposition and suggests a simple picture where the out of equlibrium ``states'' correspond to equilibrium states - at an other temperature. If the alpha relaxation is dynamically heterogeneous as it is commonly believed, then the aging results show that fast and slow ``modes'' of the relaxation are governed in the same way by structure and volume. We hypothesize that aging according to TNM formalism is an intrinsic property of Roskilde Simple liquids.

  20. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  1. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  2. Simple Machine Junk Cars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    During the month of May, the author's eighth-grade physical science students study the six simple machines through hands-on activities, reading assignments, videos, and notes. At the end of the month, they can easily identify the six types of simple machine: inclined plane, wheel and axle, pulley, screw, wedge, and lever. To conclude this unit,…

  3. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  4. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  5. Simple Machine Junk Cars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    During the month of May, the author's eighth-grade physical science students study the six simple machines through hands-on activities, reading assignments, videos, and notes. At the end of the month, they can easily identify the six types of simple machine: inclined plane, wheel and axle, pulley, screw, wedge, and lever. To conclude this unit,…

  6. Linear equations with random variables.

    PubMed

    Tango, Toshiro

    2005-10-30

    A system of linear equations is presented where the unknowns are unobserved values of random variables. A maximum likelihood estimator assuming a multivariate normal distribution and a non-parametric proportional allotment estimator are proposed for the unobserved values of the random variables and for their means. Both estimators can be computed by simple iterative procedures and are shown to perform similarly. The methods are illustrated with data from a national nutrition survey in Japan.

  7. Learning from observation, feedback, and intervention in linear and non-linear task environments.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Maria P; Enkvist, Tommy

    2016-12-12

    This multiple-cue judgment study investigates whether we can manipulate the judgment strategy and increase accuracy in linear and non-linear cue-criterion environments just by changing the training mode. Three experiments show that accuracy in simple linear additive task environments are improved with feedback training and intervention training, while accuracy in complex multiplicative tasks are improved with observational training. The observed interaction effect suggests that the training mode invites different strategies that are adjusted as a function of experience to the demands from the underlying cue-criterion structure. Thus, feedback and the intervention training modes invite cue abstraction, an effortful but successful strategy in combination with simple linear task structures, and observational training invites exemplar memory processes, a simple but successful strategy in combination with complex non-linear task structures. The study discusses adaptive cognition and the implication of the different training modes across a life span and for clinical populations.

  8. How simple are 'simple renal cysts'?

    PubMed

    Simms, Roslyn J; Ong, Albert C M

    2014-09-01

    The increasing use of medical imaging as an investigative tool is leading to the incidental and frequent finding of renal cysts in the general population. The presence of a solitary or multiple renal cysts has been generally considered benign in the absence of a family history of renal cystic disease or evidence of chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, a number of recent studies have questioned this consensus by reported associations with the development of hypertension or malignant change. For these reasons, some clinicians consider the presence of renal cysts to be a contraindication to kidney donation. The situation is complicated by the different usage of the term 'simple' by some radiologists (to indicate non-complex lesions) or nephrologists (to indicate age-related non-hereditary lesions). We propose that the term 'simple' be replaced with the morphological description, Stage I renal cyst (Bosniak Classification). The presence of a Stage I renal cyst should not preclude kidney donation. However, occult renal disease should be excluded and appropriate donor assessment performed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERAEDTA. All rights reserved.

  9. Why quantum dynamics is linear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas F.

    2009-11-01

    A seed George planted 45 years ago is still producing fruit now. In 1961, George set out the fundamental proposition that quantum dynamics is described most generally by linear maps of density matrices. Since the first sprout from George's seed appeared in 1962, we have known that George's fundamental proposition can be used to derive the linear Schrodinger equation in cases where it can be expected to apply. Now we have a proof of George's proposition that density matrices are mapped linearly to density matrices, that there can be no nonlinear generalization of this. That completes the derivation of the linear Schrodinger equation. The proof of George's proposition replaces Wigner's theorem that a symmetry transformation is represented by a linear or antilinear operator. The assumption needed to prove George's proposition is just that the dynamics does not depend on anything outside the system but must allow the system to be described as part of a larger system. This replaces the physically less compelling assumption of Wigner's theorem that absolute values of inner products are preserved. The history of this question is reviewed. Nonlinear generalizations of quantum mechanics have been proposed. They predict small but clear nonlinear effects, which very accurate experiments have not seen. This begs the question. Is there a reason in principle why nonlinearity is not found? Is it impossible? Does quantum dynamics have to be linear? Attempts to prove this have not been decisive, because either their assumptions are not compelling or their arguments are not conclusive. The question has been left unsettled. The simple answer, based on a simple assumption, was found in two steps separated by 44 years.

  10. Simple Machines Simply Put.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Students explore the workings of the lever, wheel and axle, and the inclined plane as they build simple toys--a bulldozer and a road grader. The project takes four weeks. Diagrams and procedures are included. (PR)

  11. Early Childhood: Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Clare B.; Shafer, Kathryn E.

    1987-01-01

    Encourages teachers to take advantage of the natural curiosity of young children in enhancing their interest in science. Describes four simple activities involving water, living and non-living things, air pollution, and food. (TW)

  12. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  13. Simple Machines Simply Put.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Students explore the workings of the lever, wheel and axle, and the inclined plane as they build simple toys--a bulldozer and a road grader. The project takes four weeks. Diagrams and procedures are included. (PR)

  14. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine and other stimulants found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and many soft drinks. Studies have not found ... side effects. How do fibrosis and simple cysts affect your risk for breast cancer? Neither fibrosis nor ...

  15. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  16. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  17. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  18. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  19. The Training Wheel. A Simple Model for Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogoff, Rosalind L.

    1984-01-01

    The author developed an instructional-design model consisting of four simple steps. The model is in a circular format, rather than the usual linear series form, so it is named the training wheel. (SSH)

  20. Simple circuit functions as frequency discriminator for PFM signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, J.

    1965-01-01

    Simple circuit monitors the frequency of PFM /Pulse Frequency Modulated/ telemetry signals. This discriminator can be used as a constant current integrator in such circuits as linear sweep and time delay.

  1. Strategy as simple rules.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple.

  2. SUPERNOVA FEEDBACK KEEPS GALAXIES SIMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan

    2011-05-10

    Galaxies evolve continuously under the influence of self-gravity, rotation, accretion, mergers, and feedback. The currently favored cold dark matter cosmological framework suggests a hierarchical process of galaxy formation, wherein the present properties of galaxies are decided by their individual histories of being assembled from smaller pieces. However, recent studies have uncovered surprising correlations among the properties of galaxies, to the extent of forming a one-parameter set lying on a single fundamental line. It has been argued in the literature that such simplicity is hard to explain within the paradigm of hierarchical galaxy mergers. One of the puzzling results is the simple linear correlation between the neutral hydrogen mass and the surface area, implying that widely different galaxies share very similar neutral hydrogen surface densities. In this work, we show that self-regulated star formation, driven by the competition between gravitational instabilities and mechanical feedback from supernovae, can explain the nearly constant neutral hydrogen surface density across galaxies. We therefore recover the simple scaling relation observed between the neutral hydrogen mass and surface area. This result furthers our understanding of the surprising simplicity in the observed properties of diverse galaxies.

  3. Detection and recognition of simple spatial forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    A model of human visual sensitivity to spatial patterns is constructed. The model predicts the visibility and discriminability of arbitrary two-dimensional monochrome images. The image is analyzed by a large array of linear feature sensors, which differ in spatial frequency, phase, orientation, and position in the visual field. All sensors have one octave frequency bandwidths, and increase in size linearly with eccentricity. Sensor responses are processed by an ideal Bayesian classifier, subject to uncertainty. The performance of the model is compared to that of the human observer in detecting and discriminating some simple images.

  4. Climate Change Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Harrison, Tim G.

    2007-01-01

    The newly revised specifications for GCSE science involve greater consideration of climate change. This topic appears in either the chemistry or biology section, depending on the examination board, and is a good example of "How Science Works." It is therefore timely that students are given an opportunity to conduct some simple climate modelling.…

  5. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  6. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  7. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  8. A simple snowmelt lysimeter

    Treesearch

    Harold F. Haupt

    1969-01-01

    A simple gage on the lysimeter principle has been developed to provide continuous readings of the volume of water flowing from the base of a snowpack in the form of surface melt alone or rain percolate and surface melt combined. The data obtained show promise, after two seasons of being applicable in river flood forecasting, as well as in studies of snow hydrology....

  9. Working with Simple Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that…

  10. Climate Change Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Harrison, Tim G.

    2007-01-01

    The newly revised specifications for GCSE science involve greater consideration of climate change. This topic appears in either the chemistry or biology section, depending on the examination board, and is a good example of "How Science Works." It is therefore timely that students are given an opportunity to conduct some simple climate modelling.…

  11. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  12. Working with Simple Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that…

  13. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  14. Simple Magnetometer for Autopilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.

    1982-01-01

    Simple, low-cost magnetometer is suitable for heading-reference applications in autopilots and other directional control systems. Sensing element utilizes commercially available transformer core; and supporting electronics consist of one transistor, two readily-available integrated-circuit chips, and associated resistors and capacitors.

  15. A Simple Tiltmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, M. G.; Harrison, D. R.; Edwards, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Bubble vial with external aluminum-foil electrodes is sensing element for simple indicating tiltmeter. To measure bubble displacement, bridge circuit detects difference in capacitance between two sensing electrodes and reference electrode. Tiltmeter was developed for experiment on forecasting seismic events by changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  16. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  17. On Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses San Francisco's Exploratorium, a science teaching center with 500 exhibits focusing on human perception, but extending to everything from the mechanics of voice to the art of illusion, from holograms to harmonics. The Exploratorium emphasizes "simple science" (refractions/resonances, sounds/shadows) to tune in the senses and turn on the…

  18. Simple Lookup Service

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-01

    Simple Lookup Service (sLS) is a REST/JSON based lookup service that allows users to publish information in the form of key-value pairs and search for the published information. The lookup service supports both pull and push model. This software can be used to create a distributed architecture/cloud.

  19. Direction selectivity and spatiotemporal separability in simple cortical cells.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, M A

    1999-01-01

    Simple cells in mammalian visual cortex are quasi-linear mechanisms whose behavior departs from true linearity in a very consistent manner. Empirical research on direction selectivity (DS) clearly illustrates these characteristics. A linear DS cell will be DS for all stimuli, whereas a linear non-DS cell will not be DS for any stimuli. However, many simple cells have opposite preferred directions for stimuli of reversed polarity, and some cells are DS for some stimuli (e.g., moving bars) but not for others (e.g., drifting gratings). Also, linear non-DS cells must have separable spatiotemporal receptive fields (RFs), and linear DS cells must have inseparable RFs. Yet many actual DS cells have separable RFs. Here we present a nonlinear model of simple-cell behavior that reproduces all of these empirical behaviors. The model is a variant of the current linear model, amended to include an interleaved nonlinearity (half-wave rectification) that allows it to mimic the (im)balance of push-pull mechanisms. We present simulation results showing that balanced push-pull mechanisms result in linear behavior, while imbalanced push-pull arrangements produce all of the incongruent DS-related behaviors that have been reported for simple cells.

  20. The linear-non-linear frontier for the Goldstone Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavela, M. B.; Kanshin, K.; Machado, P. A. N.; Saa, S.

    2016-12-01

    The minimal SO(5) / SO(4) σ -model is used as a template for the ultraviolet completion of scenarios in which the Higgs particle is a low-energy remnant of some high-energy dynamics, enjoying a (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone-boson ancestry. Varying the σ mass allows one to sweep from the perturbative regime to the customary non-linear implementations. The low-energy benchmark effective non-linear Lagrangian for bosons and fermions is obtained, determining as well the operator coefficients including linear corrections. At first order in the latter, three effective bosonic operators emerge which are independent of the explicit soft breaking assumed. The Higgs couplings to vector bosons and fermions turn out to be quite universal: the linear corrections are proportional to the explicit symmetry-breaking parameters. Furthermore, we define an effective Yukawa operator which allows a simple parametrization and comparison of different heavy-fermion ultraviolet completions. In addition, one particular fermionic completion is explored in detail, obtaining the corresponding leading low-energy fermionic operators.

  1. The linear -- non-linear frontier for the Goldstone Higgs

    DOE PAGES

    Gavela, M. B.; Kanshin, K.; Machado, P. A. N.; ...

    2016-12-01

    The minimalmore » $SO(5)/SO(4)$ sigma model is used as a template for the ultraviolet completion of scenarios in which the Higgs particle is a low-energy remnant of some high-energy dynamics, enjoying a (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone boson ancestry. Varying the $$\\sigma$$ mass allows to sweep from the perturbative regime to the customary non-linear implementations. The low-energy benchmark effective non-linear Lagrangian for bosons and fermions is obtained, determining as well the operator coefficients including linear corrections. At first order in the latter, three effective bosonic operators emerge which are independent of the explicit soft breaking assumed. The Higgs couplings to vector bosons and fermions turn out to be quite universal: the linear corrections are proportional to the explicit symmetry breaking parameters. Furthermore, we define an effective Yukawa operator which allows a simple parametrization and comparison of different heavy fermion ultraviolet completions. In addition, one particular fermionic completion is explored in detail, obtaining the corresponding leading low-energy fermionic operators.« less

  2. The linear -- non-linear frontier for the Goldstone Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M. B.; Kanshin, K.; Machado, P. A. N.; Saa, S.

    2016-12-01

    The minimal $SO(5)/SO(4)$ sigma model is used as a template for the ultraviolet completion of scenarios in which the Higgs particle is a low-energy remnant of some high-energy dynamics, enjoying a (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone boson ancestry. Varying the $\\sigma$ mass allows to sweep from the perturbative regime to the customary non-linear implementations. The low-energy benchmark effective non-linear Lagrangian for bosons and fermions is obtained, determining as well the operator coefficients including linear corrections. At first order in the latter, three effective bosonic operators emerge which are independent of the explicit soft breaking assumed. The Higgs couplings to vector bosons and fermions turn out to be quite universal: the linear corrections are proportional to the explicit symmetry breaking parameters. Furthermore, we define an effective Yukawa operator which allows a simple parametrization and comparison of different heavy fermion ultraviolet completions. In addition, one particular fermionic completion is explored in detail, obtaining the corresponding leading low-energy fermionic operators.

  3. Linear thermal circulator based on Coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2015-02-01

    We show that the presence of a Coriolis force in a rotating linear lattice imposes a nonreciprocal propagation of the phononic heat carriers. Using this effect we propose the concept of Coriolis linear thermal circulator which can control the circulation of a heat current. A simple model of three coupled harmonic masses on a rotating platform permits us to demonstrate giant circulating rectification effects for moderate values of the angular velocities of the platform.

  4. Linear positivity and virtual probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, James B.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the quantum theory of closed systems based on the linear positivity decoherence condition of Goldstein and Page. The objective of any quantum theory of a closed system, most generally the universe, is the prediction of probabilities for the individual members of sets of alternative coarse-grained histories of the system. Quantum interference between members of a set of alternative histories is an obstacle to assigning probabilities that are consistent with the rules of probability theory. A quantum theory of closed systems therefore requires two elements: (1) a condition specifying which sets of histories may be assigned probabilities and (2) a rule for those probabilities. The linear positivity condition of Goldstein and Page is the weakest of the general conditions proposed so far. Its general properties relating to exact probability sum rules, time neutrality, and conservation laws are explored. Its inconsistency with the usual notion of independent subsystems in quantum mechanics is reviewed. Its relation to the stronger condition of medium decoherence necessary for classicality is discussed. The linear positivity of histories in a number of simple model systems is investigated with the aim of exhibiting linearly positive sets of histories that are not decoherent. The utility of extending the notion of probability to include values outside the range of 0-1 is described. Alternatives with such virtual probabilities cannot be measured or recorded, but can be used in the intermediate steps of calculations of real probabilities. Extended probabilities give a simple and general way of formulating quantum theory. The various decoherence conditions are compared in terms of their utility for characterizing classicality and the role they might play in further generalizations of quantum mechanics.

  5. Simple Waveforms, Simply Described

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first Lazarus Project calculations, it has been frequently noted that binary black hole merger waveforms are 'simple.' In this talk we examine some of the simple features of coalescence and merger waveforms from a variety of binary configurations. We suggest an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This allows a coherent description, of both the inspiral waveforms, derivable from post-Newtonian(PN) calculations, and the numerically determined merger-ringdown. We focus particularly on similarities in the features of various Multipolar waveform components Generated by various systems. The late-time phase evolution of most L these waveform components are accurately described with a sinple analytic fit. We also discuss apparent relationships among phase and amplitude evolution. Taken together with PN information, the features we describe can provide an approximate analytic description full coalescence wavefoRms. complementary to other analytic waveforns approaches.

  6. Simple Schlieren Light Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1992-01-01

    Simple light-meter circuit used to position knife edge of schlieren optical system to block exactly half light. Enables operator to check quickly position of knife edge between tunnel runs to ascertain whether or not in alignment. Permanent measuring system made part of each schlieren system. If placed in unused area of image plane, or in monitoring beam from mirror knife edge, provides real-time assessment of alignment of schlieren system.

  7. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  8. Simple Test Functions in Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.

    2016-01-01

    Two meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) methods based on two different trial functions but that use a simple linear test function were developed for beam and column problems. These methods used generalized moving least squares (GMLS) and radial basis (RB) interpolation functions as trial functions. These two methods were tested on various patch test problems. Both methods passed the patch tests successfully. Then the methods were applied to various beam vibration problems and problems involving Euler and Beck's columns. Both methods yielded accurate solutions for all problems studied. The simple linear test function offers considerable savings in computing efforts as the domain integrals involved in the weak form are avoided. The two methods based on this simple linear test function method produced accurate results for frequencies and buckling loads. Of the two methods studied, the method with radial basis trial functions is very attractive as the method is simple, accurate, and robust.

  9. Rethinking linearized coupled-cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Taube, Andrew G; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2009-04-14

    Hermitian linearized coupled-cluster methods have several advantages over more conventional coupled-cluster methods including facile analytical gradients for searching a potential energy surface. A persistent failure of linearized methods, however, is the presence of singularities on the potential energy surface. A simple Tikhonov regularization procedure is introduced that can eliminate this singularity. Application of the regularized linearized coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method to both equilibrium structures and transition states shows that it is competitive with or better than conventional CCSD, and is more amenable to parallelization.

  10. Linear and Non-Linear Forecasts of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, H.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in thermospheric density play a major role in perturbing the orbits of objects in low Earth orbit. These variations are strongly influenced by changes in the solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths that are ultimately driven by changing levels of solar magnetic activity. Thus predicting the conjunction of operational satellites with orbital debris requires accurate forecasts of solar activity. Current operational models rely on forecasts of proxies for solar activity based on simple linear extrapolation methods. In this poster we present a systematic study of these methods applied to the 10.7 cm solar radio flux, a composite Mg core-to-wing ratio, the total unsigned solar magnetic flux, and the He II 304 irradiance observed by the EVE instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We find that although RMS errors in these forecasts appear to be small, the corresponding errors in very simple models, such as the persistence of the last measurement, are also small, and the formal skill scores are relatively modest. The use of these proxies and measurements in non-linear methods, such Gaussian process regression and recurrent neural networks, will also be discussed.

  11. A piecewise linear approximation scheme for hereditary optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An approximation scheme based on 'piecewise linear' approximations of L2 spaces is employed to formulate a numerical method for solving quadratic optimal control problems governed by linear retarded functional differential equations. This piecewise linear method is an extension of the so called averaging technique. It is shown that the Riccati equation for the linear approximation is solved by simple transformation of the averaging solution. Thus, the computational requirements are essentially the same. Numerical results are given.

  12. A piecewise linear approximation scheme for hereditary optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An approximation scheme based on 'piecewise linear' approximations of L2 spaces is employed to formulate a numerical method for solving quadratic optimal control problems governed by linear retarded functional differential equations. This piecewise linear method is an extension of the so called averaging technique. It is shown that the Riccati equation for the linear approximation is solved by simple transformation of the averaging solution. Thus, the computational requirements are essentially the same. Numerical results are given.

  13. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  14. Electrothermal linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, L. J.; Tobias, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Converting electric power into powerful linear thrust without generation of magnetic fields is accomplished with an electrothermal linear actuator. When treated by an energized filament, a stack of bimetallic washers expands and drives the end of the shaft upward.

  15. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator. Cleaner, simpler, and needs less maintenance. Features rotary-to-linear-motion converter with antibacklash gearing and position feedback via shaft-angle resolvers, which measure rotary motion.

  16. Linear integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T.

    This book is intended to be used as a textbook in a one-semester course at a variety of levels. Because of self-study features incorporated, it may also be used by practicing electronic engineers as a formal and thorough introduction to the subject. The distinction between linear and digital integrated circuits is discussed, taking into account digital and linear signal characteristics, linear and digital integrated circuit characteristics, the definitions for linear and digital circuits, applications of digital and linear integrated circuits, aspects of fabrication, packaging, and classification and numbering. Operational amplifiers are considered along with linear integrated circuit (LIC) power requirements and power supplies, voltage and current regulators, linear amplifiers, linear integrated circuit oscillators, wave-shaping circuits, active filters, DA and AD converters, demodulators, comparators, instrument amplifiers, current difference amplifiers, analog circuits and devices, and aspects of troubleshooting.

  17. A linear programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuey, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Computer solutions of linear programming problems are outlined. Information covers vector spaces, convex sets, and matrix algebra elements for solving simultaneous linear equations. Dual problems, reduced cost analysis, ranges, and error analysis are illustrated.

  18. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  19. Linear shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  20. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  1. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  2. A Vernacular for Linear Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Gregory R.; Choi, Jaehwa

    2006-01-01

    In its most basic form, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) allows an assessment of individuals' change in a measured variable X over time. For simple linear models, as with other growth models, parameter estimates associated with the a construct (amount of X at a chosen temporal reference point) and b construct (growth in X per unit…

  3. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  4. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2002-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to similar industrial uses. Advantageous features of the electrohydraulic linear actuators with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators are described.

  5. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  6. Simple piezoelectric translation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, Ph.; Emch, R.; Descouts, P.

    1988-02-01

    We describe a piezoelectric device which allows continuous movement and high-resolution micropositioning, without distance limitation. Both mechanical construction and the electronics for the device are very simple. The movement is obtained via a stick-slip mechanism, and steps as small as 10 nm are obtained. A displacement speed of 0.4 mm/s has been attained, and the device was capable of carrying several times its own weight, exerting a horizontal force, or climbing a plane inclined by 7°. Due to its compact construction, the device shows prospects for miniaturization.

  7. Simple stochastic simulation.

    PubMed

    Schilstra, Maria J; Martin, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic simulations may be used to describe changes with time of a reaction system in a way that explicitly accounts for the fact that molecules show a significant degree of randomness in their dynamic behavior. The stochastic approach is almost invariably used when small numbers of molecules or molecular assemblies are involved because this randomness leads to significant deviations from the predictions of the conventional deterministic (or continuous) approach to the simulation of biochemical kinetics. Advances in computational methods over the three decades that have elapsed since the publication of Daniel Gillespie's seminal paper in 1977 (J. Phys. Chem. 81, 2340-2361) have allowed researchers to produce highly sophisticated models of complex biological systems. However, these models are frequently highly specific for the particular application and their description often involves mathematical treatments inaccessible to the nonspecialist. For anyone completely new to the field to apply such techniques in their own work might seem at first sight to be a rather intimidating prospect. However, the fundamental principles underlying the approach are in essence rather simple, and the aim of this article is to provide an entry point to the field for a newcomer. It focuses mainly on these general principles, both kinetic and computational, which tend to be not particularly well covered in specialist literature, and shows that interesting information may even be obtained using very simple operations in a conventional spreadsheet.

  8. Probabilistic simple sticker systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2017-04-01

    A model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules, known as a sticker system, was introduced by by L. Kari, G. Paun, G. Rozenberg, A. Salomaa, and S. Yu in the paper entitled DNA computing, sticker systems and universality from the journal of Acta Informatica vol. 35, pp. 401-420 in the year 1998. A sticker system uses the Watson-Crick complementary feature of DNA molecules: starting from the incomplete double stranded sequences, and iteratively using sticking operations until a complete double stranded sequence is obtained. It is known that sticker systems with finite sets of axioms and sticker rules generate only regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered to increase the computational power of sticker systems. Recently, a variant of restricted sticker systems, called probabilistic sticker systems, has been introduced [4]. In this variant, the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probability of a generated string is computed by multiplying the probabilities of all occurrences of the initial strings in the computation of the string. Strings for the language are selected according to some probabilistic requirements. In this paper, we study fundamental properties of probabilistic simple sticker systems. We prove that the probabilistic enhancement increases the computational power of simple sticker systems.

  9. A Simple Harmonic Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Horn, Bart; Kachru, Shamit; Rajendran, Surjeet; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We explore simple but novel bouncing solutions of general relativity that avoid singularities. These solutions require curvature k = +1, and are supported by a negative cosmological term and matter with -1 < w < -1 = 3. In the case of moderate bounces (where the ratio of the maximal scale factor a{sub +} to the minimal scale factor a{sub -} is {Omicron}(1)), the solutions are shown to be classically stable and cycle through an infinite set of bounces. For more extreme cases with large a{sub +} = a{sub -}, the solutions can still oscillate many times before classical instabilities take them out of the regime of validity of our approximations. In this regime, quantum particle production also leads eventually to a departure from the realm of validity of semiclassical general relativity, likely yielding a singular crunch. We briefly discuss possible applications of these models to realistic cosmology.

  10. Quantum physics of simple optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2003-07-01

    Simple optical instruments are linear optical networks where the incident light modes are turned into equal numbers of outgoing modes by linear transformations. For example, such instruments are beam splitters, multiports, interferometers, fibre couplers, polarizers, gravitational lenses, parametric amplifiers, phase-conjugating mirrors and also black holes. The paper develops the quantum theory of simple optical instruments and applies the theory to a few characteristic situations, to the splitting and interference of photons and to the manifestation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations in parametric downconversion. How to model irreversible devices such as absorbers and amplifiers is also shown. Finally, the paper develops the theory of Hawking radiation for a simple optical black hole. The paper is intended as a primer, as a nearly self-consistent tutorial. The reader should be familiar with basic quantum mechanics and statistics, and perhaps with optics and some elementary field theory. The quantum theory of light in dielectrics serves as the starting point and, in the concluding section, as a guide to understand quantum black holes.

  11. Linear collider: a preview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  12. Linear mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III (Inventor); Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (Inventor); Jones, Irby W. (Inventor); Miller, James B. (Inventor); Davis, C. Calvin (Inventor); Behun, Vaughn D. (Inventor); Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A linear mass actuator includes an upper housing and a lower housing connectable to each other and having a central passageway passing axially through a mass that is linearly movable in the central passageway. Rollers mounted in the upper and lower housings in frictional engagement with the mass translate the mass linearly in the central passageway and drive motors operatively coupled to the roller means, for rotating the rollers and driving the mass axially in the central passageway.

  13. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  14. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  15. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  16. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  17. Two Simple Models for Fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Jaren Quinn

    Recent developments in fracking have enable the recovery of oil and gas from tight shale reservoirs. These developments have also made fracking one of the most controversial environmental issues in the United States. Despite the growing controversy surrounding fracking, there is relatively little publicly available research. This dissertation introduces two simple models for fracking that were developed using techniques from non-linear and statistical physics. The first model assumes that the volume of induced fractures must be equal to the volume of injected fluid. For simplicity, these fractures are assumed to form a spherically symmetric damage region around the borehole. The predicted volumes of water necessary to create a damage region with a given radius are in good agreement with reported values. The second model is a modification of invasion percolation which was previously introduced to model water flooding. The reservoir rock is represented by a regular lattice of local traps that contain oil and/or gas separated by rock barriers. The barriers are assumed to be highly heterogeneous and are assigned random strengths. Fluid is injected from a central site and the weakest rock barrier breaks allowing fluid to flow into the adjacent site. The process repeats with the weakest barrier breaking and fluid flowing to an adjacent site each time step. Extensive numerical simulations were carried out to obtain statistical properties of the growing fracture network. The network was found to be fractal with fractal dimensions differing slightly from the accepted values for traditional percolation. Additionally, the network follows Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga branching statistics which have been used to characterize river networks. As with other percolation models, the growth of the network occurs in bursts. These bursts follow a power-law size distribution similar to observed microseismic events. Reservoir stress anisotropy is incorporated into the model by assigning

  18. Why is Polonium simple cubic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Kraig, Robert E.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2002-03-01

    Scientists have long pondered why the simple cubic structure is so rarely seen in nature. Only one element forms the simple cubic structure: polonium. There are `proofs' dating back to 1954 that the simple cubic lattice should be unstable. We will attempt to address the question of why polonium takes the simple cubic structure by means of ab initio calculations using the pseudopotential density functional method. We will discuss the electronic structure of polonium in relation to its crystal structure.

  19. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  20. A simple wave driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kağan Temiz, Burak; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the wheel starts to turn at a constant angular speed. A rod that is fixed on the wheel turns at the same constant angular speed, too. A tight string that the wave will be created on is placed at a distance where the rod can touch the string. During each rotation of the wheel, the rod vibrates the string up and down. The vibration frequency of this rod equals the wheel’s rotation frequency, and this frequency value can be measured easily with a small magnet and a bicycle speedometer. In this way, the frequency of the waves formed in the rope can also be measured.

  1. Telemedicine kept simple

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, DJ

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine (“medicine from a distance”) is about bringing specialist knowledge to a patient from afar, by the use of communication technology. This article is based on personal experience in helping set up a simple, versatile, cheap and effective store-and-forward telemedicine system for the British Defence Medical Services. This system uses readily available still digital cameras to record clinical, radiographic and microscopic images, which are then sent by electronic mail to an organised network of specialists for secondary or tertiary opinion. The system is in use in various countries throughout the world, and has also proven to have civilian and humanitarian uses. The system is now being emulated in civilian practice in the United Kingdom, the United States, and in previously isolated hospitals in the Third World. I also describe the active role played by a telemedicine charity and by medical students on elective in the Third World in setting up telemedicine links using this system. Readers are invited to co-operate in the setting up of a global outreach telemedicine programme, linking elective students, isolated Third World hospitals, and University Teaching Hospitals. PMID:22368578

  2. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  3. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  4. Simple Epithelial Keratins.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Pavel; Guldiken, Nurdan; Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Lähdeniemi, Iris A K; Silvander, Jonas S G; Kuscuoglu, Deniz; Toivola, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Simple epithelial keratins (SEKs) are the cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins of single-layered and glandular epithelial cells as found in the liver, pancreas, intestine, and lung. SEKs have broad cytoprotective functions, which are facilitated by dynamic posttranslational modifications and interaction with associated proteins. SEK filaments are composed of obligate heteropolymers of type II (K7, K8) and type I (K18-K20, K23) keratins. The multifaceted roles of SEKs are increasingly appreciated due to findings obtained from transgenic mouse models and human studies that identified SEK variants in several digestive diseases. Reorganization of the SEK network into aggregates called Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) is characteristic for specific liver disorders such as alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To spur further research on SEKs, we here review the methods and potential caveats of their isolation as well as possibilities to study them in cell culture. The existing transgenic SEK mouse models, their advantages and potential drawbacks are discussed. The tools to induce MDBs, ways of their visualization and quantification, as well as the possibilities to detect SEK variants in humans are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of the simple correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2010-11-01

    This article investigates some unfamiliar properties of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient for the estimation of simple correlation coefficient. Although Pearson's r is biased, except for limited situations, and the minimum variance unbiased estimator has been proposed in the literature, researchers routinely employ the sample correlation coefficient in their practical applications, because of its simplicity and popularity. In order to support such practice, this study examines the mean squared errors of r and several prominent formulas. The results reveal specific situations in which the sample correlation coefficient performs better than the unbiased and nearly unbiased estimators, facilitating recommendation of r as an effect size index for the strength of linear association between two variables. In addition, related issues of estimating the squared simple correlation coefficient are also considered.

  6. Keep it simple

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Busschbach, Jan J.V.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between ordinal and cardinal valuation of health states. Study Design and Setting We analyzed rank, visual analog scale (VAS), and time trade-off (TTO) responses for 52 health states defined using the EQ-5D classification system developed by the EuroQol Group. We analyzed 179,431 responses from 11,483 subjects in eight countries: Slovenia, Argentina, Denmark, Japan, Netherlands, Spain, United Kingdom, and United States. We first compared responses across methods by frequency of ties and values below dead. Ordinal associations between methods were evaluated using Spearman’s correlation and Kendall’s tau. Next, we estimated numerical values from rank responses using country-specific conditional logit models. After anchoring predicted values on a common scale, we further investigated the cardinal relationships between rank, VAS, and TTO-based values using Pearson’s rho and quadratic regression. Results For each country, rank responses are less likely than TTO responses to be tied and to indicate that states are worse than dead. In all countries, rank responses show a strong linear correlation with both TTO (Pearson’s rho = 0.88-0.99) and VAS (rho = 0.91-0.98) responses. However, rank-based values imply greater decrements in health for mild states than cardinal values. Conclusions Illiteracy and innumeracy can hinder implementation of complex preference elicitation techniques in diverse settings and populations. These results indicate that ranking exercises may provide an attractive alternative for health-state valuation. PMID:18945585

  7. Current Reservoirs in the Simple Exclusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Masi, A.; Presutti, E.; Tsagkarogiannis, D.; Vares, M. E.

    2011-09-01

    We consider the symmetric simple exclusion process in the interval [- N, N] with additional birth and death processes respectively on ( N- K, N], K>0, and [- N,- N+ K). The exclusion is speeded up by a factor N 2, births and deaths by a factor N. Assuming propagation of chaos (a property proved in a companion paper, De Masi et al., http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.3447) we prove convergence in the limit N→∞ to the linear heat equation with Dirichlet condition on the boundaries; the boundary conditions however are not known a priori, they are obtained by solving a non-linear equation. The model simulates mass transport with current reservoirs at the boundaries and the Fourier law is proved to hold.

  8. Simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Y. V.; Sarma, L. P.

    1981-09-01

    We describe a simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer. It is based on the linear movement of a shaft (with two cantilevers and four strain gauges) in a tapered chamber, resulting in a change in resistance proportional to the cantilever deformation. The transducer with its Wheatstone full bridge configuration is calibrated against a mechanical dial indicator of 0.002 mm accuracy for both ac and dc voltage excitations. Its output is linear for measurements of full range displacement up to 25 mm. It has a sensitivity of ±0.0082 mm for ac excitation with a strain indicator whose resolution is ±1 μɛ. It has a dc full range sensitivity of 1.5 mV/V for excitation levels up to 5 V. It can have varied field and laboratory applications wherever displacements are precisely read, recorded, or monitored.

  9. Linear Equations: Equivalence = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The ability to solve linear equations sets students up for success in many areas of mathematics and other disciplines requiring formula manipulations. There are many reasons why solving linear equations is a challenging skill for students to master. One major barrier for students is the inability to interpret the equals sign as anything other than…

  10. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  11. Linearization of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz, Kenneth

    1987-01-01

    Four nonlinear control schemes equivalent. Report discusses theory of nonlinear feedback control of robot manipulator, emphasis on control schemes making manipulator input and output behave like decoupled linear system. Approach, called "exact external linearization," contributes efforts to control end-effector trajectories, positions, and orientations.

  12. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  13. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  14. Linear models: permutation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.; Everitt, B.S.; Howell, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Permutation tests (see Permutation Based Inference) for the linear model have applications in behavioral studies when traditional parametric assumptions about the error term in a linear model are not tenable. Improved validity of Type I error rates can be achieved with properly constructed permutation tests. Perhaps more importantly, increased statistical power, improved robustness to effects of outliers, and detection of alternative distributional differences can be achieved by coupling permutation inference with alternative linear model estimators. For example, it is well-known that estimates of the mean in linear model are extremely sensitive to even a single outlying value of the dependent variable compared to estimates of the median [7, 19]. Traditionally, linear modeling focused on estimating changes in the center of distributions (means or medians). However, quantile regression allows distributional changes to be estimated in all or any selected part of a distribution or responses, providing a more complete statistical picture that has relevance to many biological questions [6]...

  15. [Optimizing algorithm design of piecewise linear classifier for spectra].

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian-Ge; Fang, Yong-Hua; Xiong, Wei; Kong, Chao; Li, Da-Cheng; Dong, Da-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Being able to identify pollutant gases quickly and accurately is a basic request of spectroscopic technique for envirment monitoring for spectral classifier. Piecewise linear classifier is simple needs less computational time and approachs nonlinear boundary beautifully. Combining piecewise linear classifier and linear support vector machine which is based on the principle of maximizing margin, an optimizing algorithm for single side piecewise linear classifier was devised. Experimental results indicate that the piecewise linear classifier trained by the optimizing algorithm proposed in this paper can approach nonolinear boundary with fewer super_planes and has higher veracity for classification and recognition.

  16. Simple inflationary quintessential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry, we present a non-geodesically past complete model of our Universe without the big bang singularity at finite cosmic time, describing its evolution starting from its early inflationary era up to the present accelerating phase. We found that a hydrodynamical fluid with nonlinear equation of state could result in such scenario, which after the end of this inflationary stage, suffers a sudden phase transition and enters into the stiff matter dominated era, and the Universe becomes reheated due to a huge amount of particle production. Finally, it asymptotically enters into the de Sitter phase concluding the present accelerated expansion. Using the reconstruction technique, we also show that this background provides an extremely simple inflationary quintessential potential whose inflationary part is given by the well-known 1-dimensional Higgs potential, i.e., a double well inflationary potential, and the quintessential one by an exponential potential that leads to a deflationary regime after this inflation, and it can depict the current cosmic acceleration at late times. Moreover the Higgs potential leads to a power spectrum of the cosmological perturbations which fit well with the latest Planck estimations. Further, we compared our viable potential with some known inflationary quintessential potential, which shows that our quintessential model, that is, the Higgs potential combined with the exponential one, is an improved version of them because it contains an analytic solution that allows us to perform all analytic calculations. Finally, we have shown that the introduction of a nonzero cosmological constant simplifies the potential considerably with an analytic behavior of the background which again permits us to evaluate all the quantities analytically.

  17. Practical Session: Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Three exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. In the first one investigates the influence of several factors on atmospheric pollution. It has been proposed by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr33.pdf) and is based on data coming from 20 cities of U.S. Exercise 2 is an introduction to model selection whereas Exercise 3 provides a first example of analysis of variance. Exercises 2 and 3 have been proposed by A. Dalalyan at ENPC (see Exercises 2 and 3 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_5.pdf).

  18. Gadgets, approximation, and linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, L.; Sudan, M.; Sorkin, G.B.; Williamson, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    We present a linear-programming based method for finding {open_quotes}gadgets{close_quotes}, i.e., combinatorial structures reducing constraints of one optimization problems to constraints of another. A key step in this method is a simple observation which limits the search space to a finite one. Using this new method we present a number of new, computer-constructed gadgets for several different reductions. This method also answers a question posed by on how to prove the optimality of gadgets-we show how LP duality gives such proofs. The new gadgets improve hardness results for MAX CUT and MAX DICUT, showing that approximating these problems to within factors of 60/61 and 44/45 respectively is N P-hard. We also use the gadgets to obtain an improved approximation algorithm for MAX 3SAT which guarantees an approximation ratio of .801. This improves upon the previous best bound of .7704.

  19. High dimensional Bernstein-von Mises: simple examples.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Iain M

    2010-01-01

    In Gaussian sequence models with Gaussian priors, we develop some simple examples to illustrate three perspectives on matching of posterior and frequentist probabilities when the dimension p increases with sample size n: (i) convergence of joint posterior distributions, (ii) behavior of a non-linear functional: squared error loss, and (iii) estimation of linear functionals. The three settings are progressively less demanding in terms of conditions needed for validity of the Bernstein-von Mises theorem.

  20. Linear and non-linear methods for automatic seizure detection in scalp electro-encephalogram recordings.

    PubMed

    McSharry, P E; He, T; Smith, L A; Tarassenko, L

    2002-07-01

    The electro-encephalogram is a time-varying signal that measures electrical activity in the brain. A conceptually intuitive non-linear technique, multi-dimensional probability evolution (MDPE), is introduced. It is based on the time evolution of the probability density function within a multi-dimensional state space. A synthetic recording is employed to illustrate why MDPE is capable of detecting changes in the underlying dynamics that are invisible to linear statistics. If a non-linear statistic cannot outperform a simple linear statistic such as variance, then there is no reason to advocate its use. Both variance and MDPE were able to detect the seizure in each of the ten scalp EEG recordings investigated. Although MDPE produced fewer false positives, there is no firm evidence to suggest that MDPE, or any other non-linear statistic considered, outperforms variance-based methods at identifying seizures.

  1. Linear control of the flywheel inverted pendulum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Albertos, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    The flywheel inverted pendulum is an underactuated mechanical system with a nonlinear model but admitting a linear approximation around the unstable equilibrium point in the upper position. Although underactuated systems usually require nonlinear controllers, the easy tuning and understanding of linear controllers make them more attractive for designers and final users. In a recent paper, a simple PID controller was proposed by the authors, leading to an internally unstable controlled plant. To achieve global stability, two options are developed here: first by introducing an internal stabilizing controller and second by replacing the PID controller by an observer-based state feedback control. Simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the design.

  2. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    DOEpatents

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  3. Portfolio optimization using fuzzy linear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Purnima K.

    2013-09-01

    Portfolio Optimization (PO) is a problem in Finance, in which investor tries to maximize return and minimize risk by carefully choosing different assets. Expected return and risk are the most important parameters with regard to optimal portfolios. In the simple form PO can be modeled as quadratic programming problem which can be put into equivalent linear form. PO problems with the fuzzy parameters can be solved as multi-objective fuzzy linear programming problem. In this paper we give the solution to such problems with an illustrative example.

  4. Valuation of financial models with non-linear state spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Nick

    2001-02-01

    A common assumption in valuation models for derivative securities is that the underlying state variables take values in a linear state space. We discuss numerical implementation issues in an interest rate model with a simple non-linear state space, formulating and comparing Monte Carlo, finite difference and lattice numerical solution methods. We conclude that, at least in low dimensional spaces, non-linear interest rate models may be viable.

  5. Linear ubiquitination in immunity.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yutaka; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Walczak, Henning

    2015-07-01

    Linear ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification recently discovered to be crucial for innate and adaptive immune signaling. The function of linear ubiquitin chains is regulated at multiple levels: generation, recognition, and removal. These chains are generated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), the only known ubiquitin E3 capable of forming the linear ubiquitin linkage de novo. LUBAC is not only relevant for activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in various signaling pathways, but importantly, it also regulates cell death downstream of immune receptors capable of inducing this response. Recognition of the linear ubiquitin linkage is specifically mediated by certain ubiquitin receptors, which is crucial for translation into the intended signaling outputs. LUBAC deficiency results in attenuated gene activation and increased cell death, causing pathologic conditions in both, mice, and humans. Removal of ubiquitin chains is mediated by deubiquitinases (DUBs). Two of them, OTULIN and CYLD, are constitutively associated with LUBAC. Here, we review the current knowledge on linear ubiquitination in immune signaling pathways and the biochemical mechanisms as to how linear polyubiquitin exerts its functions distinctly from those of other ubiquitin linkage types.

  6. Piecewise Linear Slope Estimation.

    PubMed

    Ingle, A N; Sethares, W A; Varghese, T; Bucklew, J A

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a method for directly estimating slope values in a noisy piecewise linear function. By imposing a Markov structure on the sequence of slopes, piecewise linear fitting is posed as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. A dynamic program efficiently solves this by traversing a linearly growing trellis. The alternating maximization algorithm (a kind of pseudo-EM method) is used to estimate the model parameters from data and its convergence behavior is analyzed. Ultrasound shear wave imaging is presented as a primary application. The algorithm is general enough for applicability in other fields, as suggested by an application to the estimation of shifts in financial interest rate data.

  7. Piecewise Linear Slope Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sethares, W. A.; Bucklew, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for directly estimating slope values in a noisy piecewise linear function. By imposing a Markov structure on the sequence of slopes, piecewise linear fitting is posed as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. A dynamic program efficiently solves this by traversing a linearly growing trellis. The alternating maximization algorithm (a kind of pseudo-EM method) is used to estimate the model parameters from data and its convergence behavior is analyzed. Ultrasound shear wave imaging is presented as a primary application. The algorithm is general enough for applicability in other fields, as suggested by an application to the estimation of shifts in financial interest rate data. PMID:26229417

  8. Optimal Linear Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    OPTIMAL LINEAR CONTROL C.A. HARVEY M.G. SAFO NOV G. STEIN J.C. DOYLE HONEYWELL SYSTEMS & RESEARCH CENTER j 2600 RIDGWAY PARKWAY j [ MINNEAPOLIS...RECIPIENT’S CAT ALC-’ W.IMIJUff’? * J~’ CR2 15-238-4F TP P EI)ŕll * (~ Optimal Linear Control ~iOGRPR UBA m a M.G Lnar o Con_ _ _ _ _ _ R PORT__ _ _ I RE...Characterizations of optimal linear controls have been derived, from which guides for selecting the structure of the control system and the weights in

  9. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  10. Simple Choreographies of the Planar Newtonian N-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guowei

    2017-08-01

    In the N-body problem, a simple choreography is a periodic solution, where all masses chase each other on a single loop. In this paper we prove that for the planar Newtonian N-body problem with equal masses, N ≧ 3, there are at least 2 N-3 + 2[( N-3)/2] different main simple choreographies. This confirms a conjecture given by Chenciner et al. (Geometry, mechanics, and dynamics. Springer, New York, pp 287-308, 2002). All the simple choreoagraphies we prove belong to the linear chain family.

  11. Linearization of the bradford protein assay.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Orna; Zor, Tsaffrir

    2010-04-12

    Determination of microgram quantities of protein in the Bradford Coomassie brilliant blue assay is accomplished by measurement of absorbance at 590 nm. This most common assay enables rapid and simple protein quantification in cell lysates, cellular fractions, or recombinant protein samples, for the purpose of normalization of biochemical measurements. However, an intrinsic nonlinearity compromises the sensitivity and accuracy of this method. It is shown that under standard assay conditions, the ratio of the absorbance measurements at 590 nm and 450 nm is strictly linear with protein concentration. This simple procedure increases the accuracy and improves the sensitivity of the assay about 10-fold, permitting quantification down to 50 ng of bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, the interference commonly introduced by detergents that are used to create the cell lysates is greatly reduced by the new protocol. A linear equation developed on the basis of mass action and Beer's law perfectly fits the experimental data.

  12. Linear Boom Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Actuator stabilizes spacecraft spin by varying length of support struts that hold spacecraft booms. Variation changes spin axis and controls wobble. Linear actuator controls spacecraft wobble applicable in rotating systems on Earth.

  13. Isolated linear blaschkoid psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Nasimi, M; Abedini, R; Azizpour, A; Nikoo, A

    2016-10-01

    Linear psoriasis (LPs) is considered a rare clinical presentation of psoriasis, which is characterized by linear erythematous and scaly lesions along the lines of Blaschko. We report the case of a 20-year-old man who presented with asymptomatic linear and S-shaped erythematous, scaly plaques on right side of his trunk. The plaques were arranged along the lines of Blaschko with a sharp demarcation at the midline. Histological examination of a skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of psoriasis. Topical calcipotriol and betamethasone dipropionate ointments were prescribed for 2 months. A good clinical improvement was achieved, with reduction in lesion thickness and scaling. In patients with linear erythematous and scaly plaques along the lines of Blaschko, the diagnosis of LPs should be kept in mind, especially in patients with asymptomatic lesions of late onset. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Linear Resonance Cooler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    for a Stirling cycle cryocooler . 26 * .*o .. * COMPRESSOR MOTOR FORCE VERSUS ROTOR AXIAL POSITION COMPRESSOR P-V DIAGRAM *COMPRESSOR MOTOR COMPRESSOR...potential. However, the limited test program has demonstrated the application of linear motor drive technology to a Stirling cycle cryocooler design. L...Ace-ss Ion& For flTIC TAB - TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE IPAGE - 2. DETAILED DESIGN OF LINEAR RESONANCE CRYOCOOLER ......... 3 2.2 Expander

  15. Linear system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callier, Frank M.; Desoer, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a systematic and rigorous access to the main topics of linear state-space system theory in both the continuous-time case and the discrete-time case; and the I/O description of linear systems. The main thrusts of the work are the analysis of system descriptions and derivations of their properties, LQ-optimal control, state feedback and state estimation, and MIMO unity-feedback systems.

  16. Linear system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callier, Frank M.; Desoer, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a systematic and rigorous access to the main topics of linear state-space system theory in both the continuous-time case and the discrete-time case; and the I/O description of linear systems. The main thrusts of the work are the analysis of system descriptions and derivations of their properties, LQ-optimal control, state feedback and state estimation, and MIMO unity-feedback systems.

  17. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  18. Inpainting with sparse linear combinations of exemplars

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new exemplar-based inpainting algorithm based on representing the region to be inpainted as a sparse linear combination of blocks extracted from similar parts of the image being inpainted. This method is conceptually simple, being computed by functional minimization, and avoids the complexity of correctly ordering the filling in of missing regions of other exemplar-based methods. Initial performance comparisons on small inpainting regions indicate that this method provides similar or better performance than other recent methods.

  19. The cost of linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Danielle; Levy, William B.

    2006-03-01

    Information processing in the brain is metabolically expensive and energy usage by the different components of the nervous system is not well understood. In a continuing effort to explore the costs and constraints of information processing at the single neuron level, dendritic processes are being studied. More specifically, the role of various ion channel conductances is explored in terms of integrating dendritic excitatory synaptic input. Biophysical simulations of dendritic behavior show that the complexity of voltage-dependent, non-linear dendritic conductances can produce simplicity in the form of linear synaptic integration. Over increasing levels of synaptic activity, it is shown that two types of voltage-dependent conductances produce linearization over a limited range. This range is determined by the parameters defining the ion channel and the 'passive' properties of the dendrite. A persistent sodium and a transient A-type potassium channel were considered at steady-state transmembrane potentials in the vicinity of and hyperpolarized to the threshold for action potential initiation. The persistent sodium is seen to amplify and linearize the synaptic input over a short range of low synaptic activity. In contrast, the A-type potassium channel has a broader linearization range but tends to operate at higher levels of synaptic bombardment. Given equivalent 'passive' dendritic properties, the persistent sodium is found to be less costly than the A-type potassium in linearizing synaptic input.

  20. Is simple nephrectomy truly simple? Comparison with the radical alternative.

    PubMed

    Connolly, S S; O'Brien, M Frank; Kunni, I M; Phelan, E; Conroy, R; Thornhill, J A; Grainger, R

    2011-03-01

    The Oxford English dictionary defines the term "simple" as "easily done" and "uncomplicated". We tested the validity of this terminology in relation to open nephrectomy surgery. Retrospective review of 215 patients undergoing open, simple (n = 89) or radical (n = 126) nephrectomy in a single university-affiliated institution between 1998 and 2002. Operative time (OT), estimated blood loss (EBL), operative complications (OC) and length of stay in hospital (LOS) were analysed. Statistical analysis employed Fisher's exact test and Stata Release 8.2. Simple nephrectomy was associated with shorter OT (mean 126 vs. 144 min; p = 0.002), reduced EBL (mean 729 vs. 859 cc; p = 0.472), lower OC (9 vs. 17%; 0.087), and more brief LOS (mean 6 vs. 8 days; p < 0.001). All parameters suggest favourable outcome for the simple nephrectomy group, supporting the use of this terminology. This implies "simple" nephrectomies are truly easier to perform with less complication than their radical counterpart.

  1. MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) instabilities in simple plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, W.M.; Lashmore-Davies, C.

    1984-01-01

    This work provides what, we hope, is a relatively simple, self contained description of MHD instabilities in plasmas with simple configurations. By simple configuration, we mean a plasma in which all quantities vary in only one spatial direction. We deal with such plasmas here because we want to emphasize the basic physics of MHD instabilities. Although some fusion devices are inherently two or three dimensional in nature, there are others, specifically tokamaks and reversed field pinches which are, to good approximation, one dimensional. Also, these devices both display a wealth of complex MHD activity which can be fruitfully discussed. One deceptive aspect of MHD instabilities is that the simplest ones are extremely easy to understand. However more complicated instabilities, for instance in a plasma where both an axial and azimuthal field are present are much more difficult to visualize; but they are also much more interesting. This work is divided into two parts. Chapters 2-9 describe linear theory and chapters 10-15 describe the nonlinear theory. The latter part is naturally much more speculative than the former because less is known about nonlinear theory.

  2. Hom-structures on finite-dimensional simple Lie superalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jixia; Liu, Wende

    2015-06-01

    A Hom-structure on a Lie superalgebra is an even linear mapping which twists the super Jacobi identity. In this paper, using Kac's classification theorem and a reduction method, we show that finite-dimensional simple Lie superalgebras over the complex field ℂ admit only the trivial Hom-structures, that is, the scalar mappings.

  3. Simple Neural Networks that Optimize Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Gao, Juan; Holmes, Philip; Bogacz, Rafal; Gilzenrat, Mark; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    We review simple connectionist and firing rate models for mutually inhibiting pools of neurons that discriminate between pairs of stimuli. Both are two-dimensional nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations, and although they differ in how inputs and stimuli enter, we show that they are equivalent under state variable and parameter coordinate changes. A key parameter is gain: the maximum slope of the sigmoidal activation function. We develop piecewise-linear and purely linear models, and one-dimensional reductions to Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes that can be viewed as linear filters, and show that reaction time and error rate statistics are well approximated by these simpler models. We then pose and solve the optimal gain problem for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes, finding explicit gain schedules that minimize error rates for time-varying stimuli. We relate these to time courses of norepinephrine release in cortical areas, and argue that transient firing rate changes in the brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus may be responsible for approximate gain optimization.

  4. Fast linear algorithms for machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichao

    Nowadays linear methods like Regression, Principal Component Analysis and Canonical Correlation Analysis are well understood and widely used by the machine learning community for predictive modeling and feature generation. Generally speaking, all these methods aim at capturing interesting subspaces in the original high dimensional feature space. Due to the simple linear structures, these methods all have a closed form solution which makes computation and theoretical analysis very easy for small datasets. However, in modern machine learning problems it's very common for a dataset to have millions or billions of features and samples. In these cases, pursuing the closed form solution for these linear methods can be extremely slow since it requires multiplying two huge matrices and computing inverse, inverse square root, QR decomposition or Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of huge matrices. In this thesis, we consider three fast algorithms for computing Regression and Canonical Correlation Analysis approximate for huge datasets.

  5. Fuzzy linear programming for bulb production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siregar, I.; Suantio, H.; Hanifiah, Y.; Muchtar, M. A.; Nasution, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    The research was conducted at a bulb company. This company has a high market demand. The increasing of the market demand has caused the company’s production could not fulfill the demand due to production planning is not optimal. Bulb production planning is researched with the aim to enable the company to fulfill the market demand in accordance with the limited resources available. From the data, it is known that the company cannot reach the market demand in the production of the Type A and Type B bulb. In other hands, the Type C bulb is produced exceeds market demand. By using fuzzy linear programming, then obtained the optimal production plans and to reach market demand. Completion of the simple method is done by using software LINGO 13. Application of fuzzy linear programming is being able to increase profits amounted to 7.39% of the ordinary concept of linear programming.

  6. Recipes for the linear analysis of EEG.

    PubMed

    Parra, Lucas C; Spence, Clay D; Gerson, Adam D; Sajda, Paul

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple set of "recipes" for the analysis of high spatial density EEG. We focus on a linear integration of multiple channels for extracting individual components without making any spatial or anatomical modeling assumptions, instead requiring particular statistical properties such as maximum difference, maximum power, or statistical independence. We demonstrate how corresponding algorithms, for example, linear discriminant analysis, principal component analysis and independent component analysis, can be used to remove eye-motion artifacts, extract strong evoked responses, and decompose temporally overlapping components. The general approach is shown to be consistent with the underlying physics of EEG, which specifies a linear mixing model of the underlying neural and non-neural current sources.

  7. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  8. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  9. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  10. A sequential linear optimization approach for controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, L. G.; Juang, J.-N.; Junkins, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A linear optimization approach with a simple real arithmetic algorithm is presented for reliable controller design and vibration suppression of flexible structures. Using first order sensitivity of the system eigenvalues with respect to the design parameters in conjunction with a continuation procedure, the method converts a nonlinear optimization problem into a maximization problem with linear inequality constraints. The method of linear programming is then applied to solve the converted linear optimization problem. The general efficiency of the linear programming approach allows the method to handle structural optimization problems with a large number of inequality constraints on the design vector. The method is demonstrated using a truss beam finite element model for the optimal sizing and placement of active/passive-structural members for damping augmentation. Results using both the sequential linear optimization approach and nonlinear optimization are presented and compared. The insensitivity to initial conditions of the linear optimization approach is also demonstrated.

  11. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James; Selinsky, T.

    2002-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to similar industrial uses. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The shortcomings are the following: They perform unreliably and inconsistently as positioning devices. Their capabilities for end-of-stroke buffering (that is, deceleration to gentle stops at designated stopping positions) range from unsatisfactory to nonexistent, with consequent potential for inducing catastrophic failures. It takes long times to modify standard actuators to meet specifications, and the costs of such modifications are high. In the cases of actuators equipped with fail-safe shutdown systems, the stroking times of these systems cannot be adjusted in the field.

  12. Linear resonance cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    The contract requires the incorporation of linear drive technology into a cryocooler design meeting the Specification for the US Army 1/4 Watt Common Module Cooler as closely as possible. The Resonant Cryocooler employs a concept using magnetic forces to linearly move dual opposed pistons in the compressor thus eliminating the use of rotary motors, crankshaft, greases and bearings. While not a requirement of the contract, the expander also employs a linear motor to control displacer stroking. This allows for electronic end stopping to mitigate microphonics problems. In addition, the ability to vary the waveform of the displacer motion and its phasing with respect to the compressor pressure wave form in order to optimize performance offers the potential for extending the operational life of the cooler.

  13. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  14. Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    This chapter deals with the multiple linear regression. That is we investigate the situation where the mean of a variable depends linearly on a set of covariables. The noise is supposed to be gaussian. We develop the least squared method to get the parameter estimators and estimates of their precisions. This leads to design confidence intervals, prediction intervals, global tests, individual tests and more generally tests of submodels defined by linear constraints. Methods for model's choice and variables selection, measures of the quality of the fit, residuals study, diagnostic methods are presented. Finally identification of departures from the model's assumptions and the way to deal with these problems are addressed. A real data set is used to illustrate the methodology with software R. Note that this chapter is intended to serve as a guide for other regression methods, like logistic regression or AFT models and Cox regression.

  15. Linear and Non-Linear Visual Feature Learning in Rat and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bossens, Christophe; Op de Beeck, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    The visual system processes visual input in a hierarchical manner in order to extract relevant features that can be used in tasks such as invariant object recognition. Although typically investigated in primates, recent work has shown that rats can be trained in a variety of visual object and shape recognition tasks. These studies did not pinpoint the complexity of the features used by these animals. Many tasks might be solved by using a combination of relatively simple features which tend to be correlated. Alternatively, rats might extract complex features or feature combinations which are nonlinear with respect to those simple features. In the present study, we address this question by starting from a small stimulus set for which one stimulus-response mapping involves a simple linear feature to solve the task while another mapping needs a well-defined nonlinear combination of simpler features related to shape symmetry. We verified computationally that the nonlinear task cannot be trivially solved by a simple V1-model. We show how rats are able to solve the linear feature task but are unable to acquire the nonlinear feature. In contrast, humans are able to use the nonlinear feature and are even faster in uncovering this solution as compared to the linear feature. The implications for the computational capabilities of the rat visual system are discussed. PMID:28066201

  16. Cryogenic submicron linear actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Javier; Moreno Raso, Javier; González de María, David; Argelaguet Vilaseca, Heribert; Lamensans, Mikel; López Justo, David; Sanz Puig, Violeta

    2010-07-01

    The Cryogenic Submicron Linear Actuator (CSA) is a medium range (+/-5 mm) submicron resolution linear actuator suitable to be used at cryogenic temperature (12K). The unit has been developed for fine positioning use. The unit is based on classic motor-gear concept with nut and screw; different materials and lubrications have been tested for the same design configuration to compare performances. Load capability is above 20N. This paper describes main design features, results of different lubrications tested, tested performances, and main lessons learned.

  17. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  18. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  19. Linear Collider Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Marc

    2000-05-17

    Each major step toward higher energy particle accelerators relies on new technology. Linear colliders require beams of unprecedented brightness and stability. Instrumentation and control technology is the single most critical tool that enables linear colliders to extend the energy reach. In this paper the authors focus on the most challenging aspects of linear collider instrumentation systems. In the Next Linear Collider (NLC), high brightness multibunch e{sup +}/e{sup {minus}} beams, with I{sub {+-}} = 10{sup 12} particles/pulse and sigma{sub x,y} {approximately} 50 x 5 mu-m, originate in damping rings and are subsequently accelerated to several hundred GeV in 2 X-band 11,424 MHz linacs from which they emerge with typical sigma{sub x,y} {approximately} 7 x 1 mu-m. Following a high power collimation section the e{sup +}/e{sup {minus}} beams are focused to sigma{sub x,y} {approximately} 300 x 5 nm at the interaction point. In this paper they review the beam intensity, position and profile monitors (x,y,z), mechanical vibration sensing and stabilization systems, long baseline RF distribution systems and beam collimation hardware.

  20. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  1. Piezoelectric linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehrer, S.

    1969-01-01

    Actuator exerts linear force that is controllable and reproducible to microinch tolerance. It is constructed for extremely accurate control of a valve but can also be used as a variable venturi meter, micropositioner, microthruster, and in fluidics and reaction-control systems.

  2. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  3. Curiosity Front View, Linearized

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-06

    This is a version of one of the first images taken by a front Hazard-Avoidance camera on NASA Curiosity rover. It was taken through a fisheye wide-angle lens but has been linearized so that the horizon looks flat rather than curved.

  4. Optical linear discriminant functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Song, Jian-Zhong

    1989-01-01

    The use of computer generated holograms to implement feature extraction operations has been achieved. The optical realization and use of multiple linear discriminant functions on a high-dimensionality feature space for large class pattern recognition is described and initial experimental results are provided.

  5. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  6. METRIC GEOMETRY LINEAR MEASURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE (1) THE HISTORY AND MEANING OF LINEAR MEASURE, (2) FINDING THE…

  7. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  8. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  9. Simple device measures solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  10. Science Notebook: A Simple Seismometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes how to construct a simple pendulum seismometer. Includes schematic drawing of the electronic circuitry, a working drawing of the apparatus, and typical seismometer outputs caused by nearby trains and various earthquake-generated waves. (JJK)

  11. Student Conceptions of Simple Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Norman; Lochhead, John

    1980-01-01

    Investigates some conceptual difficulties which college students have with regard to simple direct current circuits. The clinical interview technique was used with 57 students in a freshman level engineering course. (HM)

  12. Simple Interval Timers for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.; Burgess, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simple interval timers for microcomputers, including (1) the Jiffy clock; (2) CPU count timers; (3) screen count timers; (4) light pen timers; and (5) chip timers. Also examines some of the general characteristics of all types of timers. (JN)

  13. Simple Motor Gestures for Birdsongs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Tim; Cecchi, G.; Magnasco, M.; Laje, R.; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2001-11-01

    We present a model of sound production in a songbird's vocal organ and find that much of the complexity of the song of the canary (Serinus canaria) can be produced from simple time variations in forcing functions. The starts, stops, and pauses between syllables, as well as variation in pitch and timbre are inherent in the mechanics and can often be expressed through smooth and simple variations in the frequency and relative phase of two driving parameters

  14. Simple motor gestures for birdsongs.

    PubMed

    Gardner, T; Cecchi, G; Magnasco, M; Laje, R; Mindlin, G B

    2001-11-12

    We present a model of sound production in a songbird's vocal organ and find that much of the complexity of the song of the canary (Serinus canaria) can be produced from simple time variations in forcing functions. The starts, stops, and pauses between syllables, as well as variation in pitch and timbre are inherent in the mechanics and can often be expressed through smooth and simple variations in the frequency and relative phase of two driving parameters

  15. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity.

  16. Externally resonated linear microvibromotor for microassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Kazuhiro; Wou, Soungjin J.

    1998-10-01

    A new design of a linear micro vibromotor for on-substrate fine positioning of micro-scale components is presented where a micro linear slider is actuated by vibratory impacts exerted by micro cantilever impacters. These micro cantilever impacters are selectively resonated by shaking the entire substrate with a piezoelectric vibrator, requiring no need for built-in driving mechanisms such as electrostatic comb actuators as reported previously. This selective resonance of the micro cantilever impacters via an external vibration energy field provides with a very simple means of controlling forward and backward motion of the micro linear slider, facilitating assembly and disassembly of a micro component on a substrate. The double-V beam suspension design is employed in the micro cantilever impacters for larger displacement in the lateral direction while achieving higher stiffness in the transversal direction. An analytical model of the device is derived in order to obtain, through the Simulated Annealing algorithm, an optimal design which maximizes translation speed of the linear slider at desired external input frequencies. Prototypes of the externally-resonated linear micro vibromotor are fabricated using the three-layer polysilicon surface micro machining process provided by the MCNC MUMPS service.

  17. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  18. Constructing Simple Predictive Models from Paleoclimate Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrhein, D. E.; Hakim, G. J.; Thompson, L.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting regional climate variability on multidecadal time scales is a central challenge in climate science. To this end, paleoclimatological records have provided reconstructions of climate variability, estimates of climate sensitivity to external forcings, and a testing ground for climate model simulations run under paleoclimate boundary conditions. The direct use of paleoclimate proxy records to quantify predictability and construct and improve climate forecast models is a natural next step. This work seeks to construct simple (linear inverse) climate prediction models directly from marine and terrestrial paleoclimate proxies from the last 400 years with a focus on Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV). Key questions are: Do paleoproxy records reveal predictability in AMV? If not, is the implication that AMV predictability is low, or are data noise and sparsity limiting factors? If there is predictability, can we diagnose time scales and regional patterns associated with climate dynamics?

  19. Genealogies in simple models of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We review the statistical properties of the genealogies of a few models of evolution. In the asexual case, selection leads to coalescence times which grow logarithmically with the size of the population, in contrast with the linear growth of the neutral case. Moreover for a whole class of models, the statistics of the genealogies are those of the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent rather than the Kingman coalescent in the neutral case. For sexual reproduction in the neutral case, the time to reach the first common ancestors for the whole population and the time for all individuals to have all their ancestors in common are also logarithmic in the population size, as predicted by Chang in 1999. We discuss how these times are modified by introducing selection in a simple way.

  20. Relativistic linear restoring force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-09-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke’s law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: dp/dt or dp/dτ. Either formulation recovers Hooke’s law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we introduce a form of retardation appropriate for the description of a linear (in displacement) force arising from the interaction of a pair of particles with a relativistic field. The procedure is akin to replacing Coulomb’s law in electromagnetism with a retarded form (the first correction in the full relativistic case). This retardation leads to the expected oscillation, but with amplitude growth in both its relativistic and non-relativistic incarnations.

  1. Reciprocating linear motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  2. Non-linear osmosis

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared M.

    1966-01-01

    1. The relation between osmotic gradient and rate of osmotic water flow has been measured in rabbit gall-bladder by a gravimetric procedure and by a rapid method based on streaming potentials. Streaming potentials were directly proportional to gravimetrically measured water fluxes. 2. As in many other tissues, water flow was found to vary with gradient in a markedly non-linear fashion. There was no consistent relation between the water permeability and either the direction or the rate of water flow. 3. Water flow in response to a given gradient decreased at higher osmolarities. The resistance to water flow increased linearly with osmolarity over the range 186-825 m-osM. 4. The resistance to water flow was the same when the gall-bladder separated any two bathing solutions with the same average osmolarity, regardless of the magnitude of the gradient. In other words, the rate of water flow is given by the expression (Om — Os)/[Ro′ + ½k′ (Om + Os)], where Ro′ and k′ are constants and Om and Os are the bathing solution osmolarities. 5. Of the theories advanced to explain non-linear osmosis in other tissues, flow-induced membrane deformations, unstirred layers, asymmetrical series-membrane effects, and non-osmotic effects of solutes could not explain the results. However, experimental measurements of water permeability as a function of osmolarity permitted quantitative reconstruction of the observed water flow—osmotic gradient curves. Hence non-linear osmosis in rabbit gall-bladder is due to a decrease in water permeability with increasing osmolarity. 6. The results suggest that aqueous channels in the cell membrane behave as osmometers, shrinking in concentrated solutions of impermeant molecules and thereby increasing membrane resistance to water flow. A mathematical formulation of such a membrane structure is offered. PMID:5945254

  3. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  4. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  5. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  6. Linear abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Danto, L A; Wolfman, E F

    1976-03-01

    Three cases of blunt abdominal trauma are presented to exemplify the mechanism of trauma and the problems of diagnosis associated with any linear blow to the abdomen. The mechanisms of visceral injury are reviewed, and special attention is directed to the abdominal wall injury that can be present in these patients. This injury has special implications in directing the operative approach and repair. An unusual aortic occlusion is described which is peculiar to this type of injury.

  7. Electrostatic Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Curry, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    Electrically charged helices attract or repel each other. Proposed electrostatic linear actuator made with intertwined dual helices, which holds charge-bearing surfaces. Dual-helix configuration provides relatively large unbroken facing charged surfaces (relatively large electrostatic force) within small volume. Inner helix slides axially in outer helix in response to voltages applied to conductors. Spiral form also makes components more rigid. Actuator conceived to have few moving parts and to be operable after long intervals of inactivity.

  8. Digital linear actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Birchard, W.G.

    1988-06-21

    A digital actuator is described comprising: (a) digital actuator cells, each digital actuator cell having an axis of expansion and first and second end surfaces; (b) third connecting means, each for connecting the first end surface of one digital actuator cell to the second end surface of an adjacent actuator cell, the plurality of digital actuator cells being connected in series by respective ones of the third connecting means to form the digital linear actuator.

  9. Wideband Linear Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Phase modulator for transmission in X band provides large phase deviation that remains nearly linear with voltage over relatively wide range. Operates with low loss over wide frequency band and with stable characteristics over wide temperature range. Phase modulator contains two varactor-diode phase shifters coupled via circulators. Separate drive circuit applies modulating voltages to varactor diodes. Modulation voltages vary in accordance with input to drive circuit.

  10. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  11. Linear accelerator thalamotomy.

    PubMed

    Frighetto, Leonardo; De Salles, Antonio; Wallace, Robert; Ford, Judith; Selch, Michael; Cabatan-Awang, Cynthia; Solberg, Timothy

    2004-08-01

    The capability of performing functional radiosurgery lesions in the brain using a dedicated linear accelerator (LINAC) have not yet been demonstrated. This study evaluates modern LINAC technology for the creation of a sharp, small and functionally eloquent lesion in the thalamus. Three patients underwent thalamotomy using a dedicated linear accelerator to radiosurgery, 2 females and 1 male, ages were 52, 53, and 73 years. Two patients presented with unilateral poststroke central pain and 1 with unilateral upper extremity pain secondary to metastatic infiltration of the brachial plexus. Maximal doses varied from 150 to 200 Gy, delivered by a 5-mm diameter collimator and 5 to 8 noncoplanar arcs evenly distributed. All patients gained substantial relief of their pain. They were able to reduce their medications and improve their activity levels. The patient with end-stage metastatic disease died of his malignancy 2 weeks after the treatment. One patient presented with recurrence of the pain 4 months after the treatment. No clinical complications were noticed. A dedicated linear accelerator is able to perform a precise and circumscribed lesion in the thalamus for pain control. Moreover, it proved to be safe, because no complications were observed. For patients using chronic anticoagulant therapy or with severe disabilities caused by cardiac, pulmonary or malignant diseases, this technique represents an alternative of treatment to radiofrequency thalamotomy.

  12. LINEAR SOLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Villante, F. L.; Ricci, B.

    2010-05-01

    We present a new approach to studying the properties of the Sun. We consider small variations of the physical and chemical properties of the Sun with respect to standard solar model predictions and we linearize the structure equations to relate them to the properties of the solar plasma. By assuming that the (variation of) present solar composition can be estimated from the (variation of) nuclear reaction rates and elemental diffusion efficiency in the present Sun, we obtain a linear system of ordinary differential equations which can be used to calculate the response of the Sun to an arbitrary modification of the input parameters (opacity, cross sections, etc.). This new approach is intended to be a complement to the traditional methods for solar model (SM) calculation and allows us to investigate in a more efficient and transparent way the role of parameters and assumptions in SM construction. We verify that these linear solar models recover the predictions of the traditional SMs with a high level of accuracy.

  13. Dense simple plasmas as high-temperature liquid simple metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrot, F.

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of dense plasmas considered as high-temperature liquid metals are studied. An attempt is made to show that the neutral pseudoatom picture of liquid simple metals may be extended for describing plasmas in ranges of densities and temperatures where their electronic structure remains 'simple'. The primary features of the model when applied to plasmas include the temperature-dependent self-consistent calculation of the electron charge density and the determination of a density and temperature-dependent ionization state.

  14. Applied Electronics: Construction of a Simple Spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thal, Melissa A.; Samide, Michael J.

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we describe the construction of a simple spectrophotometer intended for use as a capstone circuit for an electronics laboratory exercise. Students in the undergraduate laboratory have learned basic circuitry and are now able to read a schematic and construct an instrument that has practical applications in chemical analysis. A simple LED is used as the source and is easily changed to correspond to different species being studied. Detection is accomplished through the use of one of three signal transducers (a photoresistor, a photodiode, or a photodarlington) and a current-to-voltage converter. A box lined with black felt is used to shield the spectrophotometer from ambient light. This spectrophotometer shows excellent Beer-Lambert law linearity over a large concentration range and has been used in the laboratory to determine the concentration of a metal cation in solution on the basis of a calibration curve. Of the transducers used, the photoresistor showed the best response at multiple wavelengths with error in concentration determination not greater than 6%. Through the building and testing of this circuit, the students can visualize applications of electronic circuitry.

  15. Some simple properties of stellar pulsation modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    Except for the lowest harmonics, small-amplitude stellar pulsation modes possess many simple properties whose evaluation does not require numerical integration of the fourth-order equations of motion. All antinodes tend to have the same total kinetic energy except for those lying near physical or geometric boundaries. However, when kinetic energy per unit volume is considered, order-of-magnitude enhancements are seen in antinodes lying near the center of the star, and factor-of-2 enhancements occur near the polar axis. The nodes are distributed very regularly along the radius. They follow an exponential law in g-regions, and their separation is proportional to the sound travel time in p-regions. A simple graphical procedure is described for surveying the oscillation frequencies of a new stellar model. A precise condition is derived giving the division of energy between radial and angular motion. Another condition gives the fractional contribution to the velocity field of its two sources, the divergence and the curl. Certain simplifying results of weak coupling among the linear modes are briefly described.

  16. Asymptotic Linear Spectral Statistics for Spiked Hermitian Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passemier, Damien; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Using the Coulomb Fluid method, this paper derives central limit theorems (CLTs) for linear spectral statistics of three "spiked" Hermitian random matrix ensembles. These include Johnstone's spiked model (i.e., central Wishart with spiked correlation), non-central Wishart with rank-one non-centrality, and a related class of non-central matrices. For a generic linear statistic, we derive simple and explicit CLT expressions as the matrix dimensions grow large. For all three ensembles under consideration, we find that the primary effect of the spike is to introduce an correction term to the asymptotic mean of the linear spectral statistic, which we characterize with simple formulas. The utility of our proposed framework is demonstrated through application to three different linear statistics problems: the classical likelihood ratio test for a population covariance, the capacity analysis of multi-antenna wireless communication systems with a line-of-sight transmission path, and a classical multiple sample significance testing problem.

  17. Temporal and spatial stability in translation invariant linear resistive networks.

    PubMed

    Solak, M K

    1997-01-01

    Simple algebraic methods are proposed to evaluate the temporal and spatial stability of translation invariant linear resistive networks. Temporal stability is discussed for a finite number of nodes n. The proposed method evaluates stability of a Toeplitz pencil A(n)(a)+muB(n)(b) in terms of parameters a(i ) and b(i). In many cases a simple method allows one to verify positive definition of B(n)(b) in terms of b(i) only.

  18. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR QUASAR DEMOGRAPHICS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; White, Martin

    2013-01-10

    We present a simple model for the relationship between quasars, galaxies, and dark matter halos from 0.5 < z < 6. In the model, black hole (BH) mass is linearly related to galaxy mass, and galaxies are connected to dark matter halos via empirically constrained relations. A simple 'scattered' light bulb model for quasars is adopted, wherein BHs shine at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity during accretion episodes, and Eddington ratios are drawn from a lognormal distribution that is redshift independent. This model has two free, physically meaningful parameters at each redshift: the normalization of the M {sub BH}-M {sub gal} relation and the quasar duty cycle; these parameters are fit to the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) over the interval 0.5 < z < 6. This simple model provides an excellent fit to the LF at all epochs and also successfully predicts the observed projected two-point correlation of quasars from 0.5 < z < 2.5. It is significant that a single quasar duty cycle at each redshift is capable of reproducing the extant observations. The data are therefore consistent with a scenario wherein quasars are equally likely to exist in galaxies, and therefore dark matter halos, over a wide range in masses. The knee in the quasar LF is a reflection of the knee in the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. Future constraints on the quasar LF and quasar clustering at high redshift will provide strong constraints on the model. In the model, the autocorrelation function of quasars becomes a strong function of luminosity only at the very highest luminosities and will be difficult to observe because such quasars are so rare. Cross-correlation techniques may provide useful constraints on the bias of such rare objects. The simplicity of the model allows for rapid generation of quasar mock catalogs from N-body simulations that match the observed LF and clustering to high redshift.

  19. Simple models for reading neuronal population codes.

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H S; Sompolinsky, H

    1993-01-01

    In many neural systems, sensory information is distributed throughout a population of neurons. We study simple neural network models for extracting this information. The inputs to the networks are the stochastic responses of a population of sensory neurons tuned to directional stimuli. The performance of each network model in psychophysical tasks is compared with that of the optimal maximum likelihood procedure. As a model of direction estimation in two dimensions, we consider a linear network that computes a population vector. Its performance depends on the width of the population tuning curves and is maximal for width, which increases with the level of background activity. Although for narrowly tuned neurons the performance of the population vector is significantly inferior to that of maximum likelihood estimation, the difference between the two is small when the tuning is broad. For direction discrimination, we consider two models: a perceptron with fully adaptive weights and a network made by adding an adaptive second layer to the population vector network. We calculate the error rates of these networks after exhaustive training to a particular direction. By testing on the full range of possible directions, the extent of transfer of training to novel stimuli can be calculated. It is found that for threshold linear networks the transfer of perceptual learning is nonmonotonic. Although performance deteriorates away from the training stimulus, it peaks again at an intermediate angle. This nonmonotonicity provides an important psychophysical test of these models. PMID:8248166

  20. Estimating linear temporal trends from aggregated environmental monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Richard A.; Gray, Brian R.; Eager, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Trend estimates are often used as part of environmental monitoring programs. These trends inform managers (e.g., are desired species increasing or undesired species decreasing?). Data collected from environmental monitoring programs is often aggregated (i.e., averaged), which confounds sampling and process variation. State-space models allow sampling variation and process variations to be separated. We used simulated time-series to compare linear trend estimations from three state-space models, a simple linear regression model, and an auto-regressive model. We also compared the performance of these five models to estimate trends from a long term monitoring program. We specifically estimated trends for two species of fish and four species of aquatic vegetation from the Upper Mississippi River system. We found that the simple linear regression had the best performance of all the given models because it was best able to recover parameters and had consistent numerical convergence. Conversely, the simple linear regression did the worst job estimating populations in a given year. The state-space models did not estimate trends well, but estimated population sizes best when the models converged. We found that a simple linear regression performed better than more complex autoregression and state-space models when used to analyze aggregated environmental monitoring data.

  1. Extending the Error Correction Capability of Linear Codes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    be made to tolerate and correct up to (k-1) bit failures. Thus if the classical error correction bounds are assumed, a linear transmission code used...in digital circuitry is under-utilized. For example, the single- error - correction , double-error-detection Hamming code could be used to correct up to...two bit failures with some additional error correction circuitry. A simple algorithm for correcting these extra errors in linear codoes is presented. (Author)

  2. Commutator-based linearization of N = 1 nonlinear supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Motomu

    2016-11-01

    We consider the linearization of N = 1 nonlinear supersymmetry (NLSUSY) based on a commutator algebra in Volkov-Akulov (VA) NLSUSY theory. We show explicitly that U(1) gauge and scalar supermultiplets in addition to a vector supermultiplet with general auxiliary fields in linear SUSY theories are obtained from a same set of bosonic and fermionic functionals (composites) which are expressed as simple products of the powers of a Nambu-Goldstone fermion and a fundamental determinant in the NLSUSY theory.

  3. Is the Simple View of Reading Too Simple?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoien-Tengesdal, Ingjerd

    2010-01-01

    According to the Simple View of Reading (SVR), reading comprehension is the product of word decoding ability and linguistic comprehension (R = D x C). However, there is also evidence showing that an additive model (R = D + C) explains just as much or even more of the variance in reading comprehension than the product model. To further evaluate…

  4. Simple Laparoscopic Nephrectomy in Stone Disease: Not Always Simple.

    PubMed

    Angerri, Oriol; López, Juan Manuel; Sánchez-Martin, Francisco; Millán-Rodriguez, Félix; Rosales, Antonio; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    Simple nephrectomy is performed for a benign pathology that does not require the excision of either the adrenal gland or any adenopathies. When it is carried out in cases of stone disease, however, it is frequently not a "simple" technique owing to the presence of significant inflammation and infection. Ninety-six simple laparoscopic nephrectomies performed because of stone disease between 2006 and 2015 were retrospectively studied. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed, as well as an evaluation of the associated complications. Of the 96 laparoscopic nephrectomies (62 left, 34 right), 7 (7.2%) had to be converted into open surgery owing to the impossibility of dissecting the renal hilum because of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (n = 4) or major associated lesions (n = 3). The indication for nephrectomy was lumbar pain associated with urinary infection, with a partial renal function below 15% assessed by DMSA renal scan. There were three major complications. Pathologic assessment revealed chronic pyelonephritis with kidney atrophy and associated pyonephrosis in 85 cases, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in 10, and pT4 squamous cell carcinoma in 1. Despite its high technical difficulty, simple laparoscopic nephrectomy for stones is a viable technique for advanced laparoscopists. Its principal advantage compared with open surgery is improved postsurgical recovery, and it is associated with an acceptable complication rate. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is not an initial contraindication to laparoscopy, but it is the most significant risk factor for conversion to open surgery.

  5. Complex Autocatalysis in Simple Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Virgo, Nathaniel; Ikegami, Takashi; McGregor, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth must originally have arisen from abiotic chemistry. Since the details of this chemistry are unknown, we wish to understand, in general, which types of chemistry can lead to complex, lifelike behavior. Here we show that even very simple chemistries in the thermodynamically reversible regime can self-organize to form complex autocatalytic cycles, with the catalytic effects emerging from the network structure. We demonstrate this with a very simple but thermodynamically reasonable artificial chemistry model. By suppressing the direct reaction from reactants to products, we obtain the simplest kind of autocatalytic cycle, resulting in exponential growth. When these simple first-order cycles are prevented from forming, the system achieves superexponential growth through more complex, higher-order autocatalytic cycles. This leads to nonlinear phenomena such as oscillations and bistability, the latter of which is of particular interest regarding the origins of life.

  6. The Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1990-10-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been in operation for several years with the initial and accelerator physics experiments just completed. A synopsis of these results is included. The second round of experiments is now under preparation to install the new physics detector (SLD) in Fall 1990 and to increase the luminosity significantly by late 1991. Collisions at high intensity and with polarized electrons are planned. Many beam dynamics and technological advances are in progress to meet these goals. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  8. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  9. Sparse linear programming subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.J.; Hiebert, K.L.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes a subprogram, SPLP(), for solving linear programming problems. The package of subprogram units comprising SPLP() is written in Fortran 77. The subprogram SPLP() is intended for problems involving at most a few thousand constraints and variables. The subprograms are written to take advantage of sparsity in the constraint matrix. A very general problem statement is accepted by SPLP(). It allows upper, lower, or no bounds on the variables. Both the primal and dual solutions are returned as output parameters. The package has many optional features. Among them is the ability to save partial results and then use them to continue the computation at a later time.

  10. Nonlinear Modeling by Assembling Piecewise Linear Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full order system over a parameters range of interest, we propose a simple modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise local solutions, including the first-order Taylor series terms expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions. The assembly of these local approximations is accomplished by assigning nonlinear weights, through radial basis functions in this study. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving at different Mach numbers and pitching motions, under which the flow exhibits prominent nonlinear behaviors. All results confirm that our nonlinear model is accurate and stable for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robustness-accurate for inputs considerably different from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling preserves nonlinearity of the problems considered in a rather simple and accurate manner.

  11. A simple hindlimb suspension apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, E.; Schultz, E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a simple, inexpensive apparatus for application of the hindlimb suspension model to studies of the effects of unloading on mammalian physiology. Construction of a cage and suspension assembly is described using materials that can be obtained from most hardware stores. The design is kept simple for easy assembly and disassembly to facilitate cleaning and storage. The suspension assembly allows the animals full access to all portions of the floor area and provides an effective environment to study the effects of unloading.

  12. A simple hindlimb suspension apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, E.; Schultz, E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a simple, inexpensive apparatus for application of the hindlimb suspension model to studies of the effects of unloading on mammalian physiology. Construction of a cage and suspension assembly is described using materials that can be obtained from most hardware stores. The design is kept simple for easy assembly and disassembly to facilitate cleaning and storage. The suspension assembly allows the animals full access to all portions of the floor area and provides an effective environment to study the effects of unloading.

  13. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  14. A Simple and Fast Spline Filtering Algorithm for Surface Metrology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ott, Daniel; Song, John; Tong, Mingsi; Chu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spline filters and their corresponding robust filters are commonly used filters recommended in ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) standards for surface evaluation. Generally, these linear and non-linear spline filters, composed of symmetric, positive-definite matrices, are solved in an iterative fashion based on a Cholesky decomposition. They have been demonstrated to be relatively efficient, but complicated and inconvenient to implement. A new spline-filter algorithm is proposed by means of the discrete cosine transform or the discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is conceptually simple and very convenient to implement.

  15. Seeking maximum linearity of transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Filipi N.; Comin, Cesar H.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2016-12-01

    Linearity is an important and frequently sought property in electronics and instrumentation. Here, we report a method capable of, given a transfer function (theoretical or derived from some real system), identifying the respective most linear region of operation with a fixed width. This methodology, which is based on least squares regression and systematic consideration of all possible regions, has been illustrated with respect to both an analytical (sigmoid transfer function) and a simple situation involving experimental data of a low-power, one-stage class A transistor current amplifier. Such an approach, which has been addressed in terms of transfer functions derived from experimentally obtained characteristic surface, also yielded contributions such as the estimation of local constants of the device, as opposed to typically considered average values. The reported method and results pave the way to several further applications in other types of devices and systems, intelligent control operation, and other areas such as identifying regions of power law behavior.

  16. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z > 0 and V(z) = ∞ for z < 0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions gives closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  17. [General practice--linear thinking and complexity].

    PubMed

    Stalder, H

    2006-09-27

    As physicians, we apply and teach linear thinking. This approach permits to dissect the patient's problem to the molecular level and has contributed enormously to the knowledge and progress of medicine. The linear approach is particularly useful in medical education, in quantitative research and helps to resolve simple problems. However, it risks to be rigid. Living beings (such as patients and physicians!) have to be considered as complex systems. A complex system cannot be dissected into its parts without losing its identity. It is dependent on its past and interactions with the outside are often followed by unpredictable reactions. The patient-centred approach in medicine permits the physician, a complex system himself, to integrate the patient's system and to adapt to his reality. It is particularly useful in general medicine.

  18. A Simple Demonstration of Atomic and Molecular Orbitals Using Circular Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Maharudra; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata; Das, Ranendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    A quite simple and inexpensive technique is described here to represent the approximate shapes of atomic orbitals and the molecular orbitals formed by them following the principles of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Molecular orbitals of a few simple molecules can also be pictorially represented. Instructors can employ the…

  19. A Simple Demonstration of Atomic and Molecular Orbitals Using Circular Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Maharudra; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata; Das, Ranendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    A quite simple and inexpensive technique is described here to represent the approximate shapes of atomic orbitals and the molecular orbitals formed by them following the principles of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Molecular orbitals of a few simple molecules can also be pictorially represented. Instructors can employ the…

  20. Experimental quantum private queries with linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    De Martini, Francesco; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Nagali, Eleonora; Sansoni, Linda; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2009-07-15

    The quantum private query is a quantum cryptographic protocol to recover information from a database, preserving both user and data privacy: the user can test whether someone has retained information on which query was asked and the database provider can test the amount of information released. Here we discuss a variant of the quantum private query algorithm that admits a simple linear optical implementation: it employs the photon's momentum (or time slot) as address qubits and its polarization as bus qubit. A proof-of-principle experimental realization is implemented.

  1. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  2. Linear Least Squares for Correlated Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1988-01-01

    Throughout the literature authors have consistently discussed the suspicion that regression results were less than satisfactory when the independent variables were correlated. Camm, Gulledge, and Womer, and Womer and Marcotte provide excellent applied examples of these concerns. Many authors have obtained partial solutions for this problem as discussed by Womer and Marcotte and Wonnacott and Wonnacott, which result in generalized least squares algorithms to solve restrictive cases. This paper presents a simple but relatively general multivariate method for obtaining linear least squares coefficients which are free of the statistical distortion created by correlated independent variables.

  3. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  4. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  5. Alternative approach to general coupled linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2005-11-29

    The Twiss parameters provide a convenient description of beam optics in uncoupled linear beamlines. For coupled beamlines, a variety of approaches are possible for describing the linear optics; here, we propose an approach and notation that naturally generalizes the familiar Twiss parameters to the coupled case in three degrees of freedom. Our approach is based on an eigensystem analysis of the matrix of second-order beam moments, or alternatively (in the case of a storage ring) on an eigensystem analysis of the linear single-turn map. The lattice functions that emerge from this approach have an interpretation that is conceptually very simple: in particular, the lattice functions directly relate the beam distribution in phase space to the invariant emittances. To emphasize the physical significance of the coupled lattice functions, we develop the theory from first principles, using only the assumption of linear symplectic transport. We also give some examples of the application of this approach, demonstrating its advantages of conceptual and notational simplicity.

  6. Linear dependencies between composite fermion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Liabøtrø, O.; Viefers, S.

    2016-09-01

    The formalism of composite fermions (CFs) has been one of the most prominent and successful approaches to describing the fractional quantum Hall effect, in terms of trial many-body wave functions. Testing the accuracy of the latter typically involves rather heavy numerical comparison to exact diagonalization results. Thus, optimizing computational efficiency has been an important technical issue in this field. One generic (and not yet fully understood) property of the CF approach is that it tends to overcount the number of linearly independent candidate states for fixed sets of quantum numbers. Technically speaking, CF Slater determinants that are orthogonal before projection to the lowest Landau level, may lead to wave functions that are identical, or possess linear dependencies, after projection. This leads to unnecessary computations, and has been pointed out in the literature both for fermionic and bosonic systems. We here present a systematic approach that enables us to reveal all linear dependencies between bosonic compact states in the lowest CF ‘cyclotron energy’ sub-band, and almost all dependencies in higher sub-bands, at the level of the CF Slater determinants, i.e. before projection, which implies a major computational simplification. Our approach is introduced for so-called simple states of two-species rotating bosons, and then generalized to generic compact bosonic states, both one- and two-species. Some perspectives also apply to fermionic systems. The identities and linear dependencies we find, are analytically exact for ‘brute force’ projection in the disk geometry.

  7. Comet LINEAR Splits Further

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Third Nucleus Observed with the VLT Summary New images from the VLT show that one of the two nuclei of Comet LINEAR (C/2001 A2), now about 100 million km from the Earth, has just split into at least two pieces . The three fragments are now moving through space in nearly parallel orbits while they slowly drift apart. This comet will pass through its perihelion (nearest point to the Sun) on May 25, 2001, at a distance of about 116 million kilometres. It has brightened considerably due to the splitting of its "dirty snowball" nucleus and can now be seen with the unaided eye by observers in the southern hemisphere as a faint object in the southern constellation of Lepus (The Hare). PR Photo 18a/01 : Three nuclei of Comet LINEAR . PR Photo 18b/01 : The break-up of Comet LINEAR (false-colour). Comet LINEAR splits and brightens ESO PR Photo 18a/01 ESO PR Photo 18a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 438 pix - 55k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 875 pix - 136k] ESO PR Photo 18b/01 ESO PR Photo 18b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 367 x 400 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 734 x 800 pix - 272k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 18a/01 shows the three nuclei of Comet LINEAR (C/2001 A2). It is a reproduction of a 1-min exposure in red light, obtained in the early evening of May 16, 2001, with the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN (UT4) telescope at Paranal. ESO PR Photo 18b/01 shows the same image, but in a false-colour rendering for more clarity. The cometary fragment "B" (right) has split into "B1" and "B2" (separation about 1 arcsec, or 500 km) while fragment "A" (upper left) is considerably fainter. Technical information about these photos is available below. Comet LINEAR was discovered on January 3, 2001, and designated by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as C/2001 A2 (see IAU Circular 7564 [1]). Six weeks ago, it was suddenly observed to brighten (IAUC 7605 [1]). Amateurs all over the world saw the comparatively faint comet reaching naked-eye magnitude and soon thereafter, observations with professional telescopes indicated

  8. Non linear anthropometric predictors in swimming.

    PubMed

    Sekulić, Damir; Zenić, Natasa; Zubcević, Nada Grcić

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we have tried to identify the significance and character of the linear and non-linear relations between simple anthropometric predictors: body height (BH), body weight (BW), and body mass index, and swimming performance: freestyle swimming 50 (FS50) and 400 meters (FS400), in a sample of young (15 years old on average) male (N = 40) and female (N = 28) swimmers. Linear (general model: y = a+bx) and nonlinear regression (general model: y = a+bx+cx2) were calculated simultaneously. Morphological variables are a significantly better predictor of the FS50 in males (BH mostly), and FS400 in females (BW mostly). This study emphasized some of the main advantages in the nonlinear regression calculation (including an interpretation of the relationships at a more superior level), and consequently allowed a precise anthropometric modeling in swimming using simple and easily measurable variables. For example, the best results in FS400 can be expected for the subjects that are average in BW (which guarantees solid muscle mass--the generator of force), but above average in BH (because of the physical law of lever). In conclusion, nonlinear regressions allow one to define the real nature of the relationships between variables, but only if compared with the linear ones. Additionally, this study emphasized one of the most important factors in defining possible specification-equation (e.g. structure of the influence of the different dimensions on the sport achievement) in different sports. In short, it underlines the importance of sampling the appropriate sample of the subject--highly skilled athletes exclusively.

  9. Simple Techniques for Microclimate Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes simple ways of measuring the very local climate near the ground, and explains what these measurements mean. Equipment included a solar radiometer, a dew point instrument, and a thermocouple psychrometer. Examples are given of field measurements taken with some of the equipment and the results and their interpretation are discussed.…

  10. Simple Machines Curriculum. [Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11, Coon Rapids, MN.

    This manual provides suggestions for investigating simple machines and the teaching of certain basic concepts which pertain to them. Many of the lessons are designed to be used with the commercially available LEGO kits, in an effort to teach concepts in a way in which students must translate pictures shown in two dimension into three-dimensional…

  11. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  12. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  13. Simple mastectomy under local anaesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, A. R.; Watkins, R. M.; Ward, M. E.; Lee, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Nine patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the breast underwent simple mastectomy under regional anaesthesia (1% lignocaine and 1:100,000 adrenaline). Preoperative sedation was provided by oral lorazepam. There were no technical problems, evidence of lignocaine toxicity or excessive operative blood loss and no wounds became infected. PMID:4037637

  14. Simple, Flexible, Trigonometric Taper Equations

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Thomas; Bernard R. Parresol

    1991-01-01

    There have been numerous approaches to modeling stem form in recent decades. The majority have concentrated on the simpler coniferous bole form and have become increasingly complex mathematical expressions. Use of trigonometric equations provides a simple expression of taper that is flexible enough to fit both coniferous and hard-wood bole forms. As an illustration, we...

  15. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  16. Simple Machines Curriculum. [Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11, Coon Rapids, MN.

    This manual provides suggestions for investigating simple machines and the teaching of certain basic concepts which pertain to them. Many of the lessons are designed to be used with the commercially available LEGO kits, in an effort to teach concepts in a way in which students must translate pictures shown in two dimension into three-dimensional…

  17. Simple Steps to Save Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Saving water around the home is simple and smart. The average household spends as much as $500 per year on its water and sewer bill but could save about $170 per year by retrofitting with waterefficient fixtures and incorporating watersaving practices.

  18. Simple Machines in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Robert; Laroder, Aris; Tippins, Deborah; Emaz, Meliza; Fox, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The community can be a powerful context and mini-laboratory for cultivating students' common understandings of science and mathematics. On the island of Panay in the Philippines, the community was the starting place for a group of fifth- and sixth-grade students to explore simple machines in their daily lives. What students learned in the process…

  19. Simple Games . . . or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arn, Susan Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Students today begin using computers and playing video games as early as two years old. The technology behind these games is more complicated than most people can imagine. In this article, the author presents some simple number games which seem easy at the beginning, but as the games are repeated, mathematical content becomes more of the focus…

  20. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  1. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  2. Simple Games . . . or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arn, Susan Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Students today begin using computers and playing video games as early as two years old. The technology behind these games is more complicated than most people can imagine. In this article, the author presents some simple number games which seem easy at the beginning, but as the games are repeated, mathematical content becomes more of the focus…

  3. Simple Machines in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Robert; Laroder, Aris; Tippins, Deborah; Emaz, Meliza; Fox, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The community can be a powerful context and mini-laboratory for cultivating students' common understandings of science and mathematics. On the island of Panay in the Philippines, the community was the starting place for a group of fifth- and sixth-grade students to explore simple machines in their daily lives. What students learned in the process…

  4. A simple electron plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2017-03-01

    Considering a class of solutions where the density perturbations are functions of time, but not of space, we derive a new exact large amplitude wave solution for a cold uniform electron plasma. This result illustrates that most simple analytical solutions can appear even if the density perturbations are large.

  5. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  6. Keeping It Simple and Deep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Richard; Silver, Harvey; Perini, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Like today's educators, Japanese haiku poets were caught between standards (like courtly love) and everyday realities. From this tension, they created a remarkable poetic form. Three examples from teachers' professional development work apply simple-and-deep principles to listening tasks, an assessment "deal," and curricular-standards…

  7. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  8. A Simple Plant Growth Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxlade, E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the analysis of dandelion peduncle growth based on peduncle length, epidermal cell dimensions, and fresh/dry mass. Methods are simple and require no special apparatus or materials. Suggests that limited practical work in this area may contribute to students' lack of knowledge on plant growth. (Author/DH)

  9. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  10. Finite simple groups as expanders

    PubMed Central

    Kassabov, Martin; Lubotzky, Alexander; Nikolov, Nikolay

    2006-01-01

    We prove that there exist k ∈ ℕ and 0 < ε ∈ ℝ such that every non-abelian finite simple group G, which is not a Suzuki group, has a set of k generators for which the Cayley graph Cay(G; S) is an ε-expander. PMID:16601101

  11. Manipulation Capabilities with Simple Hands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Robotiq: The Adaptive Gripper (2010). URL http://robotiq.com/robot-hand/ 17. Smith , L.: A tutorial on principal components analysis (2002) 18. Theobald ...and Kemp’s [20] end-effector designed to robustly capture a large and carefully cho- sen set of household objects; and Theobald et al.’s simple gripper

  12. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  13. On the linear programming bound for linear Lee codes.

    PubMed

    Astola, Helena; Tabus, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Based on an invariance-type property of the Lee-compositions of a linear Lee code, additional equality constraints can be introduced to the linear programming problem of linear Lee codes. In this paper, we formulate this property in terms of an action of the multiplicative group of the field [Formula: see text] on the set of Lee-compositions. We show some useful properties of certain sums of Lee-numbers, which are the eigenvalues of the Lee association scheme, appearing in the linear programming problem of linear Lee codes. Using the additional equality constraints, we formulate the linear programming problem of linear Lee codes in a very compact form, leading to a fast execution, which allows to efficiently compute the bounds for large parameter values of the linear codes.

  14. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  15. Computer modeling of batteries from non-linear circuit elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waaben, S.; Federico, J.; Moskowitz, I.

    1983-01-01

    A simple non-linear circuit model for battery behavior is given. It is based on time-dependent features of the well-known PIN change storage diode, whose behavior is described by equations similar to those associated with electrochemical cells. The circuit simulation computer program ADVICE was used to predict non-linear response from a topological description of the battery analog built from advice components. By a reasonable choice of one set of parameters, the circuit accurately simulates a wide spectrum of measured non-linear battery responses to within a few millivolts.

  16. Modelling a Simple Mechanical System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Provides an example of the modeling power of Mathematics, demonstrated in a piece of A-Level student coursework which was undertaken as part of the MEI Structured Mathematics scheme. A system of two masses and two springs oscillating in one dimension is found to be accurately modeled by a system of linear differential equations. (Author/ASK)

  17. Simple Numerical Schemes for the Korteweg-deVries Equation

    SciTech Connect

    C. J. McKinstrie; M. V. Kozlov

    2000-12-01

    Two numerical schemes, which simulate the propagation of dispersive non-linear waves, are described. The first is a split-step Fourier scheme for the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The second is a finite-difference scheme for the modified KdV equation. The stability and accuracy of both schemes are discussed. These simple schemes can be used to study a wide variety of physical processes that involve dispersive nonlinear waves.

  18. An analogue of the Berry phase for simple harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    We evaluate a variant of Berry's phase for a ‘missing’ family of the square integrable wavefunctions for the linear harmonic oscillator, which cannot be derived by the separation of variables (in a natural way). Instead, it is obtained by the action of the maximal kinematical invariance group on the standard solutions. A simple closed formula for the phase (in terms of elementary functions) is found here by integration with the help of a computer algebra system.

  19. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria. The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.

  20. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  1. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  2. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  3. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  4. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  5. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  6. Solute transport under non-linear sorption and decay.

    PubMed

    Serrano, S E

    2001-04-01

    Contaminant transport in aquifers is usually represented by a solution to the advective-dispersive differential equation. When the contaminant is subject to non-linear degradation or decay, or it is characterized by a chemical constituent that follows a non-linear sorption isotherm, the resulting differential equation is non-linear. Using the method of decomposition, series solutions were obtained for the non-linear equation. The series were used to derive and test "simulant" solutions that aries using the concept of double decomposition. Simulant solutions are closed-form analytic expressions that approximate part of the series These expression are simple, stable, and flexible. They permit an accurate forecasting of contaminant propagation .under non-linearity in laboratory or field investigations at early or prolonged times after the spill. In this article, the practical scenario of an instantaneous spill, and that of a constant concentration boundary condition, is studied for situations of non-linear decay, non-linear Freundlich isotherm, and non-linear Langmuir isotherm. The solutions are verified with limited well-known analytical solutions of the linear reactive and non-reactive equations with excellent agreement, and with limited finite difference solutions. Plumes undergoing non-linear decay experience a profile re-scaling with respect to that of linear decay, the degree of which is controlled by magnitude of the non-linear parameter b. The direction of the scaling (scaling up or scaling down with respect to the linear decay plume) is controlled by the magnitude of C (whether greater or less than 1) in relation to the magnitude of b (whether greater or less than 1). When C>1, values of b<1 produce plumes that experience less decay (i.e., are scaled up) than that of the linear decay, whereas values of b> 1 produce non-linear plumes that experience more decay (i.e., are scaled down) than that of the linear decay. The opposite effect is observed when

  7. Surprisingly Simple Mechanical Behavior of a Complex Embryonic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    von Dassow, Michelangelo; Strother, James A.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that mechanical feedback could coordinate morphogenetic events in embryos. Furthermore, embryonic tissues have complex structure and composition and undergo large deformations during morphogenesis. Hence we expect highly non-linear and loading-rate dependent tissue mechanical properties in embryos. Methodology/Principal Findings We used micro-aspiration to test whether a simple linear viscoelastic model was sufficient to describe the mechanical behavior of gastrula stage Xenopus laevis embryonic tissue in vivo. We tested whether these embryonic tissues change their mechanical properties in response to mechanical stimuli but found no evidence of changes in the viscoelastic properties of the tissue in response to stress or stress application rate. We used this model to test hypotheses about the pattern of force generation during electrically induced tissue contractions. The dependence of contractions on suction pressure was most consistent with apical tension, and was inconsistent with isotropic contraction. Finally, stiffer clutches generated stronger contractions, suggesting that force generation and stiffness may be coupled in the embryo. Conclusions/Significance The mechanical behavior of a complex, active embryonic tissue can be surprisingly well described by a simple linear viscoelastic model with power law creep compliance, even at high deformations. We found no evidence of mechanical feedback in this system. Together these results show that very simple mechanical models can be useful in describing embryo mechanics. PMID:21203396

  8. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  9. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  10. Recursive Algorithm For Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, S. V.

    1988-01-01

    Order of model determined easily. Linear-regression algorithhm includes recursive equations for coefficients of model of increased order. Algorithm eliminates duplicative calculations, facilitates search for minimum order of linear-regression model fitting set of data satisfactory.

  11. Noise and non-linearities in high-throughput data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Viet-Anh; Koukolíková-Nicola, Zdena; Bagnoli, Franco; Lió, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput data analyses are becoming common in biology, communications, economics and sociology. The vast amounts of data are usually represented in the form of matrices and can be considered as knowledge networks. Spectra-based approaches have proved useful in extracting hidden information within such networks and for estimating missing data, but these methods are based essentially on linear assumptions. The physical models of matching, when applicable, often suggest non-linear mechanisms, that may sometimes be identified as noise. The use of non-linear models in data analysis, however, may require the introduction of many parameters, which lowers the statistical weight of the model. According to the quality of data, a simpler linear analysis may be more convenient than more complex approaches. In this paper, we show how a simple non-parametric Bayesian model may be used to explore the role of non-linearities and noise in synthetic and experimental data sets.

  12. Cooee bitumen. II. Stability of linear asphaltene nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2014-10-14

    Asphaltene and smaller aromatic molecules tend to form linear nanoaggregates in bitumen. Over the years bitumen undergoes chemical aging and during this process, the size of the nanoaggregate increases. This increase is associated with an increase in viscosity and brittleness of the bitumen, eventually leading to road deterioration. This paper focuses on understanding the mechanisms behind nanoaggregate size and stability. We used molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the probability of having a nanoaggregate of a given size in the stationary regime. To model this complicated behavior, we chose first to consider the simple case where only asphaltene molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate. We used a master equation approach and a related statistical mechanics model. The linear asphaltene nanoaggregates behave as a rigid linear chain. The most complicated case where all aromatic molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate is then discussed. The linear aggregates where all aromatic molecules are counted seem to behave as a flexible linear chain.

  13. Estimating monotonic rates from biological data using local linear regression.

    PubMed

    Olito, Colin; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J; Barneche, Diego R

    2017-03-01

    Accessing many fundamental questions in biology begins with empirical estimation of simple monotonic rates of underlying biological processes. Across a variety of disciplines, ranging from physiology to biogeochemistry, these rates are routinely estimated from non-linear and noisy time series data using linear regression and ad hoc manual truncation of non-linearities. Here, we introduce the R package LoLinR, a flexible toolkit to implement local linear regression techniques to objectively and reproducibly estimate monotonic biological rates from non-linear time series data, and demonstrate possible applications using metabolic rate data. LoLinR provides methods to easily and reliably estimate monotonic rates from time series data in a way that is statistically robust, facilitates reproducible research and is applicable to a wide variety of research disciplines in the biological sciences. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Testing hypotheses for differences between linear regression lines

    Treesearch

    Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2009-01-01

    Five hypotheses are identified for testing differences between simple linear regression lines. The distinctions between these hypotheses are based on a priori assumptions and illustrated with full and reduced models. The contrast approach is presented as an easy and complete method for testing for overall differences between the regressions and for making pairwise...

  15. Continuous Quantitative Measurements on a Linear Air Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Describes the construction and operational procedures of a spark-timing apparatus which is designed to record the back and forth motion of one or two carts on linear air tracks. Applications to measurements of velocity, acceleration, simple harmonic motion, and collision problems are illustrated. (CC)

  16. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  17. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  18. The Simple Science of Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennekes, Henk

    1997-05-01

    From the smallest gnat to the largest aircraft, all things that fly obey the same aerodynamic principles. The Simple Science of Flight offers a leisurely introduction to the mechanics of flight and, beyond that, to the scientific attitude that finds wonder in simple calculations, forging connections between, say, the energy efficiency of a peanut butter sandwich and that of the kerosene that fuels a jumbo jet. It is the product of a lifetime of watching and investigating the way flight happens. The hero of the book is the Boeing 747, which Tennekes sees as the current pinnacle of human ingenuity in mastering the science of flight. Also covered are paper airplanes, kites, gliders, and human-powered flying machines as well as birds and insects. Tennekes explains concepts like lift, drag, wing loading, and cruising speed through many fascinating comparisons, anecdotes, and examples.

  19. Four simple ocean carbon models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the key processes that determine oceanic CO2 uptake and sets this description within the context of four simple ocean carbon models. These models capture, in varying degrees, these key processes and establish a clear foundation for more realistic models that incorporate more directly the underlying physics and biology of the ocean rather than relying on simple parametric schemes. The purpose of this paper is more pedagogical than purely scientific. The problems encountered by current attempts to understand the global carbon cycle not only require our efforts but set a demand for a new generation of scientist, and it is hoped that this paper and the text in which it appears will help in this development.

  20. Dead simple OWL design patterns.

    PubMed

    Osumi-Sutherland, David; Courtot, Melanie; Balhoff, James P; Mungall, Christopher

    2017-06-05

    Bio-ontologies typically require multiple axes of classification to support the needs of their users. Development of such ontologies can only be made scalable and sustainable by the use of inference to automate classification via consistent patterns of axiomatization. Many bio-ontologies originating in OBO or OWL follow this approach. These patterns need to be documented in a form that requires minimal expertise to understand and edit and that can be validated and applied using any of the various programmatic approaches to working with OWL ontologies. Here we describe a system, Dead Simple OWL Design Patterns (DOS-DPs), which fulfills these requirements, illustrating the system with examples from the Gene Ontology. The rapid adoption of DOS-DPs by multiple ontology development projects illustrates both the ease-of use and the pressing need for the simple design pattern system we have developed.

  1. Dead simple OWL design patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Osumi-Sutherland, David; Courtot, Melanie; Balhoff, James P.; ...

    2017-06-05

    Bio-ontologies typically require multiple axes of classification to support the needs of their users. Development of such ontologies can only be made scalable and sustainable by the use of inference to automate classification via consistent patterns of axiomatization. Many bio-ontologies originating in OBO or OWL follow this approach. These patterns need to be documented in a form that requires minimal expertise to understand and edit and that can be validated and applied using any of the various programmatic approaches to working with OWL ontologies. We describe a system, Dead Simple OWL Design Patterns (DOS-DPs), which fulfills these requirements, illustrating themore » system with examples from the Gene Ontology. In conclusion, the rapid adoption of DOS-DPs by multiple ontology development projects illustrates both the ease-of use and the pressing need for the simple design pattern system we have developed.« less

  2. A simple, high sensitivity torquemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, P. J.; Wu, G.

    1999-06-01

    A simple torquemeter has been developed with a sensitivity exceeding 10-13 Nm when using a 13-μm-diam glass fiber and a low-mass suspension. The maximum twist angle of the fiber is constrained by the choice of its diameter to ˜1°. This angle is measured using a light, mirror, and split silicon photodetector, and is proportional to the torque on a sample in a rotating dc magnetic field.

  3. A Simple and Versatile Nebulizer

    PubMed Central

    Torloni, Maurício

    1962-01-01

    The nebulizer presented in this paper is of simple and rugged construction, permits easy control of cell concentrations, prevents sedimentation of the microorganisms, and permits the cleaning of the suspension needles even during the runs and under aseptic conditions. Fluid consumptions from 10 to 25 ml per hr were obtained with rates of primary air varying from 10 to 25 liters per min. The average diameter of the droplets varied from 1.5 to 2.7 μ. PMID:13921958

  4. Analysis of Simple Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-20

    ANALYSIS OF SThlPLE NEURAL NETWORKS Chedsada Chinrungrueng Master’s Report Under the Supervision of Prof. Carlo H. Sequin Department of... Neural Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...and guidJ.nce. I have learned a great deal from his teaching, knowledge, and criti- cism. 1. MOTIVATION ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE NEURAL NETWORKS Chedsada

  5. Simple PowerPoint Animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Leo

    2011-03-01

    The use of animation as a teaching tool has long been of interest to the readers of and contributors to this journal.1-5 While the sophisticated techniques presented in the cited papers are excellent and useful, there is one overlooked technique that may be of interest to the teacher who wants something quick and simple to enhance classroom presentations: PowerPoint animation.

  6. Simple low Reynolds number microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-11-01

    An extremely simple low Reynolds number microswimmer had been observed to swim in bulk fluid. The development of microscopic swimmers had been hindered by technical limitations in micro- and nanofabrication. To address this practical problem, the minimal geometrical requirements for swimming in low Reynolds number has been investigated. Micro- and nanofabrication of complex shapes with specialized materials, such as helices or flexible bodies, on a massive scale requires sophisticated state of the art technologies which have size limitations. In contrast, simple shaped structures, such as spherical particles, can be synthesized massively using chemical methods with relative ease at low costs. In this work, simple microswimmers were fabricated by conjugating two microbeads with debris attached to their surface. The debris allow the 2-bead structures to have two or more planes of symmetry, thus, allowing them to swim in bulk fluid at low Reynolds number. The microswimmers are magnetically actuated and controlled via a rotating magnetic field generated by an electromagnetic coil system. The microswimmers' velocity profiles had been characterized with respect to increasing rotating frequency. Furthermore, the motion of the microswimmers were analyzed using image processing. Finally, their swimming capability had been shown through experiments by steering the microswimmers in any desired direction.

  7. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  8. Doppler estimation accuracy of linear FM waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, F. E.

    The single-pulse Doppler estimation accuracy of an unweighted linear FM waveform is analyzed in detail. Simple formulas are derived that predict that one-sigma Doppler estimation error for realistic radar applications. The effects of multiple target interference and nonlinearlities in the radar measurements are considered. In addition, a practical method to estimate Doppler frequency is presented. This technique uses the phase data after pulse compression, and it limits the effect of multiple target interference. In contrast, the available literature is based on the Cramer-Rao bound for Doppler accuracy, which ignores the effects of nonlinearities, multiple target interference and the question of practical implementation. A simple formula is derived that predicts the region of validity for the Cramer-Rao bound. This formula provides a criterion for minimum signal-to-noise ratio in terms of time-bandwidth product. Finally, an important concept that is demonstrated in this paper is that: the bulk of the Doppler information in a linear FM pulse is encoded in the range sidelobes after pulse compression.

  9. A simple theory of motor protein kinetics and energetics. II.

    PubMed

    Qian, H

    2000-01-10

    A three-state stochastic model of motor protein [Qian, Biophys. Chem. 67 (1997) pp. 263-267] is further developed to illustrate the relationship between the external load on an individual motor protein in aqueous solution with various ATP concentrations and its steady-state velocity. A wide variety of dynamic motor behavior are obtained from this simple model. For the particular case of free-load translocation being the most unfavorable step within the hydrolysis cycle, the load-velocity curve is quasi-linear, V/Vmax = (cF/Fmax-c)/(1-c), in contrast to the hyperbolic relationship proposed by A.V. Hill for macroscopic muscle. Significant deviation from the linearity is expected when the velocity is less than 10% of its maximal (free-load) value--a situation under which the processivity of motor diminishes and experimental observations are less certain. We then investigate the dependence of load-velocity curve on ATP (ADP) concentration. It is shown that the free load Vmax exhibits a Michaelis-Menten like behavior, and the isometric Fmax increases linearly with ln([ATP]/[ADP]). However, the quasi-linear region is independent of the ATP concentration, yielding an apparently ATP-independent maximal force below the true isometric force. Finally, the heat production as a function of ATP concentration and external load are calculated. In simple terms and solved with elementary algebra, the present model provides an integrated picture of biochemical kinetics and mechanical energetics of motor proteins.

  10. Is the local linearity of space-time inherited from the linearity of probabilities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus P.; Carrozza, Sylvain; Höhn, Philipp A.

    2017-02-01

    The appearance of linear spaces, describing physical quantities by vectors and tensors, is ubiquitous in all of physics, from classical mechanics to the modern notion of local Lorentz invariance. However, as natural as this seems to the physicist, most computer scientists would argue that something like a ‘local linear tangent space’ is not very typical and in fact a quite surprising property of any conceivable world or algorithm. In this paper, we take the perspective of the computer scientist seriously, and ask whether there could be any inherently information-theoretic reason to expect this notion of linearity to appear in physics. We give a series of simple arguments, spanning quantum information theory, group representation theory, and renormalization in quantum gravity, that supports a surprising thesis: namely, that the local linearity of space-time might ultimately be a consequence of the linearity of probabilities. While our arguments involve a fair amount of speculation, they have the virtue of being independent of any detailed assumptions on quantum gravity, and they are in harmony with several independent recent ideas on emergent space-time in high-energy physics.

  11. Simulation of a medical linear accelerator for teaching purposes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rhys; Lamey, Michael; MacPherson, Miller; Carlone, Marco

    2015-05-08

    Simulation software for medical linear accelerators that can be used in a teaching environment was developed. The components of linear accelerators were modeled to first order accuracy using analytical expressions taken from the literature. The expressions used constants that were empirically set such that realistic response could be expected. These expressions were programmed in a MATLAB environment with a graphical user interface in order to produce an environment similar to that of linear accelerator service mode. The program was evaluated in a systematic fashion, where parameters affecting the clinical properties of medical linear accelerator beams were adjusted independently, and the effects on beam energy and dose rate recorded. These results confirmed that beam tuning adjustments could be simulated in a simple environment. Further, adjustment of service parameters over a large range was possible, and this allows the demonstration of linear accelerator physics in an environment accessible to both medical physicists and linear accelerator service engineers. In conclusion, a software tool, named SIMAC, was developed to improve the teaching of linear accelerator physics in a simulated environment. SIMAC performed in a similar manner to medical linear accelerators. The authors hope that this tool will be valuable as a teaching tool for medical physicists and linear accelerator service engineers.

  12. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  13. Linear Rogowski coil.

    PubMed

    Nassisi, V; Delle Side, D

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (∼100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  14. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  15. Linear induction pump

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, John W.; Moore, Robert M.; Bienvenue, Louis L.

    1985-03-19

    Electromagnetic linear induction pump for liquid metal which includes a unitary pump duct. The duct comprises two substantially flat parallel spaced-apart wall members, one being located above the other and two parallel opposing side members interconnecting the wall members. Located within the duct are a plurality of web members interconnecting the wall members and extending parallel to the side members whereby the wall members, side members and web members define a plurality of fluid passageways, each of the fluid passageways having substantially the same cross-sectional flow area. Attached to an outer surface of each side member is an electrically conductive end bar for the passage of an induced current therethrough. A multi-phase, electrical stator is located adjacent each of the wall members. The duct, stators, and end bars are enclosed in a housing which is provided with an inlet and outlet in fluid communication with opposite ends of the fluid passageways in the pump duct. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, the inlet and outlet includes a transition means which provides for a transition from a round cross-sectional flow path to a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow path defined by the pump duct.

  16. Linear cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zweig, George

    2015-08-01

    An active, three-dimensional, short-wavelength model of cochlear mechanics is derived from an older, one-dimensional, long-wavelength model containing time-delay forces. Remarkably, the long-wavelength model with nonlocal temporal interactions behaves like a short-wavelength model with instantaneous interactions. The cochlear oscillators are driven both by the pressure and its time derivative, the latter presumably a proxy for forces contributed by outer hair cells. The admittance in the short-wavelength region is used to find an integral representation of the transfer function valid for all wavelengths. There are only two free parameters: the pole position in the complex frequency plane of the admittance, and the slope of the transfer-function phase at low frequencies. The new model predicts a dip in amplitude and a corresponding rapid drop in phase, past the peak of the traveling wave. Linear models may be compared by their wavelengths, and if they have the same dimension, by the singularity structure of their admittances.

  17. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  18. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  19. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2008-01-01

    We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work on generalized covariance analysis methods. This prior work allowed for partitioning of the state space into "solve-for" and "consider" parameters, allowed for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator s anchor time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the "variance sandpile" and the "sensitivity mosaic," and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  20. Linear Rogowski coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (˜100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  1. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  2. LINEAR - DERIVATION AND DEFINITION OF A LINEAR AIRCRAFT MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Derivation and Definition of a Linear Model program, LINEAR, provides the user with a powerful and flexible tool for the linearization of aircraft aerodynamic models. LINEAR was developed to provide a standard, documented, and verified tool to derive linear models for aircraft stability analysis and control law design. Linear system models define the aircraft system in the neighborhood of an analysis point and are determined by the linearization of the nonlinear equations defining vehicle dynamics and sensors. LINEAR numerically determines a linear system model using nonlinear equations of motion and a user supplied linear or nonlinear aerodynamic model. The nonlinear equations of motion used are six-degree-of-freedom equations with stationary atmosphere and flat, nonrotating earth assumptions. LINEAR is capable of extracting both linearized engine effects, such as net thrust, torque, and gyroscopic effects and including these effects in the linear system model. The point at which this linear model is defined is determined either by completely specifying the state and control variables, or by specifying an analysis point on a trajectory and directing the program to determine the control variables and the remaining state variables. The system model determined by LINEAR consists of matrices for both the state and observation equations. The program has been designed to provide easy selection of state, control, and observation variables to be used in a particular model. Thus, the order of the system model is completely under user control. Further, the program provides the flexibility of allowing alternate formulations of both the state and observation equations. Data describing the aircraft and the test case is input to the program through a terminal or formatted data files. All data can be modified interactively from case to case. The aerodynamic model can be defined in two ways: a set of nondimensional stability and control derivatives for the flight point of

  3. Comparison of Linear and Non-linear Regression Analysis to Determine Pulmonary Pressure in Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Scarneciu, Camelia C.; Sangeorzan, Livia; Rus, Horatiu; Scarneciu, Vlad D.; Varciu, Mihai S.; Andreescu, Oana; Scarneciu, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) at newly diagnosed hyperthyroid patients and at finding a simple model showing the complex functional relation between pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors causing it. Methods: The 53 hyperthyroid patients (H-group) were evaluated mainly by using an echocardiographical method and compared with 35 euthyroid (E-group) and 25 healthy people (C-group). In order to identify the factors causing pulmonary hypertension the statistical method of comparing the values of arithmetical means is used. The functional relation between the two random variables (PAPs and each of the factors determining it within our research study) can be expressed by linear or non-linear function. By applying the linear regression method described by a first-degree equation the line of regression (linear model) has been determined; by applying the non-linear regression method described by a second degree equation, a parabola-type curve of regression (non-linear or polynomial model) has been determined. We made the comparison and the validation of these two models by calculating the determination coefficient (criterion 1), the comparison of residuals (criterion 2), application of AIC criterion (criterion 3) and use of F-test (criterion 4). Results: From the H-group, 47% have pulmonary hypertension completely reversible when obtaining euthyroidism. The factors causing pulmonary hypertension were identified: previously known- level of free thyroxin, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac output; new factors identified in this study- pretreatment period, age, systolic blood pressure. According to the four criteria and to the clinical judgment, we consider that the polynomial model (graphically parabola- type) is better than the linear one. Conclusions: The better model showing the functional relation between the pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors identified in this study is

  4. Comparison of Linear and Non-linear Regression Analysis to Determine Pulmonary Pressure in Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Scarneciu, Camelia C; Sangeorzan, Livia; Rus, Horatiu; Scarneciu, Vlad D; Varciu, Mihai S; Andreescu, Oana; Scarneciu, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) at newly diagnosed hyperthyroid patients and at finding a simple model showing the complex functional relation between pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors causing it. The 53 hyperthyroid patients (H-group) were evaluated mainly by using an echocardiographical method and compared with 35 euthyroid (E-group) and 25 healthy people (C-group). In order to identify the factors causing pulmonary hypertension the statistical method of comparing the values of arithmetical means is used. The functional relation between the two random variables (PAPs and each of the factors determining it within our research study) can be expressed by linear or non-linear function. By applying the linear regression method described by a first-degree equation the line of regression (linear model) has been determined; by applying the non-linear regression method described by a second degree equation, a parabola-type curve of regression (non-linear or polynomial model) has been determined. We made the comparison and the validation of these two models by calculating the determination coefficient (criterion 1), the comparison of residuals (criterion 2), application of AIC criterion (criterion 3) and use of F-test (criterion 4). From the H-group, 47% have pulmonary hypertension completely reversible when obtaining euthyroidism. The factors causing pulmonary hypertension were identified: previously known- level of free thyroxin, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac output; new factors identified in this study- pretreatment period, age, systolic blood pressure. According to the four criteria and to the clinical judgment, we consider that the polynomial model (graphically parabola- type) is better than the linear one. The better model showing the functional relation between the pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors identified in this study is given by a polynomial equation of second

  5. Some Simple Propagation Models for Linear and Parametric Sources in Shallow Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-09

    or eigenray angle 0i, there is one loss producing bottom bounce each time the horizontal range cycles through an incremental distance 2H/0. Thus at...factor which is dependent on the steepness of the eigenray angles. This start- ing range for the applicability of Eq. (5) is of course applicable to the...broad beam case, *- > 0c. Although it is difficult to illustrate mode stripping, a sketch of a few modal eigenrays is offered in Fig. 3 for the case

  6. The Prediction Properties of Inverse and Reverse Regression for the Simple Linear Calibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Geoffrey, Vining G.; Wilson, Sara R.; Szarka, John L., III; Johnson, Nels G.

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of measurement systems is a fundamental but under-studied problem within industrial statistics. The origins of this problem go back to basic chemical analysis based on NIST standards. In today's world these issues extend to mechanical, electrical, and materials engineering. Often, these new scenarios do not provide "gold standards" such as the standard weights provided by NIST. This paper considers the classic "forward regression followed by inverse regression" approach. In this approach the initial experiment treats the "standards" as the regressor and the observed values as the response to calibrate the instrument. The analyst then must invert the resulting regression model in order to use the instrument to make actual measurements in practice. This paper compares this classical approach to "reverse regression," which treats the standards as the response and the observed measurements as the regressor in the calibration experiment. Such an approach is intuitively appealing because it avoids the need for the inverse regression. However, it also violates some of the basic regression assumptions.

  7. Neutrinos in non-linear structure formation — a simple SPH approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Schultz, Christian; Haugbolle, Troels E-mail: haugboel@nbi.dk

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel method for implementing massive neutrinos in N-body simulations. Instead of sampling the neutrino velocity distribution by individual point particles we take neutrino free-streaming into account by treating it as an effective redshift dependent sound speed in a perfect isothermal fluid, and assume a relation between the sound speed and velocity dispersion of the neutrinos. Although the method fails to accurately model the true neutrino power spectrum, it is able to calculate the total matter power spectrum to the same accuracy as more complex hybrid neutrino methods, except on very small scales. We also present an easy way to update the publicly available GADGET-2 version with this neutrino approximation.

  8. Adaptive Control of Linear Modal Systems Using Residual Mode Filters and a Simple Disturbance Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark; Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible structures containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques which are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend our adaptive control theory to accommodate troublesome modal subsystems of a plant that might inhibit the adaptive controller. In some cases the plant does not satisfy the requirements of Almost Strict Positive Realness. Instead, there maybe be a modal subsystem that inhibits this property. This section will present new results for our adaptive control theory. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for the troublesome modal subsystem, or the Q modes. Here we present the theory for adaptive controllers modified by RMFs, with attention to the issue of disturbances propagating through the Q modes. We apply the theoretical results to a flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter.

  9. MISSING VALUES IN MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS. II. POINT ESTIMATION IN SIMPLE LINEAR REGRESSION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    They derive the mean square error of prediction for each method of estimation. Tables are given to characterize in terms of the correlation ... coefficient those situations where a given method has smaller mean square error than its competitors.

  10. A quick and simple FISH protocol with hybridization-sensitive fluorescent linear oligodeoxynucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan Ohtan; Matsuno, Hitomi; Ikeda, Shuji; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yasunori; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool used in karyotyping, cytogenotyping, cancer diagnosis, species specification, and gene-expression analysis. Although widely used, conventional FISH protocols are cumbersome and time consuming. We have now developed a FISH method using exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide (ECHO) probes. ECHO-FISH uses a 25-min protocol from fixation to mounting that includes no stringency washing steps. We use ECHO-FISH to detect both specific DNA and RNA sequences with multicolor probes. ECHO-FISH is highly reproducible, stringent, and compatible with other fluorescent cellular labeling techniques. The resolution allows detection of intranuclear speckles of poly(A) RNA in HeLa cells and dissociated hippocampal primary cultures, and mRNAs in the distal dendrites of hippocampal neurons. We also demonstrate detection of telomeric and centromeric DNA on metaphase mouse chromosomes. The simplicity of the ECHO-FISH method will likely accelerate cytogenetic and gene-expression analysis with high resolution.

  11. On the Characteristics of Coaxial-Type Microwave Excited Linear Plasma: a Simple Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longwei; Meng, Yuedong; Zuo, Xiao; Ren, Zhaoxing; Wu, Kenan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-05-01

    To unveil the characteristics and available propagation mechanism of coaxial-type microwave excited line-shape plasma, the effects of parameters including microwave power, working pressure, dielectric constant, and external magnetic field on the plasma distribution were numerically investigated by solving a coupled system of Maxwell's equations and continuity equations. Numerical results indicate that high microwave power, relatively high working pressure, low dielectric constant, and shaped magnetic field profiles will help produce a high-density and uniform plasma source. Exciting both ends by microwave contributed to the high-density and uniform plasma source as well. Possible mechanisms were analyzed by using the polarization model of low temperature plasma. The generation and propagation processes of the line-shape plasma mainly depend on the interaction of three aspects, i.e. the transmitted part, penetration part and absorptive part of the electromagnetic field. The numerical results were qualitatively consistent with available experimental results from literature. More elaborate descriptions of the three aspects and corresponding interactions among them need to be investigated further to improve the properties of the line-shape plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11205201 and 61205139), and the Scientific Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (No. N130405008)

  12. Non-Linear Approach in Kinesiology Should Be Preferred to the Linear--A Case of Basketball.

    PubMed

    Trninić, Marko; Jeličić, Mario; Papić, Vladan

    2015-07-01

    In kinesiology, medicine, biology and psychology, in which research focus is on dynamical self-organized systems, complex connections exist between variables. Non-linear nature of complex systems has been discussed and explained by the example of non-linear anthropometric predictors of performance in basketball. Previous studies interpreted relations between anthropometric features and measures of effectiveness in basketball by (a) using linear correlation models, and by (b) including all basketball athletes in the same sample of participants regardless of their playing position. In this paper the significance and character of linear and non-linear relations between simple anthropometric predictors (AP) and performance criteria consisting of situation-related measures of effectiveness (SE) in basketball were determined and evaluated. The sample of participants consisted of top-level junior basketball players divided in three groups according to their playing time (8 minutes and more per game) and playing position: guards (N = 42), forwards (N = 26) and centers (N = 40). Linear (general model) and non-linear (general model) regression models were calculated simultaneously and separately for each group. The conclusion is viable: non-linear regressions are frequently superior to linear correlations when interpreting actual association logic among research variables.

  13. What Is a Simple Liquid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to identify the real essence of simplicity of liquids in John Locke’s understanding of the term. Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlations between virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a direct property of the intermolecular potential because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials) and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS). This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of the structure and dynamics of several atomic and three molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. The liquids studied are inverse power-law systems (r-n pair potentials with n=18,6,4), Lennard-Jones (LJ) models (the standard LJ model, two generalized Kob-Andersen binary LJ mixtures, and the Wahnstrom binary LJ mixture), the Buckingham model, the Dzugutov model, the LJ Gaussian model, the Gaussian core model, the Hansen-McDonald molten salt model, the Lewis-Wahnstrom ortho-terphenyl model, the asymmetric dumbbell model, and the single-point charge water model. The final part of the paper summarizes properties of strongly correlating liquids, emphasizing that these are simpler than liquids in general. Simple liquids, as defined here, may be characterized in three quite

  14. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2016-12-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. Stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, that push the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like `straw' that can explain the halo morphology and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; this requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km).Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing.Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon-triggered clumping explains both small and large particles at resonances. We calculate the stationary size distribution using a cell-to-cell mapping procedure that converts the phase-plane trajectories to a Markov chain. Approximating it as an asymmetric random walk with reflecting boundaries

  15. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predatorprey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  16. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  17. Kinetic energy operators in linearized internal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesonen, Janne

    2008-01-01

    It is customary to describe molecular vibrations using as exact kinetic energy operators and as accurate potentials as possible. It has become a standard approach to express Hamiltonians in curvilinear internal displacement coordinates, because they offer a simple and physical picture of vibrational motions, including large amplitude changes in the shape. In the older normal mode model of molecular vibrations, the nuclei are thought to vibrate infinitesimally about the reference configuration, and the shape of the molecule is described using linearized approximations of the true geometrically defined internal displacement coordinates. It is natural to ask how the two approaches are related. In this work, I present a general yet practical way to obtain curvilinear displacement coordinates as closed function of their linearized counterparts, and vice versa. In contrast to the conventional power series approach, the body-frame dependency is explicitly taken into account, and the relations are valid for any value of the coordinates. The present approach also allows one to obtain easily exact kinetic energy operators in linearized shape coordinates.

  18. Linear Algebraic Method for Non-Linear Map Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,L.; Nash, B.

    2009-05-04

    We present a newly developed method to analyze some non-linear dynamics problems such as the Henon map using a matrix analysis method from linear algebra. Choosing the Henon map as an example, we analyze the spectral structure, the tune-amplitude dependence, the variation of tune and amplitude during the particle motion, etc., using the method of Jordan decomposition which is widely used in conventional linear algebra.

  19. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  20. Simple simulations of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M J

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored coulombic structure is a charge-ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomenon and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong. PMID:11159388

  1. Klein bottles and simple currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiszoon, L. R.; Schellekens, A. N.

    1999-12-01

    The standard Klein bottle coefficient in the construction of open descendants is shown to equal the Frobenius-Schur indicator of a conformal field theory. Other consistent Klein bottle projections are shown to correspond to simple currents. These observations enable us to generalize the standard open string construction from C-diagonal parent theories to include non-standard Klein bottles. Using (generalizations of) the Frobenius-Schur indicator we prove positivity and integrality of the resulting open and closed string state multiplicities for standard as well as non-standard Klein bottles.

  2. Paradox of simple limiter control.

    PubMed

    Hilker, Frank M; Westerhoff, Frank H

    2006-05-01

    Chaos control by simple limiters is an easy-to-implement and effective method of stabilizing irregular fluctuations. Here we show that applying limiter control to a state variable can significantly shift its mean value. In many situations, this is a countereffective as well as unexpected result, when the aim of control is also to restrict the dynamics. We discuss this effect on the basis of a model of population dynamics and conclude that it can have severe implications for the management of pest species and epidemic spread.

  3. Controlling chaos with simple limiters

    PubMed

    Corron; Pethel; Hopper

    2000-04-24

    New experimental results demonstrate that chaos control can be accomplished using controllers that are very simple relative to the system being controlled. Chaotic dynamics in a driven pendulum and a double scroll circuit are controlled using an adjustable, passive limiter-a weight for the pendulum and a diode for the circuit. For both experiments, multiple unstable periodic orbits are selectively controlled using minimal perturbations. These physical examples suggest that chaos control can be practically applied to a much wider array of important problems than initially thought possible.

  4. Invariants of simple gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassiola, Aggeliki; Kovner, Israel

    1995-01-01

    We present approximate tests which can be applied to a newly observed quadruple QSO, or to a quadruplet of extended objects distorted by a foreground cluster of galaxies. These tests indicate whether the responsible gravitational lens may have a simple mass distribution. If the lens galaxy is detected, the tests give an approximate orientation for it, which can be compared with the observed orientation of the galaxy. The tests do not require construction of an explicit lens model, and therefore can save time and effort. In the case of many objects distorted by a cluster, these diagnostics can help to select possible quadruplet candidates.

  5. Simple waves in relativistic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-11-01

    We consider the Riemann problem for relativistic flows of polytropic fluids and find relations for the flow characteristics. Evolution of physical quantities takes especially simple form for the case of cold magnetized plasmas. We find exact explicit analytical solutions for one-dimensional expansion of magnetized plasma into vacuum, valid for arbitrary magnetization. We also consider expansion into cold unmagnetized external medium both for stationary initial conditions and for initially moving plasma, as well as reflection of rarefaction wave from a wall. We also find self-similar structure of three-dimensional magnetized outflows into vacuum, valid close to the plasma-vacuum interface.

  6. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  7. Polarization dependent particle dynamics in simple traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yifat, Yuval; Sule, Nishant; Figliozzi, Patrick; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping has proved to be a valuable research tool in a wide range of fields including physics, chemistry, biological and materials science. The ability to precisely localize individual colloidal particles in a three-dimensional location has been highly useful for understanding soft matter phenomena and inter-particle interactions. It also holds great promise for nanoscale fabrication and ultra-sensitive sensing by enabling precise positioning of specific material building blocks. In this presentation we discuss our research on the effect of the polarization state of the incident laser on the trapping of nanoscale particles. The polarization of the incident light has a pronounced effect on particle behavior even for the simple case of two plasmonic silver nano-particles in a Gaussian trap,. When the incident light is linearly polarized, the particles form an optically induced dimer that is stably oriented along the direction of polarization. However, nanoparticle dimers and trimmers exhibit structural instabilities and novel dynamics when trapped with focused beams of circularly polarized light. The observed dynamics suggest electrodynamic and hydrodynamic coupling. We explore the electrodynamic phenomena experimentally and theoretically and discuss further examples of polarization controlled trapping.

  8. Simple Broadband Circular Polarizer in Oversized Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a possibility is shown to realize a simple waveguide polarizer producing nearly the same circular polarization over a broad frequency range up to an octave. It is based upon the combination of two smoothly squeezed oversized waveguides with different diameters. The principle is similar to an achromatic lens in optics, where two counteracting lenses with differently sloped wavelength dependencies of the refractive index are combined to compensate the dispersion in the desired wavelength range. Consequently, two different wavelengths of light are brought into focus at the same plane. A waveguide for the transmission of microwaves has a similar frequency dependence of the refractive index resulting in a frequency-dependent phase shift between two propagating waves polarized along the symmetry axes of a waveguide with an elliptical cross section. For this reason, an incident wave with a linear polarization between the axes of symmetry can be only converted into a circularly polarized wave over a limited frequency range. However, the diameter and the shape along two counteracting squeezed waveguides can be adjusted in such a way that the frequency dependence of the resultant phase shift is finally canceled out.

  9. A simple subspace approach for speech denoising.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, C; Daniello, M; Bruscaglioni, P

    2001-01-01

    For pathological voices, hoarseness is mainly due to airflow turbulence in the vocal tract and is often referred to as noise. This paper focuses on the enhancement of speech signals that are supposedly degraded by additive white noise. Speech enhancement is performed in the time-domain, by means of a fast and reliable subspace approach. A low-order singular value decomposition (SVD) allows separating the signal and the noise contribution in subsequent data frames of the analysed speech signal. The noise component is thus removed from the signal and the filtered signal is reconstructed along the directions spanned by the eigenvectors associated with the signal subspace eigenvalues only, thus giving enhanced voice quality. This approach was tested on synthetic data, showing higher performance in terms of increased SNR when compared with linear prediction (LP) filtering. It was also successfully applied to real data, from hoarse voices of patients that had undergone partial cordectomisation. The simple structure of the proposed technique allows a real-time implementation, suitable for portable device realisation, as an aid to dysphonic speakers. It could be useful for reducing the effort in speaking, which is closely related to social problems due to awkwardness of voice.

  10. Simple Cassegrain scanning system for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apt, J.; Goody, R.; Mertz, L.

    1980-01-01

    To meet the need for a reliable, fast imaging system capable of being taken rapidly on and off the telescope, a simple, inexpensive, and compact Cassegrain reimaging system for scanning IR images was constructed. Using commercially available components without requiring close mechanical tolerances, the design solves the problem of beam stability pointed out by Koornneef and van Overbeeke (1976). For the moving-iron galvanometer scanner, it is noted that at the imaging frequency of 0.5 Hz, hysteresis in image plane motion was found to be less than 0.2 arc sec for a 64-arc sec scan, and the deviation from linearity with a triangular wave input was found to be less than 0.3 arc sec. This system and a scanning secondary were used to image Venus at 11.5 microns, and compared with the scanning secondary, the reimaging system did not appear to contribute any additional noise, considerably improved mechanical reliability, and eliminated cross-scan motion

  11. Simple Colorimetric Sensor for Trinitrotoluene Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanman, S.; Masoh, N.; Salah, Y.; Srisawat, S.; Wattanayon, R.; Wangsirikul, P.; Phumivanichakit, K.

    2017-02-01

    A simple operating colorimetric sensor for trinitrotoluene (TNT) determination using a commercial scanner as a captured image was designed. The sensor is based on the chemical reaction between TNT and sodium hydroxide reagent to produce the color change within 96 well plates, which observed finally, recorded using a commercial scanner. The intensity of the color change increased with increase in TNT concentration and could easily quantify the concentration of TNT by digital image analysis using the Image J free software. Under optimum conditions, the sensor provided a linear dynamic range between 0.20 and 1.00 mg mL-1(r = 0.9921) with a limit of detection of 0.10± 0.01 mg mL-1. The relative standard deviation for eight experiments for the sensitivity was 3.8%. When applied for the analysis of TNT in two soil extract samples, the concentrations were found to be non-detectable to 0.26±0.04 mg mL-1. The obtained recovery values (93-95%) were acceptable for soil samples tested.

  12. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  13. A Simple Theory for Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennó, Nilton O.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that the simple thermodynamic theory for dust devils, proposed by Rennó et al., also applies to waterspouts. The theory is based on the thermodynamics of heat engines and predicts the central pressure and the wind speed of these convective vortices. Moreover, it provides a simple physical interpretation of their general characteristics. In particular, the heat engine theory shows that convective vortices are more likely to form in the regions where the occurrence of the warmest and moistest updrafts and the coldest and driest downdrafts are supported by the local environment. These are the regions where both the heat input into the convective heat engine is maximum and the solenoidal generation of vorticity is the greatest. This explains why waterspouts are frequently observed near the boundaries between relatively warm and relatively cold waters. Moreover, since the work done by the convective heat engine is equal to the total heat input multiplied by the thermodynamic efficiency, the theory shows that another necessary condition for the formation of intense vortices is the presence of intense convection.

  14. Assembly of simple icosahedral viruses.

    PubMed

    Almendral, José M

    2013-01-01

    Icosahedral viruses exhibit elegant pathways of capsid assembly and maturation regulated by symmetry principles. Assembly is a dynamic process driven by consecutive and genetically programmed morphogenetic interactions between protein subunits. The non-symmetric capsid subunits are gathered by hydrophobic contacts and non-covalent interactions in assembly intermediates, which serve as blocks to build a symmetric capsid. In some cases, non-symmetric interactions among intermediates are involved in assembly, highlighting the remarkable capacity of capsid proteins to fold into demanding conformations compatible with a closed protein shell. In this chapter, the morphogenesis of structurally simple icosahedral viruses, including representative members of the parvoviruses, picornaviruses or polyomaviruses as paradigms, is described in some detail. Icosahedral virus assembly may occur in different subcellular compartments and involve a panoplia of cellular and viral factors, chaperones, and protein modifications that, in general, are still poorly characterized. Mechanisms of viral genome encapsidation may imply direct interactions between the genome and the assembly intermediates, or active packaging into a preformed empty capsid. High stability of intermediates and proteolytic cleavages during viral maturation usually contribute to the overall irreversible character of the assembly process. These and other simple icosahedral viruses were pioneer models to understand basic principles of virus assembly, continue to be leading subjects of morphogenetic analyses, and have inspired ongoing studies on the assembly of larger viruses and cellular and synthetic macromolecular complexes.

  15. Linear Proof-Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III; Crossley, Edward A.; Miller, James B.; Jones, Irby W.; Davis, C. Calvin; Behun, Vaughn D.; Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr.

    1995-01-01

    Linear proof-mass actuator (LPMA) is friction-driven linear mass actuator capable of applying controlled force to structure in outer space to damp out oscillations. Capable of high accelerations and provides smooth, bidirectional travel of mass. Design eliminates gears and belts. LPMA strong enough to be used terrestrially where linear actuators needed to excite or damp out oscillations. High flexibility designed into LPMA by varying size of motors, mass, and length of stroke, and by modifying control software.

  16. Linear Proof-Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III; Crossley, Edward A.; Miller, James B.; Jones, Irby W.; Davis, C. Calvin; Behun, Vaughn D.; Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr.

    1995-01-01

    Linear proof-mass actuator (LPMA) is friction-driven linear mass actuator capable of applying controlled force to structure in outer space to damp out oscillations. Capable of high accelerations and provides smooth, bidirectional travel of mass. Design eliminates gears and belts. LPMA strong enough to be used terrestrially where linear actuators needed to excite or damp out oscillations. High flexibility designed into LPMA by varying size of motors, mass, and length of stroke, and by modifying control software.

  17. Quantization of general linear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-03-15

    General linear electrodynamics allow for an arbitrary linear constitutive relation between the field strength 2-form and induction 2-form density if crucial hyperbolicity and energy conditions are satisfied, which render the theory predictive and physically interpretable. Taking into account the higher-order polynomial dispersion relation and associated causal structure of general linear electrodynamics, we carefully develop its Hamiltonian formulation from first principles. Canonical quantization of the resulting constrained system then results in a quantum vacuum which is sensitive to the constitutive tensor of the classical theory. As an application we calculate the Casimir effect in a birefringent linear optical medium.

  18. Plasma detachment in linear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, N.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma detachment research in linear devices, sometimes called divertor plasma simulators, is reviewed. Pioneering works exploring the concept of plasma detachment were conducted in linear devices. Linear devices have contributed greatly to the basic understanding of plasma detachment such as volume plasma recombination processes, detached plasma structure associated with particle and energy transport, and other related issues including enhancement of convective plasma transport, dynamic response of plasma detachment, plasma flow reversal, and magnetic field effect. The importance of plasma detachment research using linear devices will be highlighted aimed at the design of future DEMO.

  19. Non-linear dynamics in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Darbin, Olivier; Adams, Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony; Naritoku, Leslie; Dees, Daniel; Naritoku, Dean

    2013-12-25

    Over the last 30 years, the functions (and dysfunctions) of the sensory-motor circuitry have been mostly conceptualized using linear modelizations which have resulted in two main models: the "rate hypothesis" and the "oscillatory hypothesis." In these two models, the basal ganglia data stream is envisaged as a random temporal combination of independent simple patterns issued from its probability distribution of interval interspikes or its spectrum of frequencies respectively. More recently, non-linear analyses have been introduced in the modelization of motor circuitry activities, and they have provided evidences that complex temporal organizations exist in basal ganglia neuronal activities. Regarding movement disorders, these complex temporal organizations in the basal ganglia data stream differ between conditions (i.e., parkinsonism, dyskinesia, healthy control) and are responsive to treatments (i.e., l-DOPA, deep brain stimulation). A body of evidence has reported that basal ganglia neuronal entropy (a marker for complexity/irregularity in time series) is higher in hypokinetic state. In line with these findings, an entropy-based model has been recently formulated to introduce basal ganglia entropy as a marker for the alteration of motor processing and a factor of motor inhibition. Importantly, non-linear features have also been identified as a marker of condition and/or treatment effects in brain global signals (EEG), muscular activities (EMG), or kinetic of motor symptoms (tremor, gait) of patients with movement disorders. It is therefore warranted that the non-linear dynamics of motor circuitry will contribute to a better understanding of the neuronal dysfunctions underlying the spectrum of parkinsonian motor symptoms including tremor, rigidity, and hypokinesia.

  20. Can linear superiorization be useful for linear optimization problems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censor, Yair

    2017-04-01

    Linear superiorization (LinSup) considers linear programming problems but instead of attempting to solve them with linear optimization methods it employs perturbation resilient feasibility-seeking algorithms and steers them toward reduced (not necessarily minimal) target function values. The two questions that we set out to explore experimentally are: (i) does LinSup provide a feasible point whose linear target function value is lower than that obtained by running the same feasibility-seeking algorithm without superiorization under identical conditions? (ii) How does LinSup fare in comparison with the Simplex method for solving linear programming problems? Based on our computational experiments presented here, the answers to these two questions are: ‘yes’ and ‘very well’, respectively.

  1. Simple scheme for gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Nomura, Yasunori

    2007-05-01

    We present a simple scheme for constructing models that achieve successful gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking. In addition to our previous work [H. Murayama and Y. Nomura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 151803 (2007)] that proposed drastically simplified models using metastable vacua of supersymmetry breaking in vectorlike theories, we show there are many other successful models using various types of supersymmetry-breaking mechanisms that rely on enhanced low-energy U(1){sub R} symmetries. In models where supersymmetry is broken by elementary singlets, one needs to assume U(1){sub R} violating effects are accidentally small, while in models where composite fields break supersymmetry, emergence of approximate low-energy U(1){sub R} symmetries can be understood simply on dimensional grounds. Even though the scheme still requires somewhat small parameters to sufficiently suppress gravity mediation, we discuss their possible origins due to dimensional transmutation. The scheme accommodates a wide range of the gravitino mass to avoid cosmological problems.

  2. Simple Method for Culturing Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. E.; Hunter, W. J.; Ryan, J. L.; Braude, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    A simple, effective method is needed for growing obligate anaerobes in the clinical laboratory. This report describes a pre-reduced anaerobic bottle that can be taken to the bedside for direct inoculation, provides a flat agar surface for evaluation of number and morphology of colonies, and can be incubated in conventional bacteriological incubators. Each anaerobic culture set consisted of two bottles containing brain heart infusion agar and CO2. Gentamicin sulfate (50 μg/ml) was added to one of these to inhibit facultative enteric bacilli. Comparison of the anaerobic bottles with an identical aerobic bottle which was also routinely inoculated permitted early identification of anaerobic colonies. Representative species of most anaerobic genera of proven pathogenicity for man have been isolated from this system during 10 months of routine use. Images PMID:4571657

  3. Simple thermodynamics of jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrício, Pedro; Tavares, José M.

    2010-08-01

    We use the first and second laws of thermodynamics to analyze the behavior of an ideal jet engine. Simple analytical expressions for the thermal efficiency, the overall efficiency, and the reduced thrust are derived. We show that the thermal efficiency depends only on the compression ratio r and on the velocity of the aircraft. The other two performance measures depend also on the ratio of the temperature at the turbine to the inlet temperature in the engine, T3/Ti. An analysis of these expressions shows that it is not possible to choose an optimal set of values of r and T3/Ti that maximize both the overall efficiency and thrust. We study how irreversibilities in the compressor and the turbine decrease the overall efficiency of jet engines and show that this effect is more pronounced for smaller T3/Ti.

  4. Simple cyst of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Simple cysts are rare in the urinary bladder and can pose a diagnostic dilemma to both the urologist and the histopathologist. No case study was found in the database of Elsevier Science Direct, Spring-Link, or PubMed. We present two cases of subserous cyst in the bladder and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The cystic lesion at bladder dome was detected by radiologic examination and confirmed by cystoscopy. In case 1, transurethral resection was first performed which was followed by partial cystectomy; In case 2, the cyst was removed with the urachus using laparoscopic surgery. The patients recovered uneventfully and the histopathology showed cysts in subserous layer of urinary bladder. The bladder cyst should be distinguished from urachal tumor, and laparoscopic partial cystectomy is the preferred operative procedure.

  5. Virasoro constraints and polynomial recursion for the linear Hodge integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuai; Wang, Gehao

    2016-11-01

    The Hodge tau-function is a generating function for the linear Hodge integrals. It is also a tau-function of the KP hierarchy. In this paper, we first present the Virasoro constraints for the Hodge tau-function in the explicit form of the Virasoro equations. The expression of our Virasoro constraints is simply a linear combination of the Virasoro operators, where the coefficients are restored from a power series for the Lambert W function. Then, using this result, we deduce a simple version of the Virasoro constraints for the linear Hodge partition function, where the coefficients are restored from the Gamma function. Finally, we establish the equivalence relation between the Virasoro constraints and polynomial recursion formula for the linear Hodge integrals.

  6. Linear-chain assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhak, Prasanta; Kim, Min-Kwan; Lee, Jae Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2017-07-01

    We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a simple hydrothermal approach and found several types of segments of their linear-chain self-assemblies as observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirm a well-defined single-phase FCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometry measurements exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. Micromagnetic numerical simulations show magnetic vortex states in the nanosphere model. Also, calculations of binding energies for different numbers of particles in the linear-chain assemblies explain a possible mechanism responsible for the self-assemblies of segments of the linear chains of nanoparticles. This work offers a step towards linear-chain self-assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of magnetic vortex states in individual nanoparticles on their binding energy.

  7. Mass transfer coefficients determination from linear gradient elution experiments.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-02

    A procedure to estimate mass transfer coefficients in linear gradient elution chromatography is presented and validated by comparison with experimental data. Mass transfer coefficients are traditionally estimated experimentally through the van Deemter plot, which represents the HETP as a function of the fluid velocity. Up to now, the HETP was obtained under isocratic elution conditions. Unfortunately, isocratic elution experiments are often not suitable for large biomolecules which suffer from severe mass transfer hindrances. Yamamoto et al. were the first to propose a semi-empirical equation to relate HETPs measured from linear gradient elution experiments to those obtained under isocratic conditions [7]. Based on his pioneering work, the approach presented in this work aims at providing an experimental procedure supported by simple equations to estimate reliable mass transfer parameters from linear gradient elution chromatographic experiments. From the resolution of the transport model, we derived a rigorous analytical expression for the HETP in linear gradient elution chromatography.

  8. Virasoro constraints and polynomial recursion for the linear Hodge integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuai; Wang, Gehao

    2017-04-01

    The Hodge tau-function is a generating function for the linear Hodge integrals. It is also a tau-function of the KP hierarchy. In this paper, we first present the Virasoro constraints for the Hodge tau-function in the explicit form of the Virasoro equations. The expression of our Virasoro constraints is simply a linear combination of the Virasoro operators, where the coefficients are restored from a power series for the Lambert W function. Then, using this result, we deduce a simple version of the Virasoro constraints for the linear Hodge partition function, where the coefficients are restored from the Gamma function. Finally, we establish the equivalence relation between the Virasoro constraints and polynomial recursion formula for the linear Hodge integrals.

  9. Linear relation on the correlation in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. W.; Szeto, K. Y.

    2006-04-01

    Correlation in complex networks follows a linear relation between the degree of a node and the total degrees of its neighbors for six different classes of real networks. This general linear relation is an extension of the Aboav-Weaire law in two-dimensional cellular structures and provides a simple and different perspective on the correlation in complex networks, which is complementary to an existing description using Pearson correlation coefficients and a power law fit. Analytical expression for this linear relation for three standard models of complex networks: the Erdos-Renyi, Watts-Strogatz, and Barabasi-Albert networks is provided. The slope and intercept of this linear relation are described by a single parameter a together with the first and second moment of the degree distribution of the network. The assortivity of the network can be related to the sign of the intercept.

  10. Fast discovery of simple rules

    SciTech Connect

    Domingos, P.

    1996-12-31

    The recent emergence of data mining as a major application of machine learning has led to increased interest in fast rule induction algorithms. These are able to efficiently process large numbers of examples, under the constraint of still achieving good accuracy. If e is the number of examples, many rule learners have {Theta}(e{sup 4}) asymptotic time complexity in noisy domains, and C4.5RULES has been empirically observed to sometimes require {Theta}(e{sup 4}) time. Recent advances have brought this bound down to {Theta}(e log{sup 2} e), while maintaining accuracy at the level of C4.5RULES`s. Ideally, we would like to have an algorithm capable of inducing accurate rules in time linear in e, without becoming too expensive in other factors. This extended abstract presents such an algorithm.

  11. Semantic markup of sensor capabilities: how simple it too simple?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda-Velasquez, C. A.; Janowicz, K.; Fredericks, J.

    2016-12-01

    Semantics plays a key role for the publication, retrieval, integration, and reuse of observational data across the geosciences. In most cases, one can safely assume that the providers of such data, e.g., individual scientists, understand the observation context in which their data are collected,e.g., the used observation procedure, the sampling strategy, the feature of interest being studied, and so forth. However, can we expect that the same is true for the technical details of the used sensors and especially the nuanced changes that can impact observations in often unpredictable ways? Should the burden of annotating the sensor capabilities, firmware, operation ranges, and so forth be really part of a scientist's responsibility? Ideally, semantic annotations should be provided by the parties that understand these details and have a vested interest in maintaining these data. With manufactures providing semantically-enabled metadata for their sensors and instruments, observations could more easily be annotated and thereby enriched using this information. Unfortunately, today's sensor ontologies and tool chains developed for the Semantic Web community require expertise beyond the knowledge and interest of most manufacturers. Consequently, knowledge engineers need to better understand the sweet spot between simple ontologies/vocabularies and sufficient expressivity as well as the tools required to enable manufacturers to share data about their sensors. Here, we report on the current results of EarthCube's X-Domes project that aims to address the questions outlined above.

  12. Linear Programming across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, S. Elizabeth; Kurz, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is taught in different departments across college campuses with engineering and management curricula. Modeling an LP problem is taught in every linear programming class. As faculty teaching in Engineering and Management departments, the depth to which teachers should expect students to master this particular type of…

  13. Linear Algebra and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty. (Contains 2 tables and 11 figures.)

  14. Decision Making: A Linear Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewes, Dorothy W.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a linear process of decision making to enhance management skills of day care directors. Includes decision-processing flow chart compiled from several professional disciplines to help managers recognize flexibility of linear system. Provides analysis of flow-chart steps to balance both artistic and pragmatic considerations. (LBT)

  15. Linear algebra and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-09-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty.

  16. Spatial Processes in Linear Ordering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hecker, Ulrich; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Wolf, Lukas; Fazilat-Pour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Memory performance in linear order reasoning tasks (A > B, B > C, C > D, etc.) shows quicker, and more accurate responses to queries on wider (AD) than narrower (AB) pairs on a hypothetical linear mental model (A -- B -- C -- D). While indicative of an analogue representation, research so far did not provide positive evidence for spatial…

  17. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  18. Linear Programming across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, S. Elizabeth; Kurz, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is taught in different departments across college campuses with engineering and management curricula. Modeling an LP problem is taught in every linear programming class. As faculty teaching in Engineering and Management departments, the depth to which teachers should expect students to master this particular type of…

  19. Spatial Processes in Linear Ordering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hecker, Ulrich; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Wolf, Lukas; Fazilat-Pour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Memory performance in linear order reasoning tasks (A > B, B > C, C > D, etc.) shows quicker, and more accurate responses to queries on wider (AD) than narrower (AB) pairs on a hypothetical linear mental model (A -- B -- C -- D). While indicative of an analogue representation, research so far did not provide positive evidence for spatial…

  20. Linear Algebra and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty. (Contains 2 tables and 11 figures.)

  1. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  2. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  3. Using crosscorrelation techniques to determine the impulse response of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallabetta, Michael J.; Li, Harry W.; Demuth, Howard B.

    1993-01-01

    A crosscorrelation method of measuring the impulse response of linear systems is presented. The technique, implementation, and limitations of this method are discussed. A simple system is designed and built using discrete components and the impulse response of a linear circuit is measured. Theoretical and software simulation results are presented.

  4. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  5. Investigating the linearity assumption between lumber grade mix and yield using design of experiments (DOE)

    Treesearch

    Xiaoqiu Zuo; Urs Buehlmann; R. Edward Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Solving the least-cost lumber grade mix problem allows dimension mills to minimize the cost of dimension part production. This problem, due to its economic importance, has attracted much attention from researchers and industry in the past. Most solutions used linear programming models and assumed that a simple linear relationship existed between lumber grade mix and...

  6. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  7. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  8. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  9. Stochastic robustness of linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Ryan, Laura E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple numerical procedure for estimating the stochastic robustness of a linear, time-invariant system is described. Monte Carlo evaluation of the system's eigenvalues allows the probability of instability and the related stochastic root locus to be estimated. This definition of robustness is an alternative to existing deterministic definitions that address both structured and unstructured parameter variations directly. This analysis approach treats not only Gaussian parameter uncertainties but non-Gaussian cases, including uncertain-but-bounded variations. Trivial extensions of the procedure admit alternate discriminants to be considered. Thus, the probabilities that stipulated degrees of instability will be exceeded or that closed-loop roots will leave desirable regions also can be estimated. Results are particularly amenable to graphical presentation.

  10. Linear spreading speeds from nonlinear resonant interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Grégory; Holzer, Matt; Scheel, Arnd

    2017-06-01

    We identify a new mechanism for propagation into unstable states in spatially extended systems, that is based on resonant interaction in the leading edge of invasion fronts. Such resonant invasion speeds can be determined solely based on the complex linear dispersion relation at the unstable equilibrium, but rely on the presence of a nonlinear term that facilitates the resonant coupling. We prove that these resonant speeds give the correct invasion speed in a simple example, we show that fronts with speeds slower than the resonant speed are unstable, and corroborate our speed criterion numerically in a variety of model equations, including a nonlocal scalar neural field model. GF received support from the project NONLOCAL (ANR-14-CE25-0013) funded by the French National Research Agency. MH was partially supported by the National Science Foundation through grant NSF-DMS-1516155. AS was partially supported by the National Science Foundation through grant NSF-DMS-1311740 and through a DAAD Fellowship.

  11. Robust Control Design via Linear Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, L. H.; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of synthesizing or designing a feedback controller of fixed dynamic order. The closed loop specifications considered here are given in terms of a target performance vector representing a desired set of closed loop transfer functions connecting various signals. In general these point targets are unattainable with a fixed order controller. By enlarging the target from a fixed point set to an interval set the solvability conditions with a fixed order controller are relaxed and a solution is more easily enabled. Results from the parametric robust control literature can be used to design the interval target family so that the performance deterioration is acceptable, even when plant uncertainty is present. It is shown that it is possible to devise a computationally simple linear programming approach that attempts to meet the desired closed loop specifications.

  12. A magnetically suspended linearly driven cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolfi, F.; Goldowsky, M.; Ricciardelli, J.; Shapiro, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper described a novel Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerator which was designed, fabricated and successfully tested at Philips Laboratories. The prominent features of the machine are an electro-magnetic bearing system, a pair of moving magnet linear motors, and clearance seals with a 25 mu m radial gap. The all-metal and ceramic construction eliminates long-term organic contamination of the helium working fluid. The axial positions of the piston and displacer are electronically controlled, permitting independent adjustment of the amplitude of each and their relative phase relationship during operation. A simple passive counterbalance reduces axial vibrations. The design of the refrigerator system components is discussed and a comparison is made between performance estimates and measured results.

  13. Identifiability of linear systems in physical coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1992-01-01

    Identifiability of linear, time-invariant systems in physical coordinates is discussed. It is shown that identification of the system matrix in physical coordinates can be accomplished by determining a transformation matrix that relates the physical locations of actuators and sensors to the test-data-derived input and output matrices. For systems with symmetric matrices, the solution of a constrained optimization problem is used to characterize all the possible solutions of the transformation matrix. Conditions for the existence of a unique transformation matrix are established easily from the explicit form of the solutions. For systems with limited inputs and outputs, the question about which part of the system can be uniquely identified is also answered. A simple mass-spring system is used to verify the conclusions of this study.

  14. A Simple Demonstration Model of Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Joseph G.

    1999-01-01

    A simple device constructed from a wire screen, a large beaker, beans, and oats is described. It provides a simple and effective visual model of the phenomenon of osmosis and, by extension, the origin of other colligative properties of solutions.

  15. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  16. Standing wave bi-directional linearly moving ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    He, S; Chen, W; Tao, X; Chen, Z

    1998-01-01

    A standing wave bi-directional linearly moving ultrasonic motor has been studied for the purpose of implementing a practical linear ultrasonic motor with simple structure, simple driving and high resolution. The fundamental principle of this linear motor is projections on the right sides of a standing wave crests generating thrust force right-diagonally on the slider pressed against the projections. Correspondingly, projections on the left sides of the wave crests make the slider move toward the left. In order to realize bi-directional actuating, vibration mode B3 or B4 is excited in a rectangular plate-type vibrator to make the projections on the right sides or the left sides of the wave crests. In this paper, the operation principle of the linear motor is demonstrated. Furthermore, a prototype linear ultrasonic motor of 40 mm in length, 10 mm in width is fabricated and investigated. The following performances have been achieved: maximum speed 200 mm/s, maximum force output 150 gf, and resolution less than 0.1 microm.

  17. Linear and nonlinear Zeno effects in an optical coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Konotop, V. V.; Shchesnovich, V. S.

    2011-04-15

    It is shown that, in a simple coupler where one of the waveguides is subject to controlled losses of the electric field, it is possible to observe an optical analog of the linear and nonlinear quantum Zeno effects. The phenomenon consists in a counterintuitive enhancement of transparency of the coupler with an increase of the dissipation and represents an optical analog of the quantum Zeno effect. Experimental realization of the phenomenon based on the use of chalcogenide glasses is proposed. The system allows for observation of the crossover between the linear and nonlinear Zeno effects, as well as the effective manipulation of light transmission through the coupler.

  18. INTEGRATING A LINEAR INTERPOLATION FUNCTION ACROSS TRIANGULAR CELL BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. WISEMAN; J. S. BROCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational models of particle dynamics often exchange solution data with discretized continuum-fields using interpolation functions. These particle methods require a series expansion of the interpolation function for two purposes: numerical analysis used to establish the model's consistency and accuracy, and logical-coordinate evaluation used to locate particles within a grid. This report presents discrete-expansions for a linear interpolation function commonly used within triangular cell geometries. Discrete-expansions, unlike a Taylor's series, account for interpolation discontinuities across cell boundaries and, therefore, are valid throughout a discretized domain. Verification of linear discrete-expansions is demonstrated on a simple test problem.

  19. Novel linear piezoelectric motor for precision position stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Yunlai; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Junshan

    2016-03-01

    Conventional servomotor and stepping motor face challenges in nanometer positioning stages due to the complex structure, motion transformation mechanism, and slow dynamic response, especially directly driven by linear motor. A new butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric motor for linear motion is presented. A two-degree precision position stage driven by the proposed linear ultrasonic motor possesses a simple and compact configuration, which makes the system obtain shorter driving chain. Firstly, the working principle of the linear ultrasonic motor is analyzed. The oscillation orbits of two driving feet on the stator are produced successively by using the anti-symmetric and symmetric vibration modes of the piezoelectric composite structure, and the slider pressed on the driving feet can be propelled twice in only one vibration cycle. Then with the derivation of the dynamic equation of the piezoelectric actuator and transient response model, start-upstart-up and settling state characteristics of the proposed linear actuator is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and is applicable to evaluate step resolution of the precision platform driven by the actuator. Moreover the structure of the two-degree position stage system is described and a special precision displacement measurement system is built. Finally, the characteristics of the two-degree position stage are studied. In the closed-loop condition the positioning accuracy of plus or minus <0.5 μm is experimentally obtained for the stage propelled by the piezoelectric motor. A precision position stage based the proposed butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric is theoretically and experimentally investigated.

  20. Asymptotics of Simple Branching Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huillet, Thierry; Kłopotowski, Andrzej; Porzio, Anna

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we study a simple deterministic tree structure: an initial individual generates a finite number of offspring, each of which has given integer valued lifetime, iterating the same procedure when dying. Three asymptotic distributions of this asynchronous deterministic branching procedure are considered: the generation distribution, the ability of individuals to generate offspring and the age distribution. Thermodynamic formalism is then developped to reveal the multifractal nature of the mass splitting associated to our process. On considère l'itération d'une structure déterministe arborescente selon laquelle un ancêtre engendre un nombre fini de descendants dont la durée de vie (à valeurs entières) est donnée. Dans un premier temps on s'intéresse aux trois distributions asymptotiques suivantes : répartition des générations, aptitude à engendrer des descendants et répartition selon l'âge. Ensuite nous développons le formalisme thermodynamique pour mettre en évidence le caractère multifractal de la scission d'une masse unitaire associée à cette arborescence.