Science.gov

Sample records for hyperaccumulators alyssum murale

  1. Nickel and Manganese Accumulation, Interaction and Localization in Leaves of the Ni Hyperaccumulators Alyssum murale and Alyssum corsicum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Alyssum contains >50 Ni hyperaccumulator species; many can achieve 3% Ni in dry leaf. In soils with normal Mn levels, Alyssum trichome bases were observed previously to accumulate Ni and Mn to high levels. Here we report concentration and localization patterns in A. murale and A. corsicum...

  2. The Metal Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale Uses Nitrogen and Oxygen Donor Ligands for Ni Transport and Storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Kotodesh genotype of the nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale was examined to determine the compartmentalization and internal speciation of Ni, and other elements, in an effort to ascertain the mechanism used by this plant to tolerate extremely high shoot Ni concentrations. Plants were g...

  3. Interaction of Nickel and Manganese in Accumulation and Localization in Leaves of the Ni Hyperaccumulators Alyssum murale and Alyssum corsicum

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, C.; Tappero, R; Maugel, T; Erbe, E; Sparks, D; Chaney, R

    2009-01-01

    The genus Alyssum contains >50 Ni hyperaccumulator species; many can achieve >2.5% Ni in dry leaf. In soils with normal Mn levels, Alyssum trichome bases were previously observed to accumulate Ni and Mn to high levels. Here we report concentration and localization patterns in A. murale and A. corsicum grown in soils with nonphytotoxic factorial additions of Ni and Mn salts. Four leaf type subsets based on size and age accumulated Ni and Mn similarly. The greatest Mn accumulation (10 times control) was observed in A. corsicum with 40 mmol Mn kg-1 and 40 mmol Ni kg-1 added to potting soil. Whole leaf Ni concentrations decreased as Mn increased. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of whole fresh leaves showed localized in distinct high-concentration Mn spots associated with trichomes, Ni and Mn distributions were strongly spatially correlated. Standard X-ray fluorescence point analysis/mapping of cryofractured and freeze-dried samples found that Ni and Mn were co-located and strongly concentrated only in trichome bases and in cells adjacent to trichomes. Nickel concentration was also strongly spatially correlated with sulfur. Results indicate that maximum Ni phytoextraction by Alyssum may be reduced in soils with higher phytoavailable Mn, and suggest that Ni hyperaccumulation in Alyssum species may have developed from a Mn handling system.

  4. Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale Relies on a Different Metal Storage Mechanism for Cobalt than for Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Tappero, R.; Peltier, E; Grafe, M; Heidel, K; Ginder-Vogel, M; Livi, K; Rivers, M; Marcus, M; Chaney, R; Sparks, D

    2007-01-01

    The nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale has been developed as a commercial crop for phytoremediation/phytomining Ni from metal-enriched soils. Here, metal co-tolerance, accumulation and localization were investigated for A. murale exposed to metal co-contaminants. A. murale was irrigated with Ni-enriched nutrient solutions containing basal or elevated concentrations of cobalt (Co) or zinc (Zn). Metal localization and elemental associations were investigated in situ with synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (SXRF) and computed-microtomography (CMT). A. murale hyperaccumulated Ni and Co (> 1000 {micro}g g{sup -1} dry weight) from mixed-metal systems. Zinc was not hyperaccumulated. Elevated Co or Zn concentrations did not alter Ni accumulation or localization. SXRF images showed uniform Ni distribution in leaves and preferential localization of Co near leaf tips/margins. CMT images revealed that leaf epidermal tissue was enriched with Ni but devoid of Co, that Co was localized in the apoplasm of leaf ground tissue and that Co was sequestered on leaf surfaces near the tips/margins. Cobalt-rich mineral precipitate(s) form on leaves of Co-treated A. murale. Specialized biochemical processes linked with Ni (hyper)tolerance in A. murale do not confer (hyper)tolerance to Co. A. murale relies on a different metal storage mechanism for Co (exocellular sequestration) than for Ni (vacuolar sequestration).

  5. Growth and Metal Accumulation of an Alyssum murale Nickel Hyperaccumulator Ecotype Co-cropped with Alyssum montanum and Perennial Ryegrass in Serpentine Soil

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, Catherine L.; Chaney, Rufus L.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 30 g kg−1 Ni in dry leaf. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viable candidates for commercial Ni phytoremediation and phytomining technologies. It is not known whether these species secrete organic and/or amino acids into the rhizosphere to solubilize Ni, or can make use of such acids within the soil to facilitate uptake. It has been hypothesized that in fields with mixed plant species, mobilization of metals by phytosiderophores secreted by Graminaceae plants could affect Alyssum Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn uptake. We co-cropped the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale, non-hyperaccumulator A. montanum and perennial ryegrass in a natural serpentine soil. All treatments had standard inorganic fertilization required for ryegrass growth and one treatment was compost amended. After 4 months A. murale leaves and stems contained 3600 mg kg−1 Ni which did not differ significantly with co-cropping. Overall Ni and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in A. murale than in A. montanum or L. perenne. Copper was not accumulated by either Alyssum species, but L. perenne accumulated up to 10 mg kg−1. A. montanum could not compete with either A. murale or ryegrass, and neither Alyssum species survived in the compost-amended soil. Co-cropping with ryegrass reduced Fe and Mn concentrations in A. murale but not to the extent of either increasing Ni uptake or affecting plant nutrition. The hypothesized Alyssum Ni accumulation in response to phytosiderophores secreted by co-cropped grass did not occur. Our data do not support increased mobilization of Mn by a phytosiderophore mechanism either, but the converse: mobilization of Mn by the Alyssum hyperaccumulator species significantly increased Mn levels in L. perenne. Tilling soil to maximize root penetration, adequate inorganic fertilization and appropriate plant densities are more important for developing efficient phytoremediation and

  6. Growth and Metal Accumulation of an Alyssum murale Nickel Hyperaccumulator Ecotype Co-cropped with Alyssum montanum and Perennial Ryegrass in Serpentine Soil.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Catherine L; Chaney, Rufus L

    2016-01-01

    The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 30 g kg(-1) Ni in dry leaf. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viable candidates for commercial Ni phytoremediation and phytomining technologies. It is not known whether these species secrete organic and/or amino acids into the rhizosphere to solubilize Ni, or can make use of such acids within the soil to facilitate uptake. It has been hypothesized that in fields with mixed plant species, mobilization of metals by phytosiderophores secreted by Graminaceae plants could affect Alyssum Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn uptake. We co-cropped the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale, non-hyperaccumulator A. montanum and perennial ryegrass in a natural serpentine soil. All treatments had standard inorganic fertilization required for ryegrass growth and one treatment was compost amended. After 4 months A. murale leaves and stems contained 3600 mg kg(-1) Ni which did not differ significantly with co-cropping. Overall Ni and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in A. murale than in A. montanum or L. perenne. Copper was not accumulated by either Alyssum species, but L. perenne accumulated up to 10 mg kg(-1). A. montanum could not compete with either A. murale or ryegrass, and neither Alyssum species survived in the compost-amended soil. Co-cropping with ryegrass reduced Fe and Mn concentrations in A. murale but not to the extent of either increasing Ni uptake or affecting plant nutrition. The hypothesized Alyssum Ni accumulation in response to phytosiderophores secreted by co-cropped grass did not occur. Our data do not support increased mobilization of Mn by a phytosiderophore mechanism either, but the converse: mobilization of Mn by the Alyssum hyperaccumulator species significantly increased Mn levels in L. perenne. Tilling soil to maximize root penetration, adequate inorganic fertilization and appropriate plant densities are more important for developing efficient phytoremediation and

  7. Exogenous cytokinin treatments of a Ni hyper-accumulator, Alyssum murale, grown in a serpentine soil: Implications for phytoextraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of exogenous plant growth regulators was examined as a viable technique to increase the efficiency of plant metal phytoextraction from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of Ni phytoextraction by Alyssum murale, a Ni hyperaccumulator, following the...

  8. Transient Influx of nickel in root mitochondria modulates organic acid and reactive oxygen species production in nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Bhavana; Czymmek, Kirk J; Sparks, Donald L; Bais, Harsh P

    2013-03-08

    Mitochondria are important targets of metal toxicity and are also vital for maintaining metal homeostasis. Here, we examined the potential role of mitochondria in homeostasis of nickel in the roots of nickel hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum murale. We evaluated the biochemical basis of nickel tolerance by comparing the role of mitochondria in closely related nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale and non-accumulator Alyssum montanum. Evidence is presented for the rapid and transient influx of nickel in root mitochondria of nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale. In an early response to nickel treatment, substantial nickel influx was observed in mitochondria prior to sequestration in vacuoles in the roots of hyperaccumulator A. murale compared with non-accumulator A. montanum. In addition, the mitochondrial Krebs cycle was modulated to increase synthesis of malic acid and citric acid involvement in nickel hyperaccumulation. Furthermore, malic acid, which is reported to form a complex with nickel in hyperaccumulators, was also found to reduce the reactive oxygen species generation induced by nickel. We propose that the interaction of nickel with mitochondria is imperative in the early steps of nickel uptake in nickel hyperaccumulator plants. Initial uptake of nickel in roots results in biochemical responses in the root mitochondria indicating its vital role in homeostasis of nickel ions in hyperaccumulation.

  9. Transient Influx of Nickel in Root Mitochondria Modulates Organic Acid and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Nickel Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale*

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Bhavana; Czymmek, Kirk J.; Sparks, Donald L.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are important targets of metal toxicity and are also vital for maintaining metal homeostasis. Here, we examined the potential role of mitochondria in homeostasis of nickel in the roots of nickel hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum murale. We evaluated the biochemical basis of nickel tolerance by comparing the role of mitochondria in closely related nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale and non-accumulator Alyssum montanum. Evidence is presented for the rapid and transient influx of nickel in root mitochondria of nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale. In an early response to nickel treatment, substantial nickel influx was observed in mitochondria prior to sequestration in vacuoles in the roots of hyperaccumulator A. murale compared with non-accumulator A. montanum. In addition, the mitochondrial Krebs cycle was modulated to increase synthesis of malic acid and citric acid involvement in nickel hyperaccumulation. Furthermore, malic acid, which is reported to form a complex with nickel in hyperaccumulators, was also found to reduce the reactive oxygen species generation induced by nickel. We propose that the interaction of nickel with mitochondria is imperative in the early steps of nickel uptake in nickel hyperaccumulator plants. Initial uptake of nickel in roots results in biochemical responses in the root mitochondria indicating its vital role in homeostasis of nickel ions in hyperaccumulation. PMID:23322782

  10. Growth and metal accumulation of an Alyssum murale nickel hyperaccumulator ecotype co-cropped with Alyssum montanum or perennial ryegrass in serpentine soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    More than 400 plant species naturally accumulate high levels of metals such as Cd, Cu, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains the greatest number of reported Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 3 wt% Ni in dry leaves. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viabl...

  11. Do high-nickel leaves shed by the nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale inhibit seed germination of competing plants?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Angle, J Scott; Chaney, Rufus L

    2007-01-01

    Elemental allelopathy suggests that nickel (Ni)-rich leaves shed by hyperaccumulators inhibit the germination and growth of nearby plant species. Here, the germination of eight herbaceous species following addition of Alyssum murale biomass or Ni(NO3)2, with the same Ni level added to soil, was assessed. The distribution of Ni in soil was tested by determining Ni phytoavailability and speciation over time. Phytoavailable Ni in soil amended with biomass declined rapidly over time due to Ni binding to iron (Fe)/manganese (Mn) oxides in the soil. No significant effects on seed germination were observed. Unlike the Ni complex in Alyssum biomass, more Ni remained soluble and phytoavailable in soil amended with Ni(NO3)2, thus significantly inhibiting seed germination. High-Ni leaves shed by hyperaccumulators did not appear to create a 'toxic zone' around the plants and inhibit germination or growth of competing plants. The lack of an allelopathic effect was probably related to low Ni availability.

  12. The Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale uses Complexation with Nitrogen and Oxygen Donor Ligands for Ni Transport and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McNear, Jr., D.; Chanay, R; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    The Kotodesh genotype of the nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale was examined to determine the compartmentalization and internal speciation of Ni, and other elements, in an effort to ascertain the mechanism used by this plant to tolerate extremely high shoot (stem and leaf) Ni concentrations. Plants were grown either hydroponically or in Ni enriched soils from an area surrounding an historic Ni refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada. Electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and synchrotron based micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) spectroscopy were used to determine the metal distribution and co-localization and synchrotron X-ray and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies were used to determine the Ni speciation in plant parts and extracted sap. Nickel is concentrated in the dermal leaf and stem tissues of A. murale bound primarily to malate along with other low molecular weight organic ligands and possibly counter anions (e.g., sulfate). Ni is present in the plant sap and vasculature bound to histidine, malate and other low molecular weight compounds. The data presented herein supports a model in which Ni is transported from the roots to the shoots complexed with histidine and stored within the plant leaf dermal tissues complexed with malate, and other low molecular weight organic acids or counter-ions.

  13. Effects of nickel hyperaccumulation on physiological characteristics of Alyssum murale grown on metal contaminated waste amended soil.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Rim; Gharbi, Fatma; Rejeb, Saloua; Rejeb, Mohamed Néjib; Henchi, Belgacem; Echevarria, Guillaume; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of nickel concentration on physiological characteristics of Alyssum murale when grown in a soil mixed with sewage sludge (at the rate of 2.8%). Two types of sludge were used: agricultural sewage sludge (S1) and industrial sewage sludge with an increasing nickel concentration (S2, S3, and S4). Results showed that Ni in shoots was higher than Ni in roots. A. murale is able to concentrate up to 12730 mg/kg Ni in leaves. The highest dry matter yield was observed with plants grown with agricultural sewage sludge. An addition of S2 and S3 increased shoot biomass. However, application of S4 reduced 40% shoot dry weight as compared to the control Ni treatment did not affect all chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. The F(v)/F(m) ratio was stable between Ni treatments. Photosynthesis rate (A) increased with agricultural sewage sludge, but remained stable with variable Ni rates from the industrial sludge. The chlorophyll content increased with S1, S2 and S3 but it remains constant with S4 when compared to the control Therefore, high nickel concentration did not affect the function of the photosynthetic machine of A. murale.

  14. Application of quantitative fluorescence and absorption-edge computed microtomography to image metal compartmentalization in Alyssum murale.

    PubMed

    McNear, David H; Peltier, Edward; Everhart, Jeff; Chaney, Rufus L; Sutton, Steve; Newville, Matt; Rivers, Mark; Sparks, Donald L

    2005-04-01

    This paper shows that synchrotron-based fluorescence and absorption-edge computed microtomographies (CMT) are well-suited for determining the compartmentalization and concentration of metals in hyperaccumulating plant tissues. Fluorescence CMT of intact leaf, stem, and root samples revealed that Ni concentrated in stem and leaf dermal tissues and, together with Mn, in distinct regions associated with the Ca-rich trichomes on the leaf surface of the nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale "Kotodesh". Metal enrichment was also observed within the vascular system of the finer roots, stem, and leaves but absent from the coarser root, which had a well-correlated metal coating. Absorption-edge CMT showed the three-dimensional distribution of the highest metal concentrations and verified that epidermal localization and Ni and Mn co-localization at the trichome base are phenomena that occurred throughout the entire leaf and may contribute significantly to metal detoxification and storage. Ni was also observed in the leaf tips, possibly resulting from release of excess Ni with guttation fluids. These results are consistent with a transport model where Ni is removed from the soil by the finer roots, carried to the leaves through the stem xylem, and distributed throughout the leaf by the veins to the dermal tissues, trichome bases, and in some cases the leaf tips.

  15. Simultaneous hyperaccumulation of nickel, manganese, and calcium in Alyssum leaf trichomes.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, C Leigh; Chaney, Rufus L; Angle, J Scott; Maugel, Timothy K; Erbe, Eric F; Murphy, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    We have developed commercially viable phytoremediation/phytomining technologies employing Alyssum Ni-hyperaccumulator species to quantitatively extract Ni from soils. The majority of Ni is stored either in Alyssum leaf epidermal cell vacuoles or in the basal portions only of the numerous stellate trichomes. Here, we report simultaneous and region-specific localization of high levels of Ni, Mn, and Ca within Alyssum trichomes as determined by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). Plants were grown in high Ni soil, achieving up to 48 400 microg g(-1) Ni in total leaf concentration; however, Ca and Mn were not enriched in the experimental soils. The region-specific localization of hyperaccumulated Ca, Mn, and Ni occurred in three soil types, five Alyssum species/ecotypes, and over a wide range of soil Ni concentrations. The metal concentration in the trichome basal compartment was approximately 15-20% dry weight, the highest ever reported for healthy vascular plant tissue.

  16. Hyperaccumulation of nickel by hairy roots of alyssum species: comparison with whole regenerated plants.

    PubMed

    Nedelkoska, T V; Doran, P M

    2001-01-01

    Hairy roots were used to investigate nickel uptake by the hyperaccumulator species, Alyssum bertolonii, A. tenium, and A. troodii. The Ni biosorption capacity of A. tenium hairy roots was lower than for other types of biomass such as bacteria and algae; in short-term (9-h) equilibrium studies, the highest Ni content measured in the roots was 17 500 microg g(-1) dry weight at a liquid concentration of about 4000 ppm. Using long-term hairy root cultures, it was demonstrated that Ni tolerance and hyperaccumulation do not necessarily depend on the presence of shoots or root-shoot translocation. A. bertolonii hairy roots remained healthy in appearance and continued to grow in the presence of 20-100 ppm Ni, accumulating up to 7200 microg g(-1) dry weight Ni. In contrast, hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum turned dark brown at 20 ppm Ni and growth was negligible. The ability to grow at high external Ni concentrations allowed hyperaccumulator hairy roots to remove much greater amounts of heavy metals from the culture liquid than nonhyperaccumulator hairy roots, even though biomass Ni concentrations were similar. Although hairy roots proved to be a useful tool for investigating Ni hyperaccumulation, there were significant differences in the Ni uptake capacity of hairy roots and whole plants. Regenerated plants of A. tenium were much more tolerant of Ni and capable of accumulating higher Ni concentrations than hairy roots of this species.

  17. Evolution of nickel hyperaccumulation and serpentine adaptation in the Alyssum serpyllifolium species complex.

    PubMed

    Sobczyk, M K; Smith, J A C; Pollard, A J; Filatov, D A

    2017-01-01

    Metal hyperaccumulation is an uncommon but highly distinctive adaptation found in certain plants that can grow on metalliferous soils. Here we review what is known about evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in plants and describe a population-genetic analysis of the Alyssum serpyllifolium (Brassicaceae) species complex that includes populations of nickel-hyperaccumulating as well as non-accumulating plants growing on serpentine (S) and non-serpentine (NS) soils, respectively. To test whether the S and NS populations belong to the same or separate closely related species, we analysed genetic variation within and between four S and four NS populations from across the Iberian peninsula. Based on microsatellites, genetic variation was similar in S and NS populations (average Ho=0.48). The populations were significantly differentiated from each other (overall FST=0.23), and the degree of differentiation between S and NS populations was similar to that within these two groups. However, high S versus NS differentiation was observed in DNA polymorphism of two genes putatively involved in adaptation to serpentine environments, IREG1 and NRAMP4, whereas no such differentiation was found in a gene (ASIL1) not expected to play a specific role in ecological adaptation in A. serpyllifolium. These results indicate that S and NS populations belong to the same species and that nickel hyperaccumulation in A. serpyllifolium appears to represent a case of adaptation to growth on serpentine soils. Further functional and evolutionary genetic work in this system has the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in plants.

  18. NanoSIMS and EPMA analysis of nickel localisation in leaves of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, K. E.; Kilburn, M. R.; Salter, C. J.; Smith, J. A. C.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2007-02-01

    Certain plants known as `metal hyperaccumulators' can accumulate exceptional concentrations of elements such as zinc, manganese, nickel, cobalt, copper, selenium, cadmium or arsenic in their above ground tissue. In members of the genus Alyssum, nickel concentrations can reach values as high as 3% of leaf dry biomass. These plants must possess very effective mechanisms for the transport, chelation and sequestration of such elements within their tissues to avoid the toxic effects of free metal ions. Evidence from a number of different techniques suggests that nickel is concentrated primarily in the outermost, epidermal tissue of leaves of Alyssum hyperaccumulators, but there is currently no consensus on the principal sites of nickel sequestration. In this study, high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis has been performed on longitudinal sections of Alyssum lesbiacum leaves. Elemental maps were obtained which revealed the high concentrations of nickel in the peripheral regions of the large unicellular stellate leaf hairs (trichomes) and in the epidermal cell layer. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was used to provide independent confirmation of elemental distribution in the specimens, but the superior spatial resolution and high chemical sensitivity of the NanoSIMS technique provided a more detailed image of elemental distribution in these biological specimens at the cellular level.

  19. Micro-PIXE as a technique for studying nickel localization in leaves of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, U.; Grime, G. W.; Smith, J. A. C.; Hawes, C. R.; Baker, A. J. M.

    1997-07-01

    Certain terrestrial plants are able to accumulate metals such as zinc, manganese, nickel, cobalt, or copper in their above-ground biomass. The largest group of these so-called "metal hyperaccumulators" is to be found among certain species in the family Brassicaceae endemic to ultramafic soils. For example, nickel concentrations in members of the genus Alyssum can reach 3% of the leaf dry biomass. However, nickel levels in the root tissue of these plants are low, suggesting that hyperaccumulation is associated with effective metal translocation from root to shoot and sequestration of the metal in non-toxic form within the leaves. To investigate the sites of nickel localization within A. lesbiacum, leaf cross-sections were examined by nuclear microscopy using PIXE and RBS on the Oxford Scanning Proton Microprobe (SPM) with a spatial resolution of 1 μm. This paper describes the sample preparation and analysis methods and presents some preliminary results indicating that nickel is sequestered to a considerable degree within the epidermal trichomes on the leaf surface.

  20. Organic acids rather than histidine predominate in Ni chelation in Alyssum hyperaccumulator xylem exudate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A better understanding of Ni uptake mechanisms by hyperaccumulator plants is necessary to improve Ni uptake efficiency for phytoremediation technologies i.e. phytomining. It is known that an important aspect of Ni translocation involves Ni chelation with organic ligands. However, it is still not cle...

  1. Evolutionary lineages of nickel hyperaccumulation and systematics in European Alysseae (Brassicaceae): evidence from nrDNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Lorenzo; Gabbrielli, Roberto; Arnetoli, Miluscia; Gonnelli, Cristina; Hasko, Agim; Selvi, Federico

    2010-11-01

    Nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulation is a rare form of physiological specialization shared by a small number of angiosperms growing on ultramafic soils. The evolutionary patterns of this feature among European members of tribe Alysseae (Brassicaceae) are investigated using a phylogenetic approach to assess relationships among Ni hyperaccumulators at the genus, species and below-species level. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were generated for multiple accessions of Alysseae. Phylogenetic trees were obtained for the genera of the tribe and Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena. All accessions and additional herbarium material were tested for Ni hyperaccumulation with the dimethylglyoxime colorimetric method. Molecular data strongly support the poorly known hyperaccumulator endemic Leptoplax (Peltaria) emarginata as sister to hyperaccumulator species of Bornmuellera within Alysseae. This is contrary to current assumptions of affinity between L. emarginata and the non-hyperaccumulator Peltaria in Thlaspideae. The lineage Bornmuellera-Leptoplax is, in turn, sister to the two non-hyperaccumulator Mediterranean endemics Ptilotrichum rupestre and P. cyclocarpum. Low ITS sequence variation was found within the monophyletic Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena and especially in A. murale sensu lato. Nickel hyperaccumulation was not monophyletic in any of three main clades retrieved, each consisting of hyperaccumulators and non-hyperaccumulators of different geographical origin. Nickel hyperaccumulation in Alysseae has a double origin, but it did not evolve in Thlaspideae. In Bornmuellera-Leptoplax it represents an early synapomorphy inherited from an ancestor shared with the calcicolous, sister clade of Mediterranean Ptilotrichum. In Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena it has multiple origins even within the three European clades recognized. Lack of geographical cohesion suggests that accumulation ability has been lost or gained over the different serpentine areas of south Europe through

  2. Evolutionary lineages of nickel hyperaccumulation and systematics in European Alysseae (Brassicaceae): evidence from nrDNA sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Lorenzo; Gabbrielli, Roberto; Arnetoli, Miluscia; Gonnelli, Cristina; Hasko, Agim; Selvi, Federico

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulation is a rare form of physiological specialization shared by a small number of angiosperms growing on ultramafic soils. The evolutionary patterns of this feature among European members of tribe Alysseae (Brassicaceae) are investigated using a phylogenetic approach to assess relationships among Ni hyperaccumulators at the genus, species and below-species level. Methods Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were generated for multiple accessions of Alysseae. Phylogenetic trees were obtained for the genera of the tribe and Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena. All accessions and additional herbarium material were tested for Ni hyperaccumulation with the dimethylglyoxime colorimetric method. Key Results Molecular data strongly support the poorly known hyperaccumulator endemic Leptoplax (Peltaria) emarginata as sister to hyperaccumulator species of Bornmuellera within Alysseae. This is contrary to current assumptions of affinity between L. emarginata and the non-hyperaccumulator Peltaria in Thlaspideae. The lineage Bornmuellera–Leptoplax is, in turn, sister to the two non-hyperaccumulator Mediterranean endemics Ptilotrichum rupestre and P. cyclocarpum. Low ITS sequence variation was found within the monophyletic Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena and especially in A. murale sensu lato. Nickel hyperaccumulation was not monophyletic in any of three main clades retrieved, each consisting of hyperaccumulators and non-hyperaccumulators of different geographical origin. Conclusions Nickel hyperaccumulation in Alysseae has a double origin, but it did not evolve in Thlaspideae. In Bornmuellera–Leptoplax it represents an early synapomorphy inherited from an ancestor shared with the calcicolous, sister clade of Mediterranean Ptilotrichum. In Alyssum sect. Odontarrhena it has multiple origins even within the three European clades recognized. Lack of geographical cohesion suggests that accumulation ability has been lost or gained over the

  3. Evaluation of plant growth regulators to increase nickel phytoextraction by Alyssum species.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Conejo, M I; Centofanti, T; Kidd, P S; Prieto-Fernández, A; Chaney, R L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that application of phytohormones to shoots of Alyssum murale increased biomass production but did not increase Ni shoot concentration. Increased biomass and Ni phytoextraction efficiency is useful to achieve economically viable phytomining. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two types of phytohormones on the Ni phytoextraction capacity of four Alyssum species. Two different commercially available phytohormones (Cytokin and Promalin) based on cytokinins and/or gibberellins were applied on shoot biomass of four Ni hyperaccumulating Alyssum species (A. corsicum, A. malacitanum, A. murale, and A. pintodasilvae). Cytokin was applied in two concentrations and promalin in one concentration. The application of phytohormones had no clear positive effect on biomass production, Ni accumulation and Ni phytoextraction efficiency in the studied Alyssum species. A. malacitanum was the only species in which a significantly negative effect of these treatments was observed (in Ni uptake). A slightly positive response to promalin treatment was observed in the biomass production and Ni phytoextraction efficiency of A. corsicum. Although this effect was not significant it does indicate a potential application of these approaches to improve phytoextraction ability. Further studies will be needed to identify the most adequate phytohormone treatment as well as the appropriate concentrations and application times.

  4. NiO (bunsenite) is not available to Alyssum species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some species of the genus Alyssum are capable of accumulating up to 30 g kg-1 DW Ni in their leaves when grown on serpentine soils where these species are endemic. The unique ability of Alyssum species to hyperaccumulate high concentration of Ni stimulated basic research toward a better understandi...

  5. Heavy metal resistance and genotypic analysis of metal resistance genes in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria present in Ni-rich serpentine soil and in the rhizosphere of Alyssum murale.

    PubMed

    Abou-Shanab, R A I; van Berkum, P; Angle, J S

    2007-06-01

    Forty-six bacterial cultures, including one culture collection strain, thirty from the rhizosphere of Alyssum murale and fifteen from Ni-rich soil, were tested for their ability to tolerate arsenate, cadmium, chromium, zinc, mercury, lead, cobalt, copper, and nickel in their growth medium. The resistance patterns, expressed as minimum inhibitory concentrations, for all cultures to the nine different metal ions were surveyed by using the agar dilution method. A large number of the cultures were resistant to Ni (100%), Pb (100%), Zn (100%), Cu (98%), and Co (93%). However, 82, 71, 58 and 47% were sensitive to As, Hg, Cd and Cr(VI), respectively. All cultures had multiple metal-resistant, with heptametal resistance as the major pattern (28.8%). Five of the cultures (about of 11.2% of the total), specifically Arthrobacter rhombi AY509239, Clavibacter xyli AY509235, Microbacterium arabinogalactanolyticum AY509226, Rhizobium mongolense AY509209 and Variovorax paradoxus AY512828 were tolerant to nine different metals. The polymerase chain reaction in combination with DNA sequence analysis was used to investigate the genetic mechanism responsible for the metal resistance in some of these gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria that were, highly resistant to Hg, Zn, Cr and Ni. The czc, chr, ncc and mer genes that are responsible for resistance to Zn, Cr, Ni and Hg, respectively, were shown to be present in these bacteria by using PCR. In the case of, M. arabinogalactanolyticum AY509226 these genes were shown to have high homology to the czcD, chrB, nccA, and mer genes of Ralstonia metallidurans CH34. Therefore, Hg, Zn, Cr and Ni resistance genes are widely distributed in both gram-positive and gram-negative isolates obtained from A. murale rhizosphere and Ni-rich soils.

  6. Exogenous treatments with phytohormones can improve growth and nickel yield of hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Conejo, M I; Prieto-Fernández, A; Kidd, P S

    2014-10-01

    The application of plant growth regulators (PGRs) or phytohormones could be an interesting option for stimulating biomass production of hyperaccumulating plants and, consequently, their metal phytoextraction capacity. The effect of exogenous applications of phytohormones (PGR) on the Ni phytoextraction capacity of four Ni hyperaccumulating species (Alyssum corsicum, Alyssum malacitanum, Alyssum murale and Noccaea goesingense) was evaluated. Four different commercially available phytohormones (B, C, K and P) based on gibberellins, cytokinins and auxins were applied to the plant aerial tissues. Each product was applied at three different concentrations (B1-3, C1-3, K1-3 and P1-3). The effect on biomass production was dependent on the species, the PGR type and the concentration at which it was applied. Two of the four products (K and P) consistently increased biomass production compared to untreated control plants in all four plant species. On the other hand, all four products led to a significant increase in the number of branches (and leaves in the case of N. goesingense) of all four species compared to control plants. Application of phytohormones generally led to a reduction in shoot Ni concentration. Nonetheless, in some cases as a consequence of the increase observed in biomass after the application of phytohormones a significant increase in the Ni phytoextraction efficiency was also observed (but this was species- and PGR type-dependent). The results show that PGRs can be successfully used to improve the growth and biomass production of hyperaccumulating species such as Alyssum and Noccaea. However, an increase in biomass did not always lead to a higher Ni removal, and the most effective PGR for increasing Ni removal was the IAA-based product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of nickel chelators in three hyperaccumulating plants: an X-ray spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Montargès-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Chardot, Vanessa; Echevarria, Guillaume; Michot, Laurent J; Bauer, Allan; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    We have investigated the accumulation of nickel in a hyperaccumulating plant from the Brassicacae family Leptoplax emarginata (Boiss.) O.E. Schulz. Two supplementary hyperaccumulating plants, which have been the subject of a high number of publications, Alyssum murale Waldst. & Kit and Thlaspi caerulescens J.&C. Presl, and a nonaccumulating species Aurinia saxatilis were also studied for reference. The plants were grown during 4 months in specific rhizoboxes with Ni-bearing minerals as a source of nickel. Nickel speciation was analyzed through X-ray absorption spectroscopy at Ni K-edge (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy) in the different parts of the plants (leaves, stems and roots) and compared with aqueous solutions containing different organo-Ni(II) complexes. Carboxylic acids (citrate, malate) appeared as the main ligands responsible of nickel transfer within those plants. Citrate was found as the predominant ligand for Ni in stems of Leptoplax and Alyssum, whereas in leaves of the three plants, malate appeared as the chelating organic acid of accumulated metal. Histidine could not be detected either in leaves, stems nor roots of any studied plant sample.

  8. Nickel and zinc isotope fractionation in hyperaccumulating and nonaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Deng, Teng-Hao-Bo; Cloquet, Christophe; Tang, Ye-Tao; Sterckeman, Thibault; Echevarria, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-10-21

    Until now, there has been little data on the isotope fractionation of nickel (Ni) in higher plants and how this can be affected by plant Ni and zinc (Zn) homeostasis. A hydroponic cultivation was conducted to investigate the isotope fractionation of Ni and Zn during plant uptake and translocation processes. The nonaccumulator Thlaspi arvense, the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale and the Ni and Zn hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens were grown in low (2 μM) and high (50 μM) Ni and Zn solutions. Results showed that plants were inclined to absorb light Ni isotopes, presumably due to the functioning of low-affinity transport systems across root cell membrane. The Ni isotope fractionation between plant and solution was greater in the hyperaccumulators grown in low Zn treatments (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.90 to -0.63‰) than that in the nonaccumulator T. arvense (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.21‰), thus indicating a greater permeability of the low-affinity transport system in hyperaccumulators. Light isotope enrichment of Zn was observed in most of the plants (Δ(66)Zn(plant-solution) = -0.23 to -0.10‰), but to a lesser extent than for Ni. The rapid uptake of Zn on the root surfaces caused concentration gradients, which induced ion diffusion in the rhizosphere and could result in light Zn isotope enrichment in the hyperaccumulator N. caerulescens. In high Zn treatment, Zn could compete with Ni during the uptake process, which reduced Ni concentration in plants and decreased the extent of Ni isotope fractionation (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.11 to -0.07‰), indicating that plants might take up Ni through a low-affinity transport system of Zn. We propose that isotope composition analysis for transition elements could become an empirical tool to study plant physiological processes.

  9. Chelator-buffered nutrient solution is ineffective in extracting Ni from seeds of Alyssum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperaccumulator species of the genera Alyssum can accumulate 100 times more Ni than normal crops and are therefore used for phytomining and phytoextraction of nickel contaminated soils. Basic studies on the physiology and metal uptake mechanisms of these plants are needed to increase efficiency and...

  10. NiO(s) (Bunsenite) is not Available to Alyssum species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    AIMS: To determine if the Ni-hyperaccumulator Alyssum corsicum can absorb Ni from the kinetically inert crystalline mineral NiO(s) (bunsenite). METHODS: A. corsicum and A. montanum plants were grown for 30 days in a serpentine Hoagland solution. NiO was provided at 0 or 0.1 g L-1 (1.34 mmol L-1) ...

  11. Evaluation of plant growth regulators to increase Ni phytoextraction by Alyssum species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have shown that application of phytohormones to shoots of Alyssum murale increased biomass production but did not increase Ni shoot concentration. Increased biomass and Ni phytoextraction efficiency is useful to achieve economically viable phytomining. The objective of this study wa...

  12. Chelator-buffered nutrient solution is ineffective in extracting Ni from seeds of Alyssum.

    PubMed

    Centofanti, Tiziana; Tappero, Ryan V; Davis, Allen P; Chaney, Rufus L

    2011-01-01

    Hyperaccumulator species of the genera Alyssum can accumulate 100 times more Ni than normal crops and are therefore used for phytomining and phytoextraction of nickel contaminated soils. Basic studies on the physiology and metal uptake mechanisms of these plants are needed to increase efficiency and uptake capacity of Nickel (Ni) by hyperaccumulators. Recent attempts to disclose if those hyperaccumulator species require higher Ni level than normal plants failed because of the high Ni content in the seeds (7000-9000 microg g(-1)). In this study, we attempted to use chelator buffered nutrient solution to deplete Ni from the seed/seed coat and to obtain low Ni seedlings of Alyssum cultivars to be used in physiology studies. HEDTA-buffered nutrient solution did not deplete Ni from the seeds, perhaps because Ni was mainly localized within the seedling embryonic tissues with greatest Ni enrichment in the cotyledons and hypocotyls. We could not observe any positive correlation between seed fitness and germination capacity with seed Ni content. Investigation of nickel localization in Alyssum seeds using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (micro-SXRF) showed that nickel is localized in the embryonic tissues with greatest Ni enrichment observed in the cotyledons and hypocotyl.

  13. Mural Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Five articles describe techniques of mural making and mural projects which have been accomplished by elementary and secondary students, including a class of blind and partially sighted children. (SJL)

  14. Critical Muralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  15. Constitutively High Expression of the Histidine Biosynthetic Pathway Contributes to Nickel Tolerance in Hyperaccumulator PlantsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Robert A.; Mugford, Sam T.; Rees, Jonathan D.; Campbell, Malcolm M.; Smith, J. Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Plants that hyperaccumulate Ni exhibit an exceptional degree of Ni tolerance and the ability to translocate Ni in large amounts from root to shoot. In hyperaccumulator plants in the genus Alyssum, free His is an important Ni binding ligand that increases in the xylem proportionately to root Ni uptake. To determine the molecular basis of the His response and its contribution to Ni tolerance, transcripts representing seven of the eight enzymes involved in His biosynthesis were investigated in the hyperaccumulator species Alyssum lesbiacum by RNA gel blot analysis. None of the transcripts changed in abundance in either root or shoot tissue when plants were exposed to Ni, but transcript levels were constitutively higher in A. lesbiacum than in the congeneric nonaccumulator A. montanum, especially for the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT). Comparison with the weak hyperaccumulator A. serpyllifolium revealed a close correlation between Ni tolerance, root His concentration, and ATP-PRT transcript abundance. Overexpression of an A. lesbiacum ATP-PRT cDNA in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana increased the pool of free His up to 15-fold in shoot tissue, without affecting the concentration of any other amino acid. His-overproducing lines also displayed elevated tolerance to Ni but did not exhibit increased Ni concentrations in either xylem sap or shoot tissue, suggesting that additional factors are necessary to recapitulate the complete hyperaccumulator phenotype. These results suggest that ATP-PRT expression plays a major role in regulating the pool of free His and contributes to the exceptional Ni tolerance of hyperaccumulator Alyssum species. PMID:15923352

  16. Feasibility of using hyperaccumulating plants to bioremediate metal-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.J.; Guerin, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study was carried out to determine whether selected plants were capable of hyperaccumulating anthropogenic sources of metals found in soils from three contaminated sites. A trial was conducted using the previously reported hyperaccumulators, Armeria maritima (thrift), Impatiens balsamina (balsam), Alyssum saxatile (gold dust), and the control species, Brassica oleracea (cabbage). Although none of these plants showed any substantial hyperaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd, it was established that there is an optimum period in the life-cycle of these plants in which the metal concentration reaches a maximum. This period was dependent on the metal, soil, and plant type. The current paper describes the data obtained for Zn and Cu uptake by thrift.

  17. Murals as Storytellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fradella, Laura

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes murals as visual storytelling. In times before most people could read or write, pictures were used to tell stories and to teach people. Visual storytelling is most often seen in the form of drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, quilts, stained-glass windows, and murals. The concept of visual storytelling…

  18. Murals as Storytellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fradella, Laura

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes murals as visual storytelling. In times before most people could read or write, pictures were used to tell stories and to teach people. Visual storytelling is most often seen in the form of drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, quilts, stained-glass windows, and murals. The concept of visual storytelling…

  19. The Ketchikan Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrie, Don; And Others

    The Ketchikan Mural Project was a community supported program funded in part through CETA, Title III, Summer Program for Economically Disadvantaged Youth. The 120' by 70' mural, located on the Ketchikan Community College campus, is called "Return of the Eagle" or "Return of Supernatural Powers." It was executed by muralist Don…

  20. Improved understanding of hyperaccumulation yields commercial phytoextraction and phytomining technologies.

    PubMed

    Chaney, Rufus L; Angle, J Scott; Broadhurst, C Leigh; Peters, Carinne A; Tappero, Ryan V; Sparks, Donald L

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews progress in phytoextraction of soil elements and illustrates the key role of hyperaccumulator plant species in useful phytoextraction technologies. Much research has focused on elements which are not practically phytoextracted (Pb); on addition of chelating agents which cause unacceptable contaminant leaching and are cost prohibitive; and on plant species which offer no useful phytoextraction capability (e.g., Brassica juncea Czern). Nickel phytoextraction by Alyssum hyperaccumulator species, which have been developed into a commercial phytomining technology, is discussed in more detail. Nickel is ultimately accumulated in vacuoles of leaf epidermal cells which prevents metal toxicity and provides defense against some insect predators and plant diseases. Constitutive up-regulation of trans-membrane element transporters appears to be the key process that allows these plants to achieve hyperaccumulation. Cadmium phytoextraction is needed for rice soils contaminated by mine wastes and smelter emissions with 100-fold more soil Zn than Cd. Although many plant species can accumulate high levels of Cd in the absence of Zn, when Cd/Zn>100, only Thlaspi caerulescens from southern France has demonstrated the ability to phytoextract useful amounts of Cd. Production of element-enriched biomass with value as ore or fertilizer or improved food (Se) or feed supplement may offset costs of phytoextraction crop production. Transgenic phytoextraction plants have been achieved for Hg, but not for other elements. Although several researchers have been attempting to clone all genes required for effective hyperaccumulation of several elements, success appears years away; such demonstrations will be needed to prove we have identified all necessary processes in hyperaccumulation.

  1. Left ventricular mural thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, J.V.

    1983-08-01

    The identification of mural thrombus in patients with left ventricular aneurysm and mural thrombus probably warrants consideration of long-term anticoagulation. In patients with acute, large, anterior or anteroapical, transmural myocardial infarctions, serial noninvasive examinations are warranted to define a group of patients at high risk for the development of left ventricular aneurysm and/or mural thrombus. Anticoagulants should be considered in patients in whom mural thrombi develop as a complication of their infarction. Patients with congestive cardiomyopathy should be considered for long-term anticoagulation. These recommendations are all tempered by the realization that the use of anticoagulant therapy is not without its own risks. The decision to anticoagulate must be balanced against each individual patient's suitability for such therapy and the individual likelihood of the development of side effects.

  2. An Ocean Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Frank; Graham, Ada

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a class project on oceans, fishes, and fishing industries around the world. Groups of students make a mural of the world, filling the oceans with accurate drawings of fish, fishing boats, and fishing equipment. Students learn about the importance of fish in various cultures and about the migration routes of fish. Includes a resource…

  3. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  4. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  5. An Ocean Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Frank; Graham, Ada

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a class project on oceans, fishes, and fishing industries around the world. Groups of students make a mural of the world, filling the oceans with accurate drawings of fish, fishing boats, and fishing equipment. Students learn about the importance of fish in various cultures and about the migration routes of fish. Includes a resource…

  6. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  7. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  8. Metal hyperaccumulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Ute

    2010-01-01

    During the history of life on Earth, tectonic and climatic change repeatedly generated large territories that were virtually devoid of life and exhibited harsh environmental conditions. The ability of a few specialist pioneer plants to colonize such hostile environments was thus of paramount ecological importance for the continuous maintenance of primary production over time. Yet, we know very little about how extreme traits evolve and function in plants. Recent breakthroughs have given first insights into the molecular basis underlying the complex extreme model trait of metal hyperaccumulation and associated metal hypertolerance. This review gives an introduction into the hyperaccumulator research field and its history; provides an overview of hyperaccumulator germplasm; describes the state of the art of our understanding of the physiological, molecular, and genetic basis underlying metal hyperaccumulation and its evolution; and highlights future research needs and opportunities.

  9. Mural Painting as Inclusive Art Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kong

    2010-01-01

    Traditional art education, like other academic disciplines, emphasizes competitiveness and individualism. Through a mural painting curriculum, learners participate in mural art and history appreciation, are active in mural theme or content construction, and engage in hands-on mural design and painting processes. When mural paintings are produced…

  10. Is it worth hyperaccumulating Ni on non-serpentine soils? Decomposition dynamics of mixed-species litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni across serpentine and non-serpentine environments.

    PubMed

    Adamidis, George C; Kazakou, Elena; Aloupi, Maria; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G

    2016-06-01

    Nickel (Ni)-hyperaccumulating species produce high-Ni litters and may potentially influence important ecosystem processes such as decomposition. Although litters resembling the natural community conditions are essential in order to predict decomposition dynamics, decomposition of mixed-species litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni has never been studied. This study aims to test the effect of different litter mixtures containing hyperaccumulated Ni on decomposition and Ni release across serpentine and non-serpentine soils. Three different litter mixtures were prepared based on the relative abundance of the dominant species in three serpentine soils in the island of Lesbos, Greece where the Ni-hyperaccumulator Alyssum lesbiacum is present. Each litter mixture decomposed on its original serpentine habitat and on an adjacent non-serpentine habitat, in order to investigate whether the decomposition rates differ across the contrasted soils. In order to make comparisons across litter mixtures and to investigate whether additive or non-additive patterns of mass loss occur, a control non-serpentine site was used. Mass loss and Ni release were measured after 90, 180 and 270 d of field exposure. The decomposition rates and Ni release had higher values on serpentine soils after all periods of field exposure. The recorded rapid release of hyperaccumulated Ni is positively related to the initial litter Ni concentration. No differences were found in the decomposition of the three different litter mixtures at the control non-serpentine site, while their patterns of mass loss were additive. Our results: (1) demonstrate the rapid decomposition of litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni on serpentine soils, indicating the presence of metal-tolerant decomposers; and (2) imply the selective decomposition of low-Ni parts of litters by the decomposers on non-serpentine soils. This study provides support for the elemental allelopathy hypothesis of hyperaccumulation, presenting the

  11. 7. INTERIOR DETAIL OF MURAL IN LOBBY. THE MURAL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR DETAIL OF MURAL IN LOBBY. THE MURAL IS PAINTED IN PASTEL SHADES, AND A REFLECTION OF THE BALUSTRADE OF THE OPPOSITE STAIRWAY IS VISIBLE IN THE MIRROR - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  12. INTERIOR DETAIL OF MURAL IN LOBBY. THE MURAL IS PAINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL OF MURAL IN LOBBY. THE MURAL IS PAINTED IN PASTEL SHADES, AND A REFLECTION OF THE BALUSTRADE OF THE OPPOSITE STAIRWAY IS VISIBLE IN THE MIRROR. - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  13. Ecological Mural as Community Reconnection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang Song, Young Imm; Gammel, Jo Ann

    2011-01-01

    Murals are particularly visually captivating forms of public art due to their size and accessibility. Mural images also capture public attention and provoke viewers to explore layers of meaning and find hidden stories. They are often in places that people come to visit, study, play, congregate and discuss matters that may relate to the content of…

  14. Ecological Mural as Community Reconnection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang Song, Young Imm; Gammel, Jo Ann

    2011-01-01

    Murals are particularly visually captivating forms of public art due to their size and accessibility. Mural images also capture public attention and provoke viewers to explore layers of meaning and find hidden stories. They are often in places that people come to visit, study, play, congregate and discuss matters that may relate to the content of…

  15. Chalk Murals and Great Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweizer, Kay

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Annual Chalk Mural project done by the members of the National Art Honor Society at the Sacramento County Day School. Discusses the tradition of the annual project and the planning and research involved. Focuses on the 7th Annual Chalk Mural featuring Wayne Thiebaud. (CMK)

  16. Chalk Murals and Great Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweizer, Kay

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Annual Chalk Mural project done by the members of the National Art Honor Society at the Sacramento County Day School. Discusses the tradition of the annual project and the planning and research involved. Focuses on the 7th Annual Chalk Mural featuring Wayne Thiebaud. (CMK)

  17. Agronomy of strip intercropping broccoli with alyssum for biological control of aphids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic broccoli growers in California typically control aphids by intercropping broccoli with strips of alyssum (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.) which attracts hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) that are important predators of aphids. A three year study with transplanted organic broccoli in Salinas, ...

  18. Waste or substrate for metal hyperaccumulating plants - The potential of phytomining on waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Theresa; Kisser, Johannes; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Phytomining could represent an innovative low-cost technology for the selective recovery of valuable trace elements from secondary resources. In this context the potential of phytomining from waste incineration bottom ash was tested in a pot experiment. Fresh bottom ash was acidified, leached to reduce salinity and amended with organic material to obtain a suitable substrate for plant growth. Two hyperaccumulator species, Alyssum serpyllifolium subsp. lusitanicum and Sedum plumbizincicola as well as three metal tolerant species, Brassica napus, B. juncea and Nicotiana tabacum were tested for their phytomining potential on the pre-treated and amended bottom ashes from municipal solid waste and hazardous waste incineration. The hyperaccumulators had severe difficulties to establish on the bottom ash and to produce sufficient biomass, likely due to salinity and Cu toxicity. Nevertheless, concentrations of Ni in A. serpyllifolium and Zn in S. plumbizincicola were high, but total metal removal was limited by the low biomass production and was clearly less than on metalliferous soils. The Brassica species proved to be more tolerant to salinity and high Cu concentrations and produced considerably higher biomass, but total metal removal was limited by rather low shoot concentrations. The observed limitations of the phytomining process along with currently low market prices of Ni and Zn suggest that further optimisation of the process is required in order to make phytomining economically feasible on the tested waste incineration bottom ashes.

  19. Patriotic Mural: An Artistic Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfi, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Explains how students created artwork as a therapeutic outlet after the attack on the World Trade Center (New York) on September 11th, 2001. Describes a project that focused on patriotism in which students created murals with quotes from national hymns. (CMK)

  20. Patriotic Mural: An Artistic Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfi, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Explains how students created artwork as a therapeutic outlet after the attack on the World Trade Center (New York) on September 11th, 2001. Describes a project that focused on patriotism in which students created murals with quotes from national hymns. (CMK)

  1. Mexican American Murals: Making a Place in the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary

    This curriculum unit helps teachers and students explore important murals by Mexican American artists in Los Angeles (California), examine murals from the past, and work together to make their own murals. The unit suggests questions to be considered in the classroom: Why do people make murals? Why does Los Angeles have more murals than any other…

  2. Molecular mechanisms of metal hyperaccumulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian; Schat, Henk

    2009-03-01

    Metal hyperaccumulator plants accumulate and detoxify extraordinarily high concentrations of metal ions in their shoots. Metal hyperaccumulation is a fascinating phenomenon, which has interested scientists for over a century. Hyperaccumulators constitute an exceptional biological material for understanding mechanisms regulating plant metal homeostasis as well as plant adaptation to extreme metallic environments.Our understanding of metal hyperaccumulation physiology has recently increased as a result of the development of molecular tools. This review presents key aspects of our current understanding of plant metal – in particular cadmium (Cd),nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) – hyperaccumulation.

  3. Facultative hyperaccumulation of heavy metals and metalloids.

    PubMed

    Pollard, A Joseph; Reeves, Roger D; Baker, Alan J M

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 500 species of plants are known to hyperaccumulate heavy metals and metalloids. The majority are obligate metallophytes, species that are restricted to metalliferous soils. However, a smaller but increasing list of plants are "facultative hyperaccumulators" that hyperaccumulate heavy metals when occurring on metalliferous soils, yet also occur commonly on normal, non-metalliferous soils. This paper reviews the biology of facultative hyperaccumulators and the opportunities they provide for ecological and evolutionary research. The existence of facultative hyperaccumulator populations across a wide edaphic range allows intraspecific comparisons of tolerance and uptake physiology. This approach has been used to study zinc and cadmium hyperaccumulation by Noccaea (Thlaspi) caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri, and it will be instructive to make similar comparisons on species that are distributed even more abundantly on normal soil. Over 90% of known hyperaccumulators occur on serpentine (ultramafic) soil and accumulate nickel, yet there have paradoxically been few experimental studies of facultative nickel hyperaccumulation. Several hypotheses suggested to explain the evolution of hyperaccumulation seem unlikely when most populations of a species occur on normal soil, where plants cannot hyperaccumulate due to low metal availability. In such species, it may be that hyperaccumulation is an ancestral phylogenetic trait or an anomalous manifestation of physiological mechanisms evolved on normal soils, and may or may not have direct adaptive benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Agronomic aspects of strip intercropping lettuce with alyssum for biological control of aphids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic growers in California typically devote 5 to 10% of the area in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) fields to insectary strips of alyssum (Lobularia maritime (L.) Desv.) to attract syrphid flies (Syrphidae) whose larvae provide biological control of aphids. A 2-year study with organic romaine lettuc...

  5. Time-Lapse and the Shadow Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrich, Milt

    1979-01-01

    Describes a mural project designed to introduce students to the concept of overlapping similar images as a way of depicting a time sequence. This article is one of four articles in this issue on elementary-level mural projects. (Author/SJL)

  6. Arsenic Hyperaccumulation Strategies: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Souri, Zahra; Karimi, Naser; Sandalio, Luisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution, which is on the increase around the world, poses a growing threat to the environment. Phytoremediation, an important green technology, uses different strategies, including As uptake, transport, translocation, and detoxification, to remediate this metalloid. Arsenic hyperaccumulator plants have developed various strategies to accumulate and tolerate high concentrations of As. In these plants, the formation of AsIII complexes with GSH and phytochelatins and their transport into root and shoot vacuoles constitute important mechanisms for coping with As stress. The oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the principal toxic effects of As; moreover, the strong antioxidative defenses in hyperaccumulator plants could constitute an important As detoxification strategy. On the other hand, nitric oxide activates antioxidant enzyme and phytochelatins biosynthesis which enhances As stress tolerance in plants. Although several studies have focused on transcription, metabolomics, and proteomic changes in plants induced by As, the mechanisms involved in As transport, translocation, and detoxification in hyperaccumulator plants need to be studied in greater depth. This review updates recent progress made in the study of As uptake, translocation, chelation, and detoxification in As hyperaccumulator plants. PMID:28770198

  7. Arsenic Hyperaccumulation Strategies: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Souri, Zahra; Karimi, Naser; Sandalio, Luisa M

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution, which is on the increase around the world, poses a growing threat to the environment. Phytoremediation, an important green technology, uses different strategies, including As uptake, transport, translocation, and detoxification, to remediate this metalloid. Arsenic hyperaccumulator plants have developed various strategies to accumulate and tolerate high concentrations of As. In these plants, the formation of AsIII complexes with GSH and phytochelatins and their transport into root and shoot vacuoles constitute important mechanisms for coping with As stress. The oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the principal toxic effects of As; moreover, the strong antioxidative defenses in hyperaccumulator plants could constitute an important As detoxification strategy. On the other hand, nitric oxide activates antioxidant enzyme and phytochelatins biosynthesis which enhances As stress tolerance in plants. Although several studies have focused on transcription, metabolomics, and proteomic changes in plants induced by As, the mechanisms involved in As transport, translocation, and detoxification in hyperaccumulator plants need to be studied in greater depth. This review updates recent progress made in the study of As uptake, translocation, chelation, and detoxification in As hyperaccumulator plants.

  8. Potential use of metal hyperaccumulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chaney, R.; Li, Yin-Ming; Green, C.

    1996-12-31

    Experiments involving biological accumulation of metal contaminants are summarized in the article. The focus is on identification of hyperaccumulating plant species for cadmium and zinc. Two of the studies examined Thlaspi caerulescens (alpine pennycress) as a bioadsorbent; the third study compared different species of Thlaspi. The T. caerulescens accumulated both metals, but with low yields. Other plant species were identified which adsorbed cadmium or zinc, but not both metals.

  9. Analysis of the brain mural cell transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    He, Liqun; Vanlandewijck, Michael; Raschperger, Elisabeth; Andaloussi Mäe, Maarja; Jung, Bongnam; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Ando, Koji; Hofmann, Jennifer; Keller, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes, the mural cells of blood microvessels, regulate microvascular development and function and have been implicated in many brain diseases. However, due to a paucity of defining markers, pericyte identification and functional characterization remain ambiguous and data interpretation problematic. In mice carrying two transgenic reporters, Pdgfrb-eGFP and NG2-DsRed, we found that double-positive cells were vascular mural cells, while the single reporters marked additional, but non-overlapping, neuroglial cells. Double-positive cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and analyzed by RNA sequencing. To reveal defining patterns of mural cell transcripts, we compared the RNA sequencing data with data from four previously published studies. The meta-analysis provided a conservative catalogue of 260 brain mural cell-enriched gene transcripts. We validated pericyte-specific expression of two novel markers, vitronectin (Vtn) and interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (Ifitm1), using fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We further analyzed signaling pathways and interaction networks of the pericyte-enriched genes in silico. This work provides novel insight into the molecular composition of brain mural cells. The reported gene catalogue facilitates identification of brain pericytes by providing numerous new candidate marker genes and is a rich source for new hypotheses for future studies of brain mural cell physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27725773

  10. 21. View West, Detail Mural, Children's Room, Rip Van Winkle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View West, Detail Mural, Children's Room, Rip Van Winkle Mural, Project of the CWA (Civil Works Administration) Completed May 1934. - Ives Memorial Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. Ecological aspects of plant selenium hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, A F; Pilon-Smits, E A H

    2012-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are plants that accumulate toxic elements to extraordinary levels. Selenium (Se) hyperaccumulators can contain 0.1-1.5% of their dry weight as Se, levels toxic to most other organisms. In this review we summarise what is known about the ecological functions and implications of Se (hyper)accumulation by plants. Selenium promotes hyperaccumulator growth and also offers a plant several ecological advantages through negative effects on Se-sensitive partners. High tissue Se levels reduce herbivory and pathogen infection, and high-Se litter deposition can inhibit neighbouring plants. There is no evidence for a cost of hyperaccumulation in terms of reproductive functions or pollinator visitation. Hyperaccumulators offer a niche for Se-tolerant herbivores, pollinators, microbes and neighbouring plants. They may even facilitate these partners through Se enrichment: neighbouring plants with elevated Se levels enjoy enhanced growth and reduced herbivory. Through combined negative and positive effects on ecological partners, Se hyperaccumulators likely affect local plant, microbial and animal species composition and richness, favouring Se-tolerant species at different trophic levels. By locally concentrating Se and altering its chemical form, Se hyperaccumulators likely play an important role in Se entry into, and Se cycling through, seleniferous ecosystems. These findings are of significance since they provide insight into the ecological reverberations of Se hyperaccumulation, and shed light on the possible selection pressures that have led to the evolution of this fascinating phenomenon. Better ecological insight will also help in the management of seleniferous areas and the agricultural production of Se-rich crops for phytoremediation or biofortification. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. The Politics of Clay: The American-Soviet Mural Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Lynn

    1990-01-01

    Describes a U.S.-Soviet mural project where citizens from Milwaukee, Wisconsin and citizens from Leningrad created two peace murals--one in the United States and the other in the Soviet Union. The murals were exchanged. Participants made their own clay using dry clay and water before creating their impressions of peace and friendship. (KM)

  13. The Politics of Clay: The American-Soviet Mural Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Lynn

    1990-01-01

    Describes a U.S.-Soviet mural project where citizens from Milwaukee, Wisconsin and citizens from Leningrad created two peace murals--one in the United States and the other in the Soviet Union. The murals were exchanged. Participants made their own clay using dry clay and water before creating their impressions of peace and friendship. (KM)

  14. Mural Ecology: An Interesting Alternative or a Useful Adjunct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinchin, Ian M.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests mural ecology as an alternative to studying other habitats, providing examples of zonation patterns, food webs, effects of physical factors, and influence of man on mural communities. Also suggests incorporating these topics into ecology courses, offering ideas for field work and comparing mural to traditional ecological studies.…

  15. Investigating murals with terahertz reflective tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Minjie; Sun, Wenfeng; Wang, Xinke; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Qunxi; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging technology has been proposed to be used in the non-invasive detection of murals. THz-TDS images provide structural data of the sample that cannot be obtained with other complementary techniques. In this paper, two types of defects hidden in the plaster used to simulate the cases of defects in the murals, have been investigated by the terahertz reflected time domain spectroscopy imaging system. These preset defects include a leaf slice and a slit built in the plaster. With the terahertz reflective tomography, information about defects has been determined involving the thickness from the surface of sample to the built-in defect, the profile and distribution of the defect. With this THz tomography, different defects with the changes of optical thickness and their relative refractive index have been identified. The application of reflective pulsed terahertz imaging has been extended to the defect detection of the murals.

  16. RVOT mural and mitral valve endocarditis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Maadh; Cardozo, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Mural endocarditis is a very rare condition. This entity involves bacterial growth on cardiac walls. In addition, concomitant valvular endocarditis, along with mural endocarditis, is an extremely rare combination. The diagnosis of mural endocarditis is difficult and requires more advanced cardiac imaging, such as a transesophageal echocardiogram. The differential diagnoses of mural masses include vegetations, thrombi, metastasis, and benign and malignant tumors. We present a rare and unusual case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with findings of both right ventricular outflow tract mural endocarditis and valvular endocarditis involving the mitral valve.

  17. RVOT mural and mitral valve endocarditis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, Maadh; Cardozo, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Mural endocarditis is a very rare condition. This entity involves bacterial growth on cardiac walls. In addition, concomitant valvular endocarditis, along with mural endocarditis, is an extremely rare combination. The diagnosis of mural endocarditis is difficult and requires more advanced cardiac imaging, such as a transesophageal echocardiogram. The differential diagnoses of mural masses include vegetations, thrombi, metastasis, and benign and malignant tumors. We present a rare and unusual case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with findings of both right ventricular outflow tract mural endocarditis and valvular endocarditis involving the mitral valve. PMID:26702695

  18. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    PubMed Central

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  19. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants.

    PubMed

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-09-20

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their "strange" behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs.

  20. Kids Paint Mural to Send Message!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Callie; Adams, Alexis

    1994-01-01

    Describes the efforts of a group called Teens Networking Together (TNT) to paint a mural and send a message to their neighbors about taking care of the environment and taking pride in their cultural history. The teens focused on the importance of clean water and waste disposal issues. (LZ)

  1. Phytomining of valuable metals from waste incineration residues using hyperaccumulator plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenkranz, Theresa; Kisser, Johannes; Gattringer, Heinz; Iordanopoulos-Kisser, Monika; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    involving six plant species and an unplanted control as well as two different substrates. Fast growing species (Brassica napus, B. juncea, Nicotiana tabacum) will be harvested after two months, whereas slowly growing hyperaccumulators (Sedum plumbizincicola, Alyssum pintodasilvae) will be harvested after four months of growth. The plant tissue will be analyzed for the accumulation of the target metals. Moreover, the influence of plants on the substrate and solubility of certain metals is going to be evaluated.

  2. MURAL ON BUILDING OPPOSITE LIBRARY ON LEHIGH AVENUE DEPICTING LIBRARIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MURAL ON BUILDING OPPOSITE LIBRARY ON LEHIGH AVENUE DEPICTING LIBRARIAN LILLIAN MARRERO - Free Library of Philadelphia, Lehigh Avenue Branch, 601 West Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Metal Hyperaccumulation Armors Plants against Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fones, Helen; Davis, Calum A. R.; Rico, Arantza; Fang, Fang; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Preston, Gail M.

    2010-01-01

    Metal hyperaccumulation, in which plants store exceptional concentrations of metals in their shoots, is an unusual trait whose evolutionary and ecological significance has prompted extensive debate. Hyperaccumulator plants are usually found on metalliferous soils, and it has been proposed that hyperaccumulation provides a defense against herbivores and pathogens, an idea termed the ‘elemental defense’ hypothesis. We have investigated this hypothesis using the crucifer Thlaspi caerulescens, a hyperaccumulator of zinc, nickel, and cadmium, and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm). Using leaf inoculation assays, we have shown that hyperaccumulation of any of the three metals inhibits growth of Psm in planta. Metal concentrations in the bulk leaf and in the apoplast, through which the pathogen invades the leaf, were shown to be sufficient to account for the defensive effect by comparison with in vitro dose–response curves. Further, mutants of Psm with increased and decreased zinc tolerance created by transposon insertion had either enhanced or reduced ability, respectively, to grow in high-zinc plants, indicating that the metal affects the pathogen directly. Finally, we have shown that bacteria naturally colonizing T. caerulescens leaves at the site of a former lead–zinc mine have high zinc tolerance compared with bacteria isolated from non-accumulating plants, suggesting local adaptation to high metal. These results demonstrate that the disease resistance observed in metal-exposed T. caerulescens can be attributed to a direct effect of metal hyperaccumulation, which may thus be functionally analogous to the resistance conferred by antimicrobial metabolites in non-accumulating plants. PMID:20838462

  4. Metal hyperaccumulation armors plants against disease.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen; Davis, Calum A R; Rico, Arantza; Fang, Fang; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2010-09-09

    Metal hyperaccumulation, in which plants store exceptional concentrations of metals in their shoots, is an unusual trait whose evolutionary and ecological significance has prompted extensive debate. Hyperaccumulator plants are usually found on metalliferous soils, and it has been proposed that hyperaccumulation provides a defense against herbivores and pathogens, an idea termed the 'elemental defense' hypothesis. We have investigated this hypothesis using the crucifer Thlaspi caerulescens, a hyperaccumulator of zinc, nickel, and cadmium, and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm). Using leaf inoculation assays, we have shown that hyperaccumulation of any of the three metals inhibits growth of Psm in planta. Metal concentrations in the bulk leaf and in the apoplast, through which the pathogen invades the leaf, were shown to be sufficient to account for the defensive effect by comparison with in vitro dose-response curves. Further, mutants of Psm with increased and decreased zinc tolerance created by transposon insertion had either enhanced or reduced ability, respectively, to grow in high-zinc plants, indicating that the metal affects the pathogen directly. Finally, we have shown that bacteria naturally colonizing T. caerulescens leaves at the site of a former lead-zinc mine have high zinc tolerance compared with bacteria isolated from non-accumulating plants, suggesting local adaptation to high metal. These results demonstrate that the disease resistance observed in metal-exposed T. caerulescens can be attributed to a direct effect of metal hyperaccumulation, which may thus be functionally analogous to the resistance conferred by antimicrobial metabolites in non-accumulating plants.

  5. Xylem exudate composition and root-to-shoot nickel translocation in Alyssum species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An improved understanding of Ni root-to-shoot translocation mechanism in hyperaccumulators is necessary to increase Ni uptake efficiency for phytoextraction technologies. It is presumed that an important aspect of Ni translocation and storage involves chelation with organic ligands. It has been re...

  6. All Together Now: A District-Wide Mural Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densel, Shari

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the development and implementation of a district-wide mural project that would highlight the strength of the arts and encourage collaboration between all the art teachers, students of multiple ages, and the community. Over 350 students, exhibited their talents and skills by collaborating on a three-paneled ceramic mural that…

  7. Out of America: Exploring Collaborative Mural Teaching in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kong

    2012-01-01

    In February 2010, the author arrived in the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, to teach mural painting at the National Academy of Art for his five-month Fulbright U.S. Scholarship Program lecturing award. He targeted Bulgaria as his host country in his 2009-2010 Fulbright U.S. Scholarship Program application because of its rich mural painting culture. He…

  8. Knowing, Experiencing and Feeling: A Mural for Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jenny

    1980-01-01

    Described is a project in which art education graduate students in Perth, Australia, built a story mural for blind children. Using an Australian adaptation of "The Wizard of Oz," they created a mural with textures and objects that illustrated the story carried in print and braille. (SJL)

  9. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    PubMed

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D

    1999-11-07

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The data for tolerance are consistent with a single major gene for this character (although the number of genes for hyperaccumulation cannot be determined), and is probably not very large.

  10. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    PubMed Central

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D

    1999-01-01

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The data for tolerance are consistent with a single major gene for this character (although the number of genes for hyperaccumulation cannot be determined), and is probably not very large. PMID:10649632

  11. The arsenic hyperaccumulator fern Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-En; Yan, Xiu-Lan; Liao, Xiao-Yong; Li, Xia

    2009-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contaminated soils and waters are becoming major global environmental and human health risks. The identification of natural hyperaccumulators of As opens the door for phytoremediation of the arsenic contaminant. Pteris vittata is the first identified naturally evolving As hyperaccumulator. More than a decade after its discovery, we have made great progress in understanding the uptake, transport, and detoxification of As in the fern. The molecular mechanisms controlling As accumulation in P. vittata are now beginning to be recognized. In this review, we will try to summarize what we have learned about this As accumulator, with particular emphasis on the current knowledge of the physiological and molecular mechanisms of arsenic phytoremediation. We also discuss the potential strategies to further enhance phytoextraction abilities of P. vittata.

  12. Accumulation of heavy metals in soils and plants of Polar Urals and South Chukotka in contrast geochemical conditions in connection with the search for hyperaccumulator species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva-Popova, Natalja Vadimovna; Bech, Jaume; Drozdova, Irina Valeryevna; Roca, Núria

    2017-04-01

    This study highlights the heavy metals (HM) distribution in soils and their uptake by wild plants that grow to the soils formed on the ultramafic and acid rocks of Polar Urals and South Chukotka in Arctic Russia. The contents of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and Co have been determined by the atomic absorption spectrometry more than in 100 plant species of 25 families and in 92 soil samples. The data indicate that the levels of Fe, Cr and especially Ni in the soils on the ultramafic rocks exceeded those on acid rocks. It has been found that the mineral composition of plant species varies depending on edaphic conditions. Greater variability was noticed in the uptake of HM by various plant species on the studied soils. Taxon-specific features in the accumulation of heavy metals in plants of these regions have been revealed for the first time. Plants accumulation results showed that species Thlaspi cochleariforme and Alyssum obovatum (Brassicaceae) could act as hyperaccumulators Ni. The excessive concentrations of Cr and Ni in some plants species can be used for mineral prospecting. The excess of Ni is serious environmental problem and health risks in the inhabitants of the study areas.

  13. Development and characterization of electrosprayed Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum nanoparticles for encapsulation of d-limonene.

    PubMed

    Khoshakhlagh, Khadije; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Allafchian, Alireza

    2017-03-15

    In this study, the feasibility of developing Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum (AHSG) nanocapsules containing d-limonene by electrospraying has been investigated. d-limonene emulsions with constant AHSG (0.5% w/w) and various flavor concentrations (10-30% based on gum weight) with 0.1% Tween 20 were electrosprayed at 20kV and 0.1ml/h of flow rate. The effects of key parameters of emulsions (rheological properties, droplet size, surface tension and electrical conductivity) on the morphology of structures have been studied. The morphology of nanocapsules had strong dependency on solution properties. The aggregated irregular shaped nanoparticles were obtained from electrospraying of AHSG solution. After incorporation of 10 and 20% d-limonene, spherical nanocapsules were yielded. However, morphology of nanocapsules changed to nanofibers by increasing the flavor content to 30%. The encapsulation efficiency for 10 and 20% d-limonene loaded nanocapsules was around 87-93%. Attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were also employed to study the physicochemical characteristics of nanocapsules. These experiments provided evidences that electrosprayed AHSG nanoparticles introduce a novel and efficient carrier for encapsulation of bioactive ingredients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Is hybridization driving the evolution of climatic niche in Alyssum montanum.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Nils; de La Harpe, Marylaure; Litsios, Glenn; Zozomová-Lihová, Judita; Španiel, Stanislav; Marhold, Karol; Barker, Michael S; Alvarez, Nadir

    2016-07-01

    After decades of interest, the contribution of hybridization to ecological diversification remains unclear. Hybridization is a potent source of novelty, but nascent hybrid lineages must overcome reproductive and ecological competition from their parental species. Here, we assess whether hybrid speciation is advantageous over alternative modes of speciation, by comparing the geographical and ecological ranges and climatic niche evolutionary rates of stabilized allopolyploid vs. autopolyploids in the Alyssum montanum species complex. We combined an extensive review of studies addressing the systematics and genetic diversity of A. montanum s.l., with flow cytometry and cloning of nuclear markers, to establish the ploidy level and putative hybrid nature of 205 populations. The respective geographic distribution and climatic niche evolution dynamics of the allo- and autopolyploids were investigated using multivariate analyses and comparative phylogenetic approaches. As expected by theory, allopolyploids occur mainly along contact zones and are generally spatially overlapping with their diploid counterparts. However, they demonstrate higher rates of niche evolution and expand into different climatic conditions than those of their diploid congeners. In contrast, autopolyploids show lower rates of niche evolution, occupy ecological niches similar to their ancestors and are restricted to less competitive and peripheral geographic areas. Hybridization thus seems advantageous by promoting ecological niche evolution and more readily allowing escape from competitive exclusion. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Magnetic remanence of hematite-bearing murals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, R.; Zanella, E.; Saudino, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a series of experiments designed to test the ability of hematite-bearing colors to record the direction of the ambient magnetic field. Plasterboards accurately oriented with respect to the Earth's magnetic field were painted with red tempera colors prepared with hematite pigments. Magnetic measurements indicate that the color film retains a remanent magnetization and acquires a well developed magnetic fabric. The remanence direction is close to, yet slightly deviated from the Earth's magnetic field. The deviation is interpreted to result from preferential alignment of the pigment grains parallel to the plasterboard surface and depends on both its orientation with respect to magnetic north and the degree of magnetic anisotropy of the color film, which in turn varies according to the pigment used. Investigation of the magnetic remanence of murals may complement archaeomagnetic information derived from traditional materials such as baked and fired structures.

  16. Prospecting for hyperaccumulators of trace elements: a review.

    PubMed

    Krzciuk, Karina; Gałuszka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Specific plant species that can take up and accumulate abnormally high concentrations of elements in their aboveground tissues are referred to as "hyperaccumulators". The use of this term is justified in the case of enormous element-binding capacity of plants growing in their natural habitats and showing no toxicity symptoms. An increasing interest in the study of hyperaccumulators results from their potential applications in environmental biotechnology (phytoremediation, phytomining) and their emerging role in nanotechnology. The highest number of plant species with confirmed hyperaccumulative properties has been reported for hyperaccumulators of nickel, cadmium, zinc, manganese, arsenic and selenium. More limited data exist for plants accumulating other elements, including common pollutants (chromium, lead and boron) or elements of commercial value, such as copper, gold and rare earth elements. Different approaches have been used for the study of hyperaccumulators - geobotanical, chemical, biochemical and genetic. The chemical approach is the most important in screening for new hyperaccumulators. This article presents and critically reviews current trends in new hyperaccumulator research, emphasizing analytical methodology that is applied in identification of new hyperaccumulators of trace elements and its future perspectives.

  17. The proteomics of heavy metal hyperaccumulation by plants.

    PubMed

    Visioli, Giovanna; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-02-21

    Hyperaccumulators are distinguished from non-hyperaccumulators on the basis of their capacity to extract heavy metal ions from the soil, their more efficient root-to-shoot translocation of these ions and their greater ability to detoxify and sequester heavy metals in the shoot. The understanding of the mechanisms underlying metal ion accumulation has progressed beyond the relevant biochemistry and physiology to encompass the genetic and molecular regulatory systems which differentiate hyperaccumulators from non-hyperaccumulators. This paper reviews the literature surrounding the application of proteomics technology to plant metal hyperaccumulation, in particular involving the elements As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The hyperaccumulation process across a number of unrelated plant species appears to be associated with proteins involved in energy metabolism, the oxidative stress response and abiotic and biotic stress. The relevance of transducers of the metal stress response to the phenomenon of hyperaccumulation is summarized. Proteomic data complement the more voluminous genomic and transcriptomic data sets in providing a more nuanced picture of the process, and should therefore help in the identification of the major genetic determinants of the hyperaccumulation phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 13. GENERAL VIEW IN HOUSE LOUNGE; THOMAS HART BENTON MURALS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GENERAL VIEW IN HOUSE LOUNGE; THOMAS HART BENTON MURALS DEPICT SOCIAL HISTORY OF MISSOURI - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  19. 9. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT DEARBORN - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  20. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF PODIUM, SENATE CHAMBER; MURAL TO LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF PODIUM, SENATE CHAMBER; MURAL TO LEFT DEPICTS 'FRANK P. BLAIR'S SPEECH AT LOUISIANA 1866' - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  1. 60. 451 MADISON AVENUE, DRAWING ROOM, NORTH WALL, WEST MURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. 451 MADISON AVENUE, DRAWING ROOM, NORTH WALL, WEST MURAL PAINTING SHOWING A WOMAN (See NY-5635-54 for original location) - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  2. 35. Writing room with fireplace and a Chinese style mural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Writing room with fireplace and a Chinese style mural painted by Alison Stilwell. (removed 1997) - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  3. Effects of arsenic on nitrogen metabolism in arsenic hyperaccumulator and non-hyperaccumulator ferns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the effects of arsenic on the in vitro activities of the enzymes (nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) involved in nitrate metabolism in the roots, rhizomes, and fronds of two four-month old fern plants, Pteris vittata, an arsenic-hyperaccumulator, and Pteris ensiformis, ...

  4. 76 FR 63701 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Diego Rivera: Murals for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Diego Rivera: Murals for the Museum of Modern Art'' SUMMARY... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Diego Rivera: Murals for The Museum of Modern Art,'' imported...

  5. An Intercultural Peace Mural Project: Let's Make a Peaceful World Hand in Hand!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Jaehan

    2012-01-01

    Murals have become a powerful art form for portraying antiwar, human rights, social justice, and human dignity issues. Educators and artists have conducted mural workshops with adolescents in international settings to educate them about peace, human rights, and cultural tolerance. Learning with murals has been shown to be pedagogically meaningful…

  6. Recipe for Working Together: Gen. Colin Powell and the Baker's Dough Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a baker's-dough mural that would become a permanent part of the community and relates a visit made to the Sacramento (California) Boys & Girls Club by General Colin Powell. Discusses Powell's part in creating the mural. Includes the steps for how to make a Baker's-dough mural. (CMK)

  7. Recipe for Working Together: Gen. Colin Powell and the Baker's Dough Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a baker's-dough mural that would become a permanent part of the community and relates a visit made to the Sacramento (California) Boys & Girls Club by General Colin Powell. Discusses Powell's part in creating the mural. Includes the steps for how to make a Baker's-dough mural. (CMK)

  8. An Intercultural Peace Mural Project: Let's Make a Peaceful World Hand in Hand!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Jaehan

    2012-01-01

    Murals have become a powerful art form for portraying antiwar, human rights, social justice, and human dignity issues. Educators and artists have conducted mural workshops with adolescents in international settings to educate them about peace, human rights, and cultural tolerance. Learning with murals has been shown to be pedagogically meaningful…

  9. Hyperaccumulators, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and stress of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Miransari, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Use of plants, with hyperaccumulating ability or in association with soil microbes including the symbiotic fungi, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), are among the most common biological methods of treating heavy metals in soil. Both hyperaccumulating plants and AM fungi have some unique abilities, which make them suitable to treat heavy metals. Hyperaccumulator plants have some genes, being expressed at the time of heavy metal pollution, and can accordingly localize high concentration of heavy metals to their tissues, without showing the toxicity symptoms. A key solution to the issue of heavy metal pollution may be the proper integration of hyperaccumulator plants and AM fungi. The interactions between the soil microbes and the host plant can also be important for the treatment of soils polluted with heavy metals.

  10. Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma with sarcoma-like mural nodule

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, R. F. R.; Stoot, J. H. M. B.; Blok, P.

    2007-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal cystadenomas are extremely rare. This is the first report in literature to describe a primary retroperitoneal cystadenoma with a sarcoma-like mural nodule. A 45-year-old woman complained of a left-sided abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed a cystic mass with a mural nodule, which seemed to originate from the tail of the pancreas. At laparotomy the cyst was not adhered to the pancreas but localized retroperitoneally. Histologic examination showed a mucinous cystadenoma with only foci of borderline malignancy with a mural “sarcoma-like” nodule. In view of the surgical and histopathological findings, the mucinous cystadenoma was regarded as primary retroperitoneal. This case demonstrates that in the era of radiological preoperative refinement, pathological diagnosis remains of utmost importance, especially for rare cases. PMID:17690906

  11. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez del Río, M.; Martinetto, P.; Somogyi, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Dooryhée, E.; Peltier, N.; Alianelli, L.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.

    2004-10-01

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used.

  12. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  13. 4D Visualization of Painted Sculpture and Murals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, M. Y.; Tong, H.; Shen, L.; Wang, R. X.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Z. C.; Hu, Q. W.; Zhu, Y. X.; Zhang, H.

    2015-08-01

    Most cultural heritage applications address visualization with using various media or platforms: desktop-based multimedia presentations, museum kiosks, or videos produced with computer animation. However, these techniques can not directly reveal or show the course that the colorful surface of painted sculpture and murals becomes faint along with the change of the climate and time. Most current techniques just preserve the current appearance and disseminate the current situation of the painted sculpture and murals. The course how these forms of cultural heritage change along the time has not been visualized. In this paper we developed an approach to modelling of painted sculpture and murals that has undergone changes over the years. Different hypotheses has also be given if there is uncertainty. A painted sculpture of Mogao Grottoes is used to demonstate this approach.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of heavy metal hyperaccumulation and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoe; Feng, Ying; He, Zhenli; Stoffella, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    A relatively small group of hyperaccumulator plants is capable of sequestering heavy metals in their shoot tissues at high concentrations. In recent years, major scientific progress has been made in understanding the physiological mechanisms of metal uptake and transport in these plants. However, relatively little is known about the molecular bases of hyperaccumulation. In this paper, current progresses on understanding cellular/molecular mechanisms of metal tolerance/hyperaccumulation by plants are reviewed. The major processes involved in hyperaccumulation of trace metals from the soil to the shoots by hyperaccumulators include: (a) bioactivation of metals in the rhizosphere through root-microbe interaction; (b) enhanced uptake by metal transporters in the plasma membranes; (c) detoxification of metals by distributing to the apoplasts like binding to cell walls and chelation of metals in the cytoplasm with various ligands, such as phytochelatins, metallothioneins, metal-binding proteins; (d) sequestration of metals into the vacuole by tonoplast-located transporters. The growing application of molecular-genetic technologies led to the well understanding of mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance/accumulation in plants, and subsequently many transgenic plants with increased resistance and uptake of heavy metals were developed for the purpose of phytoremediation. Once the rate-limiting steps for uptake, translocation, and detoxification of metals in hyperaccumulating plants are identified, more informed construction of transgenic plants would result in improved applicability of the phytoremediation technology.

  15. Cadmium hyperaccumulation and reproductive traits in natural Thlaspi caerulescens populations.

    PubMed

    Basic, N; Keller, C; Fontanillas, P; Vittoz, P; Besnard, G; Galland, N

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, the metal hyperaccumulating plants have attracted considerable attention because of their potential use in decontamination of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, in most species, little is known regarding the function, the ecological and the evolutionary significances of hyperaccumulation. In our study, we investigated the parameters influencing the Cd concentration in plants as well as the biological implications of Cd hyperaccumulation in nine natural populations of Thlaspi caerulescens. First, we showed that Cd concentration in the plant was positively correlated with plant Zn, Fe, and Cu concentrations. This suggested that the physiological and/or molecular mechanisms for uptake, transport and/or accumulation of these four heavy metals interact with each other. Second, we specified a measure of Cd hyperaccumulation capacity by populations and showed that T. caerulescens plants originating from populations with high Cd hyperaccumulation capacity had better growth, by developing more and bigger leaves, taller stems, and produced more fruits and heavier seeds. These results suggest a tolerance/disposal role of Cd hyperaccumulation in this species.

  16. Effects of Cadmium on Nickel Tolerance and Accumulation in Alyssum species and Cabbage Grown in Nutrient Solution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nickel phytoextraction using hyperaccumulator plant species to accumulate Ni from mineralized and contaminated soils rich in Ni is an emerging technology. Serpentinite derived soils which contain Ni ore value have a very low ratio of Ca:Mg among soils due the nature of the parent rock. In crop plant...

  17. Influence of subsoil and Soil Volume on the accumulation of nickel by Alyssum corsicum grown on a serpentine soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: Test the effect of soil volume and presence of subsoil on Ni hyperaccumulation. Methods: A. corsicum Duby was grown for 3 months on Chrome loam topsoil and subsoil from near Reistertown, MD, in a test of growth and Ni accumulation with varied soil masses (2.8 and 5.6 kg pot-1) to study the im...

  18. On the Wall: Art Students Learn to Paint a Mural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Mississippi University for Women's studio art course that teaches students the ins and outs of mural making from inception and design to application of the final glaze. While students in other courses may spend the semester working toward a final exam or paper, this four-and-a-half-week summer course…

  19. Beautiful Walls: Reclaiming Urban Space through Mural Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Bethany J.

    2016-01-01

    During the nearly sixteen years she has lived and worked in inner city neighborhoods in New York, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Bethany Welch has seen communities reclaim these spaces by tackling the most visible things first. This includes clearing trash strewn vacant lots and creating murals on expansive exterior walls stained with marks of time.…

  20. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  1. 18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON INTERIOR WALL OF ELEVATOR SHAFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  2. 2. CENTENNIAL MURAL DEPICTING ROLE OF THE BRIDGE IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CENTENNIAL MURAL DEPICTING ROLE OF THE BRIDGE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GREENE; ON THE NE FACADE OF BUILDING ON THE NW CORNER OF 1ST AND TRAER STREETS - Traer Street Bridge, Spanning Shell Rock River at Traer Street, Greene, Butler County, IA

  3. On the Wall: Art Students Learn to Paint a Mural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Mississippi University for Women's studio art course that teaches students the ins and outs of mural making from inception and design to application of the final glaze. While students in other courses may spend the semester working toward a final exam or paper, this four-and-a-half-week summer course…

  4. University Extra-Mural Studies and Extension Outreach: Incompatibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The argument of this paper is that--within a wide range of university responses to the challenge of outreach--there grew up in the extra-mural or adult education departments of many UK universities an alternative epistemological paradigm to the older and more traditional extension programmes. This paradigm threatened the extension approach and has…

  5. 59. 451 MADISON AVENUE, DRAWING ROOM, NORTH WALL, CENTRAL MURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. 451 MADISON AVENUE, DRAWING ROOM, NORTH WALL, CENTRAL MURAL PAINTING SHOWING WOMAN ON A SWING (See NY-5635-54 for original location) - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  6. Roles of rhizobial symbionts in selenium hyperaccumulation in Astragalus (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Alford, Élan R; Lindblom, Stormy D; Pittarello, Marco; Freeman, John L; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Broeckling, Corey; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Paschke, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Are there dimensions of symbiotic root interactions that are overlooked because plant mineral nutrition is the foundation and, perhaps too often, the sole explanation through which we view these relationships? In this paper we investigate how the root nodule symbiosis in selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator Astragalus species influences plant selenium (Se) accumulation. In greenhouse studies, Se was added to nodulated and nonnodulated hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator Astragalus plants, followed by investigation of nitrogen (N)-Se relationships. Selenium speciation was also investigated, using x-ray microprobe analysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Nodulation enhanced biomass production and Se to S ratio in both hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator plants. The hyperaccumulator contained more Se when nodulated, while the nonaccumulator contained less S when nodulated. Shoot [Se] was positively correlated with shoot N in Se-hyperaccumulator species, but not in nonhyperaccumulator species. The x-ray microprobe analysis showed that hyperaccumulators contain significantly higher amounts of organic Se than nonhyperaccumulators. LC-MS of A. bisulcatus leaves revealed that nodulated plants contained more γ-glutamyl-methylselenocysteine (γ-Glu-MeSeCys) than nonnodulated plants, while MeSeCys levels were similar. Root nodule mutualism positively affects Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus. The microbial N supply particularly appears to contribute glutamate for the formation of γ-Glu-MeSeCys. Our results provide insight into the significance of symbiotic interactions in plant adaptation to edaphic conditions. Specifically, our findings illustrate that the importance of these relationships are not limited to alleviating macronutrient deficiencies. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  7. Effects of selenium hyperaccumulation on plant-plant interactions: evidence for elemental allelopathy?

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2011-07-01

    • Few studies have investigated plant-plant interactions involving hyperaccumulator plants. Here, we investigated the effect of selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation on neighboring plants. • Soil and litter Se concentrations were determined around the hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata and around the nonhyperaccumulators Medicago sativa and Helianthus pumilus. We also compared surrounding vegetative cover, species composition and Se concentration in two plant species (Artemisia ludoviciana and Symphyotrichum ericoides) growing either close to or far from Se hyperaccumulators. Then, Arabidopsis thaliana germination and growth were compared on soils collected next to the hyperaccumulators and the nonhyperaccumulators. • Soil collected around hyperaccumulators contained more Se (up to 266 mg Se kg(-1) ) than soil collected around nonhyperaccumulators. Vegetative ground cover was 10% lower around Se hyperaccumulators compared with nonhyperaccumulators. The Se concentration was higher in neighboring species A. ludoviciana and S. ericoides when growing close to, compared with far from, Se hyperaccumulators. A. thaliana showed reduced germination and growth, and higher Se accumulation, when grown on soil collected around Se hyperaccumulators compared with soil collected around nonaccumulators. • In conclusion, Se hyperaccumulators may increase the surrounding soil Se concentration (phytoenrichment). The enhanced soil Se contents around hyperaccumulators can impair the growth of Se-sensitive plant species, pointing to a possible role of Se hyperaccumulation in elemental allelopathy. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. The apoplasmic pathway via the root apex and lateral roots contributes to Cd hyperaccumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Qi; Jupa, Radek; Luo, Jipeng; Lux, Alexander; Kováč, Ján; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Yimei; Jan, Japenga; Liang, Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although the significance of apoplasmic barriers in roots with regards to the uptake of toxic elements is generally known, the contribution of apoplasmic bypasses (ABs) to cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation is little understood. Here, we employed a combination of stable isotopic tracer techniques, an ABs tracer, hydraulic measurements, suberin lamellae staining, metabolic inhibitors, and antitranspirants to investigate and quantify the impact of the ABs on translocation of Cd to the xylem in roots of a hyperaccumulating (H) ecotype and a non-hyperaccumulating (NH) ecotype of Sedum alfredii. In the H ecotype, the Cd content in the xylem sap was proportional to hydrostatic pressure, which was attributed to pressure-driven flow via the ABs. The contribution of the ABs to Cd transportation to the xylem was dependent on the Cd concentration applied to the H ecotype (up to 37% at the highest concentration used). Cd-treated H ecotype roots showed significantly higher hydraulic conductance compared with the NH ecotype (76 vs 52 × 10–8 m s–1MPa–1), which is in accordance with less extensive suberization due to reduced expression of suberin-related genes. The main entry sites of apoplasmically transported Cd were localized in the root apexes and lateral roots of the H ecotype, where suberin lamellae were not well developed. These findings highlight the significance of the apoplasmic bypass in Cd hyperaccumulation in hyperaccumulating ecotypes of S. alfredii. PMID:28204505

  9. The apoplasmic pathway via the root apex and lateral roots contributes to Cd hyperaccumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qi; Jupa, Radek; Luo, Jipeng; Lux, Alexander; Kováč, Ján; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Yimei; Jan, Japenga; Liang, Yongchao; Li, Tingqiang

    2016-12-16

    Although the significance of apoplasmic barriers in roots with regards to the uptake of toxic elements is generally known, the contribution of apoplasmic bypasses (ABs) to cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation is little understood. Here, we employed a combination of stable isotopic tracer techniques, an ABs tracer, hydraulic measurements, suberin lamellae staining, metabolic inhibitors, and antitranspirants to investigate and quantify the impact of the ABs on translocation of Cd to the xylem in roots of a hyperaccumulating (H) ecotype and a non-hyperaccumulating (NH) ecotype of Sedum alfredii In the H ecotype, the Cd content in the xylem sap was proportional to hydrostatic pressure, which was attributed to pressure-driven flow via the ABs. The contribution of the ABs to Cd transportation to the xylem was dependent on the Cd concentration applied to the H ecotype (up to 37% at the highest concentration used). Cd-treated H ecotype roots showed significantly higher hydraulic conductance compared with the NH ecotype (76 vs 52 × 10(-8) m s(-1)MPa(-1)), which is in accordance with less extensive suberization due to reduced expression of suberin-related genes. The main entry sites of apoplasmically transported Cd were localized in the root apexes and lateral roots of the H ecotype, where suberin lamellae were not well developed. These findings highlight the significance of the apoplasmic bypass in Cd hyperaccumulation in hyperaccumulating ecotypes of S. alfredii.

  10. Unicystic ameloblastoma with mural proliferation: conservative or surgical approach?

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Soumi; Mistry, Freddy K; Chopra, Shilpa; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma occurs in a wide variety of forms. Various forms of ameloblastomas have various treatment modalities ranging from a conservative approach to surgical resection with reconstruction. We report a case of unicystic ameloblastoma with mural proliferation in a 17-year-old girl, who presented with a swelling in the lower left jaw associated with dull aching pain and was managed initially by a conservative approach followed by surgical enucleation on recurrence. PMID:25103487

  11. Characterizing microbial diversity and damage in mural paintings.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Tânia; Mirão, José; Candeias, António; Caldeira, Ana Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Mural paintings are some of the oldest and most important cultural expressions of mankind and play an important role for the understanding of societies and civilizations. These cultural assets have high economic and cultural value and therefore their degradation has social and economic impact. The present work presents a novel microanalytical approach to understand the damages caused by microbial communities in mural paintings. This comprises the characterization and identification of microbial diversity and evaluation of damage promoted by their biological activity. Culture-dependent methods and DNA-based approaches like denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing are important tools in the isolation and identification of the microbial communities allowing characterization of the biota involved in the biodeterioration phenomena. Raman microspectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry are also useful tools for evaluation of the presence of microbial contamination and detection of the alteration products resulting from metabolic activity of the microorganisms. This study shows that the degradation status of mural paintings can be correlated to the presence of metabolically active microorganisms.

  12. Plant homeostasis of foliar manganese sinks: specific variation in hyperaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Denise R; Woodrow, Ian E; Baker, Alan J M; Marshall, Alan T

    2012-11-01

    Plant manganese (Mn) hyperaccumulation provides unusual insight into homeostasis of this essential micronutrient, in particular its excessive storage in shoot tissues. The compartmentation of hyperaccumulated foliar Mn appears exceptional among metal hyperaccumulators, since it occurs via specific microdistribution patterns. Here, three associated Mn hyperaccumulators, Virotia neurophylla, Maytenus fournieri, and Garcinia amplexicaulis exhibiting distinctly different Mn detoxification strategies were examined. Non-invasive sample preparation in conjunction with cryo scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to obtain in vivo quantitative microprobe X-ray and anatomical data from fully hydrated cells. Highly vacuolated large palisade mesophyll cells in V. neurophylla leaves were found to contain around 650 mM Mn. The large non-photosynthetic hypodermal cells of M. fournieri leaves, also with high vacuolar content, and the main site for Mn disposal, had an estimated mean vacuolar Mn concentration of around 600 mM. Previous qualitative X-ray mapping had shown Mn to be almost evenly sequestered across the entire leaf cross section of G. amplexicaulis. However, quantitative data obtained here showed a marked variation in localised concentrations that ranged between ~15 and >800 mM. Notable among these were mean values of >600 mM in spongy mesophyll cells, and ~800 mM within cells of a narrow sub epidermal layer preceding the palisade mesophyll. This study demonstrated the extraordinary Mn carrying capacities of different types of leaf cell vacuoles.

  13. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1) were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1). Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the protective effect of

  14. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Colin F; Freeman, John L; Reynolds, Ray J B; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Lindblom, Stormy D; Quinn, Erin K; Bennett, Lindsay E; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2010-08-27

    Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg(-1)) were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg(-1)). Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg(-1) dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. This is the first reported study investigating the protective effect of hyperaccumulated Se against cell

  15. [Studies on microbiological factor in colour change of mogao graffito's mural. II. Effect of microorganism on the pigment of imitative mural].

    PubMed

    Feng, Q; Zhang, X; Ma, Q; Ma, X

    1998-04-01

    Throung the assay and analysis of the imitative mural after cultivated with microorganisms, it has been shown that microorganisms had a pronounced effect on the pigments of the mural: the pigments secreted by microorganisms changed the colour of the mural, and produced much oxalic acid salt, which damaged the formation of crystals of the pigment, moreover, the chemical combination valence of Pb3O4 had been changed due to the metabolic products of microorganisms, that may play an important role in the chemical change of Pb3O4.

  16. Teaching with Murals at a Post Office: A Community's Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Jaehan

    2009-01-01

    Murals in a post office can be an important way to explore how public art functions in a community because they represent stories about history, culture, people, and lives. In this lesson, middle school students will investigate murals at a local post office in Sheboygan, Wisconsin to learn about the function of public art and the social role…

  17. Art, Education, and the Bomb: Reflections on an International Children's Peace Mural Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Argues that social change can be evidenced in the absence of an image. Discusses how murals painted by children 50 years after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki do not depict "the bomb," but it pervades the murals nonetheless. Shows that viewers draw unintended analogies between the images and the bombings. (DSK)

  18. Tiene Arte Valor Afuera Del Barrio: The Murals of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holscher, Louis M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the themes of the murals and explores the possible uses that the murals in Los Angeles have for the outsider, the non-Chicano, for those who have only a little understanding or awareness of the Chicano community. (Author/AM)

  19. Art, Education, and the Bomb: Reflections on an International Children's Peace Mural Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Argues that social change can be evidenced in the absence of an image. Discusses how murals painted by children 50 years after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki do not depict "the bomb," but it pervades the murals nonetheless. Shows that viewers draw unintended analogies between the images and the bombings. (DSK)

  20. Tiene Arte Valor Afuera Del Barrio: The Murals of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holscher, Louis M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the themes of the murals and explores the possible uses that the murals in Los Angeles have for the outsider, the non-Chicano, for those who have only a little understanding or awareness of the Chicano community. (Author/AM)

  1. Molecular dissection of the cellular mechanisms involved in nickel hyperaccumulation in plants. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.

    1998-06-01

    'Phytoremediation, the use of plants for environmental cleanup of pollutants, including toxic metals, holds the potential to allow the economic restoration of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated sites. A number of terrestrial plants are known to naturally accumulate high levels of metals in their shoots (1--2% dry weight), and these plants have been termed metal-hyperaccumulators. Clearly, the genetic traits that determine metal-hyperaccumulation offers the potential for the development of practical phytoremediation processes. The long-term objective is to rationally design and generate plants ideally suited for phytoremediation using this unique genetic material. Initially, the strategy will focus on isolating and characterizing the key genetic information needed for expression of the metal-hyperaccumulation phenotype. Recently, histidine has been shown to play a major role in Ni hyperaccumulation. Based on this information the authors propose to investigate, at the molecular level, the role of histidine biosynthesis in Ni hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense, a Ni hyperaccumulator species.'

  2. Enhanced expression of SaHMA3 plays critical roles in Cd hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance in Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Min; Shohag, Md Jahidul Islam; Tian, Shengke; Song, Haiyan; Feng, Ying; Yang, Xiaoe

    2016-03-01

    The enhanced expression of a P 1B -type ATPase gene ( SaHMA3 ) is essential for Cd hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance in Sedum alfredii Hance. A functional understanding of the mechanism through which hyperaccumulator plants accumulate and tolerate extremely toxic metals is a prerequisite for the development of novel strategies for improving phytoremediation using engineered plants or natural hyperaccumulators as well as biofortification and food crop safety. Most hyperaccumulator species, however, are small and slow-growing, and their potential for large-scale decontamination of polluted soils is limited. Sedum alfredii Hance, the only one metal hyperaccumulator from the Crassulaceae family, is an ideal candidate for gaining a functional understanding of the intra-family hyperaccumulation mechanisms as well as their potential applications. In the present study, we isolated and functionally characterized a P1B-type ATPase gene (SaHMA3) from S. alfredii Hance. SaHMA3 alleles from a hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) were constitutively expressed in both shoot and root and encoded tonoplast-localized proteins, but showed differences in transport substrate specificity and expression level. SaHMA3 h from the HE plant was a Cd transporter. In contrast, SaHMA3n from NHE plants was able to transport both Zn and Cd. SaHMA3 showed a significantly higher constitutive expression level in HE plants than in NHE plants. Furthermore, the expression level of SaHMA3 in the shoots of HE plants was considerably higher than in the roots. Overexpression of SaHMA3h in tobacco plants significantly enhanced Cd tolerance and accumulation and greatly increased the root sequestration of Cd. In summary, our data suggested that SaHMA3 plays critical roles in Cd hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance in Cd hyperaccumulator S. alfredii Hance.

  3. Mural art therapy for young offenders hospitalised with a mental illness.

    PubMed

    George, Oleen; Kasinathan, John

    2015-02-01

    To describe a mural art therapy project completed within an adolescent unit of a secure forensic psychiatric hospital. The planning, implementation and consecutive stages of the mural art therapy project are described. Pertinent themes are identified. A cohort of adolescent forensic inpatients was engaged in a group therapeutic process involving collaboration, design and the completion of an art mural. The participants generally approved of the project and identified themes of gaining a sense of achievement, empowerment, teamwork, involvement and ownership. The art mural transformed and improved the visual and spatial environment of the Adolescent unit courtyard. Mural art therapy was acceptable to young offenders hospitalised with mental illness, which has relevance for adolescent psychiatric units and youth detention centres. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  4. Pre-Columbian mural paintings from Mesoamerica as geomagnetic field recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, A.; Soler, A. M.; Zanella, E.; Chiari, G.; Lanza, R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Gonzalez, T.

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance archeomagnetic study of mural paintings in various pre-Columbian sites in Mexico. The magnetic measurements of the pigments show that at least four murals (sites: Cacaxtla, Cholula and Templo Mayor) retain a remanent magnetization carried by a mixture of magnetite and minor hematite grains. In most specimens, a characteristic remanent magnetization is successfully isolated by alternating field demagnetization. The mean directions are reasonably well determined for each mural and within the range of secular variation during the last centuries. Studied Mesoamerican murals apparently retain the direction of the magnetic field at the time they were painted and therefore are an invaluable source of information concerning its secular variation. The archeomagnetic study of pre-Columbian mural paintings opens new alternatives to drawing a reliable reference master curve for the region and may largely contribute to the Mesoamerican absolute chronology.

  5. Solar and Calendrical Symbolism in the Early Medieval Finnish Church Murals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridderstad, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    The earliest church murals of the first stone churches in Finland were painted at the time when Christianity had only just become the official faith in the region and the old ethnic religion was still widely practiced. The 'pagan' motifs of these Early Medieval Finnish church murals reflect the complexity of the religious beliefs in this transition phase. The church actively transformed the festivals of the vernacular religion by giving Christian meanings to the symbols and rituals, as well as by replacing the ethnic deities with Christian figures. The solar symbolism and the calendrical motifs of the church murals are interpreted as imagery largely based on the Christianized remnants of the pre-Christian annual festivals. The earliest church murals thus provide important insight into the pre-Christian religious beliefs of late Iron Age Finland. Many of the motifs and symbols represented in the murals are related to the annual fertility cult and the solar goddess as one of its central figures.

  6. Grossesse intra murale à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    de Tové, Kofi-Mensa Savi; Salifou, Kabibou; Imorou, Rachidi Sidi; Biaou, Olivier; Boco, Vicentia

    2015-01-01

    La grossesse intra-murale est la variété la plus rare de grossesse extra-utérine. Il s'agit de la localisation de l’œuf dans l’épaisseur du myomètre. En cas de retard diagnostic, l’évolution peut être catastrophique avec rupture utérine et hémorragie cataclysmique. L’échographie permet dans certains cas un diagnostic pré opératoire. Les auteurs rapportent un cas survenu chez une patiente aux antécédents de curetage. PMID:26448812

  7. Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Proliferation Managed by Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma is a distinguishable entity of ameloblastomas, characterized by slow growth and being relatively locally aggressive. Three histological types are recognized according to the degree of ameloblastomatous epithelial extension, namely, luminal, intraluminal, and mural types. This classification has a direct bearing on their biological behavior, treatment, and prognosis. However, there is difficulty in determining the most appropriate form of treatment for unicystic ameloblastoma. We present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma that occurred in the right posterior mandible of 19-year-old girl, which was enucleated and did not recur after 12-month follow-up. PMID:27610259

  8. Reciprocal grafting separates the roles of the root and shoot in zinc hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    de Guimarães, Marcelo A; Gustin, Jeffery L; Salt, David E

    2009-10-01

    * The extreme phenotype of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation, which is found in several Brassicaceae species, is determined by mechanisms that promote elevated Zn tolerance and high Zn accumulation in shoots. * We used reciprocal grafting between a Zn hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, and a Zn nonaccumulator, Thlaspi perfoliatum, to determine the relative importance of roots and shoots in Zn hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance. * Leaves from plants with a T. perfoliatum rootstock and a T. caerulescens shoot scion did not hyperaccumulate Zn, whereas plants with a T. caerulescens rootstock and a T. perfoliatum shoot scion did hyperaccumulate Zn. However, although leaves from plants with a T. caerulescens rootstock and a T. perfoliatum shoot scion hyperaccumulated Zn, at high Zn loads these leaves showed significant symptoms of Zn toxicity, unlike leaves of self grafted T. caerulescens. * Hyperaccumulation of Zn in leaves of the hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens is pri-marily dictated by root processes. Further, the mechanisms controlling Zn hypertolerance in the hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens are driven primarily by shoot processes.

  9. Reciprocal grafting separates the roles of the root and shoot in zinc hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    de A Guimarães, Marcelo; Gustin, Jeffery L; Salt, David E

    2009-01-01

    The extreme phenotype of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation, which is found in several Brassicaceae species, is determined by mechanisms that promote elevated Zn tolerance and high Zn accumulation in shoots. We used reciprocal grafting between a Zn hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, and a Zn nonaccumulator, Thlaspi perfoliatum, to determine the relative importance of roots and shoots in Zn hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance. Leaves from plants with a T. perfoliatum rootstock and a T. caerulescens shoot scion did not hyperaccumulate Zn, whereas plants with a T. caerulescens rootstock and a T. perfoliatum shoot scion did hyperaccumulate Zn. However, although leaves from plants with a T. caerulescens rootstock and a T. perfoliatum shoot scion hyperaccumulated Zn, at high Zn loads these leaves showed significant symptoms of Zn toxicity, unlike leaves of self grafted T. caerulescens. Hyperaccumulation of Zn in leaves of the hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens is pri-marily dictated by root processes. Further, the mechanisms controlling Zn hypertolerance in the hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens are driven primarily by shoot processes. PMID:19656301

  10. Hyperaccumulation, complexation and distribution of nickel in Sebertia acuminata.

    PubMed

    Sagner, S; Kneer, R; Wanner, G; Cosson, J P; Deus-Neumann, B; Zenk, M H

    1998-02-01

    The nickel content in different parts of the hyperaccumulating tree Sebertia acuminata was analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Nickel was found to be mainly located in laticifers. The total nickel content of a single mature tree was estimated to be 37 kg. By gel filtration and NMR spectroscopy, citric acid was unequivocally identified as counter ion for about 40% of this metal present. Nitrate was assumed to be a further partner for a complete ionic balance. Phytochelatins were not found to be involved in nickel detoxification in Sebertia. The localization of nickel complexes inside the laticifers was demonstrated by light microscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy in combination with an EDX system for the analysis of elements. A repellent effect of the plant sap was observed on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster indicating that in hyperaccumulating plants nickel functions as an agent to prevent predation.

  11. Cerebellar dermoid cyst with contrast enhancement mural nodule: case report.

    PubMed

    Morina, Arsim; Kelmendi, Fatos; Morina, Qamile; Morina, Dukagjin

    2014-12-01

    Typical dermoid cysts are well-circumscribed fat-density masses with no associated contrast enhancement; rarely, they may appear hyperattenuating on CT scan. CT hyperattenuating dermoid cyst (CHADC) is very uncommon, with only nine case reports in the literature update, which occurs exclusively in the posterior fossa. CHADC with mural nodule is extremely rare and, to the best of our knowledge, only two cases have been documented previously in the literature. A 49-year-old farmer had a 2-month history of occipital headaches, which were not suggestive of raised intracranial pressure. During the last month, he experienced loss of balance, frequent falls, anorexia and loss of weight. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a huge mass from the tentorium to the foramen occipitale magnum with obliteration of the fourth ventricle; the lesion was well circumscribed. We completely removed the tumor and postoperative MRI showed no residual tumor. Epidermoid tumors with enhancing mural nodule on MRI and with hyperattenuating lesion on CT are extremely rare. Dermoid cysts are never associated with edema and extremely rarely cause obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI investigations are mandatory to diagnose these cases. The best curative treatment is total removal of the lesion.

  12. Selenium-tolerant diamondback moth disarms hyperaccumulator plantdefense

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.L.; Quinn, C.F.; Marcus, M.A.; Fakra, S.; Pilon-Smits,E.A.H.

    2006-11-20

    Background Some plants hyperaccumulate the toxic element selenium (Se) to extreme levels, up to 1% of dry weight. The function of this intriguing phenomenon is obscure. Results Here, we show that the Se in the hyperaccumulator prince's plume (Stanleya pinnata) protects it from caterpillar herbivory because of deterrence and toxicity. In its natural habitat, however, a newly discovered variety of the invasive diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) has disarmed this elemental defense. It thrives on plants containing highly toxic Se levels and shows no oviposition or feeding deterrence, in contrast to related varieties. Interestingly, a Se-tolerant wasp (Diadegma insulare) was found to parasitize the tolerant moth. The insect's Se tolerance mechanism was revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography--mass spectroscopy, which showed that the Se-tolerant moth and its parasite both accumulate methylselenocysteine, the same form found in the hyperaccumulator plant, whereas related sensitive moths accumulate selenocysteine. The latter is toxic because of its nonspecific incorporation into proteins. Indeed, the Se-tolerant diamondback moth incorporated less Se into protein. Additionally, the tolerant variety sequestered Se in distinct abdominal areas, potentially involved in detoxification and larval defense to predators. Conclusions Although Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from herbivory by some invertebrates, it can give rise to the evolution of unique Se-tolerant herbivores and thus provide a portal for Se into the local ecosystem. In a broader context, this study provides insight into the possible ecological implications of using Se-enriched crops as a source of anti-carcinogenic selenocompounds and for the remediation of Se-polluted environments.

  13. Selenium hyperaccumulators facilitate selenium-tolerant neighbors via phytoenrichment and reduced herbivory.

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2011-09-13

    Soil surrounding selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plants was shown earlier to be enriched in Se, impairing the growth of Se-sensitive plant species. Because Se levels in neighbors of hyperaccumulators were higher and Se has been shown to protect plants from herbivory, we investigate here the potential facilitating effect of Se hyperaccumulators on Se-tolerant neighboring species in the field. We measured growth and herbivory of Artemisia ludoviciana and Symphyotrichum ericoides as a function of their Se concentration and proximity to hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata. When growing next to hyperaccumulators, A. ludoviciana and S. ericoides contained 10- to 20-fold higher Se levels (800-2,000 mg kg(-1) DW) than when growing next to nonaccumulators. The roots of both species were predominantly (70%-90%) directed toward hyperaccumulator neighbors, not toward other neighbors. Moreover, neighbors of hyperaccumulators were 2-fold bigger, showed 2-fold less herbivory damage, and harbored 3- to 4-fold fewer arthropods. When used in laboratory choice and nonchoice grasshopper herbivory experiments, Se-rich neighbors of hyperaccumulators experienced less herbivory and caused higher grasshopper Se accumulation (10-fold) and mortality (4-fold). Enhanced soil Se levels around hyperaccumulators can facilitate growth of Se-tolerant plant species through reduced herbivory and enhanced growth. This study is the first to show facilitation via enrichment with a nonessential element. It is interesting that Se enrichment of hyperaccumulator neighbors may affect competition in two ways, by reducing growth of Se-sensitive neighbors while facilitating Se-tolerant neighbors. Via these competitive and facilitating effects, Se hyperaccumulators may affect plant community composition and, consequently, higher trophic levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Halimaa, Pauliina; Blande, Daniel; Aarts, Mark G. M.; Tuomainen, Marjo; Tervahauta, Arja; Kärenlampi, Sirpa

    2014-01-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens is an established model to study the adaptation of plants to metalliferous soils. Various comparators have been used in these studies. The choice of suitable comparators is important and depends on the hypothesis to be tested and methods to be used. In high-throughput analyses such as microarray, N. caerulescens has been compared to non-tolerant, non-accumulator plants like Arabidopsis thaliana or Thlaspi arvense rather than to the related hypertolerant or hyperaccumulator plants. An underutilized source is N. caerulescens populations with considerable variation in their capacity to accumulate and tolerate metals. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) is revealing interesting variation in their gene expression profiles. Combining physiological characteristics of N. caerulescens accessions with their RNA-Seq has a great potential to provide detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms, including entirely new gene products. In this review we will critically consider comparative transcriptome analyses carried out to explore metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance of N. caerulescens, and demonstrate the potential of RNA-Seq analysis as a tool in evolutionary genomics. PMID:24904610

  15. Estimation of shear stress by using a myocardial bridge-mural coronary artery simulating device.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Yang, Qian; Shang, Kun; Lan, Hailian; Lv, Jie; Liu, Zhilin; Liu, Yang; Sheng, Lixing; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-10-07

    This study was aimed at developing a myocardial bridge-mural coronary artery simulative device and analyzing the relationship between shear stress on the mural coronary artery and atherosclerosis. A myocardial bridge-mural coronary artery simulative device was used to simulate experiments in vitro. In the condition of maintaining any related parameters such as system temperature, average flow rate, and heart rate, we calculated and observed changes in proximal and distal mean values, and oscillatory value of shear stress on the mural coronary artery by regulating the compression level of the myocardial bridge to the mural coronary artery. Under 0% compression, no significant differences were observed in distal and proximal mean values and oscillatory value of the shear stress on the mural coronary artery. With the increase in the degree of compression, the mean shear stress at the distal end was greater than that at the proximal end, but the oscillatory value of the shear stress at the proximal end was greater than that at the distal end. The experimental results of this study indicate that myocardial bridge compression leads to abnormal hemodynamics at the proximal end of the mural coronary artery. This abnormal phenomenon is of great significance in the study of atherosclerosis hemodynamic pathogenesis, which has potential clinical value for pathological effects and treatments of myocardial bridge.

  16. Archaeomagnetism of some pre-Columbian mural paintings in Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, A.; Soler, A.; Zanella, E.; Lanza, R.; Chiari, G.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2003-12-01

    This work investigates the magnetic remanence associated with the mural paintings at three archeological sites in Central Mexico dated between 200 AD and 1450 AD (Cholula, Cacaxtla and Templo Mayor). The remanence of the murals is shown, using X-ray analyses and rock-magnetic measurements, to be carried by both magnetite and hematite. In most specimens, a characteristic magnetization is successfully isolated by alternating field demagnetization. The mean site directions are consistent with the available master curve for Mesoamerica. This work shows that murals from Central Mexico can retain their remanent magnetization for centuries and demonstrates the viability in principle of pictorial remanence as an archeomagnetic tool.

  17. Molecular Dissection of the Cellular Mechanisms Involved in Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, David E.

    1999-06-01

    Phytoremediation, the use of plants for environmental cleanup of pollutants, including toxic metals, holds the potential to allow the economic restoration of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated sites. A number of terrestrial plants are known to naturally accumulate high levels of metals in their shoots (1-2% dry weight), and these plants have been termed metal-hyperaccumulators. Clearly, the genetic traits that determines metal-hyperaccumulation offers the potential for the development of practical phytoremediation processes. Our long-term objective is to rationally design and generate plants ideally suited for phytoremediation using this unique genetic material. Initially, our strategy will focus on isolating and characterizing the key genetic information needed for expression of the metal-hyperaccumulation phenotype. Recently, histidine has been shown to play a major role in Ni hyperaccumulation. Based on this information we propose to investigate, at the molecular level, the role of histidine biosynthesis in Ni hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense, a Ni hyperaccumulator species. We will clone key genes involved in histidine biosynthesis. We will characterize their transcriptional and post transcriptional regulation by histidine, Ni. We will determine if any of these genes are essential and sufficient for Ni hyperaccumulation by their expression in the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana.

  18. Constitutively Elevated Salicylic Acid Signals Glutathione-Mediated Nickel Tolerance in Thlaspi Nickel Hyperaccumulators1

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John L.; Garcia, Daniel; Kim, Donggiun; Hopf, Amber; Salt, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Progress is being made in understanding the biochemical and molecular basis of nickel (Ni)/zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi; however, the molecular signaling pathways that control these mechanisms are not understood. We observed that elevated concentrations of salicylic acid (SA), a molecule known to be involved in signaling induced pathogen defense responses in plants, is a strong predictor of Ni hyperaccumulation in the six diverse Thlaspi species investigated, including the hyperaccumulators Thlaspi goesingense, Thlaspi rosulare, Thlaspi oxyceras, and Thlaspi caerulescens and the nonaccumulators Thlaspi arvense and Thlaspi perfoliatum. Furthermore, the SA metabolites phenylalanine, cinnamic acid, salicyloyl-glucose, and catechol are also elevated in the hyperaccumulator T. goesingense when compared to the nonaccumulators Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and T. arvense. Elevation of free SA levels in Arabidopsis, both genetically and by exogenous feeding, enhances the specific activity of serine acetyltransferase, leading to elevated glutathione and increased Ni resistance. Such SA-mediated Ni resistance in Arabidopsis phenocopies the glutathione-based Ni tolerance previously observed in Thlaspi, suggesting a biochemical linkage between SA and Ni tolerance in this genus. Intriguingly, the hyperaccumulator T. goesingense also shows enhanced sensitivity to the pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe cruciferarum) and fails to induce SA biosynthesis after infection. Nickel hyperaccumulation reverses this pathogen hypersensitivity, suggesting that the interaction between pathogen resistance and Ni tolerance and hyperaccumulation may have played a critical role in the evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in the Thlaspi genus. PMID:15734913

  19. Constitutively elevated salicylic acid signals glutathione-mediated nickel tolerance in Thlaspi nickel hyperaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Garcia, Daniel; Kim, Donggiun; Hopf, Amber; Salt, David E

    2005-03-01

    Progress is being made in understanding the biochemical and molecular basis of nickel (Ni)/zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi; however, the molecular signaling pathways that control these mechanisms are not understood. We observed that elevated concentrations of salicylic acid (SA), a molecule known to be involved in signaling induced pathogen defense responses in plants, is a strong predictor of Ni hyperaccumulation in the six diverse Thlaspi species investigated, including the hyperaccumulators Thlaspi goesingense, Thlaspi rosulare, Thlaspi oxyceras, and Thlaspi caerulescens and the nonaccumulators Thlaspi arvense and Thlaspi perfoliatum. Furthermore, the SA metabolites phenylalanine, cinnamic acid, salicyloyl-glucose, and catechol are also elevated in the hyperaccumulator T. goesingense when compared to the nonaccumulators Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and T. arvense. Elevation of free SA levels in Arabidopsis, both genetically and by exogenous feeding, enhances the specific activity of serine acetyltransferase, leading to elevated glutathione and increased Ni resistance. Such SA-mediated Ni resistance in Arabidopsis phenocopies the glutathione-based Ni tolerance previously observed in Thlaspi, suggesting a biochemical linkage between SA and Ni tolerance in this genus. Intriguingly, the hyperaccumulator T. goesingense also shows enhanced sensitivity to the pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe cruciferarum) and fails to induce SA biosynthesis after infection. Nickel hyperaccumulation reverses this pathogen hypersensitivity, suggesting that the interaction between pathogen resistance and Ni tolerance and hyperaccumulation may have played a critical role in the evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in the Thlaspi genus.

  20. Seasonal fluctuations of selenium and sulfur accumulation in selenium hyperaccumulators and related nonaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Galeas, Miriam L; Zhang, Li Hong; Freeman, John L; Wegner, Mellissa; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2007-01-01

    Some plants hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) up to 1% of dry weight. This study was performed to obtain insight into whole-plant Se fluxes in hyperaccumulators. Selenium hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata were monitored over two growing seasons for seasonal fluctuations in concentrations of Se and the chemically similar element sulfur (S). The related nonhyperaccumulators Astragalus sericoleucus, Oxytropis sericea and Thlaspi montanum were included for comparison. In both hyperaccumulators leaf Se decreased from April to October, coinciding with Se hyperaccumulation in flowers and seeds. Root Se levels were lowest in summer. Selenium concentration decreased with leaf age in both hyperaccumulators. Leaf S levels peaked in summer in all plant species, as did Se levels in nonhyperaccumulators. Selenium and S levels tended to be negatively correlated in hyperaccumulators, and positively correlated in nonhyperaccumulators. These results suggest a specific flow of Se in hyperaccumulator plants over the growing season, from root to young leaves in spring, followed by remobilization from aging leaves to reproductive tissues in summer, and back to roots in the autumn.

  1. Terahertz analysis of an East Asian historical mural painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, K.; Hosako, I.; Kohdzuma, Y.; Koezuka, T.; Kim, M.-J.; Ikari, T.; Du, X.

    2010-05-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and THz and imaging techniques are expected to have great potential for the non-invasive analysis of artworks. We have applied THz imaging to analyse the historic mural painting of a Lamaism temple by using a transportable time-domain THz imaging system; such an attempt is the first in the world. The reflection image revealed that there are two orange colours in the painting, although they appear the same to the naked eye. THz imaging can also estimate the depth of cracks. The colours were examined by X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, and the results were found to be in good agreement. This work proved that THz imaging can contribute to the non-invasive analysis of cultural heritage.

  2. Molybdenum accumulation, tolerance and molybdenum-selenium-sulfur interactions in Astragalus selenium hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator species.

    PubMed

    DeTar, Rachael Ann; Alford, Élan R; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-07-01

    Some species hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) upwards of 0.1% of dry weight. This study addressed whether Se hyperaccumulators also accumulate and tolerate more molybdenum (Mo). A field survey revealed on average 2-fold higher Mo levels in three hyperaccumulator Astragali compared to three nonaccumulator Astragali, which were not significantly different. Next, a controlled study was performed where hyperaccumulators Astragalus racemosus and Astragalus bisulcatus were compared with nonaccumulators Astragalus drummondii and Astragalus convallarius for Mo accumulation and tolerance, alone or in the presence of Se. When grown on agar media with 0, 12, 24 or 48 mg L(-1) molybdate and/or 0, 1.6 or 3.2 mg L(-1) selenate, all species decreased in biomass with increasing Mo supply. Selenium did not impact biomass at the supplied levels. All Astragali accumulated Mo upwards of 0.1% of dry weight. Selenium levels were up to 0.08% in Astragalus racemosus and 0.04% Se in the other species. Overall, there was no correlation between Se hyperaccumulation and Mo accumulation capacity. However, the hyperaccumulators and nonaccumulators differed in some respects. While none of the species had a higher tissue Mo to sulfur (S) ratio than the growth medium, nonaccumulators had a higher Mo/S ratio than hyperaccumulators. Also, while molybdate and selenate reduced S accumulation in nonaccumulators, it did not in hyperaccumulators. Furthermore, A. racemosus had a higher Se/S ratio than its medium, while the other species did not. Additionally, Mo and Se treatment affected S levels in nonaccumulators, but not in hyperaccumulators. In conclusion, there is no evidence of a link between Se and Mo accumulation and tolerance in Astragalus. Sulfate transporters in hyperaccumulating Astragali appear to have higher sulfate specificity over other oxyanions, compared to nonaccumulators, and A. racemosus may have a transporter with enhanced selenate specificity relative to sulfate or molybdate.

  3. Descending thoracic aortic mural thrombus presentation and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyermann, Karol; Trani, Jose; Caputo, Francis J; Lombardi, Joseph V

    2017-09-01

    Thoracic aortic mural thrombus (TAMT) of the descending aorta is rare but can result in dramatic embolic events. Early treatment is therefore crucial; however, there is not a consensus on ideal initial treatment. A review of the literature using PubMed was conducted, and all relevant publications describing descending TAMT of the past 15 years were reviewed. Variables included for this analysis were presentation, initial treatment strategy employed, outcome measures of thrombus resolution or regression, recurrence of symptomatic emboli, and mortality. Seventy-four patients were included in this analysis. Women were significantly more likely to be described with descending TAMT. The majority (82.4%) of cases reported were diagnosed after an embolic event. Patients were equally likely to receive medical, open surgical, or endovascular therapy as the initial treatment modality. However, there is a trend within the past 5 years to report cases describing successful thoracic endovascular aortic repair for initial management. Of patients who initially underwent medical management, nine patients (34.6%) had persistent thrombus. Of the patients who initially underwent open surgical repair, six patients (31.6%) had persistent thrombus; of these patients, four underwent endovascular repair. Twenty-nine patients (39.2%) with descending TAMT initially underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Twenty-seven (93.1%) had fully excluded thrombus at the time of the procedure, with no recurrence or evidence of repeated embolic phenomena at follow-up. Whereas mural thrombus of the thoracic aorta is uncommon, it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of embolic events. Although endovascular therapy may be a useful first-line option for TAMT with reports of positive outcomes in select literature, further study of this treatment option is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Two New Murals by John Biggers: Salt Marsh and Nubia, Origins of Business and Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theisen, Olive Jensen

    2001-01-01

    Provides background information on the life and career of muralist John Biggers. Focuses on two of his murals, offering a description and information about each: (1) "Salt Marsh;" and (2) "Nubia, the Origins of Business and Commerce." (CMK)

  5. Osteosarcoma as Malignant Mural Nodule in Ovarian Mucinous Neoplasms of Intestinal Type: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Marie; Dina, Roberto; Fisher, Cyril; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2015-07-01

    Mural nodules, which may be benign or malignant, are well recognized in ovarian mucinous neoplasms, especially of borderline type. Malignant mural nodules most commonly comprise anaplastic carcinoma but sarcomas of various types have been reported. We report 2 cases of osteosarcoma occurring in young women (aged 18 and 34) as malignant mural nodules in a Grade 1 ovarian mucinous carcinoma of intestinal type and a borderline mucinous tumor of intestinal type. Primary osteosarcomas of the ovary have been described either arising within a teratoma or as a pure neoplasm but, to the best of our knowledge, osteosarcoma occurring as a mural nodule in an ovarian mucinous neoplasm has not been reported. In both our cases, the tumor was Stage 1 at presentation and the patients were treated with surgery without adjuvant chemotherapy. Both patients are free of disease with follow-up of 12 and 18 mo.

  6. Alyssum homolocarpum seeds: phytochemical analysis and effects of the seed oil on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Ghanbari, Amir; Razavipour, Razieh; Saeidi, Vahid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Sohrabpour, Maryam; Azari, Hassan

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacognostic evaluation of medicinal plants may assess their current applications and possibly results in finding new active components. In this study, ash and extractive values and high performance thin layer chromatography fingerprints of Alyssum homolocarpum (Brassicaceae) seed extracts were investigated to elucidate its composition. Differential scanning calorimetry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis were employed to determine the components of A. homolocarpum seed oil (AHO). Neurosphere assay, in vitro differentiation and immunofluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the effects of oral administration of AHO (0.5 or 1 g/kg/day for 14 days) on proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult male BALB/c mice. Total, acid-insoluble and water-soluble ash values were determined as 45.83 ± 5.85, 6.67 ± 2.89 and 28.33 ± 2.89 mg/g, respectively. The extractive values were 4.90, 0.43 and 0.56 % (w/w) for n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethanolic extracts, respectively. Interestingly, AHO was mainly composed of α-linolenic acid (89.71 %), β-sitosterol (3.3 mg/g) and campesterol (0.86 mg/g). Administration of AHO at 1 g/kg/day significantly increased proliferation of NSCs, as evidenced by an increase in mean neurosphere-forming frequency per brain (872.7 ± 15.17) and neurosphere diameter (101 ± 2.48 µm) compared to the control group (424.3 ± 59.29 and 78.63 ± 1.7 µm, respectively; P < 0.05). AHO treatment did not affect in vitro differentiation of the harvested NSCs. Our data show that A. homolocarpum seed oil is a rich source of α-linolenic acid and β-sitosterol with potential therapeutic application to enhance NSC proliferation and recruitment in neurological diseases.

  7. Soluble forms of VEGF receptor-1 and -2 promote vascular maturation via mural cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lorquet, Sophie; Berndt, Sarah; Blacher, Silvia; Gengoux, Emily; Peulen, Olivier; Maquoi, Erik; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Munaut, Carine; Péqueux, Christel

    2010-10-01

    Two soluble forms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, are physiologically released and overproduced in some pathologies. They are known to act as anti-VEGF agents. Here we report that these soluble receptors contribute to vessel maturation by mediating a dialogue between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells that leads to blood vessel stabilization. Through a multidisciplinary approach, we provide evidence that these soluble VEGF receptors promote mural cell migration through a paracrine mechanism involving interplay in ECs between VEGF/VEGFR-2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate type-1 (S1P)/S1P1 pathways that leads to endothelial nitric oxyde synthase (eNOS) activation. This new paradigm is supported by the finding that sVEGFR-1 and -2 perform the following actions: 1) induce an eNOS-dependent outgrowth of a mural cell network in an ex vivo model of angiogenesis, 2) increase the mural cell coverage of neovessels in vitro and in vivo, 3) promote mural cell migration toward ECs, and 4) stimulate endothelial S1P1 overproduction and eNOS activation that promote the migration and the recruitment of neighboring mural cells. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms regulating physiological and pathological angiogenesis and vessel stabilization.

  8. Zinc hyperaccumulation and uptake by Potentilla griffithii Hook.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rongliang; Fang, Xiaohang; Tang, Yetao; Du, Suojun; Zeng, Xiaowen; Brewer, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Potentilla griffithii Hook var. velutina Cardot to hypaeraccumulate zinc (Zn) was identified through field survey and hydroponic experiments. Our results showed that P. griffithii could be classified as a new Zn hyperaccumulator. Zn concentrations in the shoots of P. griffithii averaged 6250 mg kg(-1) (3870-8530 mg kg(-1)) growing in Zn-rich soils. The highest Zn concentration was observed in the leaves of P. griffithii at 22,990 mg kg(-1). The fact that P. griffithii was able to grow in a mining soil with a Zn concentration of 193,000 mg kg(-1) without showing a major sign of phytotoxicity demonstrated its high tolerance to Zn. When growing in hydroponic systems, P. griffithii accumulated a maximum 26700 mg kg(-1) zinc concentration in the shoots, indicating the ability of this species to effectively take up and translocate Zn. Translocation factors (the ratio of Zn concentration in shoot to root) of 1.1 to 1.6 were obtained. Compared to the control, dry biomass of P. griffithii in 160 mg L(-1) Zn treatment increased 66.6% (P < 0.05). The time-course experiment showed that the maximum Zn concentration at 100 mg L(-1) Zn treatment was found at 16 d, much later than that of the 10 mg L(-1) Zn treatment, which might be an attribution of a accumulating mechanism or detoxification of a plant. The report of a new Zn hyperaccumulator provides a new plant species for the phytoremediation of contaminated soil and for the research on mechanisms of Zn hyperaccumulation in plants.

  9. Using Arabidopsis to explore zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Roosens, Nancy H C J; Willems, Glenda; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    Identifying the particular gene or genes underlying a specific adaptation is a major challenge in modern biology. Currently, the study of naturally occurring variation in Arabidopsis thaliana provides a bridge between functional genetics and evolutionary analyses. Nevertheless, the use of A. thaliana to study adaptation is limited to those traits that have undergone selection. Therefore, to understand fully the genetics of adaptation, the vast arsenal of genetic resources developed in A. thaliana must be extended to other species that display traits absent in this model species. Here, we discuss how A. thaliana resources can significantly enhance the study of heavy-metal tolerance and hyperaccumulation in the wild species Arabidopsis halleri.

  10. Selenium distribution and speciation in the hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus and associated ecological partners.

    PubMed

    Valdez Barillas, José R; Quinn, Colin F; Freeman, John L; Lindblom, Stormy D; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Gilligan, Todd M; Alford, Élan R; Wangeline, Ami L; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2012-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how plant selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation may affect ecological interactions and whether associated partners may affect Se hyperaccumulation. The Se hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus was collected in its natural seleniferous habitat, and x-ray fluorescence mapping and x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were used to characterize Se distribution and speciation in all organs as well as in encountered microbial symbionts and herbivores. Se was present at high levels (704-4,661 mg kg(-1) dry weight) in all organs, mainly as organic C-Se-C compounds (i.e. Se bonded to two carbon atoms, e.g. methylselenocysteine). In nodule, root, and stem, up to 34% of Se was found as elemental Se, which was potentially due to microbial activity. In addition to a nitrogen-fixing symbiont, the plants harbored an endophytic fungus that produced elemental Se. Furthermore, two Se-resistant herbivorous moths were discovered on A. bisulcatus, one of which was parasitized by a wasp. Adult moths, larvae, and wasps all accumulated predominantly C-Se-C compounds. In conclusion, hyperaccumulators live in association with a variety of Se-resistant ecological partners. Among these partners, microbial endosymbionts may affect Se speciation in hyperaccumulators. Hyperaccumulators have been shown earlier to negatively affect Se-sensitive ecological partners while apparently offering a niche for Se-resistant partners. Through their positive and negative effects on different ecological partners, hyperaccumulators may influence species composition and Se cycling in seleniferous ecosystems.

  11. [Design and manufacture of mechanic modeling of fluid dynamics related to the myocardial bridging and mural coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Ge, Junbo; Shen, Lixing; Wang, Keqiang; Qian, Juying; Fan, Bing; Xu, Genlin; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Feng

    2005-06-01

    A model of fluid dynamics related to the myocardial bridginged and mural coronary artery was designed and manufactured according to the physical principle and characteristic of the mural coronary artery. The model can imitate systematically well the effect of myocardial bridging on hemodynamic change of the mural coronary artery under different controlled experimental parameter. The methodology is proved to be feasible and has good prosperity of experimental study.

  12. Cadmium hyperaccumulation leads to an increase of glutathione rather than phytochelatins in the cadmium hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qin; Ye, Zhi Hong; Wang, Xiao Rong; Wong, Ming Hung

    2007-11-01

    Sedum alfredii has been reported to be a cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator. Phytochelatins (PCs) and other thiol (SH)-containing compounds have been proposed to play an important role in the detoxification and tolerance of some heavy metals, but it is not clear whether PCs are responsible for Cd hyperaccumulation and tolerance in S. alfredii. In this study, two geographically isolated populations of S. alfredii were studied: one population grew on an old Pb/Zn mine site, while the other on a non-mine site. The mine population of this species exhibited a stronger heavy metal tolerance than in the other population. Root-to-shoot transport of Cd was higher in population located at the mine site than at the non-mine site. Considerable amounts of Cd were accumulated in leaves and stems of mine plants, while most Cd was distributed in roots of non-mine plants. Non-protein SH in plant tissues of two populations were further investigated by a HPLC pre-column derivatization system. Upon exposure to Cd, no PCs were detected in all tissues of mine population, while an appreciable amount of glutathione (GSH) was observed in the descending order of stem>root>leaf. The concentrations of GSH consistently increased with the increase of exogenous Cd concentrations and time. On the contrary, Cd exposure strongly induced the production of PCs (mainly PC(2) and PC(3)) and GSH in plant tissues of non-mine population, and the concentrations of GSH showed an initial drop over the duration of 7-d exposure. The present results provided strong evidence that PCs are not involved in Cd transport, hyperaccumulation and tolerance in mine population of S. alfredii.

  13. Increased glutathione biosynthesis plays a role in nickel tolerance in thlaspi nickel hyperaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Persans, Michael W; Nieman, Ken; Albrecht, Carrie; Peer, Wendy; Pickering, Ingrid J; Salt, David E

    2004-08-01

    Worldwide more than 400 plant species are now known that hyperaccumulate various trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn), metalloids (As) and nonmetals (Se) in their shoots. Of these, almost one-quarter are Brassicaceae family members, including numerous Thlaspi species that hyperaccumulate Ni up to 3% of there shoot dry weight. We observed that concentrations of glutathione, Cys, and O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), in shoot tissue, are strongly correlated with the ability to hyperaccumulate Ni in various Thlaspi hyperaccumulators collected from serpentine soils, including Thlaspi goesingense, T. oxyceras, and T. rosulare, and nonaccumulator relatives, including T. perfoliatum, T. arvense, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Further analysis of the Austrian Ni hyperaccumulator T. goesingense revealed that the high concentrations of OAS, Cys, and GSH observed in this hyperaccumulator coincide with constitutively high activity of both serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and glutathione reductase. SAT catalyzes the acetylation of l-Ser to produce OAS, which acts as both a key positive regulator of sulfur assimilation and forms the carbon skeleton for Cys biosynthesis. These changes in Cys and GSH metabolism also coincide with the ability of T. goesingense to both hyperaccumulate Ni and resist its damaging oxidative effects. Overproduction of T. goesingense SAT in the nonaccumulator Brassicaceae family member Arabidopsis was found to cause accumulation of OAS, Cys, and glutathione, mimicking the biochemical changes observed in the Ni hyperaccumulators. In these transgenic Arabidopsis, glutathione concentrations strongly correlate with increased resistance to both the growth inhibitory and oxidative stress induced effects of Ni. Taken together, such evidence supports our conclusion that elevated GSH concentrations, driven by constitutively elevated SAT activity, are involved in conferring tolerance to Ni-induced oxidative stress in Thlaspi Ni hyperaccumulators.

  14. Selenium hyperaccumulation by Astragalus (Fabaceae) does not inhibit root nodule symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Alford, Elan R; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Fakra, Sirine C; Paschke, Mark W

    2012-12-01

    A survey of the root-nodule symbiosis in Astragalus and its interaction with selenium (Se) has not been conducted before. Such studies can provide insight into how edaphic conditions modify symbiotic interactions and influence partner coevolution. In this paper plant-organ Se concentration ([Se]) was investigated to assess potential Se exposure to endophytes. • Selenium distribution and molecular speciation of root nodules from Se-hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus, A. praelongus, and A. racemosus was determined by Se K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A series of greenhouse experiments were conducted to characterize the response of root-nodule symbiosis in Se-hyperaccumulators and nonhyperaccumulators. • Nodules in three Se-hyperaccumulators (Astragalus crotalariae, A. praelongus, and A. preussii) are reported for the first time. Leaves, flowers, and fruits from Se-hyperaccumulators were routinely above the hyperaccumulator threshold (1,000 µg Se g(-1) DW), but root samples rarely contained that amount, and nodules never exceeded 110 µg Se g(-1) DW. Nodules from A. bisulcatus, A. praelongus, and A. racemosus had Se throughout, with a majority stored in C-Se-C form. Finally, an evaluation of nodulation in Se-hyperaccumulators and nonhyperaccumulators indicated that there was no nodulation inhibition because of plant Se tolerance. Rather, we found that in Se-hyperaccumulators higher levels of Se treatment (up to 100 µM Se) corresponded with higher nodule counts, indicating a potential role for dinitrogen fixation in Se-hyperaccumulation. The effect was not found in nonhyperaccumulators. • As the evolution of Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus developed, root-nodule symbiosis may have played an integral role.

  15. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  16. Genetic and Molecular Dissection of Arsenic Hyperaccumulation in the fern Pteris vittata.

    SciTech Connect

    Jo Ann Banks; David Salt

    2008-04-04

    Pteris vittata is a fern that is extraordinary in its ability to tolerate hyperaccumulate high levels of arsenic (As). The goals of the proposed research, to identify the genes that are necessary for As hyperaccumulation in P. vittata using molecular and genetic approaches and to understand the physiology of arsenic uptake and distribution in the living plant, were accomplished during the funding period. The genes that have been identified may ultimately enable the engineering or selection of other plants capable of As hyperaccumulation. This is important for the phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils in areas where P. vittata cannot grow.

  17. Digital Technology in the protection of cultural heritage Bao Fan Temple mural digital mapping survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Peng Xi county, Sichuan province, the Bao Fan temple mural digitization survey mapping project: we use three-dimensional laserscanning, multi-baseline definition digital photography, multi-spectral digital image acquisition and other technologies for digital survey mapping. The purpose of this project is to use modern mathematical reconnaissance mapping means to obtain accurate mural shape, color, quality and other data. Combined with field investigation and laboratory analysis results, and based on a comprehensive survey and study, a comprehensive analysis of the historical Bao Fan Temple mural artistic and scientific value was conducted. A study of the mural's many qualities (structural, material, technique, preservation environment, degradation, etc.) reveal all aspects of the information carried by the Bao Fan Temple mural. From multiple angles (archeology, architecture, surveying, conservation science and other disciplines) an assessment for the Bao Fan Temple mural provides basic data and recommendations for conservation of the mural. In order to achieve the conservation of cultural relics in the Bao Fan Temple mural digitization survey mapping process, we try to apply the advantages of three-dimensional laser scanning equipment. For wall murals this means obtaining three-dimensional scale data from the scan of the building and through the analysis of these data to help determine the overall condition of the settlement as well as the deformation of the wall structure. Survey analysis provides an effective set of conclusions and suggestions for appropriate mural conservation. But before data collection, analysis and research need to first to select the appropriate scanning equipment, set the appropriate scanning accuracy and layout position of stations necessary to determine the scope of required data. We use the fine features of the three-dimensional laser scanning measuring arm to scan the mural surface deformation degradation to reflect the actual state of

  18. A newly found manganese hyperaccumulator--Polygonum lapathifolium Linn.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehui; Yu, Fangming; Chen, Menglin; Zhou, Zhenming; Chen, Chaoshu; Li, Ming Shun; Zhu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, both field investigation and laboratory experiment were carried out to testify whether Polygonum lapathifolium L. is a potential manganese (Mn) hyperaccumulator. Results from field investigation showed that P. lapathifolium had great tolerance and accumulation to Mn. Mn concentrations in leaves were the highest, varied from 6889.2 mg kg-1 dry weight (DW) to 18841.7 mg kg(-1) DW with the average of 12180.6 mg kg(-1). The values of translocation factor (the concentrations of Mn in leaf to that in root) ranged from 5.72 to 9.53. Results from laboratory experiment illuminated that P. lapathifolium could grow well and show no toxic symptoms even under high Mn stress (16 mmol L(-1)). Although the changes of antioxidant enzymes activities were triggered under Mn stress, the alterations of pigments were not significant (P > 0.05) as compared with control. Total plant biomass and plant height increased with increasing Mn supply. Mn concentrations in leaves and stems were constantly greater than those in roots, the ratio of concentrations in leaves to that in roots were 2.58-6.72 and the corresponding values in stems to that in roots were 1.45-3.18. The results showed that P. lapathifolium is a Mn-hyperaccumulator.

  19. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L; Noller, Barry N; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H

    2017-02-16

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves - in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni(2+) does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni(2+) chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  20. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L.; Noller, Barry N.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H.

    2017-02-01

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves – in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  1. Prosopis pubescens (screw bean mesquite) seedlings are hyperaccumulators of copper.

    PubMed

    Zappala, Marian N; Ellzey, Joanne T; Bader, Julia; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Due to health reasons, toxic metals must be removed from soils contaminated by mine tailings and smelter activities. The phytoremediation potential of Prosopis pubescens (screw bean mesquite) was examined by use of inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes of parenchymal cells of leaves in the presence of copper. Elemental analysis was used to localize copper within leaves. A 600-ppm copper sulfate exposure to seedlings for 24 days resulted in 31,000 ppm copper in roots, 17,000 ppm in stems, 11,000 in cotyledons and 20 ppm in the true leaves. For a plant to be considered a hyperaccumulator, the plant must accumulate a leaf-to-root ratio <1. Screw bean mesquite exposed to copper had a leaf-to-root ratio of 0.355 when cotyledons were included. We showed that P. pubescens grown in soil is a hyperaccumulator of copper. We recommend that this plant should be field tested.

  2. Successful micropropagation of the cadmium hyperaccumulator Viola baoshanensis (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Tian; Deng, Dong-Mei; Peng, Guang-Tian; Deng, Jin-Chuan; Zhang, Jun; Liao, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Viola baoshanensis is one of the most rare cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulators, however, it is hard to propagate. Micropropagation has been applied to solve the problems with propagation of a few heavy metal hyperaccumulators. Therefore there is a high likelihood that micropropagation may offer a suitable method for large-scale propagation of V. baoshanensis To test this hypothesis, three types of explants were used for shoot regeneration and various combinations of four plant growth regulators were used to improve shoot regeneration efficiency from leaflet of V. baoshanensis. Best shoot regeneration efficiency was obtained by incubating leaflet in a 1/2 MS medium supplemented with 2.5 oM BA + 2.5 microM IBA, therein shoot regeneration rate was 70.9% and the number of shoots formation per explant was 22.4. Rooting was achieved from almost all regenerated shoot growing on 1/2 MS medium without plant growth regulator. Micropropagated seedlings were acclimatized under greenhouse conditions and 95% of them survived and showed no visible morphological variation compared to their donor plant. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between regenerated and seed-germinated V. baoshanensis in Cd tolerance and accumulation. These results suggested that an efficient and rapid micropropogation system was successfully developed for V. baoshanensis.

  3. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

    PubMed Central

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L.; Noller, Barry N.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H.

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves – in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants. PMID:28205587

  4. Tissue Fractions of Cadmium in Two Hyperaccumulating Jerusalem Artichoke Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiaohua; Ni, Ni; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed; Jiang, Xin; Shao, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms in two Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) genotypes that hyperaccumulate Cd, a sand-culture experiment was carried out to characterize fractionation of Cd in tissue of Cd-hyperaccumulating genotypes NY2 and NY5. The sequential extractants were: 80% v/v ethanol (FE), deionized water (FW), 1 M NaCl (FNaCl), 2% v/v acetic acid (FAcet), and 0.6 M HCl (FHCl). After 20 days of treatments, NY5 had greater plant biomass and greater Cd accumulation in tissues than NY2. In both genotypes the FNaCl fraction was the highest in roots and stems, whereas the FAcet and FHCl fractions were the highest in leaves. With an increase in Cd concentration in the culture solution, the content of every Cd fraction also increased. The FW and FNaCl ratios in roots were lower in NY5 than in NY2, while the amount of other Cd forms was higher. It implied that, in high accumulator, namely, NY5, the complex of insoluble phosphate tends to be shaped more easily which was much better for Cd accumulation. Besides, translocation from plasma to vacuole after combination with protein may be one of the main mechanisms in Cd-accumulator Jerusalem artichoke genotypes. PMID:24883399

  5. Tissue fractions of cadmium in two hyperaccumulating Jerusalem artichoke genotypes.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaohua; Ni, Ni; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed; Jiang, Xin; Shao, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms in two Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) genotypes that hyperaccumulate Cd, a sand-culture experiment was carried out to characterize fractionation of Cd in tissue of Cd-hyperaccumulating genotypes NY2 and NY5. The sequential extractants were: 80% v/v ethanol (FE), deionized water (FW), 1 M NaCl (FNaCl), 2% v/v acetic acid (FAcet), and 0.6 M HCl (FHCl). After 20 days of treatments, NY5 had greater plant biomass and greater Cd accumulation in tissues than NY2. In both genotypes the FNaCl fraction was the highest in roots and stems, whereas the FAcet and FHCl fractions were the highest in leaves. With an increase in Cd concentration in the culture solution, the content of every Cd fraction also increased. The FW and FNaCl ratios in roots were lower in NY5 than in NY2, while the amount of other Cd forms was higher. It implied that, in high accumulator, namely, NY5, the complex of insoluble phosphate tends to be shaped more easily which was much better for Cd accumulation. Besides, translocation from plasma to vacuole after combination with protein may be one of the main mechanisms in Cd-accumulator Jerusalem artichoke genotypes.

  6. Limewashed mural paintings as seen by VIS-IR reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Striova, J.; Barucci, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Mariotti, P.

    2015-06-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) reflectography is a well-established technique for painting diagnostics, offering a fundamental contribution to the conservation of paintings. Since the '80s it has been routinely applied to study the execution technique of the author, as well as the presence of pentimenti, retouches, integrations or underdrawing. In the last decades IR reflectography has been extended to the visible (VIS) spectral range, providing information about the pigment composition. Up to now the multispectral analysis is still applied at an experimental level, as the processing of the image set is not straightforward. Rarely multispectral VIS-IR application has been applied to frescos, probably due to the lack, in most cases, of a scattering background. In this work we present the results provided by a multispectral scanning device based on single sensor acquisition, working in the 380-2500 nm spectral range, that is a laboratory prototype specifically built for research-grade imaging. The technique have been applied on a mock up simulating a mural painting substrate where an underdrawing, made of either carbon or iron-gall ink, was covered by different surface layers of limewash, the so-called scialbo.

  7. Mural inspection by vibration measurements with TV-holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke-Begemann, Thomas; Gülker, Gerd; Hinsch, Klaus D.; Joost, Holger

    A commonly encountered problem in the conservation of historical murals is the identification of sections in the plaster that have detached from the wall and thus threaten to fall off. Commonly, walls are inspected by the acoustic response to a gentle finger-tapping (percussion method). Since this is a costly and cumbersome technique, means for a more automatic inspection are searched for. A TV-holography system of increased sensitivity in combination with acoustic excitation of the object is shown to be a new and powerful tool for monitoring of loose areas. It has the advantage of non-contact and remote operation which, for example, is extremely useful in large buildings. Principles of the method, experimental results obtained at an artificial wall in the laboratory, and a thorough comparison of results from historical sites gained by the traditional percussion method and the new technique are presented. The latter shows very good agreement in the assessment of wall quality and thus is evidence of the suitability of the optical equipment for tasks in conservation.

  8. Mural inspection by vibration measurements with TV-holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke-Begemann, Thomas; Gülker, Gerd; Hinsch, Klaus D.; Joost, Holger

    1999-12-01

    A commonly encountered problem in the conservation of historical murals is the identification of sections in the plaster that have detached from the wall and thus threaten to fall off. Commonly, walls are inspected by the acoustic response to a gentle finger-tapping (percussion method). Since this is a costly and cumbersome technique, means for a more automatic inspection are searched for. A TV-holography system of increased sensitivity in combination with acoustic excitation of the object is shown to be a new and powerful tool for monitoring of loose areas. It has the advantage of non-contact and remote operation which, for example, is extremely useful in large buildings. Principles of the method, experimental results obtained at an artificial wall in the laboratory, and a thorough comparison of results from historical sites gained by the traditional percussion method and the new technique are presented. The latter shows very good agreement in the assessment of wall quality and thus is evidence of the suitability of the optical equipment for tasks in conservation.

  9. The tectonic plates are shifting: cultural change vs. mural dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Kenneth; Friedman, Leonard H; Allyn, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    In response to a rapidly changing healthcare marketplace, a variety of new business models have arisen, including new specialties (hospitalists), selective care (concierge medicine), and joint ventures (ambulatory surgical centers, specialty hospitals), some with hospitals and others with independent vendors. Since both hospitals and physicians are feeling the squeeze of rising expenses, burdensome regulations, heightened consumer expectations, and stagnant or decreasing reimbursement, the response to global economic competition and the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes can bring physicians and hospitals together rather than drive them farther apart. In response to perceived threats, physicians and hospital executives can engage in defensive reasoning that may feel protective but can also lead to mural dyslexia, the inability or unwillingness to see the handwriting on the wall. The strategies of positive deviance (finding solutions that already exist in the community rather than importing best practices), appreciative inquiry (building on success rather than relying solely on root-cause analyses of problems), and structured dialogue (allowing practicing physicians to articulate clinical priorities rather than assuming they lack the maturity and will to come to consensus) are field-tested approaches that allow hospital leaders to engage practicing physicians and that can help both parties work more interdependently to improve patient care in a dynamically changing environment. Physician-hospital collaboration based on transparency, active listening, and prompt implementation can offer sustainable competitive advantage to those willing to embark on a lifetime learning journey.

  10. Microbacterium murale sp. nov., isolated from an indoor wall.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, P; Schäfer, J; Lodders, N; Martin, K

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive rod, designated 01-Gi-001(T), was isolated from a wall colonized with moulds. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis clearly showed that the isolate belonged to the genus Microbacterium. On the basis of pairwise comparisons of 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain 01-Gi-001(T) was most closely related to Microbacterium hydrocarbonoxydans DSM 16089(T) (98.9% sequence similarity), Microbacterium profundi Shh49(T) (98.7%), Microbacterium phyllosphaerae DSM 13468(T) (98.3%) and Microbacterium foliorum DSM 12966(T) (98.1%). The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan was ornithine. The major menaquinones detected were MK-13 and MK-12. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phospholipid and one unknown glycolipid. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(16:0) and anteiso-C(17:0), which were in agreement with those reported for other members of the genus Microbacterium. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and DNA-DNA relatedness between strain 01-Gi-001(T) and the type strains of its closest phylogenetic neighbours showed clear differences. For this reason, strain 01-Gi-001(T) (=DSM 22178(T)=CCM 7640(T)) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Microbacterium murale sp. nov.

  11. Sulfur-selenium-molybdenum interactions distinguish selenium hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata from non-hyperaccumulator Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Harris, Jonathan; Schneberg, Kathryn A; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2014-02-01

    Long-term sulfate, selenate and molybdate accumulation and translocation were investigated in two ecotypes of Stanleya pinnata and non-hyperaccumulator Brassica juncea under different levels of applied sulfate and selenate. Morphological differences were observed between the ecotypes of S. pinnata, but few differences in selenium (Se) and sulfur (S) accumulation were measured. Se-to-S ratios were nearly identical between the ecotypes under all treatments. When compared with B. juncea, several unique trends were observed in the hyperaccumulators. While both S. pinnata ecotypes showed no significant effect on Se content of young leaves when the supplied sulfate in the growth medium was increased tenfold (from 0.5 to 5 mM), the Se levels in B. juncea decreased 4- to 12-fold with increased sulfate in the growth medium. Furthermore, S. pinnata’s S levels decreased slightly with high levels of supplied Se, suggesting competitive inhibition of uptake, while B. juncea showed higher S levels with increasing Se, possibly due to up-regulation of sulfate transporters. Both ecotypes of S. pinnata showed much larger Se concentrations in young leaves, while B. juncea showed slightly higher levels of Se in older leaves relative to young. Molybdenum (Mo) levels significantly decreased in S. pinnata with increasing sulfate and selenate in the medium; B. juncea did not show the same trends. These findings support the hypothesis that S. pinnata contains a modified sulfate transporter with a higher specificity for selenate.

  12. Microbeam methodologies as powerful tools in manganese hyperaccumulation research: present status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Denise R.; Marshall, Alan; Baker, Alan J. M.; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Microbeam studies over the past decade have garnered unique insight into manganese (Mn) homeostasis in plant species that hyperaccumulate this essential mineral micronutrient. Electron- and/or proton-probe methodologies employed to examine tissue elemental distributions have proven highly effective in illuminating excess foliar Mn disposal strategies, some apparently unique to Mn hyperaccumulating plants. When applied to samples prepared with minimal artefacts, these are powerful tools for extracting true ‘snapshot’ data of living systems. For a range of reasons, Mn hyperaccumulation is particularly suited to in vivo interrogation by this approach. Whilst microbeam investigation of metallophytes is well documented, certain methods originally intended for non-biological samples are now widely applied in biology. This review examines current knowledge about Mn hyperaccumulators with reference to microbeam methodologies, and discusses implications for future research into metal transporters. PMID:23970891

  13. Molecular Dissection of The Cellular Mechanisms Involved In Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Salt

    2002-04-08

    Hyperaccumulator plant species are able to accumulate between 1-5% of their biomass as metal. However, these plants are often small, slow growing, and do not produce a high biomass. Phytoextraction, a cost-effective, in situ, plant based approach to soil remediation takes advantage of the remarkable ability of hyperaccumulating plants to concentrate metals from the soil and accumulate them in their harvestable, above-ground tissues. However, to make use of the valuable genetic resources identified in metal hyperaccumulating species, it will be necessary to transfer this material to high biomass rapidly growing crop plants. These plants would then be ideally suited to the phytoremediation process, having the ability to produce large amount of metal-rich plant biomass for rapid harvest and soil cleanup. Although progress is being made in understanding the genetic basis of metal hyperaccumulation a more complete understanding will be necessary before we can take full advantage of the genetic potential of these plants.

  14. Investigating heavy-metal hyperaccumulation using Thlaspi caerulescens as a model system.

    PubMed

    Milner, Matthew J; Kochian, Leon V

    2008-07-01

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plant species are plants that are endemic to metalliferous soils and are able to tolerate and accumulate metals in their above-ground tissues to very high concentrations. One such hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, has been widely studied for its remarkable properties to tolerate toxic levels of zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and sometimes nickel (Ni) in the soil, and accumulate these metals to very high levels in the shoot. The increased awareness regarding metal-hyperaccumulating plants by the plant biology community has helped spur interest in the possible use of plants to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils, a process known as phytoremediation. Hence, there has been a focus on understanding the mechanisms that metal-hyperaccumulator plant species such as Thlaspi caerulescens employ to absorb, detoxify and store metals in order to use this information to develop plants better suited for the phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils. In this review, an overview of the findings from recent research aimed at better understanding the physiological mechanisms of Thlaspi caerulescens heavy-metal hyperaccumulation as well as the underlying molecular and genetic determinants for this trait will be discussed. Progress has been made in understanding some of the fundamental Zn and Cd transport physiology in T. caerulescens. Furthermore, some interesting metal-related genes have been identified and characterized in this plant species, and regulation of the expression of some of these genes may be important for hyperaccumulation. Thlaspi caerulescens is a fascinating and useful model system not only for studying metal hyperaccumulation, but also for better understanding micronutrient homeostasis and nutrition. Considerable future research is still needed to elucidate the molecular, genetic and physiological bases for the extreme metal tolerance and hyperaccumulation exhibited by plant species such as T. caerulescens.

  15. Investigating Heavy-metal Hyperaccumulation using Thlaspi caerulescens as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Matthew J.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2008-01-01

    Background Metal-hyperaccumulating plant species are plants that are endemic to metalliferous soils and are able to tolerate and accumulate metals in their above-ground tissues to very high concentrations. One such hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, has been widely studied for its remarkable properties to tolerate toxic levels of zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and sometimes nickel (Ni) in the soil, and accumulate these metals to very high levels in the shoot. The increased awareness regarding metal-hyperaccumulating plants by the plant biology community has helped spur interest in the possible use of plants to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils, a process known as phytoremediation. Hence, there has been a focus on understanding the mechanisms that metal-hyperaccumulator plant species such as Thlaspi caerulescens employ to absorb, detoxify and store metals in order to use this information to develop plants better suited for the phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils. Scope In this review, an overview of the findings from recent research aimed at better understanding the physiological mechanisms of Thlaspi caerulescens heavy-metal hyperaccumulation as well as the underlying molecular and genetic determinants for this trait will be discussed. Progress has been made in understanding some of the fundamental Zn and Cd transport physiology in T. caerulescens. Furthermore, some interesting metal-related genes have been identified and characterized in this plant species, and regulation of the expression of some of these genes may be important for hyperaccumulation. Conclusions Thlaspi caerulescens is a fascinating and useful model system not only for studying metal hyperaccumulation, but also for better understanding micronutrient homeostasis and nutrition. Considerable future research is still needed to elucidate the molecular, genetic and physiological bases for the extreme metal tolerance and hyperaccumulation exhibited by plant species such as T

  16. Fixation of metals in soil constituents and potential remobilization by hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating plants: results from an isotopic dilution study.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Daniel; Keller, Catherine; McLaughlin, Michael J; Hamon, Rebecca E

    2006-10-01

    In this study isotopic dilution methods were used to investigate the hypothesis that access to metals associated with specific chemical components in the soil that are not available to non-accumulator species could be involved in hyperaccumulation. The hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens and a non-accumulator species, Brassica napus, were grown in Cd and Zn enriched soil components calcite, goethite, charcoal and cryptomelane. The metal enriched components were aged to allow transformation of a proportion of added metals to non-labile forms. Results from the isotopic dilution L value method showed that despite taking up more metals, T. caerulescens accessed the same pool of metals as B. napus. Hence differential access to different solid-phase pools of metals appears to be an unlikely mechanism underlying metal hyperaccumulation. For all components except charcoal, L values for Cd and Zn were greater than the corresponding E values suggesting that E values may tend to underestimate the bioavailable fraction of metals in soils.

  17. The Possible Interpretation of a Mural in a Sixth Century Koguryo Tumulus as an AD 555 Solar Eclipse Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il-Seong, Nha; Nha, Sarah L.

    Large numbers of tumuli are a feature of the Koguryo Kingdom (37 BC to AD 668), one of the Three Kingdoms in ancient Korea, and their interiors contain an extremely diverse range of murals. Quite a number of these murals include astronomical motifs, including the stars, the Sun and the Moon.

  18. Metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance: a model for plant evolutionary genomics.

    PubMed

    Hanikenne, Marc; Nouet, Cécile

    2011-06-01

    In the course of evolution, plants adapted to widely differing metal availabilities in soils and therefore represent an important source of natural variation of metal homeostasis networks. Research on plant metal homeostasis can thus provide insights into the functioning, regulation and adaptation of biological networks. Here, we describe major recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of metal hyperaccumulation and associated hypertolerance, a naturally selected complex trait which represents an extreme adaptation of the metal homeostasis network. Investigations in this field reveal further the molecular alterations underlying the evolution of natural phenotypic diversity and provide a highly relevant framework for comparative genomics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pb hyperaccumulation and tolerance in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hideo; Honda, Munechika; Sato, Takeshi; Kamachi, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    Common buckwheat grown in Pb-contaminated soil was found to accumulate a large amount of Pb in its leaves (8,000 mg/kg DW), stem (2,000 mg/kg DW), and roots (3,300 mg/kg DW), without significant damage. This indicates that buckwheat is a newly recognized Pb hyperaccumulator, which is defined as a plant containing over 1,000 mg/kg of Pb in its shoots on a dry-weight basis. Moreover, it was shown that application of the biodegradable chelator methylglycinediacetic acid trisodium salt at concentrations of up to 20 mmol/kg resulted in a more than five times higher concentration of Pb in the shoot without notable growth inhibitation at up to 10 mmol/kg. These results indicate that buckwheat is a potential phytoremediator of Pb-contaminated soils.

  20. Intracystic mural nodules of the breast: benign versus malignant; a multidisciplinary imaging and management approach.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melissa J

    2015-06-01

    This case report illustrates the presence of intracystic mural nodules within the breast, a benign proliferative disorder associated with the fibrocystic spectrum: papillary apocrine metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the physical and histological attributes of benign intracystic mural nodules, and the ability to distinguish these from a malignant papilloma and carcinoma. Also, the technical and patient considerations, as well as the appropriate imaging and interventional methods required to ensure correct patient management pathway are discussed, extending into an analysis of the psychological effects felt by patients undergoing assessment.

  1. Evolution of metal hyperaccumulation required cis-regulatory changes and triplication of HMA4.

    PubMed

    Hanikenne, Marc; Talke, Ina N; Haydon, Michael J; Lanz, Christa; Nolte, Andrea; Motte, Patrick; Kroymann, Juergen; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2008-05-15

    Little is known about the types of mutations underlying the evolution of species-specific traits. The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri has the rare ability to colonize heavy-metal-polluted soils, and, as an extremophile sister species of Arabidopsis thaliana, it is a powerful model for research on adaptation. A. halleri naturally accumulates and tolerates leaf concentrations as high as 2.2% zinc and 0.28% cadmium in dry biomass. On the basis of transcriptomics studies, metal hyperaccumulation in A. halleri has been associated with more than 30 candidate genes that are expressed at higher levels in A. halleri than in A. thaliana. Some of these genes have been genetically mapped to broad chromosomal segments of between 4 and 24 cM co-segregating with Zn and Cd hypertolerance. However, the in planta loss-of-function approaches required to demonstrate the contribution of a given candidate gene to metal hyperaccumulation or hypertolerance have not been pursued to date. Using RNA interference to downregulate HMA4 (HEAVY METAL ATPASE 4) expression, we show here that Zn hyperaccumulation and full hypertolerance to Cd and Zn in A. halleri depend on the metal pump HMA4. Contrary to a postulated global trans regulatory factor governing high expression of numerous metal hyperaccumulation genes, we demonstrate that enhanced expression of HMA4 in A. halleri is attributable to a combination of modified cis-regulatory sequences and copy number expansion, in comparison to A. thaliana. Transfer of an A. halleri HMA4 gene to A. thaliana recapitulates Zn partitioning into xylem vessels and the constitutive transcriptional upregulation of Zn deficiency response genes characteristic of Zn hyperaccumulators. Our results demonstrate the importance of cis-regulatory mutations and gene copy number expansion in the evolution of a complex naturally selected extreme trait. The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies

  2. Analysis of selenium accumulation, speciation and tolerance of potential selenium hyperaccumulator Symphyotrichum ericoides.

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Reynolds, Ray Jason B; Prins, Christine N; Lindblom, Stormy D; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2014-09-01

    Symphyotrichum ericoides was shown earlier to contain hyperaccumulator levels of selenium (Se) in the field (>1000 mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW)), but only when growing next to other Se hyperaccumulators. It was also twofold larger next to hyperaccumulators and suffered less herbivory. This raised two questions: whether S. ericoides is capable of hyperaccumulation without neighbor assistance, and whether its Se-derived benefit is merely ecological or also physiological. Here, in a comparative greenhouse study, Se accumulation and tolerance of S. ericoides were analyzed in parallel with hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus, Se accumulator Brassica juncea and related Asteraceae Machaeranthera tanacetifolia. Symphyotrichum ericoides and M. tanacetifolia accumulated Se up to 3000 and 1500 mg Se kg(-1) DW, respectively. They were completely tolerant to these Se levels and even grew 1.5- to 2.5-fold larger with Se. Symphyotrichum ericoides showed very high leaf Se/sulfur (S) and shoot/root Se concentration ratios, similar to A. bisulcatus and higher than M. tanacetifolia and B. juncea. Se X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy showed that S. ericoides accumulated Se predominantly (86%) as C-Se-C compounds indistinguishable from methyl-selenocysteine, which may explain its Se tolerance. Machaeranthera tanacetifolia accumulated 55% of its Se as C-Se-C compounds; the remainder was inorganic Se. Thus, in this greenhouse study S. ericoides displayed all of the characteristics of a hyperaccumulator. The larger size of S. ericoides when growing next to hyperaccumulators may be explained by a physiological benefit, in addition to the ecological benefit demonstrated earlier. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  3. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Community Mural Making and Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetto, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Through a hermeneutic phenomenological study of interview data from 8 community artists, the author sought to discover commonalities and differences in the worldviews and philosophies of self that underlie community mural making as they relate to art therapy as social action and art therapy practice within a traditional Western cultural framework.…

  4. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Community Mural Making and Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetto, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Through a hermeneutic phenomenological study of interview data from 8 community artists, the author sought to discover commonalities and differences in the worldviews and philosophies of self that underlie community mural making as they relate to art therapy as social action and art therapy practice within a traditional Western cultural framework.…

  5. Mexican Muralism: Its Social-Educative Roles in Latin America and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Shifra M.

    1982-01-01

    Traces the history of Mexican muralism (1920s to 1970s) as an art of advocacy intended to change consciousness and promote political action; shows how it can still be used in an educative manner in schools. Emphasizes the effects of three great muralists (Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros). (LC)

  6. The Safford, Arizona, Murals of Seymour Fogel: A Study in Artistic Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Jared A.; Stevens, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the controversy generated by art works commissioned by the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Attempting to create work for depression-era artists, the WPA often commissioned murals for government buildings. Recounts the experience of Seymour Fogel, who's positive portrayal of Native Americans ran afoul of racist sentiments in Safford,…

  7. Public Art Education in Brunei Darussalam: The Cultural Language of Community Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kong

    2014-01-01

    Two mural projects in Brunei offer insight into the specific and universal aspects of public art education and community art making. This article describes how the author used his initiative and experience as a muralist to plan and implement two community art research projects in Bandar Seri Begwan, the capital of Brunei Darussalam. A premise of…

  8. Murals as Text: A Social-Cultural Perspective on Family Literacy Events in US Prisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, William

    2011-01-01

    Literacy and parenting programmes in US prisons tend to be generic and skills-oriented, insensitive to pressing personal needs of parents and their distant children. This study reports on a prison-based family/art/literacy programme that attended to the local needs and interests of participants through a mural project. The article describes some…

  9. Archaeomagnetic results from mural paintings and pyroclastic rocks in Pompeii and Herculaneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, E.; Gurioli, L.; Chiari, G.; Ciarallo, A.; Cioni, R.; De Carolis, E.; Lanza, R.

    2000-03-01

    This work investigates the magnetic remanence associated with red pigments from murals at Pompeii and compares their directions to those of the pyroclastic rocks from the Vesuvius AD 79 eruption. The remanence of the murals is shown, using X-ray analyses, to be carried by haematite. Murals in Thermae Stabianae, known to have been painted a few years before AD 79, yield an archaeomagnetic direction ( D=1.2°, I=58.0°; α95=5.5°) indistinguishable from that of a nearby kiln ( D=358.0°, I=59.1°; α95=1.7°) ( Evans and Mareschal, 1989) probably last used immediately prior to the eruption. The directions are also consistent with those of fine-grained pyroclastic rocks from the eruption ( D=351.2°, I=57.9°; α95=3.4°) and lithic and tile fragments embedded within them ( D=358.5°, I=60.4°; α95=8.5°). Other paintings of the 1st century AD yield similar directions, with a lower statistical definition. This study shows that murals can retain their remanent magnetization for centuries and demonstrates the viability in principle of pictorial remanence as an archaeomagnetic tool.

  10. Murals as Text: A Social-Cultural Perspective on Family Literacy Events in US Prisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, William

    2011-01-01

    Literacy and parenting programmes in US prisons tend to be generic and skills-oriented, insensitive to pressing personal needs of parents and their distant children. This study reports on a prison-based family/art/literacy programme that attended to the local needs and interests of participants through a mural project. The article describes some…

  11. Mexican Muralism: Its Social-Educative Roles in Latin America and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Shifra M.

    1982-01-01

    Traces the history of Mexican muralism (1920s to 1970s) as an art of advocacy intended to change consciousness and promote political action; shows how it can still be used in an educative manner in schools. Emphasizes the effects of three great muralists (Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros). (LC)

  12. Public Art Education in Brunei Darussalam: The Cultural Language of Community Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kong

    2014-01-01

    Two mural projects in Brunei offer insight into the specific and universal aspects of public art education and community art making. This article describes how the author used his initiative and experience as a muralist to plan and implement two community art research projects in Bandar Seri Begwan, the capital of Brunei Darussalam. A premise of…

  13. Selenium hyperaccumulation - Astragalus bisulcatus, Cardamine hupingshanensis and Stanleya pinnata - may be useful for agromining selenium-rich soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selenium hyperaccumulator plants like Stanleya pinnata, Astragalus bisulcatus and the newly discovered Se-accumulator Cardamine hupingshanensis may play an important role in the Se cycle from soil to plant to human in China. Se-hyperaccumulators can be used for agromining or for phytoremediation of ...

  14. Evolution of selenium hyperaccumulation in Stanleya (Brassicaceae) as inferred from phylogeny, physiology and X-ray microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Jennifer J; Yetter, Crystal; Fakra, Sirine; Cappa, Patrick J; DeTar, Rachael; Landes, Corbett; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Simmons, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have identified herbivory as a likely selection pressure for the evolution of hyperaccumulation, but few have tested the origin(s) of hyperaccumulation in a phylogenetic context. We focused on the evolutionary history of selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation in Stanleya (Brassicaceae). Multiple accessions were collected for all Stanleya taxa and two outgroup species. We sequenced four nuclear gene regions and performed a phylogenetic analysis. Ancestral reconstruction was used to predict the states for Se-related traits in a parsimony framework. Furthermore, we tested the taxa for Se localization and speciation using X-ray microprobe analyses. True hyperaccumulation was found in three taxa within the S. pinnata/bipinnata clade. Tolerance to hyperaccumulator Se concentrations was found in several taxa across the phylogeny, including the hyperaccumulators. X-ray analysis revealed two distinct patterns of leaf Se localization across the genus: marginal and vascular. All taxa accumulated predominantly (65-96%) organic Se with the C-Se-C configuration. These results give insight into the evolution of Se hyperaccumulation in Stanleya and suggest that Se tolerance and the capacity to produce organic Se are likely prerequisites for Se hyperaccumulation in Stanleya. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Interactive effects of Cd and PAHs on contaminants removal from co-contaminated soil planted with hyperaccumulator plant Sedum alfredii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil contamination by multiple organic and inorganic contaminants is common but its remediation by hyperaccumulator plants is rarely reported. The growth of a cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii and removal of contaminants from Cd and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) co-contaminated s...

  16. Recent advances in the analysis of metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance in plants using proteomics.

    PubMed

    Dalcorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Furini, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant plant species have evolved strategies allowing them to grow in metal-contaminated soils, where they accumulate high concentrations of heavy metals in their shoots without signs of toxicity. The mechanisms that allow enhanced metal uptake, root-to-shoot translocation and detoxification in these species are not fully understood. Complementary approaches such as transcriptomic-based DNA microarrays and proteomics have recently been used to gain insight into the molecular pathways evolved by metal hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant species. Proteomics has the advantage of focusing on the translated portion of the genome and it allows to analyze complex networks of proteins. This review discusses the recent analysis of metal hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant plant species using proteomics. Changes in photosynthetic proteins, sulfur, and glutathione metabolism, transport, biotic and xenobiotic defenses as well as the differential regulation of proteins involved in signaling and secondary metabolism are discussed in relation to metal hyperaccumulation. We also consider the potential contribution of several proteins to the hyperaccumulation phenotype.

  17. Recent advances in the analysis of metal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance in plants using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    DalCorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Furini, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant plant species have evolved strategies allowing them to grow in metal-contaminated soils, where they accumulate high concentrations of heavy metals in their shoots without signs of toxicity. The mechanisms that allow enhanced metal uptake, root-to-shoot translocation and detoxification in these species are not fully understood. Complementary approaches such as transcriptomic-based DNA microarrays and proteomics have recently been used to gain insight into the molecular pathways evolved by metal hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant species. Proteomics has the advantage of focusing on the translated portion of the genome and it allows to analyze complex networks of proteins. This review discusses the recent analysis of metal hyperaccumulator/hypertolerant plant species using proteomics. Changes in photosynthetic proteins, sulfur, and glutathione metabolism, transport, biotic and xenobiotic defenses as well as the differential regulation of proteins involved in signaling and secondary metabolism are discussed in relation to metal hyperaccumulation. We also consider the potential contribution of several proteins to the hyperaccumulation phenotype. PMID:23898342

  18. Actephila alanbakeri (Phyllanthaceae): a new nickel hyperaccumulating plant species from localised ultramafic outcrops in Sabah (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    van der Ent, Antony; van Balgooy, Max; van Welzen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The Malaysian state of Sabah on the Island of Borneo is emerging as a hotspot for nickel hyperaccumulator species with at least 25 such species discovered to date. New discoveries of the hyperaccumulation trait in described taxa, as well as taxonomical novelties that are nickel hyperaccumulators, continue to be made. Here we describe a new nickel hyperaccumulating species of Actephila (Phyllanthaceae) originating from two known populations on ultramafic soils in Sabah. The most characteristic feature of Actephila alanbakeri are its knobbly fruits, but other diagnostic morphological characters are discussed and information about its ecology and rhizosphere and plant tissue chemistry is provided. This new species is one of the strongest known nickel hyperaccumulator plants in Southeast Asia with up to 14,700 μg g(-1) (1.47 %) nickel in its leaves. The occurrences of Actephila alanbakeri on just two sites, both of which lie outside protected areas and are disturbed by recurring forest fires, combined with the small total numbers of individuals, render this species Endangered (EN) on the basis of IUCN Red List Criteria.

  19. A nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain enhances phytoextraction of heavy metals by the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xincheng; Lin, Li; Chen, Mingyue; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Weidong; Chen, Bao; Yang, Xiaoe; An, Qianli

    2012-08-30

    Low biomass and shallow root systems limit the application of heavy metal phytoextraction by hyperaccumulators. Plant growth-promoting microbes may enhance hyperaccumulators'phytoextraction. A heavy metal-resistant fungus belonged to the Fusarium oxysporum complex was isolated from the Zn/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance grown in a Pb/Zn mined area. This Fusarium fungus was not pathogenic to plants but promoted host growth. Hydroponic experiments showed that 500 μM Zn(2+) or 50 μM Cd(2+) combined with the fungus increased root length, branches, and surface areas, enhanced nutrient uptake and chlorophyll synthesis, leading to more vigorous hyperaccumulators with greater root systems. Soil experiments showed that the fungus increased root and shoot biomass and S. alfredii-mediated heavy metal availabilities, uptake, translocation or concentrations, and thus increased phytoextraction of Zn (144% and 44%), Cd (139% and 55%), Pb (84% and 85%) and Cu (63% and 77%) from the original Pb/Zn mined soil and a multi-metal contaminated paddy soil. Together, the nonpathogenic Fusarium fungus was able to increase S. alfredii root systems and function, metal availability and accumulation, plant biomass, and thus phytoextraction efficiency. This study showed a great application potential for culturable indigenous fungi other than symbiotic mycorrhizas to enhance the phytoextraction by hyperaccumulators.

  20. Molecular dissection of the cellular mechanisms involved in nickel hyperaccumulation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.

    1997-10-28

    'Phytoremediation, the use of plants for environmental cleanup of pollutants, including toxic metals, holds the potential to allow the economic restoration of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated sites. A number of terrestrial plants are known to naturally accumulate high levels of metals in their shoots (1--2% dry weight), and these plants have been termed metal-hyperaccumulators. Clearly, the genetic traits that determine metal-hyperaccumulation offers the potential for the development of practical phytoremediation processes. The long-term objective is to rationally design and generate plants ideally suited for phytoremediation using this unique genetic material. Initially, the strategy will focus on isolating and characterizing the key genetic information needed for expression of the metal-hyperaccumulation phenotype. Recently, histidine has been shown to play a major role in Ni hyperaccumulation. Based on this information the authors propose to investigate, at the molecular level, the role of histidine biosynthesis in Ni hyperaccumuIation in Thlaspi goesingense, a Ni hyperaccumulator species.'

  1. The bacterial rhizobiome of hyperaccumulators: future perspectives based on omics analysis and advanced microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Visioli, Giovanna; D'Egidio, Sara; Sanangelantoni, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are plants that can extract heavy metal ions from the soil and translocate those ions to the shoots, where they are sequestered and detoxified. Hyperaccumulation depends not only on the availability of mobilized metal ions in the soil, but also on the enhanced activity of metal transporters and metal chelators which may be provided by the plant or its associated microbes. The rhizobiome is captured by plant root exudates from the complex microbial community in the soil, and may colonize the root surface or infiltrate the root cortex. This community can increase the root surface area by inducing hairy root proliferation. It may also increase the solubility of metals in the rhizosphere and promote the uptake of soluble metals by the plant. The bacterial rhizobiome, a subset of specialized microorganisms that colonize the plant rhizosphere and endosphere, makes an important contribution to the hyperaccumulator phenotype. In this review, we discuss classic and more recent tools that are used to study the interactions between hyperaccumulators and the bacterial rhizobiome, and consider future perspectives based on the use of omics analysis and microscopy to study plant metabolism in the context of metal accumulation. Recent data suggest that metal-resistant bacteria isolated from the hyperaccumulator rhizosphere and endosphere could be useful in applications such as phytoextraction and phytoremediation, although more research is required to determine whether such properties can be transferred successfully to non-accumulator species. PMID:25709609

  2. Hyperaccumulator straw improves the cadmium phytoextraction efficiency of emergent plant Nasturtium officinale.

    PubMed

    Li, Keqiang; Lin, Lijin; Wang, Jin; Xia, Hui; Liang, Dong; Wang, Xun; Liao, Ming'an; Wang, Li; Liu, Li; Chen, Cheng; Tang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    With the development of economy, the heavy metal contamination has become an increasingly serious problem, especially the cadmium (Cd) contamination. The emergent plant Nasturtium officinale R. Br. is a Cd-accumulator with low phytoremediation ability. To improve Cd phytoextraction efficiency of N. officinale, the straw from Cd-hyperaccumulator plants Youngia erythrocarpa, Galinsoga parviflora, Siegesbeckia orientalis, and Bidens pilosa was applied to Cd-contaminated soil and N. officinale was then planted; the study assessed the effect of hyperaccumulator straw on the growth and Cd accumulation of N. officinale. The results showed that application of hyperaccumulator species straws increased the biomass and photosynthetic pigment content and reduced the root/shoot ratio of N. officinale. All straw treatments significantly increased Cd content in roots, but significantly decreased Cd content in shoots of N. officinale. Applying hyperaccumulator straw significantly increased the total Cd accumulation in the roots, shoots, and whole plants of N. officinale. Therefore, application of straw from four hyperaccumulator species promoted the growth of N. officinale and improved the phytoextraction efficiency of N. officinale in Cd-contaminated paddy field soil; the straw of Y. erythrocarpa provided the most improvement.

  3. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-28

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  4. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  5. Successful seed germination of the nickel hyperaccumulator Stackhousia tryonii.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Naveen P; Nkang, Ani E; Walsh, Kerry B; Baker, Alan J M; Ashwath, Nanjappa; Midmore, David J

    2005-07-01

    Stackhousia tryonii, a rare nickel hyperaccumulating herb, is endemic to ultramafic (serpentine) soils of central Queensland, Australia. The effects of eight dormancy-relieving treatments on germination of stored seeds of Stackhousia tryonii were investigated under controlled light and temperature conditions. * The treatments were: untreated (control i), leached and dehydrated (primed control ii), treating with gibberellic acid (150 and 300 microM), smoke extract (5 and 10 %, v/v) and potassium cyanide (40 and 80 mM). * Freshly harvested seeds did not germinate. Germination percentage increased with time of storage for up to 18 months (38.3 %). Gibberellin, smoke extract and cyanide treatments did not significantly improve germination. Light did not affect seed germination and there was no interaction between dormancy-relieving treatments and light. A significant inhibition of germination occurred in seeds treated with 5 % (but not 10 %) aqueous smoke extract. Saturated fatty acids, predominantly tridecanoic (C13:0), constituted about 90 % of the total fatty acids in the oil of freshly harvested seeds. In contrast, there was increased accumulation (>75 %) of mono-unsaturated (oleic, c18:1) and poly-unsaturated (linoleic, c18:2; linolenic, c18:3) fatty acids in the oil of stored seeds. * Seeds of S. tryonii require an after-ripening period for germination.

  6. Rhizosphere bacteria mobilize Zn for hyperaccumulation by Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Whiting, S N; de Souza, M P; Terry, N

    2001-08-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens has a remarkable ability to hyperaccumulate Zn from soils containing mostly nonlabile Zn. The present study shows that rhizosphere microbes play an important role in increasing the availability of water-soluble Zn in soil, thus enhancing Zn accumulation by T. caerulescens. The addition of bacteria to surface-sterilized seeds of T. caerulescens sown in autoclaved soil increased the Zn concentration in shoots 2-fold as compared to axenic controls; the total accumulation of Zn was enhanced 4-fold. When the same experiment was conducted with Thlaspi arvense, a nonaccumulator, bacteria had no effect on shoot Zn accumulation although they increased water-soluble Zn concentrations available to both Thlaspi species by 22-67% as compared to the axenic controls. Further evidence that bacteria increase the availability of water-soluble Zn in soil was obtained when liquid media that had supported bacterial growth mobilized 1.3-1.8-fold more Zn from soil as compared to axenic media. Other experiments with agar media showed that bacteria did not facilitate an increase in the rate of soluble Zn transport into the root nor did they enlarge the surface area of the roots of either Thlaspi species. Thus, the bacterially mediated increase in the dissolution of Zn from the nonlabile phase in soil may enhance Zn accumulation in T. caerulescens shoots.

  7. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  8. Revisiting the plant hyperaccumulation criteria to rare plants and earth abundant elements.

    PubMed

    Branquinho, Cristina; Serrano, Helena Cristina; Pinto, Manuel João; Martins-Loução, Maria Amélia

    2007-03-01

    The several established criteria to define a hyperaccumulator plant were applied to a rare and endangered species, Plantago almogravensis, and to the 3rd most abundant element in the earth crust, Al. Using the most common criteria, P. almogravensis undoubtedly is an Al hyperaccumulator plant. If the recent proposed requirements were considered, most of them matching those for a plant to be used in phytoextraction, it can only be considered an unusual accumulator of Al. A discussion is made concerning the several criteria of a hyperaccumulator plant in order to include rare and endemic ones and abundant elements. In ecological terms, the enrichment in Al and Fe observed may account for the differences in the vegetation pattern. Due to the rarity and endangered nature of this plant, the contribution of this work is also relevant for the ecological understanding and the development of conservation options of this endemic species.

  9. Pb and Zn accumulation in a Cd-hyperaccumulator (Viola baoshanensis).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan; Liao, Bin; Wang, Sheng-Long; Zhang, Jun; Li, Jin-Tian

    2010-08-01

    Viola baoshanensis has been identified as a Cd-hyperaccumulator, however, its ability to accumulate Pb or Zn is less certain. Therefore, this study focused on determining whether or not V. baoshanensis can accumulate Pb or Zn, by means of field survey, hydroponic and pot experiments. In addition, we also tried to obtain further information on the Cd hyperaccumulating characteristics of this species. Under field conditions, V. baoshanensis accumulated on average 1090 mg Cd kg(-1), 1902 mg Pb kg(-1) and 3428 mg Zn kg(-1) in its shoots, respectively. In hydroponic and pot experiments, V. baoshanensis showed high tolerance to Cd, Pb, and Zn, as well as the ability to accumulate exceptionally high concentrations of the three elements in its shoots (> 2% Cd, > 1% Pb, and > 0.5% Zn on a dry matter basis). These results, taken together, suggested that V. baoshanensis is not only a Cd-hyperaccumulator, but also a strong accumulator of Pb and Zn.

  10. Hyperaccumulation of silver by Amanita strobiliformis and related species of the section Lepidella.

    PubMed

    Borovicka, Jan; Randa, Zdenek; Jelínek, Emil; Kotrba, Pavel; Dunn, Colin E

    2007-11-01

    Two ectomycorrhizal macrofungal Amanita species of the section Lepidella, A. strobiliformis and A. solitaria, were found to hyperaccumulate silver (Ag). All samples were collected from non-argentiferous areas with background Ag content in soils (0.07-1.01 mgkg(-1) Ag). The Ag contents of both Amanita species were mostly in the range of 200-700 mgkg(-1)D.W. with the highest Ag content of 1253 mgkg(-1) in one sample of A. strobiliformis. Silver concentrations in macrofungal fruit bodies were commonly 800-2500 times higher than in underlying soils. A. strobiliformis and A. solitaria are the first eukaryotic organisms known to hyperaccumulate Ag.

  11. Selenium protects the hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata against black-tailed prairie dog herbivory in native seleniferous habitats.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Quinn, Colin F; Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Klamper, Erin M; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2009-06-01

    Elemental hyperaccumulation in plants is hypothesized to represent a plant defense mechanism. The objective of this study was to determine whether selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation offers plants long-term protection from the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prairie dogs are a keystone species. The hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata (prince's plume) co-occurs with prairie dogs in seleniferous areas in the western United States. Stanleya pinnata plants pretreated with high or low Se concentrations were planted on two prairie dog towns with different levels of herbivory pressure, and herbivory of these plants was monitored over 2 years. Throughout this study, plants with elevated Se levels suffered less herbivory and survived better than plants with low leaf Se concentrations. This study indicates that the Se in hyperaccumulator S. pinnata protects the plant in its natural habitat from herbivory by the black-tailed prairie dog. The results from this study support the hypothesis that herbivory by prairie dogs or similar small mammals has been a contributing selection pressure for the evolution of plant Se hyperaccumulation in North America. This study is the first to test the ecological significance of hyperaccumulation over a long period in a hyperaccumulator's natural habitat.

  12. Recovery of zinc from hyperaccumulator plants: Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Guang; Yang, Jian-Ying; Peng, Chang-Hong; Tang, Chao-Bo; Zhou, Ke-Cao

    2009-06-01

    Hyperaccumulator biomass harvested after heavy-metal phytoremediation must be considered as hazardous waste that should be contained or treated appropriately before disposal or reuse. As a potential method to detoxify the biomass and to convert this material to a suitable fertilizer or mulch, leaching of heavy metals from Sedum plumbizincicola biomass was studied by using ammonia-ammonium chloride solution as a leaching agent. The research was carried out in two phases: (i) a leaching study to determine the heavy metal:zinc extraction efficiency of this leaching agent and (ii) a thermodynamic analysis to identify the likely reactions and stable Zn(II) species formed in the leaching systems. Experimentally, a Taguchi orthogonal experiment with four variable parameter elements: leaching temperature, nNH4Cl:nNH3 ratio, leaching time and solid-liquid ratio, each at three levels, was used to optimize the experimental parameters by the analysis of variances. Application of the Taguchi technique significantly reduced the time and cost required for the experimental investigation. The findings indicate that leaching temperature had the most dominant effect on metal extraction performance, followed by nNH4Cl:nNH3 ratio, solid-liquid ratio and leaching time. Accordingly, the optimum leaching conditions were determined as temperature: 60 degrees C, nNH4Cl:nNH3 = 0.6, leaching time: 2 h and solid/liquid ratio: 5:1. The total zinc removal after leaching under the optimum conditions reached 97.95%. The thermodynamic study indicated that the dominant species produced by the leaching process should be the soluble species Zn(NH3)4(2+).

  13. Hyperaccumulation of cadmium by hairy roots of Thlaspi caerulescens

    SciTech Connect

    Nedelkoska, T.V.; Doran, P.M.

    2000-03-05

    Hairy roots were used to investigate cadmium uptake by Thlaspi caerulescens, a metal hyperaccumulator plant with potential applications in phytoremediation and phytomining. Experiments were carried out in nutrient media under conditions supporting root growth. Accumulation of Cd in short-term (9-h) experiments varied with initial medium pH and increased after treating the roots with H{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor. The highest equilibrium Cd content measured in T. caerulescens roots was 62,800 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight, or 6.3% dry weight, at a liquid Cd concentration of 3,710 ppm. Cd levels in live T. caerulescens roots were 1.5- to 1.7-fold those in hairy roots of nonhyperaccumulator species exposed to the same Cd concentration, but similar to the Cd content of auto-claved T. caerulescens roots. The ability to grow at Cd concentrations of up to 100 ppm clearly distinguished T. caerulescens hairy roots from the nonhyperaccumulators. The specific growth rate of T. caerulescens roots was essentially unaffected by 20 to 50 ppm Cd in the culture medium; in contrast, N. tabacum roots turned dark brown at 20 ppm and growth was negligible. Up to 10,600 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight Cd was accumulated by growing T. caerulescens hairy roots. Measurement of Cd levels in while roots and in the cell wall fraction revealed significant differences in the responses of T. caerulescens and N. tabacum roots to 20 ppm Cd. Most metal was transported directly into the symplasm of N. tabacum roots within 3 days of exposure; in contrast, T. caerulescens roots stored virtually all of their Cd in the wall fraction for the first 7 to 10 days. This delay in transmembrane uptake may represent an important defensive strategy against Cd poisoning in T. caerulescens, allowing time for activation of intracellular mechanisms for heavy metal detoxification.

  14. Heart pump system in "heart-mural coronary artery-myocardial bridge" simulative device.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Chen, Z; Shen, L; Xu, M; Zhou, Y; Xu, S; Zeng, Y

    2009-06-01

    The myocardial tissue covering the artery is termed a myocardial bridge. But so far many researches on the myocardial bridge have been involved with clinical patients or animals, which have some limitations (e.g. lack of systematicness, difficulties in measuring the flow in the mural coronary artery and so on). Designing a "Heart-Mural coronary artery-Myocardial Bridge" Simulative Device provides a good approach to solve above problems; however, documents on this subject have seldom been reported until now. The heart pump as the key part of the whole simulative device should be able to simulate the waveform of blood pressure, adjust blood flow and regulate heart rate. Our experimental results basically met above requirements. The heart pump proposed in the paper presented an alternative experimental method to go further into other issues about the cardiovascular circulation system.

  15. Non-invasive NMR stratigraphy of a multi-layered artefact: an ancient detached mural painting.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Valeria; Capitani, Donatella; Presciutti, Federica; Gentile, Gennaro; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Proietti, Noemi

    2013-10-01

    NMR stratigraphy was used to investigate in situ, non-destructively and non-invasively, the stratigraphy of hydrogen-rich layers of an ancient Nubian detached mural painting. Because of the detachment procedure, a complex multi-layered artefact was obtained, where, besides layers of the original mural painting, also the materials used during the procedure all became constitutive parts of the artefact. NMR measurements in situ enabled monitoring of the state of conservation of the artefact and planning of minimum representative sampling to validate results obtained in situ by solid-state NMR analysis of the samples. This analysis enabled chemical characterization of all organic materials. Use of reference compounds and prepared specimens assisted data interpretation.

  16. Non-invasive detection of murals with pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Minjie; Sun, Wenfeng; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Qunxi; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Pulsed terahertz reflected imaging technology has been expected to have great potential for the non-invasive analysis of artworks. In this paper, three types of defects hidden in the plaster used to simulate the cases of defects in the murals, have been investigated by a pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system. These preset defects include a circular groove, a cross-shaped slit and a piece of "Y-type" metal plate built in the plaster. With the terahertz reflective tomography, information about defects has been determined involving the thickness from the surface of sample to the built-in defect, the profile and distribution of the defect. Additionally, three-dimensional analyses have been performed in order to reveal the internal structure of defects. Terahertz reflective imaging can be applied to the defect investigation of the murals.

  17. Investigation of Layer Structure of the Takamatsuzuka Mural Paintings by Terahertz Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, M.; Kouzuma, Y.; Sugioka, N.; Fukunaga, K.; Tateishi, T.

    2017-04-01

    Terahertz imaging can be a powerful tool in conservation science for cultural heritages. In this study, a new terahertz imaging system was applied to the Takamatsuzuka mural painting of a blue dragon, and the condition of the plaster layer was diagnosed. As a result, the locations where the plaster layer appears solid on the surface but in actuality may have peeled off the underlying tuff stone were revealed and viewed as two-dimensional images.

  18. Investigation of Layer Structure of the Takamatsuzuka Mural Paintings by Terahertz Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, M.; Kouzuma, Y.; Sugioka, N.; Fukunaga, K.; Tateishi, T.

    2017-02-01

    Terahertz imaging can be a powerful tool in conservation science for cultural heritages. In this study, a new terahertz imaging system was applied to the Takamatsuzuka mural painting of a blue dragon, and the condition of the plaster layer was diagnosed. As a result, the locations where the plaster layer appears solid on the surface but in actuality may have peeled off the underlying tuff stone were revealed and viewed as two-dimensional images.

  19. Approach of the measurement of thermal diffusivity of mural paintings by front face photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, Jean Charles; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, Vincent; Remy, B.; Grossel, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present, in an experimental way, the possibilities of front face photothermal radiometry to measure, in situ, the longitudinal thermal diffusivity of mural paintings. First, we present the principle of the method of measurement. Then, we present the experimental device implemented for the study. Finally, we show, using the experimental study of a plaster sample, the photothermal method allows in a particular case, a good approximation of the parameter longitudinal thermal diffusivity.

  20. Heavy metal hyperaccumulating plants: how and why do they do it? And what makes them so interesting?

    PubMed

    Rascio, Nicoletta; Navari-Izzo, Flavia

    2011-02-01

    The term "hyperaccumulator" describes a number of plants that belong to distantly related families, but share the ability to grow on metalliferous soils and to accumulate extraordinarily high amounts of heavy metals in the aerial organs, far in excess of the levels found in the majority of species, without suffering phytotoxic effects. Three basic hallmarks distinguish hyperaccumulators from related non-hyperaccumulating taxa: a strongly enhanced rate of heavy metal uptake, a faster root-to-shoot translocation and a greater ability to detoxify and sequester heavy metals in leaves. An interesting breakthrough that has emerged from comparative physiological and molecular analyses of hyperaccumulators and related non-hyperaccumulators is that most key steps of hyperaccumulation rely on different regulation and expression of genes found in both kinds of plants. In particular, a determinant role in driving the uptake, translocation to leaves and, finally, sequestration in vacuoles or cell walls of great amounts of heavy metals, is played in hyperaccumulators by constitutive overexpression of genes encoding transmembrane transporters, such as members of ZIP, HMA, MATE, YSL and MTP families. Among the hypotheses proposed to explain the function of hyperaccumulation, most evidence has supported the "elemental defence" hypothesis, which states that plants hyperaccumulate heavy metals as a defence mechanism against natural enemies, such as herbivores. According to the more recent hypothesis of "joint effects", heavy metals can operate in concert with organic defensive compounds leading to enhanced plant defence overall. Heavy metal contaminated soils pose an increasing problem to human and animal health. Using plants that hyperaccumulate specific metals in cleanup efforts appeared over the last 20 years. Metal accumulating species can be used for phytoremediation (removal of contaminant from soils) or phytomining (growing plants to harvest the metals). In addition, as many

  1. Enhanced cadmium efflux and root-to-shoot translocation are conserved in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae family).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongchun; Yu, Qi; Du, Hanying; Ai, Wenli; Yao, Xuan; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Qiu, Baosheng

    2016-06-01

    Investigation on the molecular mechanisms of cadmium hyperaccumulation has been mostly focused on members of the Brassicaceae family. Here, we show using hyperaccumulating (HP) and nonhyperaccumulating (NHP) populations of Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae), that Cd hypertolerance correlates with higher Cd efflux rates and less cadmium accumulation in suspension cells and roots. The heavy metal ATPase HMA2, but not HMA4, was highly expressed in suspension cultures and roots from HP plants compared to NHP cells and plants. Reciprocal grafting also showed that Cd translocation is more efficient in HP plants. These results suggest that cadmium efflux is a conserved mechanism among natural cadmium hyperaccumulator species. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of Cadmium Stress Response in the Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoe; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The Sedum alfredii Hance hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) has the ability to hyperaccumulate cadmium (Cd), as well as zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) in above-ground tissues. Although many physiological studies have been conducted with these plants, the molecular mechanisms underlying their hyper-tolerance to heavy metals are largely unknown. Here we report on the generation of 9.4 gigabases of adaptor-trimmed raw sequences and the assembly of 57,162 transcript contigs in S. alfredii Hance (HE) shoots by the combination of Roche 454 and Illumina/Solexa deep sequencing technologies. We also have functionally annotated the transcriptome and analyzed the transcriptome changes upon Cd hyperaccumulation in S. alfredii Hance (HE) shoots. There are 110 contigs and 123 contigs that were up-regulated (Fold Change ≧2.0) and down-regulated (Fold Change ≦0.5) by chronic Cd treatment in S. alfredii Hance (HE) at q-value cutoff of 0.005, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR was employed to compare gene expression patterns between S. alfredii Hance (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). Our results demonstrated that several genes involved in cell wall modification, metal translocation and remobilization were more induced or constitutively expressed at higher levels in HE shoots than that in NHE shoots in response to Cd exposure. Together, our study provides large-scale expressed sequence information and genome-wide transcriptome profiling of Cd responses in S. alfredii Hance (HE) shoots. PMID:23755133

  3. Role of sulfur assimilation pathway in cadmium hyperaccumulation by Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Shohag, M J I; Yang, Xiaoe; Tian, Shengke; Zhang, Yibin; Feng, Ying; He, Zhenli

    2014-02-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance is a promising cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulating plant recently identified in China. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying Cd accumulation, which differentiate hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) from non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) has not been elucidated yet. A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the role of sulfur assimilation pathway in Cd hyperaccumulation by the S. alfredii Hance, by analyzing gene expression pattern in sulfur assimilation pathway and the concentration of some sulfur containing compounds. The results show that, sulfur assimilation pathway was affected by Cd differently in HE and NHE S. alfredii Hance. The gene expression pattern of sulfur assimilation pathway was regulated differently in HE and NHE plants, especially the nicotianamine synthase (NAS). NAS transcript levels in root of HE was 141-fold higher than NHE, while in shoots of HE only 0.31-fold higher than NHE. In HE roots, NAS expression level was maximum 3171-fold higher than shoots, while in NHE plants roots NAS expression level was maximum 45.3-fold higher than shoots. In HE plant roots, sulfur, cysteine and methionine concentrations increased 30%, 46% and 835% respectively, by Cd treatment, but in NHE plants roots, sulfur concentration increased less than 1%, cysteine and methionine concentrations decreased 78.5% and 13.3% respectively, by Cd. Cd exposure increased glutathione levels by 142% in HE but less than 10% in NHE plant roots. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Nickel hyperaccumulation as an elemental defense of Streptanthus polygaloides (Brassicaceae): influence of herbivore feeding mode.

    PubMed

    Jhee, Edward M; Boyd, Robert S; Eubanks, Micky D

    2005-11-01

    No study of a single nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator species has investigated the impact of hyperaccumulation on herbivores representing a variety of feeding modes. Streptanthus polygaloides plants were grown on high- or low-Ni soils and a series of no-choice and choice feeding experiments was conducted using eight arthropod herbivores. Herbivores used were two leaf-chewing folivores (the grasshopper Melanoplus femurrubrum and the lepidopteran Evergestis rimosalis), a dipteran rhizovore (the cabbage maggot Delia radicum), a xylem-feeder (the spittlebug Philaenus spumarius), two phloem-feeders (the aphid, Lipaphis erysimi and the spidermite Trialeurodes vaporariorum) and two cell-disruptors (the bug Lygus lineolaris and the whitefly Tetranychus urticae). Hyperaccumulated Ni significantly decreased survival of the leaf-chewers and rhizovore, and significantly reduced population growth of the whitefly cell-disruptor. However, vascular tissue-feeding insects were unaffected by hyperaccumulated Ni, as was the bug cell-disruptor. We conclude that Ni can defend against tissue-chewing herbivores but is ineffective against vascular tissue-feeding herbivores. The effects of Ni on cell-disruptors varies, as a result of either variation of insect Ni sensitivity or the location of Ni in S. polygaloides cells and tissues.

  5. Elevated Nicotianamine Levels in Arabidopsis halleri Roots Play a Key Role in Zinc Hyperaccumulation[W

    PubMed Central

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Weber, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Rensch, Stefan; Trampczynska, Aleksandra; Hansen, Thomas H.; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Talke, Ina N.; Krämer, Ute; Clemens, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Zn deficiency is among the leading health risk factors in developing countries. Breeding of Zn-enriched crops is expected to be facilitated by molecular dissection of plant Zn hyperaccumulation (i.e., the ability of certain plants to accumulate Zn to levels >100-fold higher than normal plants). The model hyperaccumulators Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens share elevated nicotianamine synthase (NAS) expression relative to nonaccumulators among a core of alterations in metal homeostasis. Suppression of Ah-NAS2 by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in strongly reduced root nicotianamine (NA) accumulation and a concomitant decrease in root-to-shoot translocation of Zn. Speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that the dominating Zn ligands in roots were NA and thiols. In NAS2-RNAi plants, a marked increase in Zn-thiol species was observed. Wild-type A. halleri plants cultivated on their native soil showed elemental profiles very similar to those found in field samples. Leaf Zn concentrations in NAS2-RNAi lines, however, did not reach the Zn hyperaccumulation threshold. Leaf Cd accumulation was also significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a role for NAS2 in Zn hyperaccumulation also under near-natural conditions. We propose that NA forms complexes with Zn(II) in root cells and facilitates symplastic passage of Zn(II) toward the xylem. PMID:22374395

  6. Uncoupling of reactive oxygen species accumulation and defence signalling in the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen N; Eyles, Chris J; Bennett, Mark H; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2013-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS tolerance mechanisms, which might quench ROS-based signals. We therefore investigated whether metal accumulation alters defence signalling via ROS in this plant. We studied the effect of zinc (Zn) accumulation by N. caerulescens on pathogen-induced ROS production, salicylic acid accumulation and downstream defence responses, such as callose deposition and pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. The accumulation of Zn caused increased superoxide production in N. caerulescens, but inoculation with P. syringae did not elicit the defensive oxidative burst typical of most plants. Defences dependent on signalling through ROS (callose and PR gene expression) were also modified or absent in N. caerulescens, whereas salicylic acid production in response to infection was retained. These observations suggest that metal hyperaccumulation is incompatible with defence signalling through ROS and that, as metal hyperaccumulation became effective as a form of elemental defence, normal defence responses became progressively uncoupled from ROS signalling in N. caerulescens. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Elevated nicotianamine levels in Arabidopsis halleri roots play a key role in zinc hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Weber, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Rensch, Stefan; Trampczynska, Aleksandra; Hansen, Thomas H; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan K; Talke, Ina N; Krämer, Ute; Clemens, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Zn deficiency is among the leading health risk factors in developing countries. Breeding of Zn-enriched crops is expected to be facilitated by molecular dissection of plant Zn hyperaccumulation (i.e., the ability of certain plants to accumulate Zn to levels >100-fold higher than normal plants). The model hyperaccumulators Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens share elevated nicotianamine synthase (NAS) expression relative to nonaccumulators among a core of alterations in metal homeostasis. Suppression of Ah-NAS2 by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in strongly reduced root nicotianamine (NA) accumulation and a concomitant decrease in root-to-shoot translocation of Zn. Speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that the dominating Zn ligands in roots were NA and thiols. In NAS2-RNAi plants, a marked increase in Zn-thiol species was observed. Wild-type A. halleri plants cultivated on their native soil showed elemental profiles very similar to those found in field samples. Leaf Zn concentrations in NAS2-RNAi lines, however, did not reach the Zn hyperaccumulation threshold. Leaf Cd accumulation was also significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a role for NAS2 in Zn hyperaccumulation also under near-natural conditions. We propose that NA forms complexes with Zn(II) in root cells and facilitates symplastic passage of Zn(II) toward the xylem.

  8. Cadmium leaching from micro-lysimeters planted with the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens: experimental findings and modeling.

    PubMed

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Bücherl, Barbara; Neumann, Günter; Streck, Thilo

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy metal hyperaccumulating plants has the potential to become a promising new technique to remediate contaminated sites. We investigated the role of metal mobilization in the Cd hyperaccumulation of Thlaspi caerulescens (J. & C. Presl, 'Ganges'). In a micro-lysimeter experiment we investigated the dynamics of Cd concentration of leachate as well as Cd removal by plant uptake in four treatments: (i) Control (bare soil), (ii) T. caerulescens, (iii) nonhyperaccumulator Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. ('PI 426308'), and (iv) co-cropping of the hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator. The experimental findings were analyzed using one- and two-site rate-limited desorption models. Co-cropping of T. caerulescens and B. juncea did not enhance metal uptake by B. juncea. Although Cd uptake of T. caerulescens was 10 times higher than that of B. juncea, the Cd concentration of leachate of the T. caerulescens treatment did not decrease below that of the B. juncea treatment. The Cd depletion in leachate was well reproduced by the two-site rate-limited desorption model. The optimized desorption coefficient was three orders of magnitude higher in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Our results indicate that T. caerulescens accelerates the resupply of Cd from soil pointing to an important role of kinetic desorption in the hyperaccumulation by T. caerulescens.

  9. High-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting for lipid hyperaccumulating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Stessman, Dan; Hart, Jason H; Dong, Haili; Wang, Yingjun; Wright, David A; Nikolau, Basil J; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    The genetically tractable microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model for renewable bioproducts and/or biofuels production. However, one limitation of C. reinhardtii is its relatively low-lipid content compared with some other algal species. To overcome this limitation, we combined ethane methyl sulfonate mutagenesis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of cells stained with the lipophilic stain Nile Red to isolate lipid hyperaccumulating mutants of C. reinhardtii. By manipulating the FACS gates, we sorted mutagenized cells with extremely high Nile Red fluorescence signals that were rarely detected in nonmutagenized populations. This strategy successfully isolated several putative lipid hyperaccumulating mutants exhibiting 23% to 58% (dry weight basis) higher fatty acid contents than their progenitor strains. Significantly, for most mutants, nitrogen starvation was not required to attain high-lipid content nor was there a requirement for a deficiency in starch accumulation. Microscopy of Nile Red stained cells revealed that some mutants exhibit an increase in the number of lipid bodies, which correlated with TLC analysis of triacyglycerol content. Increased lipid content could also arise through increased biomass production. Collectively, our findings highlight the ability to enhance intracellular lipid accumulation in algae using random mutagenesis in conjunction with a robust FACS and lipid yield verification regime. Our lipid hyperaccumulating mutants could serve as a genetic resource for stacking additional desirable traits to further increase lipid production and for identifying genes contributing to lipid hyperaccumulation, without lengthy lipid-induction periods.

  10. The leguminous species Anthyllis vulneraria as a Zn-hyperaccumulator and eco-Zn catalyst resources.

    PubMed

    Grison, Claire M; Mazel, Marine; Sellini, Amandine; Escande, Vincent; Biton, Jacques; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Anthyllis vulneraria was highlighted here as a Zn-hyperaccumulator for the development of a pilot phytoextraction process in the mine site of Les Avinières in the district of Saint-Laurent-Le-Minier. A. vulneraria appeared to hyperaccumulate the highest concentration of Zn in shoots with a better metal selectivity relative to Cd and Pb than the reference Zn-hyperaccumulator Noccea caerulescens. A bigger biomass production associated to a higher Zn concentration conducted A. vulneraria to the highest total zinc gain per hectare per year. As a legume, A. vulneraria was infected by rhizobia symbionts. Inoculation of A. vulneraria seeds showed a positive impact on Zn hyperaccumulation. A large-scale culture process of symbiotic rhizobia of A. vulneraria was investigated and optimized to allow large-scale inoculation process. Contaminated shoots of A. vulneraria were not considered as wastes and were recovered as Eco-Zn catalyst in particular, examples of organic synthesis, electrophilic aromatic substitution. Eco-Zn catalyst was much more efficient than conventional catalysts and allowed greener chemical processes.

  11. The metal hyperaccumulators from New Caledonia can broaden our understanding of nickel accumulation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jaffré, Tanguy; Pillon, Yohan; Thomine, Sébastien; Merlot, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    While an excess of metals such as zinc, cadmium or nickel (Ni) is toxic for most plants, about 500 plant species called hyperaccumulators are able to accumulate high amounts of these metals. These plants and the underlying mechanisms are receiving an increasing interest because of their potential use in sustainable biotechnologies such as biofortification, phytoremediation, and phytomining. Among hyperaccumulators, about 400 species scattered in 40 families accumulate Ni. Despite this wide diversity, our current knowledge of the mechanisms involved in Ni accumulation is still limited and mostly restricted to temperate herbaceous Brassicaceae. New Caledonia is an archipelago of the tropical southwest pacific with a third of its surface (5500 km2) covered by Ni-rich soils originating from ultramafic rocks. The rich New Caledonia flora contains 2145 species adapted to these soils, among which 65 are Ni hyperaccumulators, including lianas, shrubs or trees, mostly belonging to the orders Celastrales, Oxalidales, Malpighiales, and Gentianales. We present here our current knowledge on Ni hyperaccumulators from New Caledonia and the latest molecular studies developed to better understand the mechanisms of Ni accumulation in these plants. PMID:23898341

  12. Line-Drawing Enhanced Interactive Mural Restoration for Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X. Y.; Han, Y.; Sun, Z. J.; Ma, X. J.; Xu, Y. Q.

    2017-08-01

    Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes in western China is one of the most famous World Cultural Heritage Sites, known for its glorious Chinese Buddhist art spanning a period of 1,000 years. However, it has been suffering from damage and degradation caused by man-made and natural factors. In this article, we present a novel line-drawing enhanced interactive system for digital restoration of damaged murals in Mogao Grottoes. Our system consists of four components, namely data pre-processing, damaged area selection, line-drawing segmentation, and mural restoration. Each component is a hybrid of efficient algorithms and user interactions. We introduce the infrastructure and process of using our system, from data capture and collection, database establishment, to interactive restoration. We conduct a user study with 15 participants who have varied experiences with and skills on repairing murals and editing images. Results and feedback suggest that our system can achieve satisfactory restoration results without overburdening the users. It can benefit both experts trained in restoration and amateurs interested in cultural heritage conservation.

  13. Biodeterioration of Pompeian mural paintings: fungal colonization favoured by the presence of volcanic material residues.

    PubMed

    Veneranda, Marco; Prieto-Taboada, Nagore; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz; Maguregui, Maite; Morillas, Hector; Marcaida, Iker; Castro, Kepa; Madariaga, Juan Manuel; Osanna, Massimo

    2017-07-05

    This work was focused on the study of the biodegradation processes jeopardizing a mural painting conserved in the basement of Ariadne House (archaeological site of Pompeii, Italy). The fresco stood out for its peculiar state of preservation: the upper part, recovered in 1988, was just barely colonized by microorganisms. On the contrary, the lower part (excavated in 2005) was almost completely covered by extensive biological patinas. The genomic characterization carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) highlighted the presence of seven different fungi strains on the mural surface. Beside, in situ and laboratory analyses were performed with the purpose of identifying the causes of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of the biopatinas. The in situ Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectroscopy measurements excluded any link between the heterogeneous colonization and the original materials present in the wall. On the other side, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on microsamples proved the presence of a thin volcanic material layer overlying the lower part of the fresco. Considering that most of the biofilms of the studied mural painting only growth over these residues, it was confirmed the role of volcanic material as a suitable support for biological colonization. Thanks to the obtained results, this research helped to understand more in depth an important degradation pathway threatening the artworks from one of the most important archaeological sites in the world.

  14. Prototype of a pigments color chart for the digital conservation of ancient murals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinxing; Wan, Xiaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Digital imaging has become a very important technique in the conservation of cultural art relics because it can nondestructively acquire the color and spectral image of cultural art relics for different applications. Imaging accuracy is one of the key factors in digital protection of cultural art relics. In order to improve the color and spectral accuracy for digital imaging of cultural art relics, the idea of making the specific color charts for different kinds of artworks is presented. Taking ancient Chinese Dunhuang murals as the specific object of study, a prototype pigments color chart of the Dunhuang murals (DCC), containing a six-step grayscale and 30 colored pigment samples, is made to investigate its pigment types and painting techniques. Under the premise of considering the difference in the number of samples in color charts, the DCC is tested and compared with the classic and widely used standard Macbeth colorchecker (CC) in two aspects: color correction for RGB imaging and spectral reconstruction for spectral imaging. The results show that the prototype pigments color chart is more effective and exhibits superior performance to the CC in both aspects for digital conservation of the Dunhuang murals.

  15. Heat-stable chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in Chenopodium murale.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu; Sabarinath, S

    2004-08-06

    Chenopodium murale is a weed species having wide adaptation to different climatic regimes and experiences a temperature range of 5-45 degrees C during its life span. Higher temperatures may result in heat stress, which induces higher ROS production leading to oxidative stress in the plant. Superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD, EC.1.15.1.1) is ubiquitous, being widely distributed among O(2)(-) consuming organisms and is the first line of defense against oxidative stress. In this study, we have characterized the thermostability of the SOD isozymes from C. murale in vitro. The leaf protein extracts, thylakoidal and stromal fractions were subjected to elevated temperatures ranging from 50 degrees C to boiling and analyzed for activity and isoform pattern of SOD. Out of six SOD isoforms, SOD V showed stability even after boiling the extract for 10min. Under high temperature treatment (>60 degrees C) there was an appearance of a new SOD band with higher electrophoretic mobility. The inhibitor studies and subcellular analysis revealed that the SOD V isoform was a chloroplastic Cu/Zn SOD. The stromal Cu/Zn SOD (SOD V) was more stable than the co-migrating thylakoidal isozyme at 80 degrees C and boiling for 10min. Hence, we report an unusual, constitutive thermostable chloroplastic Cu/Zn SOD from C. murale, which may contribute towards its heat tolerance.

  16. Molecular Profiling Reveals a Clonal Relationship Between Ovarian Mucinous Tumors and Corresponding Mural Carcinomatous Nodules.

    PubMed

    Mesbah Ardakani, Nima; Giardina, Tindaro; Amanuel, Benhur; Stewart, Colin J

    2017-09-01

    Benign or malignant mural nodules rarely occur in mucinous tumors (MTs) of the ovary and malignant nodules can show mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The histogenesis of mural nodules is unclear and it has been suggested that these may evolve through divergent differentiation of the mucinous neoplasm or alternatively represent a collision phenomenon. To test these possibilities we compared the molecular profile of 7 ovarian MTs with their matched mural carcinomatous nodules (MCNs) by next-generation sequencing. We found identical KRAS mutations in paired MTs and MCNs in 6 cases, one of which also showed identical CDH1 mutations in both components. In 1 tumor a KRAS mutation was detected in the mucinous neoplasm but not in the MCN; however, identical p53 mutations were present in both tumor elements. Unpaired p53 and PTEN mutations were detected only in the MCN in 2 cases, while mutations in p53 and PIK3CA genes were observed only in the MT in 2 cases. The overall comparative genomic profile was consistent with the neoplastic nature of the MCNs and strongly supported their clonal relationship with the more differentiated mucinous neoplasms. MCNs possibly develop through the acquisition of additional genomic alterations, such as p53 and PTEN mutations, resulting in an anaplastic morphologic phenotype. Our findings also suggest that ovarian MTs with MCNs often arise in KRAS mutant neoplasms. However, mutations in other genes such as PIK3CA and CDH1 may play a role in the neoplastic evolution of a subset of these tumors.

  17. Development of a portable ESPI system for the analysis in situ of mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaglio, E.; Lamas, J.; López, Ana J.; Ramil, A.; Pereira, L.; Prieto, B.; Silva, B.

    2012-10-01

    The use of Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is well documented in the literature as a non-destructive technique for structural diagnostics in the field of cultural heritage.. In the case of mural paintings the lack of adhesion between the plaster and the mural support is one of the most important risk factors that threaten their conservation. With this non-invasive method it is possible to detect detachments and cracks in the paintings before they become visible The objective of this work is the development of ESPI portable equipment based on a fibre interferometer for in situ qualitative analysis of mural paintings. The novelty of the presented set up is the use of a variable ratio coupler which makes the system more immune to vibrations and allows for better use of available light compared with the equivalent of free air guided. This configuration simplifies the arrangement and makes it possible to obtain ESPI interferograms with high contrast; moreover, the use of a ceramic heater as excitation source enables the analysis during the heating. Preliminary results obtained in laboratory conditions have shown that detachments and cracks can be successfully detected on model samples of the wall paintings.

  18. Spatial imaging, speciation, and quantification of selenium in the hyperaccumulator plants Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Zhang, Li Hong; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine; McGrath, Steve P; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2006-09-01

    Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) up to 1% of plant dry weight. In the field, Se was mostly present in the young leaves and reproductive tissues of both hyperaccumulators. Microfocused scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping revealed that Se was hyperaccumulated in trichomes in young leaves of A. bisulcatus. None of 10 other elements tested were accumulated in trichomes. Micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that Se in trichomes was present in the organic forms methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys; 53%) and gamma-glutamyl-MeSeCys (47%). In the young leaf itself, there was 30% inorganic Se (selenate and selenite) in addition to 70% MeSeCys. In young S. pinnata leaves, Se was highly concentrated near the leaf edge and surface in globular structures that were shown by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis to be mainly in epidermal cells. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed both MeSeCys (88%) and selenocystathionine (12%) inside leaf edges. In contrast, both the Se accumulator Brassica juncea and the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana accumulated Se in their leaf vascular tissues and mesophyll cells. Se in hyperaccumulators appears to be mobile in both the xylem and phloem because Se-treated S. pinnata was found to be highly toxic to phloem-feeding aphids, and MeSeCys was present in the vascular tissues of a S. pinnata young leaf petiole as well as in guttation fluid. The compartmentation of organic selenocompounds in specific storage areas in the plant periphery appears to be a unique property of Se hyperaccumulators. The high concentration of Se in the plant periphery may contribute to Se tolerance and may also serve as an elemental plant defense mechanism.

  19. Aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Nagy, Nadine; Lago, Gabriela D'Amico; Kirmse, Santina; Klose, Ralph; Schrödter, Katrin; Zimmermann, Annika; Helfrich, Iris; Rundqvist, Helene; Theegarten, Dirk; Anhenn, Olaf; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique; Johnson, Randall S; Alitalo, Kari; Fischer, Jens W; Fandrey, Joachim; Stockmann, Christian

    2012-06-14

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease with unknown etiology that is characterized by extensive remodeling of the lung parenchyma, ultimately resulting in respiratory failure. Lymphatic vessels have been implicated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but the role of the lymphatic vasculature in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis remains enigmatic. Here we show in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis that lymphatic vessels exhibit ectopic mural coverage and that this occurs early during the disease. The abnormal lymphatic vascular patterning in fibrotic lungs was driven by expression of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) in lymphatic endothelial cells and signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β in associated mural cells. Because of impaired lymphatic drainage, aberrant mural cell coverage fostered the accumulation of fibrogenic molecules and the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Pharmacologic inhibition of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-β signaling axis disrupted the association of mural cells and lymphatic vessels, improved lymphatic drainage of the lung, and prevented the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Our results implicate aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and that the drainage capacity of pulmonary lymphatics is a critical mediator of fibroproliferative changes.

  20. Hyperaccumulation of lead, zinc, and cadmium in plants growing on a lead/zinc outcrop in Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. L.; Liao, W. B.; Yu, F. Q.; Liao, B.; Shu, W. S.

    2009-08-01

    A field survey was conducted to identify potential hyperaccumulators of Pb, Zn or Cd in the Beichang Pb/Zn mine outcrop in Yunnan Province, China. The average total concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cd in the soils were up to 28,438, 5,109, and 52 mg kg-1, respectively. A total of 68 plant species belonging to 60 genera of 37 families naturally colonizing the outcrop were recorded. According to metal accumulation in the plants and translocation factor (TF), Silene viscidula was identified as potential hyperaccumulator of Pb, Zn, and Cd with mean shoot concentrations of 3,938 mg kg-1 of Pb (TF = 1.2), 11,155 mg kg-1 of Zn (TF = 1.8) and 236 mg kg-1 of Cd (TF = 1.1), respectively; S. gracilicanlis (Pb 3,617 mg kg-1, TF = 1.2) and Onosma paniculatum (Pb 1,837 mg kg-1, TF = 1.9) were potential Pb hyperaccumulators. Potentilla griffithii (Zn 8,748 mg kg-1, TF = 1.5) and Gentiana sp. (Zn 19,710 mg kg-1, TF = 2.7) were potential Zn hyperaccumulators. Lysimachia deltoides (Cd 212 mg kg-1, TF = 3.2) was a potential Cd hyperaccumulator. These new plant resources could be used to explore the mechanisms of Pb, Zn and/or Cd hyperaccumulation, and the findings could be applied for the phytoremediation of Pb, Zn and/or Cd-contaminated soils.

  1. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation in F1 and F2 offspring from intra and interecotype crosses of Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Frérot, H; Lefèbvre, C; Petit, C; Collin, C; Dos Santos, A; Escarré, J

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between zinc (Zn) tolerance and hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi caerulescens was investigated from F1 and F2 crosses within and among metallicolous and nonmetallicolous Mediterranean populations. F1 offspring were grown on increasingly Zn-enriched soils to test Zn enrichment effects, and many families of F2 offspring were grown on a Zn-rich soil. Tolerance of F1 offspring depended on stress intensity. Tolerance of interecotype crosses was intermediate between that of the intraecotype crosses. No difference in Zn accumulation appeared among the F1 offspring from the three crosses involving metallicolous parents. Otherwise, none of these offspring exceeded the Zn hyperaccumulation threshold (10,000 mg kg(-1)), unlike the nonmetallicolous ones. The latter also showed the highest mortality. In some F2 families from interecotype crosses, hyperaccumulation values exceeded 15,000 mg kg(-1) in nontolerant offspring, whereas tolerant offspring displayed lower values (c. 10,000 mg kg(-1)). There was no difference between tolerant and nontolerant offspring when they showed low hyperaccumulation. Therefore, the relationship between tolerance and hyperaccumulation in F1 and F2 crosses depended on the hyperaccumulation level of plants.

  2. Do selenium hyperaccumulators affect selenium speciation in neighboring plants and soil? An X-Ray Microprobe Analysis.

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Lindblom, Stormy D; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Neighbors of Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus were found earlier to have elevated Se levels. Here we investigate whether Se hyperaccumulators affect Se localization and speciation in surrounding soil and neighboring plants. X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were used to analyze Se localization and speciation in leaves of Artemisia ludoviciana, Symphyotrichum ericoides and Chenopodium album growing next to Se hyperaccumulators or non-accumulators at a seleniferous site. Regardless of neighbors, A. ludoviciana, S. ericoides and C. album accumulated predominantly (73-92%) reduced selenocompounds with XANES spectra similar to the C-Se-C compounds selenomethionine and methyl-selenocysteine. Preliminary data indicate that the largest Se fraction (65-75%), both in soil next to hyperaccumulator S. pinnata and next to nonaccumulator species was reduced Se with spectra similar to C-Se-C standards. These same C-Se-C forms are found in hyperaccumulators. Thus, hyperaccumulator litter may be a source of organic soil Se, but soil microorganisms may also contribute. These findings are relevant for phytoremediation and biofortification since organic Se is more readily accumulated by plants, and more effective for dietary Se supplementation.

  3. Interactions of selenium hyperaccumulators and nonaccumulators during cocultivation on seleniferous or nonseleniferous soil--the importance of having good neighbors.

    PubMed

    Mehdawi, Ali F El; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Self, James; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2012-04-01

    • This study investigated how selenium (Se) affects relationships between Se hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator species, particularly how plants influence their neighbors' Se accumulation and growth. • Hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata and nonaccumulators Astragalus drummondii and Stanleya elata were cocultivated on seleniferous or nonseleniferous soil, or on gravel supplied with different selenate concentrations. The plants were analyzed for growth, Se accumulation and Se speciation. Also, root exudates were analyzed for Se concentration. • The hyperaccumulators showed 2.5-fold better growth on seleniferous than on nonseleniferous soil, and up to fourfold better growth with increasing Se supply; the nonaccumulators showed the opposite results. Both hyperaccumulators and nonaccumulators could affect growth (up to threefold) and Se accumulation (up to sixfold) of neighboring plants. Nonaccumulators S. elata and A. drummondii accumulated predominantly (88-95%) organic C-Se-C; the remainder was selenate. S. elata accumulated relatively more C-Se-C and less selenate when growing adjacent to S. pinnata. Both hyperaccumulators released selenocompounds from their roots. A. bisulcatus exudate contained predominantly C-Se-C compounds; no speciation data could be obtained for S. pinnata. • Thus, plants can affect Se accumulation in neighbors, and soil Se affects competition and facilitation between plants. This helps to explain why hyperaccumulators are found predominantly on seleniferous soils. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Transcriptome Comparison Reveals the Adaptive Evolution of Two Contrasting Ecotypes of Zn/Cd Hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianying; Shohag, M. J. I.; Feng, Ying; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe

    2017-01-01

    Hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii Hance belong to the same species but exhibit contrasting characteristics regarding hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance to cadmium and zinc. The Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform was employed to sequence HE and NHE to study the genetic evolution of this contrasting trait. Greater than 90 million clean reads were obtained and 118,479/228,051 unigenes of HE/NHE were annotated based on seven existing databases. We identified 149,668/319,830 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 12,691/14,428 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) of HE/NHE. We used a branch-site model to identify 18 divergent orthologous genes and 57 conserved orthologous genes of S. alfredii Hance. The divergent orthologous genes were mainly involved in the transcription and translation processes, protein metabolism process, calcium (Ca2+) pathway, stress response process and signal transduction process. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use RNA-seq to compare the genetic evolution of hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating plants from the same species. In addition, this study made the sole concrete for further studies on molecular markers and divergent orthologous genes to depict the evolution process and formation of the hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance traits in S. alfredii Hance. PMID:28439276

  5. Daily life of the ancient Maya recorded on murals at Calakmul, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Vargas, Ramón; López, Verónica A. Vázquez; Martin, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Research into ancient societies frequently faces a major challenge in accessing the lives of those who made up the majority of their populations, since the available evidence so often concerns only the ruling elite. Our excavations at the ancient Maya site of Calakmul, Mexico, have uncovered a “painted pyramid:” a structure decorated with murals depicting scenes of its inhabitants giving, receiving, and consuming diverse foods, as well as displaying and transporting other goods. Many are accompanied by hieroglyphic captions that describe the participants, and include spellings of key subsistence items. Collectively, they offer insights into the social mechanisms by which goods were circulated within major Maya centers. PMID:19901331

  6. Daily life of the ancient Maya recorded on murals at Calakmul, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Vargas, Ramón; López, Verónica A Vázquez; Martin, Simon

    2009-11-17

    Research into ancient societies frequently faces a major challenge in accessing the lives of those who made up the majority of their populations, since the available evidence so often concerns only the ruling elite. Our excavations at the ancient Maya site of Calakmul, Mexico, have uncovered a "painted pyramid:" a structure decorated with murals depicting scenes of its inhabitants giving, receiving, and consuming diverse foods, as well as displaying and transporting other goods. Many are accompanied by hieroglyphic captions that describe the participants, and include spellings of key subsistence items. Collectively, they offer insights into the social mechanisms by which goods were circulated within major Maya centers.

  7. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to thermophysical characterization of cultural heritage mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Detalle, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to approach stimulated infrared thermography possibilities in terms of measuring longitudinal thermal diffusivity of mural paintings in situ. The measuring method principle is first submitted. It is based on temporal analysis of changes in the characteristic radius beams of spatial profiles of the photothermal signal, measured on the spot of the laser excitation. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated, thanks to a series of simulations. Lastly, the method enables to correctly estimate longitudinal thermal diffusivity in a test sample, and further in a fragment copy of "Saint Christophe" belonging to the Campana collection in the Louvre.

  8. On the way to unravel zinc hyperaccumulation in plants: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Marquès, Laurence; Oomen, Ronald J F J

    2011-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for plants that can be accumulated to very high levels in shoots of some special plant species named hyperaccumulators. Various strategies have been used in recent years to unravel the molecular bases of such an unusual Zn transport and storage, especially in Brassicacea species. In these studies, several Zn transporters and chelators have been identified that exist both in sensitive and hyperaccumulating Brassicacea species allowing the construction of a general model for Zn homeostasis. However, some determinants involved in shoot Zn tolerance are still missing. We have previously shown that defensins confer Zn tolerance and have recently studied the sub-cellular localisation of a leaf A. halleri defensin. In this mini review, we explain why we propose that family 1 defensins could play a role in the protection of the endoplasmic reticulum functioning in leaves during a Zn overload.

  9. Rinorea niccolifera (Violaceae), a new, nickel-hyperaccumulating species from Luzon Island, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Edwino S.; Quimado, Marilyn O.; Doronila, Augustine I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new, nickel-hyperaccumulating species of Rinorea (Violaceae), Rinorea niccolifera Fernando, from Luzon Island, Philippines, is described and illustrated. This species is most similar to the widespread Rinorea bengalensis by its fasciculate inflorescences and smooth subglobose fruits with 3 seeds, but it differs by its glabrous ovary with shorter style (5 mm long), the summit of the staminal tube sinuate to entire and the outer surface smooth, generally smaller leaves (3–8 cm long × 2–3 cm wide), and smaller fruits (0.6–0.8 cm diameter). Rinorea niccolifera accumulates to >18,000 µg g-1 of nickel in its leaf tissues and is thus regarded as a Ni hyperaccumulator. PMID:24843295

  10. Rinorea niccolifera (Violaceae), a new, nickel-hyperaccumulating species from Luzon Island, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Edwino S; Quimado, Marilyn O; Doronila, Augustine I

    2014-01-01

    A new, nickel-hyperaccumulating species of Rinorea (Violaceae), Rinorea niccolifera Fernando, from Luzon Island, Philippines, is described and illustrated. This species is most similar to the widespread Rinorea bengalensis by its fasciculate inflorescences and smooth subglobose fruits with 3 seeds, but it differs by its glabrous ovary with shorter style (5 mm long), the summit of the staminal tube sinuate to entire and the outer surface smooth, generally smaller leaves (3-8 cm long × 2-3 cm wide), and smaller fruits (0.6-0.8 cm diameter). Rinorea niccolifera accumulates to >18,000 µg g(-1) of nickel in its leaf tissues and is thus regarded as a Ni hyperaccumulator.

  11. Localization of nickel in tissues of Streptanthus polygaloides Gray (Cruciferae) and endemic nickel hyperaccumulators from California.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mata, Daniel; de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rufo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptanthus Nutt. is one of the most important indicators of ultramafic floras in western North America. This genus contains taxa that are endemic or tolerant of ultramafic soils. Streptanthus polygaloides is an annual nickel hyperaccumulator strictly confined to ultramafic soils throughout the Californian Sierra Nevada foothills. Nickel concentration in S. polygaloides populations was evaluated by elemental microanalysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Representative samples of S. polygaloides roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray probe (SEM-EDX). Results show Ni accumulation values between 0.09 and 1.18 %, and a distribution pattern similar to that observed in other Ni hyperaccumulator taxa, with the leaf epidermis accumulating the largest concentrations.

  12. Effects of elevated CO₂ on rhizosphere characteristics of Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Han, Xuan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-06-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 on the metal bioavailability and the rhizosphere characteristics of hyperaccumulator are not well understood. In this study, soil pot experiment was carried out to contrast the effects of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere characteristics between a hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and a non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii grown under ambient (350 μL L(-1)) or elevated (800 μL L(-1)) CO2. Elevated CO2 facilitated the growth of both ecotypes of S. alfredii, but the promotion in the HE was much greater than in the NHE. No significant (P<0.05) changes in soil pH, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and microbial biomass (Cmic) were observed in the rhizosphere of NHE under both CO2 level. For HE, however, elevated CO2 reduced soil pH by 0.3 units, increased DOM (especially for hydrophilic acid (HiA) fractions) by 19.2% and Cmic by 19%, as compared to ambient CO2. Mobile Cd and Zn (extractable with 1M NH4NO3) in the rhizosphere of HE decreased considerably, but the decreases were greater under ambient CO2 than under elevated CO2. Phytoextraction efficiency of Cd and Zn by HE was increased significantly by elevated CO2 (P<0.05). The results suggest that elevated CO2 can change soil microenvironment, increase bioavailability of Cd and Zn and thus facilitate metal uptake by the HE. This work highlights that elevated CO2 may be a useful way to improve phytoremediation efficiency of Cd/Zn-contaminated soil by hyperaccumulating ecotype S. alfredii. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient xylem transport and phloem remobilization of Zn in the hyperaccumulator plant species Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingli; Tian, Shengke; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Xiaoe; Labavitch, John M; Webb, Samuel M; Latimer, Matthew; Brown, Patrick H

    2013-05-01

    Sedum alfredii is one of a few species known to hyperaccumulate zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd). Xylem transport and phloem remobilization of Zn in hyperaccumulating (HP) and nonhyperaccumulating (NHP) populations of S. alfredii were compared. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) images of Zn in the roots of the two S. alfredii populations suggested an efficient xylem loading of Zn in HP S. alfredii, confirmed by the seven-fold higher Zn concentrations detected in the xylem sap collected from HP, when compared with NHP, populations. Zn was predominantly transported as aqueous Zn (> 55.9%), with the remaining proportion (36.7-42.3%) associated with the predominant organic acid, citric acid, in the xylem sap of HP S. alfredii. The stable isotope (68)Zn was used to trace Zn remobilization from mature leaves to new growing leaves for both populations. Remobilization of (68)Zn was seven-fold higher in HP than in NHP S. alfredii. Subsequent analysis by μ-XRF, combined with LA-ICPMS (laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), confirmed the enhanced ability of HP S. alfredii to remobilize Zn and to preferentially distribute the metal to mesophyll cells surrounding phloem in the new leaves. The results suggest that Zn hyperaccumulation by HP S. alfredii is largely associated with enhanced xylem transport and phloem remobilization of the metal. To our knowledge, this report is the first to reveal enhanced remobilization of metal by phloem transport in hyperaccumulators. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. De novo transcriptome assemblies of four accessions of the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Blande, Daniel; Halimaa, Pauliina; Tervahauta, Arja I; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Kärenlampi, Sirpa O

    2017-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens of the Brassicaceae family has become the key model plant among the metal hyperaccumulator plants. Populations/accessions of N. caerulescens from geographic locations with different soil metal concentrations differ in their ability to hyperaccumulate and hypertolerate metals. Comparison of transcriptomes in several accessions provides candidates for detailed exploration of the mechanisms of metal accumulation and tolerance and local adaptation. This can have implications in the development of plants for phytoremediation and improved mineral nutrition. Transcriptomes from root and shoot tissues of four N. caerulescens accessions with contrasting Zn, Cd and Ni hyperaccumulation and tolerance traits were sequenced with Illumina Hiseq2000. Transcriptomes were assembled using the Trinity de novo assembler and were annotated and the protein sequences predicted. The comparison against the BUSCO plant early release dataset indicated high-quality assemblies. The predicted protein sequences have been clustered into ortholog groups with closely related species. The data serve as important reference sequences in whole transcriptome studies, in analyses of genetic differences between the accessions and other species, and for primer design. PMID:28140388

  15. Genetic architecture of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: the essential role of QTL x environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Frérot, Hélène; Faucon, Michel-Pierre; Willems, Glenda; Godé, Cécile; Courseaux, Adeline; Darracq, Aude; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to determine the main genomic regions that control zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri and to examine genotype x environment effects on phenotypic variance. To do so, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F(2) population. *The F(2) progeny as well as representatives of the parental populations were cultivated on soils at two different Zn concentrations. A linkage map was constructed using 70 markers. *In both low and high pollution treatments, zinc hyperaccumulation showed high broad-sense heritability (81.9 and 74.7%, respectively). Five significant QTLs were detected: two QTLs specific to the low pollution treatment (chromosomes 1 and 4), and three QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3, 6 and 7). These QTLs explained 50.1 and 36.5% of the phenotypic variance in low and high pollution treatments, respectively. Two QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3 and 6) showed significant QTL x environment interactions. *The QTL on chromosome 3 largely colocalized with a major QTL previously identified for Zn and cadmium (Cd) tolerance. This suggests that Zn tolerance and hyperaccumulation share, at least partially, a common genetic basis and may have simultaneously evolved on heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  16. Effects of cadmium hyperaccumulation on the concentrations of four trace elements in Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhouli; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Hyperaccumulators are important in the phytoremediation of cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil. In this study, Cd accumulation and the interactions between Cd and four other trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) in Lonicera japonica Thunb. were investigated. As a result of exposure to soil containing 50 mg kg(-1) Cd, stem and shoot Cd concentrations reached 344.49 ± 0.71 and 286.12 ± 9.38 μg g(-1) DW respectively, without showing symptoms of visible damage to the plants. This suggests that L. japonica has a strong tolerance to Cd. It is proposed that trace metal elements are involved in the Cd-detoxification mechanisms shown by hyperaccumulators. There is a synergistic interaction in accumulation and translocation between Cd and Fe and a significantly negative correlation between Cd and Cu or Zn concentrations in L. japonica plant tissues. The imbalanced trace element concentrations influences detoxification processes to Cd, therefore, L. japonica could be considered as a new Cd-hyperaccumulator model to investigate the metal tolerance strategies of plants.

  17. Cadmium hyperaccumulation protects Thlaspi caerulescens from leaf feeding damage by thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Jiang, R F; Ma, D Y; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2005-09-01

    Metal hyperaccumulation has been proposed as a plant defensive strategy. Here, we investigated whether cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation protected Thlaspi caerulescens from leaf feeding damage by thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). Two ecotypes differing in Cd accumulation, Ganges (high) and Prayon (low), were grown in compost amended with 0-1000 mg Cd kg(-1) in two experiments under glasshouse conditions. F2 and F3 plants from the Prayon x Ganges crosses were grown with 5 mg Cd kg(-1). Plants were naturally colonized by thrips and the leaf feeding damage index (LFDI) was assessed. The LFDI decreased significantly with increasing Cd in both ecotypes, and correlated with shoot Cd concentration in a log-linear fashion. Prayon was more attractive to thrips than Ganges, but the ecotypic difference in the LFDI was largely accounted for by the shoot Cd concentration. In the F2 and F3 plants, the LFDI correlated significantly and negatively with shoot Cd, but not with shoot zinc (Zn) or sulphur (S) concentrations. We conclude that Cd hyperaccumulation deters thrips from feeding on T. caerulescens leaves, which may offer an adaptive benefit to the plant.

  18. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hanikenne, Marc; Clemens, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits. PMID:24098304

  19. X-ray elemental mapping techniques for elucidating the ecophysiology of hyperaccumulator plants.

    PubMed

    van der Ent, Antony; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; de Jonge, Martin D; Harris, Hugh H; Ryan, Chris G; Tylko, Grzegorz; Paterson, David J; Barnabas, Alban D; Kopittke, Peter M; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2017-10-10

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. VI. References SUMMARY: Hyperaccumulators are attractive models for studying metal(loid) homeostasis, and probing the spatial distribution and coordination chemistry of metal(loid)s in their tissues is important for advancing our understanding of their ecophysiology. X-ray elemental mapping techniques are unique in providing in situ information, and with appropriate sample preparation offer results true to biological conditions of the living plant. The common platform of these techniques is a reliance on characteristic X-rays of elements present in a sample, excited either by electrons (scanning/transmission electron microscopy), protons (proton-induced X-ray emission) or X-rays (X-ray fluorescence microscopy). Elucidating the cellular and tissue-level distribution of metal(loid)s is inherently challenging and accurate X-ray analysis places strict demands on sample collection, preparation and analytical conditions, to avoid elemental redistribution, chemical modification or ultrastructural alterations. We compare the merits and limitations of the individual techniques, and focus on the optimal field of applications for inferring ecophysiological processes in hyperaccumulator plants. X-ray elemental mapping techniques can play a key role in answering questions at every level of metal(loid) homeostasis in plants, from the rhizosphere interface, to uptake pathways in the roots and shoots. Further improvements in technological capabilities offer exciting perspectives for the study of hyperaccumulator plants into the future. © 2017 University of Queensland. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Mn accumulation and tolerance in Celosia argentea Linn.: a new Mn-hyperaccumulating plant species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Shang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xuehong; Zhu, Yinian; Yu, Ke

    2014-02-28

    Identifying a hyperaccumulator is an important groundwork for the phytoextraction of heavy metal-contaminated soil. Celosia argentea Linn., which grew on a Mn tailing wasteland, was found to hyperaccumulate Mn (14 362mgkg(-1) in leaf dry matter) in this study. To investigate Mn tolerance and accumulation in C. argentea, a hydroponic culture experiment was conducted in a greenhouse. Results showed that the biomass and the relative growth rate of C. argentea were insignificantly different (p>0.05) at the Mn supply level ranging from 2.5mgL(-1) (control) to 400mgL(-1). Manganese concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots reached maxima of 20228, 8872, and 2823mgkg(-1) at 600mgMnL(-1), respectively. The relative rate of Mn accumulation increased by 91.2% at 400mgMnL(-1). Over 95% of the total Mn taken up by C. argentea was translocated to shoots. Thus, C. argentea exhibits the basic characteristics of a Mn-hyperaccumulator. This species has great potential to remediate Mn-contaminated soil cheaply and can also aid the studies of Mn uptake, translocation, speciation, distribution and detoxification in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal Characteristics of Hyperaccumulator and Fate of Heavy Metals during Thermal Treatment of Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Daoxu; Zhong, Zhaoping; Wu, Longhua; Xue, Hui; Song, Zuwei; Luo, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Thermal treatment is one of the most promising disposal techniques for heavy metal- (HM)-enriched hyperaccumulators. However, the thermal characteristics and fate of HMs during thermal treatment of hyperaccumulator biomass need to be known in detail. A horizontal tube furnace was used to analyze the disposal process of hyperaccumulator biomass derived from a phyto-extracted field in which the soil was moderately contaminated with heavy metals. Different operational conditions regarding temperature and gas composition were tested. A thermo-dynamic analysis by advanced system for process engineering was performed to predict HM speciation during thermal disposal and SEM-EDS, XRD and sequential chemical extraction were used to characterize the heavy metals. The recovery of Zn, Pb and Cd in bottom ash decreased with increasing temperature but recovery increased in the fly ash. Recovery of Zn, Pb and Cd fluctuated with increasing air flow rate and the metal recovery rates were higher in the fly ash than the bottom ash. Most Cl, S, Fe, Al and SiO2 were found as alkali oxides, SO2, Fe2(SO4)3, iron oxide, Ca3Al2O6, K2SiO3 and SiO2 instead of reacting with HMs. Thus, the HMs were found to occur as the pure metals and their oxides during the combustion process and as the sulfides during the reducing process.

  2. Manganese uptake and accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. (Phytolaccaceae).

    PubMed

    Xue, S G; Chen, Y X; Reeves, Roger D; Baker, Alan J M; Lin, Q; Fernando, Denise R

    2004-10-01

    The perennial herb Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. (Phytolaccaceae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new manganese hyperaccumulator by means of field surveys on Mn-rich soils and by glasshouse experiments. This species not only has remarkable tolerance to Mn but also has extraordinary uptake and accumulation capacity for this element. The maximum Mn concentration in the leaf dry matter was 19,300 microg/g on Xiangtan Mn tailings wastelands, with a mean of 14,480 microg/g. Under nutrient solution culture conditions, P. acinosa could grow normally with Mn supplied at a concentration of 8000 micromol/l, although with less biomass than in control samples supplied with Mn at 5 micromol/l. Manganese concentration in the shoots increased with increasing external Mn levels, but the total mass of Mn accumulated in the shoots first increased and then decreased. At an Mn concentration of 5000 micromol/l in the culture solution, the Mn accumulation in the shoot dry matter was highest (258 mg/plant). However, the Mn concentration in the leaves reached its highest value (36,380 microg/g) at an Mn supply level of 12,000 micromol/l. These results confirm that P. acinosa is an Mn hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly, has substantial biomass, wide distribution and a broad ecological amplitude. This species provides a new plant resource for exploring the mechanism of Mn hyperaccumulation, and has potential for use in the phytoremediation of Mn-contaminated soils.

  3. Relationships of nicotianamine and other amino acids with nickel, zinc and iron in Thlaspi hyperaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien L; Kolev, Spas D; O'Hair, Richard A J; Salt, David E; Baker, Alan J M

    2007-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that nicotianamine (NA) is involved in the complexation of metal ions in some metal-hyperaccumulating plants. Closely-related nickel (Ni)- and zinc (Zn)-hyperaccumulating species were studied to determine whether a correlation exists between the Ni and Zn concentrations and NA in foliar tissues. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) procedure was developed to quantify the NA and amino acid contents using the derivatizing agent 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. A strong correlation emerged between Ni and NA, but not between Zn and NA. Concentrations of NA and L-histidine (His) also increased in response to higher Ni concentrations in the hydroponic solution supplied to a serpentine population of Thlaspi caerulescens. An inversely proportional correlation was found between the iron (Fe) and Ni concentrations in the leaves. Correlations were also found between Zn and asparagine. The results obtained in this study suggest that NA is involved in hyperaccumulation of Ni but not Zn. The inverse proportionality between the Ni and Fe concentrations in the leaf may suggest that Ni and Fe compete for complexation to NA.

  4. Application of rhizosphere interaction of hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens to remediate cadmium-contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Jiang, Rong-Feng; Wang, Wei; Li, Hua-Fen

    2011-10-01

    There is an urgent requirement for selecting appropriate technologies to solve food safety problems due to soil contamination. In this study, the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens and a high Cd accumulator pakchoi cultivar (Brassica rapa L. spp. Chinenesis cv.) were grown in a moderately Cd-contaminated soil with three planting systems (monocrop, inter-crop, and crop-rotation) and three growing durations (25, 50, and 75 days) to study the role of rhizosphere interaction of both species on the uptake of Cd. The Cd accumulations in the shoot of pakchoi were significantly reduced in the inter-crop treatment, also the decreased percentage increased with rhizosphere interaction between the two species. In the inter-crop systems of 75 days, the Cd concentration and amount in the shoot of pakchoi represented 54% and 83% reduction, respectively, while the total depletion of Cd decreased by approximate 19%. Although the Cd concentration and amount in the shoot of pakchoi were significantly reduced by 52% and 44%, respectively, in the crop-rotation treatment, the decreased percentage were markedly lower than in the inter-crop treatment. Therefore, the rhizosphere interaction of hyperaccumulator with non-hyperaccumulator may reduce the risk of vegetable contamination during making full use of or remediating the contaminated soil.

  5. [Characteristics of 23 species of weed in northeast of China hyperaccumulating PAHs in contaminated soils].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Hong; Gao, Da-Wen; Zhang, Bai-Hui; Li, Xin-Ping; Guo, Xiao-Hu

    2011-10-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the 23 species of weed accumulation characteristics of phenanthrene, as a representative of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), from soil in the northeast of China. The result indicated that among the 23 species, the bioconcentration factors of Taraxacum ohwianum K., Potentilla aiscolor B. and Chelidonium majus L. were all higher than 1, which were 1.01, 4.98, 38.24 respectively. The phenanthrene concentrations in roots were 2.83, 16.34 and 9.66 mg/kg which were lower than those in aboveground part with phenanthrene concentrations were 15.18, 74.70 and 573.62 mg/kg, respectively. The hyperaccumulators were indicated by strong conveyance of phenanthrene from root to aboveground part. The analysis of phenanthrene concentration in aboveground weed and aboveground plant biomass showed that the accumulation of phenanthrene in plant were not correlated with their biomass. It concluded that Taraxacum ohwianum K., Potentilla aiscolor B. and Chelidonium majus L. had hyperaccumulative characteristics of phenanthrene, and it is possible to screen out plants with high biomass and hyperaccumulation capability.

  6. Relationship between metal and pigment concentrations in the Fe-hyperaccumulator moss Scopelophila ligulata.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Itoh, Kiminori

    2017-01-01

    Scopelophila ligulata is known to be a Fe-hyperaccumulator moss; however, its mechanism of accumulation and the effects of Fe on pigments remain unclear. To clarify the effects, we measured its metal and pigment concentrations. The Fe concentration in S. ligulata was 10-61 times higher than that in normal mosses, confirming that the moss is a Fe-hyperaccumulator. The black samples of S. ligulata had the highest Fe concentration (2.9 wt%) and the second in the order of decreasing Fe concentration (2.2 wt%), which explains their color and indicates that the excess amount of Fe is distributed through the plant body. Moreover, we observed that the concentration of Ca is negatively correlated with the concentrations of pigments and, conversely, that the concentration of K is positively correlated with the concentrations of pigments. This inverse relationship between Ca and K can be explained by the reduced uptake of K in S. ligulata in response to Ca stress, which is supported by the fact that the concentration of Ca is negatively correlated with that of K. These findings provide a better understanding of the relationships between metals and pigments in the Fe-hyperaccumulator moss S. ligulata.

  7. Selenium Distribution and Speciation in the Hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus and Associated Ecological Partners1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Valdez Barillas, José R.; Quinn, Colin F.; Freeman, John L.; Lindblom, Stormy D.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilligan, Todd M.; Alford, Élan R.; Wangeline, Ami L.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how plant selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation may affect ecological interactions and whether associated partners may affect Se hyperaccumulation. The Se hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus was collected in its natural seleniferous habitat, and x-ray fluorescence mapping and x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were used to characterize Se distribution and speciation in all organs as well as in encountered microbial symbionts and herbivores. Se was present at high levels (704–4,661 mg kg−1 dry weight) in all organs, mainly as organic C-Se-C compounds (i.e. Se bonded to two carbon atoms, e.g. methylselenocysteine). In nodule, root, and stem, up to 34% of Se was found as elemental Se, which was potentially due to microbial activity. In addition to a nitrogen-fixing symbiont, the plants harbored an endophytic fungus that produced elemental Se. Furthermore, two Se-resistant herbivorous moths were discovered on A. bisulcatus, one of which was parasitized by a wasp. Adult moths, larvae, and wasps all accumulated predominantly C-Se-C compounds. In conclusion, hyperaccumulators live in association with a variety of Se-resistant ecological partners. Among these partners, microbial endosymbionts may affect Se speciation in hyperaccumulators. Hyperaccumulators have been shown earlier to negatively affect Se-sensitive ecological partners while apparently offering a niche for Se-resistant partners. Through their positive and negative effects on different ecological partners, hyperaccumulators may influence species composition and Se cycling in seleniferous ecosystems. PMID:22645068

  8. Renewal of Mural Thrombus Releases Plasma Markers and Is Involved in Aortic Abdominal Aneurysm Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Veronique; Dai, Jianping; Huisse, Marie-Genevieve; Bezeaud, Annie; Sebbag, Uriel; Palombi, Tony; Rossignol, Patrick; Meilhac, Olivier; Guillin, Marie-Claude; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2006-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) expansion has been linked to the presence of a mural thrombus. Here we explored the mechanism of the continual luminal renewal of this thrombus and its ability to release biological markers potentially detectable in plasma. We also explored the ability of platelet inhibition to pacify the thrombus and to limit aneurysm progression in an experimental model. Blood samples and mural thrombi were collected in 20 AAA patients. In parallel, segments of sodium dodecyl sulfate-decellularized guinea pig aorta were xenografted onto the abdominal aorta of 30 rats to induce aneurysms. Fifteen rats received abciximab treatment and fifteen received irrelevant immunoglobulins. Procoagulant activity and platelet activation markers (microparticles, sP-selectin, sGPV, sCD40L) were increased threefold to fivefold in eluates from the luminal thrombus layer compared to other layers. All these markers were increased twofold to fivefold in patients’ plasma compared to matched controls (P < 0.005). In the rat model, abciximab reduced both thrombus area and aneurysmal enlargement (P < 0.05). Platelet aggregation is probably responsible for the renewal of the thrombus in AAA. The luminal thrombus released markers of platelet activation that could easily be detected in plasma. Platelet inhibition limited aortic aneurysm expansion in a rat model, providing new therapeutic perspectives in the prevention of AAA enlargement. PMID:16507915

  9. Mural Dissections of Brain-Supplying Arteries in a Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Baze, Wallace B; Storts, Ralph W; Wilkerson, Gregory K; Buchl, Stephanie J; Magden, Elizabeth R; Chaffee, Beth K

    2015-12-01

    We describe the pathologic features of mural arterial dissection involving brain-supplying arteries in a 31-y-old female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Several hours after examination for a possible respiratory tract infection, the chimpanzee became unresponsive, developed seizures, and died within 18 h. At necropsy, the occipital cortex of the brain had a small area of congestion, and the cerebellar cortex contained a small necrotic area. Histologic evaluation confirmed the cortical lesions and revealed an additional necrotic area in the medulla oblongata characterized by mural dissection of the brain-supplying vertebral and basilar arteries and subsequent branches. Lesions in the cortices and medulla were within areas supplied by the vertebrobasilar system. Dissection of brain-supplying arteries has been described in humans but not previously in chimpanzees (or any other NHP), suggesting that these species might be useful in understanding this condition in humans. In addition, the lesion should be added to the NHP clinician's and pathologist's differential diagnosis list for similar presentations in this species.

  10. Root and shoot transcriptome analysis of two ecotypes of Noccaea caerulescens uncovers the role of NcNramp1 in Cd hyperaccumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator, Noccaea caerulescens, has been studied extensively for its ability to accumulate Zn and Cd in its leaves to extremely high levels. Previous studies have indicated that the Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation trait exhibited by this species involves different transport and toleran...

  11. Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Fones, H. N.; McCurrach, H.; Mithani, A.; Smith, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant–pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based defences in N. caerulescens and zinc tolerance in pathogens might have driven the development of the hyperaccumulation phenotype. Here, we investigate the possibility of local adaptation by bacteria to the zinc-rich environment of N. caerulescens leaves and show that leaves sampled from the contaminated surroundings of a former mine site harboured endophytes with greater zinc tolerance than those within plants of an artificially created hyperaccumulating population. Experimental manipulation of zinc concentrations in plants of this artificial population influenced the zinc tolerance of recovered endophytes. In laboratory experiments, only endophytic bacteria isolated from plants of the natural population were able to grow to high population densities in any N. caerulescens plants. These findings suggest that long-term coexistence with zinc-hyperaccumulating plants leads to local adaptation by endophytic bacteria to the environment within their leaves. PMID:27170725

  12. Effects of arsenic on concentration and distribution of nutrients in the fronds of the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Tu, Cong; Ma, Lena Q

    2005-05-01

    Pteris vittata was the first terrestrial plant known to hyperaccumulate arsenic (As). However, it is unclear how As hyperaccumulation influences nutrient uptake by this plant. P. vittata fern was grown in soil spiked with 0-500 mg As kg(-1) in the greenhouse for 24 weeks. The concentrations of essential macro- (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and micro- (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, B and Mo) elements in the fronds of different age were examined. Both macro- and micronutrients in the fronds were found to be within the normal concentration ranges for non-hyperaccumulators. However, As hyperaccumulation did influence the elemental distribution among fronds of different age of P. vittata. Arsenic-induced P and K enhancements in the fronds contributed to the As-induced growth stimulation at low As levels. The frond P/As molar ratios of 1.0 can be used as the threshold value for normal growth of P. vittata. Potassium may function as a counter-cation for As in the fronds as shown by the As-induced K increases in the fronds. The present findings not only demonstrate that P. vittata has the ability to maintain adequate concentrations of essential nutrients while hyperaccumulating As from the soil, but also have implications for soil management (fertilization in particular) of P. vittata in As phytoextraction practice.

  13. Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, H N; McCurrach, H; Mithani, A; Smith, J A C; Preston, G M

    2016-05-11

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant-pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based defences in N. caerulescens and zinc tolerance in pathogens might have driven the development of the hyperaccumulation phenotype. Here, we investigate the possibility of local adaptation by bacteria to the zinc-rich environment of N. caerulescens leaves and show that leaves sampled from the contaminated surroundings of a former mine site harboured endophytes with greater zinc tolerance than those within plants of an artificially created hyperaccumulating population. Experimental manipulation of zinc concentrations in plants of this artificial population influenced the zinc tolerance of recovered endophytes. In laboratory experiments, only endophytic bacteria isolated from plants of the natural population were able to grow to high population densities in any N. caerulescens plants. These findings suggest that long-term coexistence with zinc-hyperaccumulating plants leads to local adaptation by endophytic bacteria to the environment within their leaves. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. An α-Smooth Muscle Actin (acta2/αsma) Zebrafish Transgenic Line Marking Vascular Mural Cells and Visceral Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Alyson D.; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M.; Childs, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels. PMID:24594685

  15. The Use of Murals in Preadolescent Inpatient Groups: An Art Therapy Approach to Cumulative Trauma. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Nicole; McCarthy, James B.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a small group of preadolescent, psychiatric inpatients and their collaborative painting of a memorial mural about the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Through an immersion in the group experience, the group members became increasingly introspective about their feelings of loss and their…

  16. What’s Wrong with the Murals at the Mogao Grottoes: A Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Method

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meijun; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zheng; Ren, Jinchang; Chai, Bolong; Sun, Jizhou

    2015-01-01

    Although a significant amount of work has been performed to preserve the ancient murals in the Mogao Grottoes by Dunhuang Cultural Research, non-contact methods need to be developed to effectively evaluate the degree of flaking of the murals. In this study, we propose to evaluate the flaking by automatically analyzing hyperspectral images that were scanned at the site. Murals with various degrees of flaking were scanned in the 126th cave using a near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral camera with a spectral range of approximately 900 to 1700 nm. The regions of interest (ROIs) of the murals were manually labeled and grouped into four levels: normal, slight, moderate, and severe. The average spectral data from each ROI and its group label were used to train our classification model. To predict the degree of flaking, we adopted four algorithms: deep belief networks (DBNs), partial least squares regression (PLSR), principal component analysis with a support vector machine (PCA + SVM) and principal component analysis with an artificial neural network (PCA + ANN). The experimental results show the effectiveness of our method. In particular, better results are obtained using DBNs when the training data contain a significant amount of striping noise. PMID:26394926

  17. A Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Using Visual Culture for the Creation of a Socially Relevant Mural in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how high school and university students in Georgia and members of a small weaving pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico, collaborated in designing and creating a mural in the central market ("mercado") of the pueblo. A number of lessons emerged from this multi-cultural collaboration. First they learned that using…

  18. A Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Using Visual Culture for the Creation of a Socially Relevant Mural in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how high school and university students in Georgia and members of a small weaving pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico, collaborated in designing and creating a mural in the central market ("mercado") of the pueblo. A number of lessons emerged from this multi-cultural collaboration. First they learned that using…

  19. The Tractor and the Taxi: Rural and Urban Students Build a New Vehicle for Friendship in an Internet Mural Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    Describes how students in a rural Missouri high school collaborated online with students in an urban New York high school to create a mural in real space that celebrates the strengths of their two communities. Students had to conduct research, create a design, and then paint collaboratively via the Internet. The project forced them to address…

  20. A large mural nodule in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Koichiro; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Shiba, Hiroaki; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Indications for resection of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) remain controversial because of their low tendency to be malignant. Surgical resection should be recommended if any factors indicating malignancy are present. However, preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant tumors is very difficult, especially in cases of branch duct IPMNs. We herein report a case of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma (IPMA) of the pancreas with a large mural nodule of 25 mm. A 74-year-old woman was admitted for examination and treatment for a cystic tumor in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography showed a cystic lesion, 50 mm in diameter, with an irregular mural nodule in the pancreatic head. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a multicystic tumor connected with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The mural nodule had a diameter of 18 mm, and the MPD had a slight dilation of 6 mm. These findings suggested a high potential for malignancy. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. The excised pancreas showed multiple cysts located in the branch pancreatic duct with a maximum diameter of 75 mm. The mural nodule had a maximum diameter of 25 mm. The tumor was diagnosed as an IPMA by pathological examination. After operation, the patient was discharged without any complications. Two years after resection, the patient remains in remission with no evidence of tumor recurrence.

  1. What’s Wrong with the Murals at the Mogao Grottoes: A Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meijun; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zheng; Ren, Jinchang; Chai, Bolong; Sun, Jizhou

    2015-09-01

    Although a significant amount of work has been performed to preserve the ancient murals in the Mogao Grottoes by Dunhuang Cultural Research, non-contact methods need to be developed to effectively evaluate the degree of flaking of the murals. In this study, we propose to evaluate the flaking by automatically analyzing hyperspectral images that were scanned at the site. Murals with various degrees of flaking were scanned in the 126th cave using a near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral camera with a spectral range of approximately 900 to 1700 nm. The regions of interest (ROIs) of the murals were manually labeled and grouped into four levels: normal, slight, moderate, and severe. The average spectral data from each ROI and its group label were used to train our classification model. To predict the degree of flaking, we adopted four algorithms: deep belief networks (DBNs), partial least squares regression (PLSR), principal component analysis with a support vector machine (PCA + SVM) and principal component analysis with an artificial neural network (PCA + ANN). The experimental results show the effectiveness of our method. In particular, better results are obtained using DBNs when the training data contain a significant amount of striping noise.

  2. Active 3'-5' cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are present in detergent-resistant membranes of mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Annick; Guillemette, Christine; Sirard, Marc-André; Richard, François J

    2016-01-04

    Lipids rafts are specialised membrane microdomains involved in cell signalling that can be isolated as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) has a central role in cell signalling in the ovary and its degradation is carried out by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme family. We hypothesised that PDEs could be functionally present in the lipid rafts of porcine mural granulosa cell membranes. PDE6C, PDE8A and PDE11A were detected by dot blot in the DRMs and the Triton-soluble fraction of the mural granulosa cells membrane and the cytosol. As shown by immunocytochemistry, PDEs showed clear immunostaining in mural granulosa cell membranes and the cytosol. Interestingly, cAMP-PDE activity was 18 times higher in the DRMs than in the Triton-soluble fraction of cell membranes and was 7.7 times higher in the cytosol than in the DRMs. cAMP-PDE activity in mural granulosa cells was mainly contributed by the PDE8 and PDE11 families. This study shows that PDEs from the PDE8 and PDE11 families are present in mural granulosa cells and that the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the cytosol. In the cell membrane, the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the DRMs. In addition, receptors for prostaglandin E2 and LH, two G-protein-coupled receptors, are present in lipid rafts and absent from the non-raft fraction of the granulosa cell membrane. These results suggest that in these cells, the lipid rafts exist as a cell-signalling platform and PDEs are one of the key enzyme families present in the raft.

  3. The potential of phytoremediation using hyperaccumulator plants: a case study at a lead-zinc mine site.

    PubMed

    Lorestani, Bahareh; Cheraghi, Mehrdad; Yousefi, Nafiseh

    2012-09-01

    Contamination with heavy metals is one of the most pressing threats to water and soil resources, as well as human health. Phytoremediation might potentially be used to remediate metal-contaminated sites. A major advance in the development of phytoremediation for heavy metal affected soils was the discovery of heavy metal hyperaccumulation in plants. This study applied several established criteria to identify hyperaccumulator plants. A case study was conducted at a mining area in the Hamedan province in the west central region of Iran. The results indicated that plant metal accumulation differed among species and plant parts. Plant species grown in substrata with elevated metal levels contained significantly higher metal levels. Using the most common criteria, Euphorbia macroclada and Centaurea virgata can be classified as hyperaccumulators of specific heavy metals measured in this study and they might potentially be used for the phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  4. Synergistic effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate rock on heavy metal uptake and accumulation by an arsenic hyperaccumulator.

    PubMed

    Leung, H M; Wu, F Y; Cheung, K C; Ye, Z H; Wong, M H

    2010-09-15

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and phosphate rock on the phytorextraction efficiency of a hyperaccumulator (Pteris vittata) and a non-hyperaccumulator (Cynodon dactylon) plant were studied. Both seedlings were planted in As contaminated soil under different treatments [(1) control (contaminated soil only), (2) indigenous mycorrhizas (IM), (3) mixed AM inoculum [indigenous mycorrhiza + Glomus mosseae (IM/Gm)] and (4) IM/Gm + phosphate rock (P rock)] with varying intensities (40%, 70% and 100%) of water moisture content (WMC). Significant As reduction in soil (23.8% of soil As reduction), increase in plant biomass (17.8 g/pot) and As accumulation (2054 mg/kg DW) were observed for P. vittata treated with IM/Gm + PR at 100% WMC level. The overall results indicated that the synergistic effect of mycorrhiza and P rock affected As subcellular distribution of the hyperaccumulator and thereby altered its As removal efficiency under well-watered conditions.

  5. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties.

    PubMed

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J B; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties.

  6. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

    PubMed Central

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J. B.; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C.; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J.; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T.; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5–1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  7. Extraction and isolation of the salidroside-type metabolite from zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance*

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Xia; Zhang, Meng-xi; Gao, Ling-ling; Yang, Xiao-e

    2012-01-01

    The active metabolite in the post-harvested biomass of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance from phytoextraction is of great interest in China. The current study demonstrates that a salidroside-type metabolite can be yielded from the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator S. alfredii biomass by means of sonication/ethanol extraction and macroporous resin column (AB-8 type) isolation. The concentrations of Zn and Cd in the salidroside-type metabolite were below the limitation of the national standards. PMID:23024051

  8. Contribution to the improvement of heritage mural painting non-destructive testing by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Di Pallo, Luigi; Detalle, Vincent; Vallet, Jean-Marc; Duvaut, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of heritage mural paintings by means of stimulated infrared thermography has now become rather efficient [1-14]. However, pigments, which form a pictorial layer, have contrasting radiative properties possibly leading to artifact detection. In this paper, attempts to alleviate this difficulty are presented. Based on the spectroscopic study of different paint layers, one can argue that, in the medium infrared field, this radiative disparity decreases significantly. Then, with similar settings, it can be shown that ceramic radiative sources allow reaching this wavelength band. Finally, on the basis of a study carried out on an academic sample and a partial copy of a fresco from the cathedral of Angers, combining ceramic heat sources with a laboratory SAMMTHIR experimental setup enables to make real headway in terms of defects' detection.

  9. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with luminal and mural component (Type 1c)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhushan; Koshy, George; Kapoor, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described and classified by Gorlin et al. It is defined as a cystic lesion in which the epithelial lining shows a well defined basal layer of columnar cells, an overlying layer that often resemble stellate reticulum and masses of ghost cells that may be in the epithelial cystic lining or in the fibrous capsule. The lesion generally occurs in the region anterior to maxillary and mandibular molars and either intraosseous or extraosseus. This entity might present as a cystic or solid lesion. Praetorius et al. classified COC into 2 main entities namely a cyst (Type 1) and a neoplasm (Type 2). The present case report exhibit a cystic lesion with both luminal and mural component. PMID:27433053

  10. Is Conservative Surgical Treatment Sufficient to Treat Unicystic Mural Ameloblastoma in Infant?

    PubMed

    Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Yolcu, Ümit; Erdem, Necip Fazil; Asutay, Fatih

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastoma, a benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium, is an aggressive and locally invasive tumor. It represents 11% of all odontogenic tumors and 1% of all oral odontogenic epithelial tumors. In this case report, a 20-month-old boy was referred to our clinic with complaint of collapse in his symphysis region of the mandible. Radiographic examination revealed unilocular radiolucency in this region. The lesion was enucleated with 1 tooth germ under general anesthesia and diagnosed as mural unicystic ameloblastoma by histopathologic examination. After the surgery, complete healing was obtained clinically and radiographically. No sign of recurrence has been seen during the follow-up period of 4.5 years. To our knowledge, this was the second youngest case of ameloblastoma in the English literature. However, it is the youngest case of ameloblastoma that occurred in an infant boy.

  11. Characterization of Streptomyces isolates causing colour changes of mural paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haliem, M E F; Sakr, A A; Ali, M F; Ghaly, M F; Sohlenkamp, C

    2013-08-25

    Paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs often suffer colour changes due to microbial growth and colonization. Streptomyces strains were isolated from mural paintings of Tell Basta and Tanis tombs (East of Nile Delta, Egypt) and were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. The16S rDNA sequences data indicated that isolated strains were closely related to S. coelicolor, S. albidofuscus, S. ambofaciens, S. canarius, S. parvullus, S. corchorusii, S. albidofuscus and S. nigrifaciens. It could be shown that Streptomyces strains are involved on a large scale in the colour changes of paintings and stone support by producing a wide range of metabolites such as acids (oxalic, citric and sulphuric acids), biopigments of melanin, carotenoids, and hydrogen sulphide.

  12. Conserved but Attenuated Parental Gene Expression in Allopolyploids: Constitutive Zinc Hyperaccumulation in the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis kamchatica.

    PubMed

    Paape, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Cereghetti, Teo; Onda, Yoshihiko; Kenta, Tanaka; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-11-01

    Allopolyploidization combines parental genomes and often confers broader species distribution. However, little is known about parentally transmitted gene expression underlying quantitative traits following allopolyploidization because of the complexity of polyploid genomes. The allopolyploid species Arabidopsis kamchatica is a natural hybrid of the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and of the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis lyrata We found that A. kamchatica retained the ability to hyperaccumulate zinc from A. halleri and grows in soils with both low and high metal content. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by A. kamchatica was reduced to about half of A. halleri, but is 10-fold greater than A. lyrata Homeologs derived from A. halleri had significantly higher levels of expression of genes such as HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4), METAL TRANSPORTER PROTEIN1 and other metal ion transporters than those derived from A. lyrata, which suggests cis-regulatory differences. A. kamchatica has on average about half the expression of these genes compared with A. halleri due to fixed heterozygosity inherent in allopolyploids. Zinc treatment significantly changed the ratios of expression of 1% of homeologous pairs, including genes putatively involved in metal homeostasis. Resequencing data showed a significant reduction in genetic diversity over a large genomic region (290 kb) surrounding the HMA4 locus derived from the A. halleri parent compared with the syntenic A. lyrata-derived region, which suggests different evolutionary histories. We also estimated that three A. halleri-derived HMA4 copies are present in A. kamchatica Our findings support a transcriptomic model in which environment-related transcriptional patterns of both parents are conserved but attenuated in the allopolyploids. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Conserved but Attenuated Parental Gene Expression in Allopolyploids: Constitutive Zinc Hyperaccumulation in the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis kamchatica

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Cereghetti, Teo; Onda, Yoshihiko; Kenta, Tanaka; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K.

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization combines parental genomes and often confers broader species distribution. However, little is known about parentally transmitted gene expression underlying quantitative traits following allopolyploidization because of the complexity of polyploid genomes. The allopolyploid species Arabidopsis kamchatica is a natural hybrid of the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and of the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis lyrata. We found that A. kamchatica retained the ability to hyperaccumulate zinc from A. halleri and grows in soils with both low and high metal content. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by A. kamchatica was reduced to about half of A. halleri, but is 10-fold greater than A. lyrata. Homeologs derived from A. halleri had significantly higher levels of expression of genes such as HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4), METAL TRANSPORTER PROTEIN1 and other metal ion transporters than those derived from A. lyrata, which suggests cis-regulatory differences. A. kamchatica has on average about half the expression of these genes compared with A. halleri due to fixed heterozygosity inherent in allopolyploids. Zinc treatment significantly changed the ratios of expression of 1% of homeologous pairs, including genes putatively involved in metal homeostasis. Resequencing data showed a significant reduction in genetic diversity over a large genomic region (290 kb) surrounding the HMA4 locus derived from the A. halleri parent compared with the syntenic A. lyrata-derived region, which suggests different evolutionary histories. We also estimated that three A. halleri-derived HMA4 copies are present in A. kamchatica. Our findings support a transcriptomic model in which environment-related transcriptional patterns of both parents are conserved but attenuated in the allopolyploids. PMID:27413047

  14. Engineering copper hyperaccumulation in plants by expressing a prokaryotic copC gene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Lafuente, Alejandro; Doukkali, Bouchra; Caviedes, Miguel A; Pajuelo, Eloisa

    2012-11-06

    In this work, engineering Cu-hyperaccumulation in plants was approached. First, the copC gene from Pseudomonas sp. Az13, encoding a periplasmic Cu-binding protein, was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana driven by the CaMV35S promoter (transgenic lines 35S-copC). 35S-copC lines showed up to 5-fold increased Cu accumulation in roots (up to 2000 μg Cu. g(-1)) and shoots (up to 400 μg Cu. g(-1)), compared to untransformed plants, over the limits established for Cu-hyperaccumulators. 35S lines showed enhanced Cu sensitivity. Second, copC was engineered under the control of the cab1 (chlorophyll a/b binding protein 1) promoter, in order to drive copC expression to the shoots (transgenic lines cab1-copC). cab1-copC lines showed increased Cu translocation factors (twice that of wild-type plants) and also displayed enhanced Cu sensitivity. Finally, subcellular targeting the CopC protein to plant vacuoles was addressed by expressing a modified copC gene containing specific vacuole sorting determinants (transgenic lines 35S-copC-V). Unexpectedly, increased Cu-accumulation was not achieved-neither in roots nor in shoots-when compared to 35S-copC lines. Conversely, 35S-copC-V lines did display greatly enhanced Cu-hypersensitivity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining Cu-hyperaccumulators by engineering a prokaryotic Cu-binding protein, but they highlight the difficulty of altering the exquisite Cu homeostasis in plants.

  15. Hyperaccumulation of cadmium and zinc in Thlaspi caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri at the leaf cellular level.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Claudia; Martinoia, Enrico; Keller, Catherine

    2004-02-01

    Vacuolar compartmentalization or cell wall binding in leaves could play a major role in hyperaccumulation of heavy metals. However, little is known about the physiology of intracellular cadmium (Cd) sequestration in plants. We investigated the role of the leaf cells in allocating metal in hyperaccumulating plants by measuring short-term (109)Cd and (65)Zn uptake in mesophyll protoplasts of Thlaspi caerulescens "Ganges" and Arabidopsis halleri, both hyperaccumulators of zinc (Zn) and Cd, and T. caerulescens "Prayon," accumulating Cd at a lower degree. The effects of low temperature, several divalent cations, and pre-exposure of the plants to metals were investigated. There was no significant difference between the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants of the three plants. It indicates that differences in metal uptake cannot be explained by different constitutive transport capacities at the leaf protoplast level and that plasma and vacuole membranes of mesophyll cells are not responsible for the differences observed in heavy metal allocation. This suggests the existence of regulation mechanisms before the plasma membrane of leaf mesophyll protoplasts. However, pre-exposure of the plants to Cd induced an increase in Cd accumulation in protoplasts of "Ganges," whereas it decreased Cd accumulation in A. halleri protoplasts, indicating that Cd-permeable transport proteins are differentially regulated. The experiment with competitors has shown that probably more than one single transport system is carrying Cd in parallel into the cell and that in T. caerulescens "Prayon," Cd could be transported by a Zn and Ca pathway, whereas in "Ganges," Cd could be transported mainly by other pathways.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Selenium Tolerance and Hyperaccumulation in Stanleya pinnata1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John L.; Tamaoki, Masanori; Stushnoff, Cecil; Quinn, Colin F.; Cappa, Jennifer J.; Devonshire, Jean; Fakra, Sirine C.; Marcus, Matthew A.; McGrath, Steve P.; Van Hoewyk, Doug; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for selenium (Se) tolerance and hyperaccumulation were studied in the Se hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) by comparing it with the related secondary Se accumulator Stanleya albescens using a combination of physiological, structural, genomic, and biochemical approaches. S. pinnata accumulated 3.6-fold more Se and was tolerant to 20 μm selenate, while S. albescens suffered reduced growth, chlorosis and necrosis, impaired photosynthesis, and high levels of reactive oxygen species. Levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione, total sulfur, and nonprotein thiols were higher in S. pinnata, suggesting that Se tolerance may in part be due to increased antioxidants and up-regulated sulfur assimilation. S. pinnata had higher selenocysteine methyltransferase protein levels and, judged from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, mainly accumulated the free amino acid methylselenocysteine, while S. albescens accumulated mainly the free amino acid selenocystathionine. S. albescens leaf x-ray absorption near-edge structure scans mainly detected a carbon-Se-carbon compound (presumably selenocystathionine) in addition to some selenocysteine and selenate. Thus, S. albescens may accumulate more toxic forms of Se in its leaves than S. pinnata. The species also showed different leaf Se sequestration patterns: while S. albescens showed a diffuse pattern, S. pinnata sequestered Se in localized epidermal cell clusters along leaf margins and tips, concentrated inside of epidermal cells. Transcript analyses of S. pinnata showed a constitutively higher expression of genes involved in sulfur assimilation, antioxidant activities, defense, and response to (methyl)jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, or ethylene. The levels of some of these hormones were constitutively elevated in S. pinnata compared with S. albescens, and leaf Se accumulation was slightly enhanced in both species when these hormones were supplied. Thus, defense-related phytohormones

  17. Phytofiltration of arsenic from drinking water using arsenic-hyperaccumulating ferns.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianwei W; Poynton, Charissa Y; Kochian, Leon V; Elless, Mark P

    2004-06-15

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water poses serious health risks to millions of people worldwide. Current technologies used to clean arsenic-contaminated water have significant drawbacks, such as high cost and generation of large volumes of toxic waste. In this study, we investigated the potential of using recently identified arsenic-hyperaccumulating ferns to remove arsenic from drinking water. Hydroponically cultivated, two arsenic-hyperaccumulating fern species (Pteris vittata and Pteris cretica cv. Mayii) and a nonaccumulating fern species (Nephrolepis exaltata) were suspended in water containing 73As-labeled arsenic with initial arsenic concentrations ranging from 20 to 500 microg L(-1). The efficiency of arsenic phytofiltration by these fern species was determined by continuously monitoring the depletion of 73As-labeled arsenic concentration in the water. With an initial water arsenic concentration of 200 microg L(-1), P. vittata reduced the arsenic concentration by 98.6% to 2.8 microg L(-1) in 24 h. When the initial water arsenic was 20 microg L(-1), P. vittata reduced the arsenic concentration to 7.2 microg L(-1) in 6 h and to 0.4 microg L(-1) in 24 h. At similar plant ages, both P. vittata and P. cretica had similar arsenic phytofiltration efficiency and were able to rapidly remove arsenic from water to achieve arsenic levels below the new drinking water limit of 10 microg L(-1). However, N. exaltata failed to reduce water arsenic to achieve the limit under the same experimental conditions. The significantly higher efficiency of arsenic phytofiltration by arsenic-hyperaccumulating fern species is associated with their ability to rapidly translocate absorbed arsenic from roots to shoots. The nonaccumulating fern N. exaltata was unable to translocate the absorbed arsenic to the shoots. Our results demonstrate that the arsenic-phytofiltration technique may provide the basis for a solar-powered hydroponic technique that enables small-scale cleanup of arsenic

  18. Nickel, Zn and Cd localisation in seeds of metal hyperaccumulators using μ-PIXE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachenko, Anthony G.; Bhatia, Naveen P.; Siegele, Rainer; Walsh, Kerry B.; Singh, Balwant

    2009-06-01

    Metal hyperaccumulators are a rare group of plant species that accumulate exceptionally high concentrations of metals in above ground tissues without showing symptoms of phytotoxicity. Quantitative localisation of the accumulated metals in seed tissues is of considerable interest to help understand the eco-physiology of these unique plant species. We investigated the spatial localisation of metals within seeds of Ni hyperaccumulating Hybanthus floribundus subsp. adpressus, H. floribundus subsp. floribundus and Pimelea leptospermoides and dual-metal (Cd and Zn) hyperaccumulating Thlaspi caerulescens using quantitative micro-proton induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) spectroscopy. Intact seeds were hand-sectioned, sandwiched between Formvar films and irradiated using the 3 MeV high energy heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO. Elemental maps of whole H. floribundus subsp. adpressus seeds showed an average Ni concentration of 5.1 × 10 3 mg kg -1 dry weight (DW) with highest Ni concentration in cotyledonary tissues (7.6 × 10 3 mg kg -1 DW), followed by the embryonic axis (4.4 × 10 3 mg kg -1 DW). Nickel concentration in whole H. floribundus subsp. floribundus seeds was 3.5 × 10 2 mg kg -1 DW without a clear pattern of Ni localisation. The average Ni concentration in whole P. leptospermoides seeds was 2.6 × 10 2 mg kg -1 DW, and Ni was preferentially localised in the embryonic axis (4.3 × 10 2 mg kg -1 DW). In T. caerulescens, Cd concentrations were similar in cotyledon (4.5 × 10 3 mg kg -1 DW) and embryonic axis (3.3 × 10 3 mg kg -1 DW) tissues, whereas Zn was highest in cotyledonary tissues (1.5 × 10 3 mg kg -1 DW). In all species, the presence of the accumulated metal within the cotyledonary and embryonic axis tissues indicates that the accumulated metal was able to move apoplastically within the seed.

  19. Tandem quadruplication of HMA4 in the zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Bowen, Helen C; Fray, Rupert G; Hammond, John P; King, Graham J; White, Philip J; Graham, Neil S; Broadley, Martin R

    2011-03-10

    Zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation may have evolved twice in the Brassicaceae, in Arabidopsis halleri and in the Noccaea genus. Tandem gene duplication and deregulated expression of the Zn transporter, HMA4, has previously been linked to Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tandem duplication and deregulation of HMA4 expression also occurs in Noccaea.A Noccaea caerulescens genomic library was generated, containing 36,864 fosmid pCC1FOS™ clones with insert sizes ∼20-40 kbp, and screened with a PCR-generated HMA4 genomic probe. Gene copy number within the genome was estimated through DNA fingerprinting and pooled fosmid pyrosequencing. Gene copy numbers within individual clones was determined by PCR analyses with novel locus specific primers. Entire fosmids were then sequenced individually and reads equivalent to 20-fold coverage were assembled to generate complete whole contigs.Four tandem HMA4 repeats were identified in a contiguous sequence of 101,480 bp based on sequence overlap identities. These were flanked by regions syntenous with up and downstream regions of AtHMA4 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Promoter-reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion analysis of a NcHMA4 in A. thaliana revealed deregulated expression in roots and shoots, analogous to AhHMA4 promoters, but distinct from AtHMA4 expression which localised to the root vascular tissue.This remarkable consistency in tandem duplication and deregulated expression of metal transport genes between N. caerulescens and A. halleri, which last shared a common ancestor >40 mya, provides intriguing evidence that parallel evolutionary pathways may underlie Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in Brassicaceae.

  20. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation.

  1. Tandem Quadruplication of HMA4 in the Zinc (Zn) and Cadmium (Cd) Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Bowen, Helen C.; Fray, Rupert G.; Hammond, John P.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Graham, Neil S.; Broadley, Martin R.

    2011-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation may have evolved twice in the Brassicaceae, in Arabidopsis halleri and in the Noccaea genus. Tandem gene duplication and deregulated expression of the Zn transporter, HMA4, has previously been linked to Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tandem duplication and deregulation of HMA4 expression also occurs in Noccaea. A Noccaea caerulescens genomic library was generated, containing 36,864 fosmid pCC1FOS™ clones with insert sizes ∼20–40 kbp, and screened with a PCR-generated HMA4 genomic probe. Gene copy number within the genome was estimated through DNA fingerprinting and pooled fosmid pyrosequencing. Gene copy numbers within individual clones was determined by PCR analyses with novel locus specific primers. Entire fosmids were then sequenced individually and reads equivalent to 20-fold coverage were assembled to generate complete whole contigs. Four tandem HMA4 repeats were identified in a contiguous sequence of 101,480 bp based on sequence overlap identities. These were flanked by regions syntenous with up and downstream regions of AtHMA4 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Promoter-reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion analysis of a NcHMA4 in A. thaliana revealed deregulated expression in roots and shoots, analogous to AhHMA4 promoters, but distinct from AtHMA4 expression which localised to the root vascular tissue. This remarkable consistency in tandem duplication and deregulated expression of metal transport genes between N. caerulescens and A. halleri, which last shared a common ancestor >40 mya, provides intriguing evidence that parallel evolutionary pathways may underlie Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in Brassicaceae. PMID:21423774

  2. Mobilization of cadmium by dissolved organic matter in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Liang, Chengfeng; Han, Xuan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-05-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Cd speciation in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii and its effects on Cd mobility. After growing HE S. alfredii, the rhizosphere soil solution pH of heavily polluted soil (HPS) and slightly polluted soil (SPS) was reduced by 0.49 and 0.40 units, respectively, due to enhanced DOC derived from root exudation. The total Cd concentration in soil solution decreased significantly but the decrease accounted for less than 1% of the total Cd uptake in the shoots of HE S. alfredii. Visual MINTEQ speciation predicted that Cd-DOM complexes were the dominant Cd species in soil solutions after the growth of S. alfredii for both soils, followed by the free metal Cd(2+) species. However, Cd-DOM complexes fraction in the rhizosphere soil solution of HE S. alfredii (89.1% and 74.6% for HPS and SPS, respectively) were much greater than NHE S. alfredii (82.8% and 64.7% for HPS and SPS, respectively). Resin equilibration experiment results indicated that DOM from the rhizosphere (R-DOM) of both ecotypes of S. alfredii had the ability to form complexes with Cd, whereas the degree of complexation was significantly higher for HE-R-DOM (79-89%) than NHE-R-DOM (63-74%) in the undiluted sample. The addition of HE-R-DOM significantly (P<0.05) increased the solubility of four Cd minerals while NHE-R-DOM was not as effective at the same concentration. It was concluded that DOM in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype of S. alfredii could significantly increase Cd mobility through the formation of soluble DOM-metal complexes.

  3. Wright Flyer detail in Bob McCall's Centennial of Flight mural

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-05

    The mural was created to celebrate the achievements of Wilbur and Orville Wright and to commemorate a century of powered flight. Central to the composition is the 1903 Wright Flyer. "On Dec. 17, 1903, the Wright brothers inaugurated the aerial age with their successful first flights of a heavier-than-air flying machine at Kitty Hawk, N.C. This airplane, known as the Wright Flyer, sometimes referred to as the Kitty Hawk Flyer, was the product of a sophisticated four-year program of research and development conducted by Wilbur and Orville Wright beginning in 1899. During the Wrights' design and construction of their experimental aircraft, they also pioneered many of the basic tenets and techniques of modern aeronautical engineering, such as the use of a wind tunnel and flight testing as design tools. Their seminal accomplishment encompassed not only the breakthrough first flight of an airplane, but also the equally important achievement of establishing the foundation of aeronautical engineering." Dr. Peter Jakab, Curator of Aviation, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution "Celebrating One Hundred Years of Powered Flight, 1903-2003", documents many significant achievements in aeronautics and space flight from the dawn of powered flight to the present. Historic aircraft and spacecraft serve as the backdrop, highlighting six figures representing the human element that made these milestones possible. These figures stand, symbolically supported by the words of Wilbur Wright, "It is my belief that flight is possible…" The quote was taken from a letter written to his father on September 3rd, 1900, announcing Wilbur's intention to make "some experiments with a flying machine" at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. "This year, Bob is helping us commemorate the Centennial of Flight with a beautiful mural slated for placement in our Dryden Flight Research Center that documents the history of flight from the Wright Flyer to the International Space Station. We should

  4. SLC2A1/GLUT1 expression in mural nodules of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Aishima, Shinichi; Shindo, Koji; Fujino, Minoru; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Hattori, Masami; Miyazaki, Tetsuyuki; Tanaka, Masao; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-07-01

    In intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), the presence of a mural nodule showing a papillary or nodular proliferation of tumor cells in the dilated pancreatic duct is an indication for resection of IPMN. Solute carrier family 2, facilitated glucose transporter member 1, known as glucose transporter type 1 (SLC2A1/GLUT1) mediates cellular glucose uptake in many carcinomas and is correlated with increased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake. We examined SLC2A1/GLUT1 expression in the mural nodules of 180 IPMN specimens to distinguish malignant/benign tumors. A mural nodule was detected in 80 (44.4%) of the IPMNs, and was detected in 18.6% (13/70) of the IPMN-low (dysplasia) specimens, 36.1% (13/36) of the IPMN-int, 93.3% (28/30) of the IPMN-high, and 59.1% (26/44) of the IPMN-inv (with an associated invasive carcinoma) specimens. The sensitivity for detecting mural nodules was 81.7% by endoscopic ultrasonography, 70% by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and 54% by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. SLC2A1/GLUT1 expression in the mural nodules was recognized in the basal and basolateral cytomembrane of tumor cells and was expressed in 15.4% (2/13) of the IPMN-low, 15.4% (2/13) of the IPMN-int, 71.4% (20/28) of the IPMN-high and 84.6% (22/26) of the IPMN-inv groups. The SLC2A1/GLUT1 expression was significantly higher in the IPMN-high and IPMN-inv mural nodules than in those of the IPMN-low and IPMN-int groups. Our findings suggest that SLC2A1/GLUT1 is expressed late in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence during carcinogenesis in IPMN, and SLC2A1/GLUT1 act as therapeutic target for malignant IPMN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Inoculation of Astragalus racemosus and Astragalus convallarius with selenium-hyperaccumulator rhizosphere fungi affects growth and selenium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Fakra, Sirine C; Landon, Jessica; Schulz, Paige; Tracy, Benjamin; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about how fungi affect plant selenium (Se) accumulation. Here we investigate the effects of two fungi on Se accumulation, translocation, and chemical speciation in the hyperaccumulator Astragalus racemosus and the non-accumulator Astragalus convallarius. The fungi, Alternaria astragali (A3) and Fusarium acuminatum (F30), were previously isolated from Astragalus hyperaccumulator rhizosphere. A3-inoculation enhanced growth of A. racemosus yet inhibited growth of A. convallarius. Selenium treatment negated these effects. F30 reduced shoot-to-root Se translocation in A. racemosus. X-ray microprobe analysis showed no differences in Se speciation between inoculation groups. The Astragalus species differed in Se localization and speciation. A. racemosus root-Se was distributed throughout the taproot and lateral root and was 90 % organic in the lateral root. The related element sulfur (S) was present as a mixture of organic and inorganic forms in the hyperaccumulator. Astragalus convallarius root-Se was concentrated in the extreme periphery of the taproot. In the lateral root, Se was exclusively in the vascular core and was only 49 % organic. These findings indicate differences in Se assimilation between the two species and differences between Se and S speciation in the hyperaccumulator. The finding that fungi can affect translocation may have applications in phytoremediation and biofortification.

  6. Comparison of root absorption, translocation and tolerance of arsenic in the hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata and the nonhyperaccumulator Pteris tremula.

    PubMed

    Caille, N; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2005-03-01

    * Several fern species can hyperaccumulate arsenic, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we investigate the roles of root absorption, translocation and tolerance in As hyperaccumulation by comparing the hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata and the nonhyperaccumulator Pteris tremula. * The two species were grown in a pot experiment with 0-500 mg As kg-1 added as arsenate, and in a short-term (8 h) uptake experiment with 5 microM arsenate under phosphorus-sufficient conditions. * In the pot experiment, P. vittata accumulated up to 2500 mg As kg-1 frond d. wt and suffered no phytotoxicity. P. tremula accumulated<100 mg As kg-1 frond d. wt and suffered severe phytotoxicity with additions of >or=25 mg As kg-1. In the short-term uptake experiment, P. vittata had a 2.2-fold higher rate of arsenate uptake than P. tremula, and distributed more As taken up to the fronds (76%) than did P. tremula (9%). * Our results show that enhanced root uptake, efficient root-to-shoot translocation, and a much elevated tolerance through internal detoxification all contribute to As hyperaccumulation in P. vittata.

  7. Potential hyperaccumulation of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in endurant plants distributed in an old smeltery, northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shuang; Zhou, Qixing; Chao, Lei

    2007-01-01

    The absorption and accumulation of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in some endurant weed plant species that survived in an old smeltery in Liaoning, China, were systematically investigated. Potential hyperaccumulative characteristics of these species were also discussed. The results showed that metal accumulation in plants differed with species, tissues and metals. Endurant weed plants growing in this contaminated site exhibited high metal adaptability. Both the metal exclusion and detoxification tolerance strategies were involved in the species studied. Seven species for Pb and four species for Cd were satisfied for the concentration time level standard for hyperaccumulator. Considering translocation factor (TF) values, one species for Pb, seven species for Zn, two species for Cu and five species for Cd possessed the characteristic of hyperaccumulator. Particularly, Abutilon theophrasti Medic, exhibited strong accumulative ability to four heavy metals. Although enrichment coefficients of all samples were lesser than 1 and the absolute concentrations didn’t reach the standard, species mentioned above were primarily believed to be potential hyperaccumulators.

  8. Zinc and cadmium hyperaccumulation act as deterrents towards specialist herbivores and impede the performance of a generalist herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Dinan, Ardeshir; Thomaschky, Sina; Stein, Ricardo J; Krämer, Ute; Müller, Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Extraordinarily high leaf metal concentrations in metal hyperaccumulator plants may serve as an elemental defence against herbivores. However, mixed results have been reported and studies using comparative approaches are missing. We investigated the deterrent and toxic potential of metals employing the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri. Effects of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) on the preferences of three Brassicaceae specialists were tested in paired-choice experiments using differently treated plant material, including transgenic plants. In performance tests, we determined the toxicity and joint effects of both metals incorporated in an artificial diet on the survival of a generalist. Feeding by all specialists was significantly reduced by metal concentrations from above 1000 μg Zn g(-1) DW and 18 μg Cd g(-1) DW. By contrast, metals did not affect oviposition. Generalist survival decreased with increasing concentrations of individual metals, whereby the combination of Zn and Cd had an additive toxic effect even at the lowest applied concentrations of 100 μg Zn g(-1) and 2 μg Cd g(-1) . Metal hyperaccumulation protects plants from herbivory resulting from deterrence and toxicity against a wide range of herbivores. The combination of metals exacerbates toxicity through joint effects and enhances elemental defence. Thus, metal hyperaccumulation is ecologically beneficial for plants. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Addition of straw from hyperaccumulator plants to cadmium-contaminated soil increases cadmium uptake by loquat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lijin; Liao, Ming'an; Lv, Xiulan; Liang, Dong; Xia, Hui; Wang, Jin; Wang, Xun

    2017-05-01

    The straw from three different cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulators (Galinsoga parviflora, Youngia erythrocarpa, and Solanum photeinocarpum) was added to Cd-contaminated soil, and its effects on plant growth and Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings were evaluated. Straw from each of G. parviflora, Y. erythrocarpa, and S. photeinocarpum was added to Cd-contaminated soil before planting seedlings of two varieties of loquat (Dawuxing and Chuanzao). Addition of straw from G. parviflora and S. photeinocarpum increased the root and shoot biomasses of both loquat varieties, compared with that in the control. Addition of straw also increased Cd uptake by loquat seedlings. The treatments could be ranked, from highest Cd contents in roots and shoots of loquat seedlings to lowest, as follows: S. photeinocarpum straw > Y. erythrocarpa straw > G. parviflora straw > control. All three types of hyperaccumulator straw increased the amount of Cd extracted by shoots of two loquat seedlings, with the maximum effect in the S. photeinocarpum straw treatment. Addition of hyperaccumulator straw also resulted in increased soil invertase, urease, and catalase activities to varying degrees. Among the three types of hyperaccumulator straw, S. photeinocarpum straw was the most effective to increase Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings. Therefore, this material has the potential to increase the phytoremediation capacity of loquat seedlings in Cd-contaminated orchards.

  10. Selenium biofortification of broccoli and carrots grown in soil amended with Se-enriched hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Amending soils with Se-hyperaccumulator plant derived sources of selenium (Se) may be useful for increasing Se content in food crops in Se-deficient regions of the world. In this study, we evaluated total Se and the different chemical species of Se in broccoli and carrots grown in soils amended with...

  11. Characterization of rhizosphere fungi from selenium hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator plants along the eastern Rocky Mountain Front Range.

    PubMed

    Wangeline, Ami L; Valdez, J Rodolfo; Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Bowling, Keri L; Reeves, F Brent; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2011-07-01

    Selenium-hyperaccumulator plants can store over 1% (dry mass) Se in their tissues, despite the toxicity of this element at high concentrations across eukaryotes. These levels of Se can have widespread effects on the plant's ecological partners, including herbivores and pathogens. Still other partners seem to have coevolved Se tolerance. This is the first known study addressing the rhizosphere mycoflora of Se hyperaccumulators and aims to evaluate the rhizospheric fungal diversity and Se tolerance to further the knowledge of how these organisms interact with their host plants and survive in these extreme habitats. Rhizosphere fungi were isolated from Se-hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator plant species collected from five sites in Colorado and Wyoming; four seleniferous sites and one nonseleniferous site. 259 isolates were identified to genus or species and evaluated for Se tolerance. Among the 24 represented genera, 11 comprised 86% of the isolates. The majority of isolates from the seleniferous sites were unaffected by 10 mg·L(-1) Se, irrespective of host plant (hyperaccumulator vs. nonaccumulator), while rhizosphere fungi from a control, nonseleniferous site were highly sensitive to Se at 10 mg·L(-1) and as a group were significantly less (α = 0.05) tolerant than the isolates from the seleniferous sites. Even though Se is a commonly used antifungal agent, these results suggest that rhizosphere fungi from seleniferous habitats have widespread Se tolerance, likely an adaptive advantage in their Se-rich habitat.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizae increase the arsenic translocation factor in the As hyperaccumulating fern Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Trotta, A; Falaschi, P; Cornara, L; Minganti, V; Fusconi, A; Drava, G; Berta, G

    2006-09-01

    Phytoremediation techniques are receiving more attention as decontaminating strategies. Phytoextraction makes use of plants to transfer contaminants from soil to the aboveground biomass. This research is devoted to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) on growth and As hyperaccumulation in the Chinese brake fern Pteris vittata. We grew for 45 days P. vittata sporophytes, infected or not infected with the AM fungi Glomus mosseae or Gigaspora margarita, in a hydroponic system on quartz sand. As-treated plants were weekly fed with 25 ppm As. The As treatment produced a dramatic increase of As concentration in pinnae and a much lower increase in roots of both mycorrhizal and control plants. Mycorrhization increased pinnae dry weight (DW) (G. margarita = G. mosseae) and leaf area (G. margarita > G. mosseae), strongly reduced root As concentration (G. mosseae > G. margarita), and increased the As translocation factor (G. mosseae > G. margarita). The concentration of phosphorus in pinnae and roots was enhanced by both fungi (G. margarita > G. mosseae). The quantitatively different effects of the two AM fungi on plant growth as well as on As and P distribution in the fern suggest that the As hyperaccumulation in P. vittata can be optimized by a careful choice of the symbiont.

  13. Arsenic complexes in the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Cai, Yong; Downum, Kelsey R; Ma, Lena Q

    2004-07-23

    Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern), the first reported arsenic (As) hyperaccumulating plant, can be potentially applied in the phytoremediation As-contaminated sites. Understanding the mechanisms of As tolerance and detoxification in this plant is critical to further enhance its capability of As hyperaccumulation. In this study, an unknown As species, other than arsenite (AsIII) or arsenate (AsV) was found in leaflets by using anion-exchange chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The chromatographic behavior of this unknown As species and its stability suggest that it is likely an As complex. Although phytochelatin with two subunits (PC2) was the only major thiol in P. vittata under As exposure, this unknown As complex was unlikely to be an AsIII-PC2 complex by comparison of their chromatographic behaviors, stability at different pHs and charge states. The complex is sensitive to temperature and metal ions, but relatively insensitive to pH. In buffer solution of pH 5.9, it is present in a neutral form.

  14. The impact of Ni on the physiology of a Mediterranean Ni-hyperaccumulating plant.

    PubMed

    Roccotiello, Enrica; Serrano, Helena Cristina; Mariotti, Mauro Giorgio; Branquinho, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    High nickel (Ni) levels exert toxic effects on plant growth and plant water content, thus affecting photosynthesis. In a pot experiment, we investigated the effect of the Ni concentration on the physiological characteristics of the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssoides utriculata when grown on a vermiculite substrate in the presence of different external Ni concentrations (0-500 mg Ni L(-1)). The results showed that the Ni concentration was higher in leaves than in roots, as evidenced by a translocation factor = 3 and a bioconcentration factor = 10. At the highest concentration tested (500 mg Ni L(-1)), A. utriculata accumulated 1100 mg Ni per kilogram in its leaves, without an effects on its biomass. Plant water content increased significantly with Ni accumulation. Ni treatment did not, or only slightly, affected chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. The photosynthetic efficiency (FV/FM) of A. utriculata was stable between Ni treatments (always ≥ 0.8) and the photosynthetic performance of the plant under Ni stress remained high (performance index = 1.5). These findings support that A. utriculata has several mechanisms to avoid severe damage to its photosynthetic apparatus, confirming the tolerance of this species to Ni under hyperaccumulation.

  15. Zinc adsorption and desorption characteristics in root cell wall involving zinc hyperaccumulation in Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e; Meng, Fan-hua; Lu, Ling-li

    2007-02-01

    Radiotracer techniques were employed to characterize (65)Zn adsorption and desorption in root-cell-wall of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) species of Sedum alfredii Hance. The results indicated that at the end of a 30 min short time radioisotope loading period, comparable amounts of (65)Zn were accumulated in the roots of the two ecotypes Sedum alfredii, whereas 2.1-fold more (65)Zn remains in NHE root after 45-min desorption. At the end of 60 min uptake period, no difference of (65)Zn accumulation was observed in undesorbed root-cell-wall of Sedum alfredii. However, 3.0-fold more (65)Zn accumulated in desorbed root-cell-wall of NHE. Zn(2+) binding in root-cell-wall preparations of NHE was greater than that in HE under high Zn(2+) concentration. All these results suggested that root-cell-wall of the two ecotypes Sedum alfredii had the same ability to adsorb Zn(2+), whereas the desorption characteristics were different, and with most of (65)Zn binding on root of HE being available for loading into the xylem, as a result, more (65)Zn was translocated to the shoot.

  16. A quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of metal hyperaccumulation are still not understood, so we conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, in a cross between this and its sister species, A. petraea, in order to determine the number and approximate location of the genomic regions significantly contributing to this adaptation. An F2 cross between the two species was made, and the leaf Zn concentration of 92 individuals was measured at both low (10 microm) and high (100 microm) Zn concentrations. Twenty-five markers were established that were distributed on all of the eight chromosomes. Mapping of the markers established that they were essentially collinear with previous studies. QTLs exceeding a logarithm to the base 10 of the odds (LOD) value of 3 were found on chromosomes 4 (low Zn), 6 (high Zn) and 7 (both high and low Zn). Evidence for a QTL on chromosome 3 (low Zn) was also found. This analysis validates a previously used method of QTL analysis, based on microarray analysis of segregating families. Genes that have altered during the evolution of this character should also be QTL: this analysis calls into question a number of candidate genes from consideration as such primary genes because they do not appear to be associated with QTLs.

  17. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by Corydalis davidii in Zn-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenjie; Xiao, Tangfu; Wu, Yunying; Ao, Ziqiang; Ning, Zengping

    2012-02-01

    A field survey was conducted to identify potential Zn accumulators from an artisanal Zn smelting area in southwest China's Guizhou Province. Hydroponic and soil culture experiments were performed to investigate the accumulation ability of Zn in Corydalis davidii. Zn concentrations in roots, stems and leaves of C. davidii in the smelting site were 1.1-3.5, 1.2-11.2, and 3.3-14 mg g(-)(1), respectively, whereas Zn concentrations in roots, stems and leaves of C. davidii in the contaminated site impacted by the Zn smelting were 1.0-2.4, 1.9-6.5, and 3.0-1.1 mg g(-1), respectively. Zn concentrations in leaves and stems of C. davidii were observed at above 10 mg g(-1) that refers to the threshold of Zn hyperaccumulator. The concentration distribution of Zn in C. davidii was leaf>stem>root, and the Zn bioaccumulation factors of C. davidii were above 1. It is concluded that C. davidii has high tolerance to concentrate Zn stress, and that C. davidii is a newly discovered Zn-hyperaccumulator with high biomass in the aboveground parts. Based on the cultivation experiments, C. davidii could reduce Zn concentration by 26.6, 21.2, and 10.2 mg kg(-1)yr(-1) by phytoextraction from the smelting slag, Zn-contaminated soil, and background soil, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Extreme nickel hyperaccumulation in the vascular tracts of the tree Phyllanthus balgooyi from Borneo.

    PubMed

    Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech; Barnabas, Alban; van der Ent, Antony

    2016-03-01

    Phyllanthus balgooyi (Phyllanthaceae), one of > 20 nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator plant species known in Sabah (Malaysia) on the island of Borneo, is remarkable because it contains > 16 wt% Ni in its phloem sap, the second highest concentration of Ni in any living material in the world (after Pycnandra acuminata (Sapotaceae) from New Caledonia with 25 wt% Ni in latex). This study focused on the tissue-level distribution of Ni and other elements in the leaves, petioles and stem of P. balgooyi using nuclear microprobe imaging (micro-PIXE). The results show that in the stems and petioles of P. balgooyi Ni concentrations were very high in the phloem, while in the leaves there was significant enrichment of this element in the major vascular bundles. In the leaves, cobalt (Co) was codistributed with Ni, while the distribution of manganese (Mn) was different. The highest enrichment of calcium (Ca) in the stems was in the periderm, the epidermis and subepidermis of the petiole, and in the palisade mesophyll of the leaf. Preferential accumulation of Ni in the vascular tracts suggests that Ni is present in a metabolically active form. The elemental distribution of P. balgooyi differs from those of many other Ni hyperaccumulator plant species from around the world where Ni is preferentially accumulated in leaf epidermal cells. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Cellular sequestration of cadmium in the hyperaccumulator plant species Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Labavitch, John; Yang, Xiaoe; He, Zhenli; Hu, Hening; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Newville, Matt; Commisso, Joel; Brown, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    Spatial imaging of cadmium (Cd) in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in vivo by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and x-ray microfluorescence imaging. Preferential Cd accumulation in the pith and cortex was observed in stems of the Cd hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE), whereas Cd was restricted to the vascular bundles in its contrasting nonhyperaccumulating ecotype. Cd concentrations of up to 15,000 μg g(-1) were measured in the pith cells, which was many fold higher than the concentrations in the stem epidermis and vascular bundles in the HE plants. In the leaves of the HE, Cd was mainly localized to the mesophyll and vascular cells rather than the epidermis. The distribution pattern of Cd in both stems and leaves of the HE was very similar to calcium but not zinc, irrespective of Cd exposure levels. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis showed that Cd in the stems and leaves of the HE was mainly associated with oxygen ligands, and a larger proportion (about 70% in leaves and 47% in stems) of Cd was bound with malic acid, which was the major organic acid in the shoots of the plants. These results indicate that a majority of Cd in HE accumulates in the parenchyma cells, especially in stems, and is likely associated with calcium pathways and bound with organic acid (malate), which is indicative of a critical role of vacuolar sequestration of Cd in the HE S. alfredii.

  20. Arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata efficiently solubilized phosphate rock to sustain plant growth and As uptake.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing-Wei; Liu, Xue; Han, Yong-He; Mei, Hanyi; Cao, Yue; de Oliveira, Letuzia M; Liu, Yungen; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-01-31

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most important nutrients for phytoremediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils. In this study, we demonstrated that As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata was efficient in acquiring P from insoluble phosphate rock (PR). When supplemented with PR as the sole P source in hydroponic systems, P. vittata accumulated 49% and 28% higher P in the roots and fronds than the -P treatment. In contrast, non-hyperaccumulator Pteris ensiformis was unable to solubilize P from PR. To gain insights into PR solubilization by plants, organic acids in plant root exudates were analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that phytic acid was the predominant (>90%) organic acid in P. vittata root exudates whereas only oxalic acid was detected in P. ensiformis. Moreover, P. vittata secreted more phytic acid in -P and PR treatments. Compared to oxalic acid, phytic acid was more effective in solubilizing PR, suggesting that phytic acid was critical for PR utilization. Besides, secretion of phytic acid by P. vittata was not inhibited by arsenate. Our data indicated that phytic acid played an important role in efficient use of insoluble PR by P. vittata, shedding light on using insoluble PR to enhance phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils.

  1. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongfei; Guo, Qingjun; Wen, Hanjie; Liu, Congqiang; Yang, Junxing; Peters, Marc; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Guangxu; Zhang, Hanzhi; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Wan, Yingxin

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The mass balance of Cd isotope yields isotope fractionations between plant and Cd source (δ114/110Cdorgans-solution) of −0.70‰ to −0.22‰ in Ricinus communis and −0.51‰ to −0.33‰ in Solanum nigrum. Moreover, Cd isotope fractionation during Cd transport from stem to leaf differs between the Cd-tolerant and -hyperaccumulator species. Based on these results, the processes (diffusion, adsorption, uptake or complexation), which may induce Cd isotope fractionation in plants, have been discussed. Overall, the present study indicates potential applications of Cd isotopes for investigating plant physiology. PMID:27076359

  2. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rongfei; Guo, Qingjun; Wen, Hanjie; Liu, Congqiang; Yang, Junxing; Peters, Marc; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Guangxu; Zhang, Hanzhi; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Wan, Yingxin

    2016-04-14

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The mass balance of Cd isotope yields isotope fractionations between plant and Cd source (δ(114/110)Cdorgans-solution) of -0.70‰ to -0.22‰ in Ricinus communis and -0.51‰ to -0.33‰ in Solanum nigrum. Moreover, Cd isotope fractionation during Cd transport from stem to leaf differs between the Cd-tolerant and -hyperaccumulator species. Based on these results, the processes (diffusion, adsorption, uptake or complexation), which may induce Cd isotope fractionation in plants, have been discussed. Overall, the present study indicates potential applications of Cd isotopes for investigating plant physiology.

  3. Molecular dissection of the role of histidine in nickel hyperaccumulation in Thalspi goesingense (Halacsy)

    SciTech Connect

    Persans, M.W.; Yan, X.; Patnoe, J.M.M.L.; Kraemer, U.; Salt, D.E.

    1999-12-01

    To understand the role of free histidine (His) in Ni hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense, the authors investigated the regulation of His biosynthesis at both the molecular and biochemical levels. Three T. goesingense cDNAs encoding the following His biosynthetic enzymes, ATP phosphoribosyltransferase, imidazoleglycerol phosphate dehydratase, and histidinol dehydrogenase, were isolated by functional complementation of Escherichia coli His autotrophs. Northern analysis of THJG1, THD1, and THB1 gene expression revealed that each gene is expressed in both roots and shoots, but at the concentrations and dosage times of Ni treatment used in this study, these genes failed to show any regulation by Ni. The authors were also unable to observe any increases in the concentration of free His in root, shoot, or xylem sap of T. goesingense in response to Ni exposure. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of root and shoot tissue from T. goesingense and the non-accumulator species Thlaspi reverse revealed no major differences in the coordination of Ni by His in these tissues. They therefore conclude that the Ni hyperaccumulation phenotype in T. goesingense is not determined by the overproduction of His in response to Ni.

  4. Cellular Sequestration of Cadmium in the Hyperaccumulator Plant Species Sedum alfredii

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Labavitch, John M.; Yang, Xiaoe; He, Zhenli; Hu, Hening; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Newville, Matt; Commisso, Joel; Brown, Patrick Hugh

    2012-07-23

    Spatial imaging of cadmium (Cd) in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in vivo by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and x-ray microfluorescence imaging. Preferential Cd accumulation in the pith and cortex was observed in stems of the Cd hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE), whereas Cd was restricted to the vascular bundles in its contrasting nonhyperaccumulating ecotype. Cd concentrations of up to 15,000 {micro}g g{sup -1} were measured in the pith cells, which was many fold higher than the concentrations in the stem epidermis and vascular bundles in the HE plants. In the leaves of the HE, Cd was mainly localized to the mesophyll and vascular cells rather than the epidermis. The distribution pattern of Cd in both stems and leaves of the HE was very similar to calcium but not zinc, irrespective of Cd exposure levels. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis showed that Cd in the stems and leaves of the HE was mainly associated with oxygen ligands, and a larger proportion (about 70% in leaves and 47% in stems) of Cd was bound with malic acid, which was the major organic acid in the shoots of the plants. These results indicate that a majority of Cd in HE accumulates in the parenchyma cells, especially in stems, and is likely associated with calcium pathways and bound with organic acid (malate), which is indicative of a critical role of vacuolar sequestration of Cd in the HE S. alfredii.

  5. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Visioli, Giovanna; Vamerali, Teofilo; Mattarozzi, Monica; Dramis, Lucia; Sanangelantoni, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM) and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest indole acetic acid production and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal, and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co, and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonized the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass, and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials in multiple metal-contaminated sites, with possible extension to non-hyperaccumulator plants. PMID:26322074

  6. Cellular Sequestration of Cadmium in the Hyperaccumulator Plant Species Sedum alfredii1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Labavitch, John; Yang, Xiaoe; He, Zhenli; Hu, Hening; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Newville, Matt; Commisso, Joel; Brown, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Spatial imaging of cadmium (Cd) in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in vivo by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and x-ray microfluorescence imaging. Preferential Cd accumulation in the pith and cortex was observed in stems of the Cd hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE), whereas Cd was restricted to the vascular bundles in its contrasting nonhyperaccumulating ecotype. Cd concentrations of up to 15,000 μg g−1 were measured in the pith cells, which was many fold higher than the concentrations in the stem epidermis and vascular bundles in the HE plants. In the leaves of the HE, Cd was mainly localized to the mesophyll and vascular cells rather than the epidermis. The distribution pattern of Cd in both stems and leaves of the HE was very similar to calcium but not zinc, irrespective of Cd exposure levels. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis showed that Cd in the stems and leaves of the HE was mainly associated with oxygen ligands, and a larger proportion (about 70% in leaves and 47% in stems) of Cd was bound with malic acid, which was the major organic acid in the shoots of the plants. These results indicate that a majority of Cd in HE accumulates in the parenchyma cells, especially in stems, and is likely associated with calcium pathways and bound with organic acid (malate), which is indicative of a critical role of vacuolar sequestration of Cd in the HE S. alfredii. PMID:22025609

  7. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Rongfei; Guo, Qingjun; Wen, Hanjie; Liu, Congqiang; Yang, Junxing; Peters, Marc; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Guangxu; Zhang, Hanzhi; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Wan, Yingxin

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The mass balance of Cd isotope yields isotope fractionations between plant and Cd source (δ114/110Cdorgans-solution) of ‑0.70‰ to ‑0.22‰ in Ricinus communis and ‑0.51‰ to ‑0.33‰ in Solanum nigrum. Moreover, Cd isotope fractionation during Cd transport from stem to leaf differs between the Cd-tolerant and -hyperaccumulator species. Based on these results, the processes (diffusion, adsorption, uptake or complexation), which may induce Cd isotope fractionation in plants, have been discussed. Overall, the present study indicates potential applications of Cd isotopes for investigating plant physiology.

  8. Contrasted zinc hyperaccumulation levels between metallicolous and non-metallicolous populations of Arabidopsis halleri is driven by divergent selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babst-Kostecka, Alicja; Waldmann, Patrik; Pauwels, Maxime; Schat, Henk; Bourceaux, Angélique; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Grodzińska, Krystyna; Frérot, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 400 species that can survive and reproduce in metalliferous environments have developed "metal hyperaccumulation" capacity, allowing them to allocate large amounts of trace elements to their aerial parts without showing severe toxicity symptoms. The potential of hyperaccumulators to be applied in phytoremediation efforts is of great research and commercial interest. Yet, the genetic basis and evolutionary significance of this trait are to date insufficiently understood. This lack of knowledge limits the efficiency and large-scale use of such plants in reducing soil pollution through "green and clean technologies" (phytoremediation). In this context, the objective of this study was to find some evidence of selection acting on metal hyperaccumulation, thus supporting the existence of genetic adaptation for this trait. Here, we collected six metallicolous and five non-metallicolous populations of the pseudometallophyte model species Arabidopsis halleri in Poland that are genetically and geographically close. We asexually propagated genotypes that were sampled in natural populations to produce several clones of each individual. These were subsequently used in a soil culture experiment with artificially zinc-contaminated compost for accumulation assessment. The zinc content of shoots was determined after five weeks of culture using the colorimetric reagent zincon. The heritability and the genetic differentiation of the zinc accumulation trait were estimated (Qst statistic) and the latter was compared to the differentiation at neutral molecular markers (Fst statistic). Despite significantly (P<0.001) lower zinc concentrations in metallicolous compared to non-metallicolous plants, we observed a rather continuous range of zinc hyperaccumulation capacities with multiple genotypes from both edaphic types in between. Overall, zinc concentrations were high in most plants, with only a few metallicolous individuals not reaching the threshold concentration for zinc

  9. Human sperm acrosome reaction-initiating activity associated with the human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Siiteri, J E; Dandekar, P; Meizel, S

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the detection and partial characterization of preovulatory human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cell-associated activity capable of initiating the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. Fragments of preovulatory human cumulus (cells plus extracellular matrix) were washed 3 times, incubated for 24 hr and the spent media and washes assayed for their ability to initiate the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. AR activity was present in the first two washes but not the third wash; however, AR activity was recovered in the spent medium after 3 X-washed fragments were incubated for 24 hr under conditions which maintained the viability of the cumulus cells. The spent media of preovulatory human mural granulosa cells contained AR-initiating activity after 1-3, 3-6, and 6-9 days of culture. The properties of the AR activity present in spent media of human cumulus fragments included resistance to loss of activity during treatment with pronase; resistance to loss of activity during treatment with chondroitinase ABC or bacterial hyaluronidase; heat stability after overnight incubation; lack of extraction by chloroform-methanol; an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 50,000, as determined by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography; conversion to a lower apparent MW activity by incubation with pronase. These properties are also characteristic of a fraction derived by Sephadex G-75 chromatography of preovulatory human follicular fluid which also has been shown to stimulate the human sperm acrosome reaction in vitro. The AR activity from spent media of human mural granulosa cells is also found in a 50,000 MW Sephadex G-75 fraction. We propose that the sources of the 50,000 MW human follicular fluid AR activity are the cumulus oophorus and the mural granulosa cells.

  10. Use of Chenopodium murale L. transgenic hairy root in vitro culture system as a new tool for allelopathic assays.

    PubMed

    Mitić, Nevena; Dmitrović, Slavica; Djordjević, Mirka; Zdravković-Korać, Snežana; Nikolić, Radomirka; Raspor, Martin; Djordjević, Tatjana; Maksimović, Vuk; Zivković, Suzana; Krstić-Milošević, Dijana; Stanišić, Mariana; Ninković, Slavica

    2012-08-15

    We investigated Chenopodium murale transgenic hairy root in vitro culture system as a new tool for allelopathic assays. Transgenic hairy roots were induced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4M70GUS from roots, cotyledons, leaves, and internodes of C. murale seedlings. Roots were found to be the best target explants, providing transformation efficiency of up to 11.1%. Established hairy root clones differed in their morphology and growth potential. Molecular characterization of these clones was carried out by PCR, RT-PCR and histochemical GUS analyses. No differences in rol gene expression were observed. Liquid culture system of characterized hairy root clones was maintained for over 2 years. Six hairy root clones were selected for assaying the allelopathic effect of their growth medium against germination and seedling elongation of wheat and lettuce test plants. The inhibitory potential varied depending on the hairy root clone. Some transgenic clones showed significantly higher inhibition compared to wild-type roots. These results revealed that hairy roots as an independent system synthesize some bioactive substances with allelopathic activity and exude them into the growth medium. Concentrations of caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids (0.07-2.85 μmol/L) identified by HPLC analysis in the growth media were at least 1000 times lower than the inhibitory active concentration (5 mmol/L) of pure grade phenolic acids, suggesting that they have a limited role in the allelopathic phenomena of C. murale. The presented hairy root system appears to be a suitable tool for further investigation of the potential and nature of root-mediated allelopathic interference of C. murale.

  11. Effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound for detecting mural nodules in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas and for making therapeutic decisions

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Mitsuru; Itoi, Takao; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Ishii, Kentaro; Kamada, Kentaro; Umeda, Junko; Tanaka, Reina; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There have been few studies to date evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) for detecting mural nodules in patients with branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) of the pancreas. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of CE-EUS for detecting mural nodules in BD-IPMN. Patients and Methods: Of the 427 BD-IPMN patients, 21 patients (4.9%) in whom the presence of mural nodules was suggested by CE computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in whom the presence of nodule-like lesions as shown by fundamental EUS, were examined by CE-EUS. Results: The mean diameter of cystic lesions was 29.8 ± 12.8 mm. The mean diameter of mural nodules was 9.5 ± 5.7 mm. BD-IPMN was detected in the pancreatic head in 16 cases, pancreatic body in 2 cases, and pancreatic tail in 3 cases. The mean follow-up period was 17.2 ± 11.9 months. The detection rates of mural nodule-like lesions in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 36.8%, 63.2%, and 100%, respectively. The detection rates of true mural nodules in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 100%, respectively. The echo levels of mural nodule-like lesions on fundamental EUS were hyperechoic in 6 patients, isoechoic in 9 patients, and hypoechoic in 6 patients. The final diagnosis was mucus lumps in 14 patients and mural nodules in 7 patients. The contrast patterns observed were avascular, isovascular, and hypervascular in 14, 3, and 4 patients, respectively. No patients showed a hypovascular pattern. Fourteen patients showing an avascular pattern were diagnosed as having mucus lumps, and they were able to avoid surgical resection. Of the 7 patients who were diagnosed as having mural nodules, 5 underwent surgical resection. The pathological findings were adenocarcinoma in 2 patients and adenoma in 3 patients. Of the 3 adenoma patients, fundamental EUS demonstrated a hypoechoic

  12. Hyperaccumulation of Pb, Zn and Cd in herbaceous grown on lead-zinc mining area in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Yanqun, Zu; Yuan, Li; Jianjun, Chen; Haiyan, Chen; Li, Qin; Schvartz, Christian

    2005-07-01

    A field survey of herbaceous growing on lead-zinc mining area in Yunnan, China were conducted to identify species accumulating exceptionally large concentrations of Pb, Zn and Cd in shoots. In total, 220 plant samples of 129 species of 50 families and 220 soil samples in which the plants were growing were collected. According to accumulation concentration in plant shoots and the concentration time levels compared to plants from non-polluted environments, 21 plant samples of 16 species were chosen as best-performing specimens, 11 plant samples of 10 species for Pb, 5 plant samples of 4 species for Zn and 5 plant samples of 5 species for Cd. Sonchus asper (L.) Hill in Qilinkeng had hyperaccumulation capacity to Pb and Zn. Corydalis pterygopetala Franch in Paomaping had hyperaccumulation capacity to Zn and Cd. All 5 Cd hyperaccumulators came from Lanping lead-zinc mining area. Out of 11 Pb hyperaccumulators, 7 came from Minbingying of Huice lead-zinc mining area. The average of the concentration time levels compared to plants from non-polluted environments were higher than 10 times in all plant samples, the concentration time levels changed from 203 times to 620 times for Pb, from 50 times to 70 times for Zn and from 145 times to 330 times for Cd. Out of 21 plant samples, translocation factor changed from 0.35 to 1.90, only translocation factor of 7 plant samples were higher than 1. Enrichment coefficients of all samples were lower than 1. These plant species were primarily heavy metal hyperaccumulator, and will be used in phytoremediation of the metallic pollutants in soils after further research in accumulation mechanism.

  13. Investigation of heavy metal hyperaccumulation at the cellular level: development and characterization of Thlaspi caerulescens suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Melinda A; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Milner, Matthew J; Kochian, Leon V

    2008-08-01

    The ability of Thlaspi caerulescens, a zinc (Zn)/cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, to accumulate extremely high foliar concentrations of toxic heavy metals requires coordination of uptake, transport, and sequestration to avoid damage to the photosynthetic machinery. The study of these metal hyperaccumulation processes at the cellular level in T. caerulescens has been hampered by the lack of a cellular system that mimics the whole plant, is easily transformable, and competent for longer term studies. Therefore, to better understand the contribution of the cellular physiology and molecular biology to Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in the intact plant, T. caerulescens suspension cell lines were developed. Differences in cellular metal tolerance and accumulation between the cell lines of T. caerulescens and the related nonhyperaccumulator, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), were examined. A number of Zn/Cd transport-related differences between T. caerulescens and Arabidopsis cell lines were identified that also are seen in the whole plant. T. caerulescens suspension cell lines exhibited: (1) higher growth requirements for Zn; (2) much greater Zn and Cd tolerance; (3) enhanced expression of specific metal transport-related genes; and (4) significant differences in metal fluxes compared with Arabidopsis. One interesting feature exhibited by the T. caerulescens cell lines was that they accumulated less Zn and Cd than the Arabidopsis cell lines, most likely due to a greater metal efflux. This finding suggests that the T. caerulescens suspension cells represent cells of the Zn/Cd transport pathway between the root epidermis and leaf. We also show it is possible to stably transform T. caerulescens suspension cells, which will allow us to alter the expression of candidate hyperaccumulation genes and thus dissect the molecular and physiological processes underlying metal hyperaccumulation in T. caerulescens.

  14. Spatial Imaging, Speciation, and Quantification of Selenium in theHyperaccumulator Plants Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.L.; Zhang, L.H.; Marcus, M.A.; Fakra, S.; McGrath,S.P.; Pilon-Smits, E.A.H.

    2006-09-01

    Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) up to 1% of plant dry weight. In the field, Se was mostly present in the young leaves and reproductive tissues of both hyperaccumulators. Microfocused scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping revealed that Se was hyperaccumulated in trichomes in young leaves of A. bisulcatus. None of 10 other elements tested were accumulated in trichomes. Micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that Se in trichomes was present in the organic forms methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys; 53%) and {gamma}-glutamyl-MeSeCys (47%). In the young leaf itself, there was 30% inorganic Se (selenate and selenite) in addition to 70% MeSeCys. In young S. pinnata leaves, Se was highly concentrated near the leaf edge and surface in globular structures that were shown by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis to be mainly in epidermal cells. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed both MeSeCys (88%) and selenocystathionine (12%) inside leaf edges. In contrast, both the Se accumulator Brassica juncea and the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana accumulated Se in their leaf vascular tissues and mesophyll cells. Se in hyperaccumulators appears to be mobile in both the xylem and phloem because Se-treated S. pinnata was found to be highly toxic to phloem-feeding aphids, and MeSeCys was present in the vascular tissues of a S. pinnata young leaf petiole as well as in guttation fluid. The compartmentation of organic selenocompounds in specific storage areas in the plant periphery appears to be a unique property of Se hyperaccumulators. The high concentration of Se in the plant periphery may contribute to Se tolerance and may also serve as an elemental plant defense mechanism.

  15. Investigation of Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulation at the Cellular Level: Development and Characterization of Thlaspi caerulescens Suspension Cell Lines1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Melinda A.; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Milner, Matthew J.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of Thlaspi caerulescens, a zinc (Zn)/cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, to accumulate extremely high foliar concentrations of toxic heavy metals requires coordination of uptake, transport, and sequestration to avoid damage to the photosynthetic machinery. The study of these metal hyperaccumulation processes at the cellular level in T. caerulescens has been hampered by the lack of a cellular system that mimics the whole plant, is easily transformable, and competent for longer term studies. Therefore, to better understand the contribution of the cellular physiology and molecular biology to Zn/Cd hyperaccumulation in the intact plant, T. caerulescens suspension cell lines were developed. Differences in cellular metal tolerance and accumulation between the cell lines of T. caerulescens and the related nonhyperaccumulator, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), were examined. A number of Zn/Cd transport-related differences between T. caerulescens and Arabidopsis cell lines were identified that also are seen in the whole plant. T. caerulescens suspension cell lines exhibited: (1) higher growth requirements for Zn; (2) much greater Zn and Cd tolerance; (3) enhanced expression of specific metal transport-related genes; and (4) significant differences in metal fluxes compared with Arabidopsis. One interesting feature exhibited by the T. caerulescens cell lines was that they accumulated less Zn and Cd than the Arabidopsis cell lines, most likely due to a greater metal efflux. This finding suggests that the T. caerulescens suspension cells represent cells of the Zn/Cd transport pathway between the root epidermis and leaf. We also show it is possible to stably transform T. caerulescens suspension cells, which will allow us to alter the expression of candidate hyperaccumulation genes and thus dissect the molecular and physiological processes underlying metal hyperaccumulation in T. caerulescens. PMID:18550685

  16. Spatial Imaging, Speciation, and Quantification of Selenium in the Hyperaccumulator Plants Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata1

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John L.; Zhang, Li Hong; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; McGrath, Steve P.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) up to 1% of plant dry weight. In the field, Se was mostly present in the young leaves and reproductive tissues of both hyperaccumulators. Microfocused scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping revealed that Se was hyperaccumulated in trichomes in young leaves of A. bisulcatus. None of 10 other elements tested were accumulated in trichomes. Micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that Se in trichomes was present in the organic forms methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys; 53%) and γ-glutamyl-MeSeCys (47%). In the young leaf itself, there was 30% inorganic Se (selenate and selenite) in addition to 70% MeSeCys. In young S. pinnata leaves, Se was highly concentrated near the leaf edge and surface in globular structures that were shown by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis to be mainly in epidermal cells. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed both MeSeCys (88%) and selenocystathionine (12%) inside leaf edges. In contrast, both the Se accumulator Brassica juncea and the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana accumulated Se in their leaf vascular tissues and mesophyll cells. Se in hyperaccumulators appears to be mobile in both the xylem and phloem because Se-treated S. pinnata was found to be highly toxic to phloem-feeding aphids, and MeSeCys was present in the vascular tissues of a S. pinnata young leaf petiole as well as in guttation fluid. The compartmentation of organic selenocompounds in specific storage areas in the plant periphery appears to be a unique property of Se hyperaccumulators. The high concentration of Se in the plant periphery may contribute to Se tolerance and may also serve as an elemental plant defense mechanism. PMID:16920881

  17. Exploring the importance of sulfate transporters and ATP sulphurylases for selenium hyperaccumulation-a comparison of Stanleya pinnata and Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Michela; Pilon, Marinus; Malagoli, Mario; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation, the capacity of some species to concentrate Se to levels upwards of 0.1% of dry weight, is an intriguing phenomenon that is only partially understood. Questions that remain to be answered are: do hyperaccumulators have one or more Se-specific transporters? How are these regulated by Se and sulfur (S)? In this study, hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata was compared with related non-hyperaccumulator Brassica juncea with respect to S-dependent selenate uptake and translocation, as well as for the expression levels of three sulfate/selenate transporters (Sultr) and three ATP sulphurylases (APS). Selenium accumulation went down ~10-fold with increasing sulfate supply in B. juncea, while S. pinnata only had a 2-3-fold difference in Se uptake between the highest (5 mM) and lowest sulfate (0 mM) treatments. The Se/S ratio was generally higher in the hyperaccumulator than the non-hyperaccumulator, and while tissue Se/S ratio in B. juncea largely reflected the ratio in the growth medium, S. pinnata enriched itself up to 5-fold with Se relative to S. The transcript levels of Sultr1;2 and 2;1 and APS1, 2, and 4 were generally much higher in S. pinnata than B. juncea, and the species showed differential transcript responses to S and Se supply. These results indicate that S. pinnata has at least one transporter with significant selenate specificity over sulfate. Also, the hyperaccumulator has elevated expression levels of several sulfate/selenate transporters and APS enzymes, which likely contribute to the Se hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance phenotype.

  18. Inoculation of selenium hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata and related non-accumulator Stanleya elata with hyperaccumulator rhizosphere fungi--investigation of effects on Se accumulation and speciation.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Fakra, Sirine C; Landon, Jessica; Schulz, Paige; Tracy, Ben; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how fungi affect elemental accumulation in hyperaccumulators (HAs). Here, two rhizosphere fungi from selenium (Se) HA Stanleya pinnata, Alternaria seleniiphila (A1) and Aspergillus leporis (AS117), were used to inoculate S. pinnata and related non-HA Stanleya elata. Growth and Se and sulfur (S) accumulation were analyzed. Furthermore, X-ray microprobe analysis was used to investigate elemental distribution and speciation. Growth of S. pinnata was not affected by inoculation or by Se. Stanleya elata growth was negatively affected by AS117 and by Se, but combination of both did not reduce growth. Selenium translocation was reduced in inoculated S. pinnata, and inoculation reduced S translocation in both species. Root Se distribution and speciation were not affected by inoculation in either species; both species accumulated mainly (90%) organic Se. Sulfur, in contrast, was present equally in organic and inorganic forms in S. pinnata roots. Thus, these rhizosphere fungi can affect growth and Se and/or S accumulation, depending on host species. They generally enhanced root accumulation and reduced translocation. These effects cannot be attributed to altered plant Se speciation but may involve altered rhizosphere speciation, as these fungi are known to produce elemental Se. Reduced Se translocation may be useful in applications where toxicity to herbivores and movement of Se into the food chain is a concern. The finding that fungal inoculation can enhance root Se accumulation may be useful in Se biofortification or phytoremediation using root crop species. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  19. Leaf-age and soil-plant relationships: key factors for reporting trace-elements hyperaccumulation by plants and design applications.

    PubMed

    Losfeld, Guillaume; L'Huillier, Laurent; Fogliani, Bruno; Mc Coy, Stéphane; Grison, Claude; Jaffré, Tanguy

    2015-04-01

    Relationships between the trace-elements (TE) content of plants and associated soil have been widely investigated especially to understand the ecology of TE hyperaccumulating species to develop applications using TE phytoextraction. Many studies have focused on the possibility of quantifying the soil TE fraction available to plants, and used bioconcentration (BC) as a measure of the plants ability to absorb TE. However, BC only offers a static view of the dynamic phenomenon of TE accumulation. Accumulation kinetics are required to fully account for TE distributions in plants. They are also crucial to design applications where maximum TE concentrations in plant leaves are needed. This paper provides a review of studies of BC (i.e. soil-plant relationships) and leaf-age in relation to TE hyperaccumulation. The paper focuses of Ni and Mn accumulators and hyperaccumulators from New Caledonia who were previously overlooked until recent Ecocatalysis applications emerged for such species. Updated data on Mn hyperaccumulators and accumulators from New Caledonia are also presented and advocate further investigation of the hyperaccumulation of this element. Results show that leaf-age should be considered in the design of sample collection and allowed the reclassification of Grevillea meisneri known previously as a Mn accumulator to a Mn hyperaccumulator.

  20. Identification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Specific Genes in Cumulus and Mural Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aydos, Alp; Gurel, Aykut; Oztemur Islakoglu, Yasemin; Noyan, Senem; Gokce, Bagdagul; Ecemis, Tolga; Kaya, Cemil; Aksu, Arif Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic and endocrine disorder which affects women of reproductive age with prevalence of 8–18%. The oocyte within the follicle is surrounded by cumulus cells (CCs), which connect with mural granulosa cells (MGCs) that are responsible for secreting steroid hormones. The main aim of this study is comparing gene expression profiles of MGCs and CCs in PCOS and control samples to identify PCOS-specific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, two microarray databases were searched for mRNA expression microarray studies performed with CCs and MGCs obtained from PCOS patients and control samples. Three independent studies were selected to be integrated with naive meta-analysis since raw meta-data from these studies were found to be highly correlated. DEGs in these somatic cells were identified for PCOS and control groups. This study enabled us to reveal dysregulation in MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase), insulin and Wnt signaling pathways between CCs and MGCs in PCOS. The meta-analysis results together with qRT-PCR validations provide evidence that molecular signaling is dysregulated through MGCs and CCs in PCOS, which is important for follicle and oocyte maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the syndrome. PMID:27997581

  1. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  2. Novel tissue harmonic imaging clearly visualizes a case of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Katanuma, Akio

    2014-05-27

    Tissue Harmonic Echo (THE) imaging is a sonographic technique that potentially provides images of higher quality than can conventional B-mode images. Potential advantages of THE imaging include improved resolution, improved signal-to-noise ratio, and reduced artifacts [1, 2]. Recently, a novel THE imaging performed using an EUS system with a monitor/processing unit (EU-ME2 PREMIER PLUS; Olympus Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) has been developed. Using this technology, we can obtain two THE mode images, namely, THE-P (penetration) and THE-R (resolution). The THE-P mode is suitable for middle range distance observation because it receives a harmonic signal whose frequency is mainly 7.5 MHz. The THE-R mode is suitable for close distance observation from the probe because it receives a harmonic signal whose frequency mainly ranges from 10 to 12 MHz. Here, we report a case of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with mural nodules which could be clearly detected using this novel THE imaging.

  3. Non-atherosclerotic aortic mural thrombus: a rare source of embolism.

    PubMed

    Marin-Acevedo, Julian A; Koop, Andree H; Diaz-Gomez, Jose L; Guru, Pramod K

    2017-08-01

    A 54-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute left-sided chest pain and left upper quadrant abdominal pain. He had a significant history of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung previously treated with right pneumonectomy who ; is currently receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin. Physical examination was remarkable for tachycardia, hypertension and mild abdominal tenderness. CT angiography revealed an aortic mural thrombus in the ascending aorta and aortic arch without dissection, aneurysm or tortuosity of the aorta. In addition, an infarction of the inferior spleen was reported. Given the high risk of surgery for this patient, he was treated conservatively with esmolol and heparin infusion. His subsequent hospital course was uneventful, and he was successfully discharged on enoxaparin therapy that was successively bridged to rivaroxaban treatment. Follow-up transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiography at one month showed no thrombus in the aorta. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Mutual interaction between endothelial cells and mural cells enhances BMP9 signaling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tachida, Yuki; Izumi, Nanae; Sakurai, Toyo; Kobayashi, Hideki

    2017-03-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is characterized by the formation of abnormal vascular networks and caused by the mutation of genes involved in BMP9 signaling. It is also known that the interaction between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells (MCs) is critical to maintain vessel integrity. However, it has not yet fully been uncovered whether the EC-MC interaction affects BMP9 signaling or not. To elucidate this point, we analyzed BMP9 signaling in a co-culture of several types of human primary culture ECs and MCs. The co-culture activated the Notch pathway in both types of cells in a co-culture- and BMP9-dependent manner. In HUVECs, the genes induced by BMP9 were significantly and synergistically induced in the presence of pericytes, fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. The synergistic induction was greatly reduced in a non-contact condition. In fibroblasts, PDGFRB expression was potently induced in the presence of HUVECs, and BMP9 additively increased this response. Taken together, these results suggest that the EC-MC interaction potentiates BMP9 signaling both in ECs and MCs and plays a critical role in the maintenance of proper vessel functions.

  5. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N.; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo. To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs. PMID:26952986

  6. Mutual interaction between endothelial cells and mural cells enhances BMP9 signaling in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tachida, Yuki; Izumi, Nanae; Sakurai, Toyo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is characterized by the formation of abnormal vascular networks and caused by the mutation of genes involved in BMP9 signaling. It is also known that the interaction between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells (MCs) is critical to maintain vessel integrity. However, it has not yet fully been uncovered whether the EC–MC interaction affects BMP9 signaling or not. To elucidate this point, we analyzed BMP9 signaling in a co-culture of several types of human primary culture ECs and MCs. The co-culture activated the Notch pathway in both types of cells in a co-culture- and BMP9-dependent manner. In HUVECs, the genes induced by BMP9 were significantly and synergistically induced in the presence of pericytes, fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. The synergistic induction was greatly reduced in a non-contact condition. In fibroblasts, PDGFRB expression was potently induced in the presence of HUVECs, and BMP9 additively increased this response. Taken together, these results suggest that the EC–MC interaction potentiates BMP9 signaling both in ECs and MCs and plays a critical role in the maintenance of proper vessel functions. PMID:28298363

  7. Netrin-4 promotes mural cell adhesion and recruitment to endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Netrins are secreted molecules involved in axon guidance and angiogenesis. We previously showed that Netrin-4 acts as an anti-angiogenic factor by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of Netrin-4 on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activity in vitro and in vivo. We show that exogenous Netrin-4 stimulated VSMC adhesion and migration, and increased their coverage on EC tubes (grown on a Matrigel substrate). siRNA knock-down of endogenous Netrin-4 expression in VSMC decreased their recruitment to EC tubes. VSMC expressed Netrin-4 and three of the six Netrin-1 cognate receptors: DCC, Neogenin, and Unc5B. Silencing of these receptors reduced Netrin-4 adhesion to VSMC, strongly suggesting that these receptors were involved in the recruitment process. We previously showed that Netrin-4 overexpression in PC3 cancer cells delayed tumor growth in a model of subcutaneous xenograft by reducing tumor vessel density. Here, we show that Netrin-4 overexpression improved tumor blood vessel structure and increased VSMC coverage. Thus, Netrin-4 induced mural cell recruitment may play a role in the inhibition of tumor growth. Our data suggest that Netrin-4 is important for blood vessel normalization through the regulation of both endothelial and perivascular cells. PMID:24472220

  8. Identification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Specific Genes in Cumulus and Mural Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Aydos, Alp; Gurel, Aykut; Oztemur Islakoglu, Yasemin; Noyan, Senem; Gokce, Bagdagul; Ecemis, Tolga; Kaya, Cemil; Aksu, Arif Tarik; Gur Dedeoglu, Bala

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic and endocrine disorder which affects women of reproductive age with prevalence of 8-18%. The oocyte within the follicle is surrounded by cumulus cells (CCs), which connect with mural granulosa cells (MGCs) that are responsible for secreting steroid hormones. The main aim of this study is comparing gene expression profiles of MGCs and CCs in PCOS and control samples to identify PCOS-specific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, two microarray databases were searched for mRNA expression microarray studies performed with CCs and MGCs obtained from PCOS patients and control samples. Three independent studies were selected to be integrated with naive meta-analysis since raw meta-data from these studies were found to be highly correlated. DEGs in these somatic cells were identified for PCOS and control groups. This study enabled us to reveal dysregulation in MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase), insulin and Wnt signaling pathways between CCs and MGCs in PCOS. The meta-analysis results together with qRT-PCR validations provide evidence that molecular signaling is dysregulated through MGCs and CCs in PCOS, which is important for follicle and oocyte maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  9. The Case of Capogrossi in Rome: Collecting Data with Different Technologies on a Contemporary Mural Painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzadri, P.; Russo, J.

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the presentation of a part of the main thematic data documenting the pathologies and the degradation problems of a contemporary mural painting, which was designed and carried out by the italian artist Giuseppe Capogrossi in 1954. This forgotten masterpiece is developed on the ceilings of the main double stairscase at the entrance of the Airone, an ex-cinema-theatre in Rome (Italy). In time, the original project was completely damaged and now the Airone cinema is abandoned since 1999; the decoration, strictly connected to the function of the original project, has been completely covered by synthetic coatings. The documentation of the observed pathologies and the original materials of the lower ceiling takes place during a restoration project in 2015-2016 and was accomplished by utilizing different technologies in order to facilitate the collecting of the main data within several graphic thematic tables. The challenge of this documentation was to create a contact point, and perhaps also a contamination, between the practices of CAD graphic documentation, restoration and GIS technology.

  10. Mechanisms of efficient As solubilization in soils and As accumulation by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-He; Liu, Xue; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Li, Hong-Bo; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic (As) in soils is of major environmental concern due to its ubiquity and carcinogenicity. Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) is the first known As-hyperaccumulator, which is highly efficient in extracting As from soils and translocating it to the fronds, making it possible to be used for phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. In addition, P. vittata has served as a model plant to study As metabolisms in plants. Based on the recent advances, we reviewed the mechanisms of efficient As solubilization and transformation in rhizosphere soils of P. vittata and effective As uptake, translocation and detoxification in P. vittata. We also provided future research perspectives to further improve As phytoremediation by P. vittata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Zinc ligands in the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens as determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.; Prince, R.C.; Baker, A.J.M.; Raskin, I.; Pickering, I.J.

    1999-03-01

    Using the noninvasive technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the authors have been able to determine the ligand environment of Zn in different tissues of the Zn-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. The majority of intracellular Zn in roots of T. caerulescens was found to be coordinated with histidine. In the xylem sap Zn was found to be transported mainly as the free hydrated Zn{sup 2+} cation with a smaller proportion coordinated with organic acids. In the shoots, Zn coordination occurred mainly via organic acids, with a smaller proportion present as the hydrated cation and coordinated with histidine and the cell wall. Their data suggest that histidine plays an important role in Zn homeostasis in the roots, whereas organic acids are involved in xylem transport and Zn storage in shoots.

  12. Evaluation of hyperaccumulator plant species grown in metalliferous sites in Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babani, F.; Civici, N.; Mullaj, A.; Kongjika, E.; Ylli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soils causes serious problems to our society. A small number of interesting plant species have been identified that can grow in soils containing high levels of heavy metals, and can also accumulate these metals to high concentrations in the shoot. The heavy metal contents in root, shoot, leaves and flowers of spontaneous plants grown in metalliferous sites in Albania together with the elemental composition of the native soils were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Efficiency of photosynthetic apparatus of analyzed ecotypes was evaluated via chlorophyll fluorescence imaging during induction kinetics. Response of plant root system to the presence of metals, the available pools of metals to plants, effect of plant biomass to phytoextraction, photosynthetic pigment metabolism and chlorophyll fluorescence signature of leaves allowed to characterize hyperaccumulator properties and to detect the variation between selected ecotypes to heavy metal accumulation.

  13. Role of transpiration in arsenic accumulation of hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao-ming; Lei, Mei; Chen, Tong-bin; Yang, Jun-xing; Liu, Hong-tao; Chen, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms of Pteris vittata L. to hyperaccumulate arsenic (As), especially the efficient translocation of As from rhizoids to fronds, are not clear yet. The present study aims to investigate the role of transpiration in the accumulation of As from the aspects of transpiration regulation and ecotypic difference. Results showed that As accumulation of P. vittata increased proportionally with an increase in the As exposure concentration. Lowering the transpiration rate by 28∼67% decreased the shoot As concentration by 19∼56%. Comparison of As distribution under normal treatment and shade treatment indicated that transpiration determines the distribution pattern of As in pinnae. In terms of the ecotypic difference, the P. vittata ecotype from moister and warmer habitat had 40% higher transpiration and correspondingly 40% higher shoot As concentration than the ecotype from drier and cooler habitat. Results disclosed that transpiration is the main driver for P. vittata to accumulate and re-distribute As in pinnae.

  14. Nickel localization on tissues of hyperaccumulator species of phyllanthus L. (Euphorbiaceae) from ultramafic areas of Cuba.

    PubMed

    Berazaín, R; de la Fuente, V; Sánchez-Mata, D; Rufo, L; Rodríguez, N; Amils, R

    2007-01-01

    Two species of perennial Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae) (Phyllanthus orbicularis and Phyllanthus discolor, both endemic to ultramafic areas of Cuba, and their natural hybrid, Phyllanthus xpallidus) were selected for metal localization microanalysis. Different plant tissues were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray probe. All of the studied taxa are nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulators and significant concentrations of this element were found in different leaf and stem tissues. The highest Ni content was found in the laticifer tubes, whereas leaf epidermis Ni content resulted to be much more relevant in terms of total metal storage. Calcium and magnesium were found more evenly distributed in leaf and stem tissues.

  15. Phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated farmland soil by the hyperaccumulator Beta vulgaris L. var. cicla.

    PubMed

    Song, Xueying; Hu, Xiaojun; Ji, Puhui; Li, Yushuang; Chi, Guangyu; Song, Yufang

    2012-04-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation efficiency of cadmium (Cd) contaminated soil utilizing the Cd hyperaccumulator Beta vulgaris L. var. cicla during one growing season (about 2 months) on farmland in Zhangshi Irrigation Area, the representative wastewater irrigation area in China. Results showed that B. vulgaris L. var. cicla is a promising plant in the phytoremediation of Cd contaminated farmland soil. The maximum of Cd phytoremediation efficiency by B. vulgaris L. var. cicla reached 144.6 mg/ha during one growing season. Planting density had a significant effect on the plant biomass and the overall Cd phytoremediation efficiency (p < 0.05). The amendment of organic manure promoted the biomass increase of B. vulgaris L. var. cicla (p < 0.05) but inhibited the Cd phytoremediation efficiency.

  16. Selenium uptake by edible oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sp.) from selenium-hyperaccumulated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Prakash, Ranjana; Prakash, N Tejo

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to produce selenium (Se)-fortifying edible mushrooms, five species of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.), were cultivated on Se-rich wheat straw collected from a seleniferous belt of Punjab, India. Total selenium was analyzed in the selenium hyperaccumulated wheat straw and the fruiting bodies. Significantly high levels (p<0.0001) of Se uptake were observed in fruiting bodies of all mushrooms grown on Se-rich wheat straw. To the best of our knowledge, accumulation and quantification of selenium in mushrooms has hitherto not been reported with substrates naturally enriched with selenium. The results demonstrate the potential of selenium-rich agricultural residues as substrates for production of Se-enriched mushrooms and the ability of different species of oyster mushrooms to absorb and fortify selenium. The study envisages potential use of selenium-rich agricultural residues towards cultivation of Se-enriched mushrooms for application in selenium supplementation or neutraceutical preparations.

  17. Chelator effects on bioconcentration and translocation of cadmium by hyperaccumulators, Tagetes patula and Impatiens walleriana.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jhen-Lian; Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2012-10-01

    French marigold (Tagetes patula) and impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) can act as hyperaccumulator plants for removal of cadmium (Cd) from contaminated sites. In this study, an exponential decay model was used to predict the maximum removal of Cd from artificially spiked soils by impatiens. Application of a chelator, EDTA, was also assessed for effects on the bioconcentration (BCF) and translocation (TF) factors of the two species with four replicates. Exposure to Cd significantly decreased the biomass of two plant species. Impatiens and French marigold accumulated Cd at a rate of 200-1200 mg Cd kg(-1) in shoots, with BCFs and TFs of 8.5-15 and 1.7-2.6, respectively.

  18. The Colors of Keith Haring: A Spectroscopic Study on the Materials of the Mural Painting Tuttomondo and on Reference Contemporary Outdoor Paints.

    PubMed

    Cucci, Costanza; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; De Vita, Marco; Marchiafava, Veronica; Picollo, Marcello; Casadio, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To date, little attention has been given to the scientific investigation of modern and contemporary mural paintings. This paper reports on: (1) the in situ spectroscopic analyses of the mural Tuttomondo (1989) painted by Keith Haring (1958-1990) in Pisa (Italy); and (2) the laboratory characterization of acrylic paints produced by Caparol Italy GmbH & Co., the original supplier of paint materials to the artist for the mural. Ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), and near-infrared (NIR) fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) measurements were carried out in situ. The Caparol paint samples were characterized using benchtop instrumentation including both dispersive and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR; with sample pre-treatment to remove filler interference in the fingerprint region), and UV-Vis-NIR FORS. This combined analytical approach confirmed that the materials used by Haring for the mural Tuttomondo have the same composition of the new Caparol acrylic paints, except for the case of the yellow pigment. This information offers valuable documentation for the materials history and for the conservation of a mural painting that is considered the last great public work by Haring. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Hydroponic phytoremediation of Cd, Cr, Ni, As, and Fe: can Helianthus annuus hyperaccumulate multiple heavy metals?

    PubMed

    January, Mary C; Cutright, Teresa J; Van Keulen, Harry; Wei, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Sundance sunflowers were subjected to contaminated solutions containing 3, 4, or 5 heavy metals, with and without EDTA. The sunflowers exhibited a metal uptake preference of Cd=Cr>Ni, Cr>Cd>Ni>As and Fe>As>Cd>Ni>Cr without EDTA and Cr>Cd>Ni, Fe>As>Cd>Cr>Ni with EDTA. As uptake was not affected by other metals, but it decreased Cd and Ni concentration in the stems. The presence of Fe improved the translocation of the other metals regardless of whether EDTA was present. In general, EDTA served as a hindrance to metal uptake. For the experiment with all five heavy metals, EDTA decreased Cd in the roots and stems from 2.11 to 1.36 and from 2.83 to 2.3 2mg g(-1) biomass, respectively. For the same conditions, Ni in the stems decreased from 1.98 to 0.94 mg g(-1) total metal uptake decreased from 14.95 mg to 13.89 mg, and total biomass decreased from 2.38 g to 1.99 g. These results showed an overall negative effect in addition of EDTA. However it is unknown whether the negative effect was due to toxicity posed by EDTA or the breaking of phytochelatin-metal bonds. The most important finding was the ability of Sundance sunflowers to achieve hyperaccumulator status for both As and Cd under all conditions studied. Ni hyperaccumulator status was only achieved in the presence of three metals without EDTA.

  20. Arsenic species and leachability in the fronds of the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.).

    PubMed

    Tu, Cong; Ma, Lena Q; Zhang, Weihua; Cai, Yong; Harris, Willie G

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic speciation is important not only for understanding the mechanisms of arsenic accumulation and detoxification by hyperaccumulators, but also for designing disposal options of arsenic-rich biomass. The primary objective of this research was to understand the speciation and leachability of arsenic in the fronds of Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.), an arsenic hyperaccumulator, with an emphasis on the implications for arsenic-rich biomass disposal. Chinese brake was grown for 18 weeks in a soil spiked with 50 mg As kg(-1) as arsenate (AsO4(3-)), arsenite (AsO3(3-)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), or methylarsonic acid (MMA). Plant samples were extracted with methanol/water (1:1) and arsenic speciation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The impacts of air-drying on arsenic species and leachability in the fronds were examined in the laboratory. After 18 weeks, water-soluble arsenic in soil was mainly present as arsenate with little detectable organic species or arsenite regardless of arsenic species added to the soil. However, arsenic in the fronds was primarily present as inorganic arsenite with an average of 94%. Arsenite re-oxidation occurred in the old fronds and the excised dried tissues. Arsenic species in the fronds were slightly influenced by arsenic forms added to the soil. Air-drying of the fronds resulted in leaching of substantial amounts of arsenic. These findings can be of significance when looking at disposal options of arsenic-rich biomass from the point of view of secondary contamination.

  1. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    PubMed

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-09-27

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Metal accumulation in tobacco expressing Arabidopsis halleri metal hyperaccumulation gene depends on external supply

    PubMed Central

    Barabasz, Anna; Krämer, Ute; Hanikenne, Marc; Rudzka, Justyna; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2010-01-01

    Engineering enhanced transport of zinc to the aerial parts of plants is a major goal in bio-fortification. In Arabidopsis halleri, high constitutive expression of the AhHMA4 gene encoding a metal pump of the P1B-ATPase family is necessary for both Zn hyperaccumulation and the full extent of Zn and Cd hypertolerance that are characteristic of this species. In this study, an AhHMA4 cDNA was introduced into N. tabacum var. Xanthi for expression under the control of its endogenous A. halleri promoter known to confer high and cell-type specific expression levels in both A. halleri and the non-hyperaccumulator A. thaliana. The transgene was expressed at similar levels in both roots and shoots upon long-term exposure to low Zn, control, and increased Zn concentrations. A down-regulation of AhHMA4 transcript levels was detected with 10 μM Zn resupply to tobacco plants cultivated in low Zn concentrations. In general, a transcriptional regulation of AhHMA4 in tobacco contrasted with the constitutively high expression previously observed in A. halleri. Differences in root/shoot partitioning of Zn and Cd between transgenic lines and the wild type were strongly dependent on metal concentrations in the hydroponic medium. Under low Zn conditions, an increased Zn accumulation in the upper leaves in the AhHMA4-expressing lines was detected. Moreover, transgenic plants exposed to cadmium accumulated less metal than the wild type. Both modifications of zinc and cadmium accumulation are noteworthy outcomes from the biofortification perspective and healthy food production. Expression of AhHMA4 may be useful in crops grown on soils poor in Zn. PMID:20484319

  3. Ultrastructural changes, zinc hyperaccumulation and its relation with antioxidants in two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao Fen; Yang, Xiao E; Islam, Ejazul; Liu, Dan; Mahmood, Qaisar; Li, Hong; Li, Junying

    2008-11-01

    Zn phytotoxicity and its possible detoxifying responses in two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii Hance, i.e. hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) were investigated. HE grew better with high Zn concentrations of 29.11gkg(-1) DW in shoots when exposed to 500microM Zn2+. Toxicity symptoms caused by Zn in root cells of both ecotypes mainly included plasmolysis, disruption of plasma membranes and increased cell vacuolation. At high supplied Zn concentration, chloroplasts suffered from structural disorganization in both ecotypes. Zn-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical (O(2)-) productions in leaves were determined by a histochemical method, which revealed that Zn stress may have involved NADPH oxidase, protein phosphatases and intracellular Ca2+ to activate the reactive oxygen species production. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis may have led to increased H2O2 and O(2)- accumulations in leaves of HE. In response to higher Zn concentrations, ascorbic acid significantly increased in both ecotypes and levels of glutathione increased in both leaves and roots of HE and in roots of NHE without any change in the leaves of NHE. The enzymatic activities like those of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) in leaves of HE were all enhanced at supplied Zn concentration of 500microM, which may account for its better growth.

  4. Metal accumulation in tobacco expressing Arabidopsis halleri metal hyperaccumulation gene depends on external supply.

    PubMed

    Barabasz, Anna; Krämer, Ute; Hanikenne, Marc; Rudzka, Justyna; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2010-06-01

    Engineering enhanced transport of zinc to the aerial parts of plants is a major goal in bio-fortification. In Arabidopsis halleri, high constitutive expression of the AhHMA4 gene encoding a metal pump of the P(1B)-ATPase family is necessary for both Zn hyperaccumulation and the full extent of Zn and Cd hypertolerance that are characteristic of this species. In this study, an AhHMA4 cDNA was introduced into N. tabacum var. Xanthi for expression under the control of its endogenous A. halleri promoter known to confer high and cell-type specific expression levels in both A. halleri and the non-hyperaccumulator A. thaliana. The transgene was expressed at similar levels in both roots and shoots upon long-term exposure to low Zn, control, and increased Zn concentrations. A down-regulation of AhHMA4 transcript levels was detected with 10 muM Zn resupply to tobacco plants cultivated in low Zn concentrations. In general, a transcriptional regulation of AhHMA4 in tobacco contrasted with the constitutively high expression previously observed in A. halleri. Differences in root/shoot partitioning of Zn and Cd between transgenic lines and the wild type were strongly dependent on metal concentrations in the hydroponic medium. Under low Zn conditions, an increased Zn accumulation in the upper leaves in the AhHMA4-expressing lines was detected. Moreover, transgenic plants exposed to cadmium accumulated less metal than the wild type. Both modifications of zinc and cadmium accumulation are noteworthy outcomes from the biofortification perspective and healthy food production. Expression of AhHMA4 may be useful in crops grown on soils poor in Zn.

  5. Hyperaccumulation of vanadium in the Antarctic polychaete Perkinsiana littoralis as a natural chemical defense against predation.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Daniele; Notti, Alessandra; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Exceptionally high levels of trace metals have been reported in specific tissues of certain polychaetes. In the present study, the Antarctic fan worm Perkinsiana littoralis was shown to hyperaccumulate vanadium in the branchial tissues, and the hypothesis of an antipredatory strategy has been investigated. Trace metals (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn) were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in tissues of P. littoralis and, only for V, in two Antarctic bivalves and in various Mediterranean polychaetes. Subcellular distribution of vanadium was investigated in P. littoralis after differential centrifugations; feeding trials with the Antarctic rock cod Trematomus berancchii were performed to test the palatability of P. littoralis. Analyses of trace metals in tissues of P. littoralis confirmed the naturally high bioavailability of cadmium due to upwelling phenomena in the investigated area and revealed extremely high concentrations of vanadium up to 10,000 microg/g, in the branchial crowns; much lower concentrations were measured in the body portions and even less in the Antarctic bivalves and in Mediterranean polychaetes. The subcellular distribution indicated that this metal was associated in branchial crowns with both heavy components and vanadium binding proteins; the latter predominated in body tissues, although with a different pattern of molecular weight. Feeding trials suggested that the elevated levels of vanadium in branchial crown of P. littoralis act as chemical deterrents against predation in more exposed tissues. The hyperaccumulation of toxic metals might represent a common antipredatory strategy for unpalatable branchial crowns of sabellid polychaetes, as recently hypothesized also for the high concentrations of arsenic in the Mediterranean Sabella spallanzanii. The evolution of such adaptation and the reasons behind the possibility for different species to accumulate different metals represent a stimulating

  6. Antioxidant responses of hyper-accumulator and sensitive fern species to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrittunjai; Ma, Lena Q; Singh, Nandita; Singh, Shraddha

    2005-05-01

    Plant species capable of hyper-accumulating heavy metals are of considerable interest for phytoremediation, and differ in their ability to accumulate metals from the environment. This work aims to examine (i) arsenic accumulation in three fern species [Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), slender brake fern (Pteris ensiformis Burm. f.), and Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata L.)], which were exposed to 0, 150, or 300 muM of arsenic (Na(2)HAsO(4).7H(2)O), and (ii) the role of anti-oxidative metabolism in arsenic tolerance in these fern species. Arsenic accumulation increased with an increase in arsenic concentration in the growth medium, the most being found in P. vittata fronds showing no toxicity symptoms. In addition, accumulation was highest in the fronds, followed by the rhizome, and finally the roots, in all three fern species. Thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, indicators of stress in plants, were found to be lowest in P. vittata, which corresponds with its observed tolerance to arsenic. All three ferns responded differentially to arsenic exposure in terms of anti-oxidative defence. Higher levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were observed in P. vittata than in P. ensiformis and N. exaltata, showing their active involvement in the arsenic detoxification mechanism. However, no significant increase was observed in either guaiacol peroxides or glutathione reductase in arsenic-treated P. vittata. Higher activity of anti-oxidative enzymes and lower thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances in arsenic-treated P. vittata correspond with its arsenic hyper-accumulation and no symptoms of toxicity.

  7. A Newly Identified Passive Hyperaccumulator Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla under Manganese Stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingqing; Li, Zhenji; Yang, Limin; Lv, Jing; Jobe, Timothy O; Wang, Qiuquan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient needed for plant growth and development, but can be toxic to plants in excess amounts. However, some plant species have detoxification mechanisms that allow them to accumulate Mn to levels that are normally toxic, a phenomenon known as hyperaccumulation. These species are excellent candidates for developing a cost-effective remediation strategy for Mn-polluted soils. In this study, we identified a new passive Mn-hyperaccumulator Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla during a field survey in southern China in July 2010. This hybrid can accumulate as much as 13,549 mg/kg DW Mn in its leaves. Our results from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) X-ray microanalysis indicate that Mn is distributed in the entire leaf and stem cross-section, especially in photosynthetic palisade, spongy mesophyll tissue, and stem xylem vessels. Results from size-exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) lead us to speculate that Mn associates with relatively high molecular weight proteins and low molecular weight organic acids, including tartaric acid, to avoid Mn toxicity. Our results provide experimental evidence that both proteins and organic acids play important roles in Mn detoxification in Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla. The key characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla are an increased Mn translocation facilitated by transpiration through the xylem to the leaves and further distribution throughout the leaf tissues. Moreover, the Mn-speciation profile obtained for the first time in different cellular organelles of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla suggested that different organelles have differential accumulating abilities and unique mechanisms for Mn-detoxification.

  8. A Newly Identified Passive Hyperaccumulator Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla under Manganese Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qingqing; Li, Zhenji; Yang, Limin; Lv, Jing; Jobe, Timothy O.; Wang, Qiuquan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient needed for plant growth and development, but can be toxic to plants in excess amounts. However, some plant species have detoxification mechanisms that allow them to accumulate Mn to levels that are normally toxic, a phenomenon known as hyperaccumulation. These species are excellent candidates for developing a cost-effective remediation strategy for Mn-polluted soils. In this study, we identified a new passive Mn-hyperaccumulator Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla during a field survey in southern China in July 2010. This hybrid can accumulate as much as 13,549 mg/kg DW Mn in its leaves. Our results from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) X-ray microanalysis indicate that Mn is distributed in the entire leaf and stem cross-section, especially in photosynthetic palisade, spongy mesophyll tissue, and stem xylem vessels. Results from size-exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) lead us to speculate that Mn associates with relatively high molecular weight proteins and low molecular weight organic acids, including tartaric acid, to avoid Mn toxicity. Our results provide experimental evidence that both proteins and organic acids play important roles in Mn detoxification in Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla. The key characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla are an increased Mn translocation facilitated by transpiration through the xylem to the leaves and further distribution throughout the leaf tissues. Moreover, the Mn-speciation profile obtained for the first time in different cellular organelles of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla suggested that different organelles have differential accumulating abilities and unique mechanisms for Mn-detoxification. PMID:26327118

  9. Bacterial Communities Associated with Flowering Plants of the Ni Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi goesingense

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Rughia; Trifonova, Radoslava; Puschenreiter, Markus; Wenzel, Walter W.; Sessitsch, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Thlaspi goesingense is able to hyperaccumulate extremely high concentrations of Ni when grown in ultramafic soils. Recently it has been shown that rhizosphere bacteria may increase the heavy metal concentrations in hyperaccumulator plants significantly, whereas the role of endophytes has not been investigated yet. In this study the rhizosphere and shoot-associated (endophytic) bacteria colonizing T. goesingense were characterized in detail by using both cultivation and cultivation-independent techniques. Bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis, and isolates were further characterized regarding characteristics that may be relevant for a beneficial plant-microbe interaction—Ni tolerance, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase and siderophore production. In the rhizosphere a high percentage of bacteria belonging to the Holophaga/Acidobacterium division and α-Proteobacteria were found. In addition, high-G+C gram-positive bacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and microbes of the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides division colonized the rhizosphere. The community structure of shoot-associated bacteria was highly different. The majority of clones affiliated with the Proteobacteria, but also bacteria belonging to the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides division, the Holophaga/Acidobacterium division, and the low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, were frequently found. A high number of highly related Sphingomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences were detected, which were also obtained by the cultivation of endophytes. Rhizosphere isolates belonged mainly to the genera Methylobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Okibacterium, whereas the majority of endophytes showed high levels of similarity to Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Additionally, Sphingomonas spp. were abundant. Isolates were resistant to Ni concentrations between 5 and 12 mM; however, endophytes generally tolerated higher Ni levels than rhizosphere bacteria. Almost all bacteria were able to produce siderophores

  10. QTL analysis of cadmium and zinc accumulation in the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Deniau, A X; Pieper, B; Ten Bookum, W M; Lindhout, P; Aarts, M G M; Schat, H

    2006-09-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens (Tc; 2n = 14) is a natural Zn, Cd and Ni hyperaccumulator species belonging to the Brassicaceae family. It shares 88% DNA identity in the coding regions with Arabidopsis thaliana (At) (Rigola et al. 2006). Although the physiology of heavy metal (hyper)accumulation has been intensively studied, the molecular genetics are still largely unexplored. We address this topic by constructing a genetic map based on AFLP markers and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). To establish a genetic map, an F(2) population of 129 individuals was generated from a cross between a plant from a Pb/Cd/Zn-contaminated site near La Calamine, Belgium, and a plant from a comparable site near Ganges (GA), France. These two accessions show different degrees of Zn and, particularly, Cd accumulation. We analyzed 181 AFLP markers (of which 4 co-dominant) and 13 co-dominant EST sequences-based markers and mapped them to seven linkage groups (LGs), presumably corresponding to the seven chromosomes of T. caerulescens. The total length of the genetic map is 496 cM with an average density of one marker every 2.5 cM. This map was used for Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping in the F(2). For Zn as well as Cd concentration in root we mapped two QTLs. Three QTLs and one QTL were mapped for Zn and Cd concentration in shoot, respectively. These QTLs explain 23.8-60.4% of the total variance of the traits measured. We found only one common locus (LG6) for Zn and Cd (concentration in root) and one common locus for shoot and root concentrations of Zn (LG1) and of Cd (LG3). For all QTLs, the GA allele increased the trait value except for two QTLs for Zn accumulation in shoot (LG1 and LG4) and one for Zn concentration in root (LG1).

  11. Enhancement of Cd phytoextraction by hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii using electrical field and organic amendments.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wendan; Li, Dan; Ye, Xuezhu; Xu, Haizhou; Yao, Guihua; Wang, Jingwen; Zhang, Qi; Hu, Jing; Gao, Na

    2017-02-01

    The combined use of organic amendment-assisted phytoextraction and electrokinetic remediation to decontaminate Cd-polluted soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. The plant species selected was the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii. Prior to the pot experiment, the loamy soil was treated with 15 g kg(-1) of pig manure compost, 10 g kg(-1) of humic acid, or 5 mmol kg(-1) of EDTA, and untreated soil without application of any amendment was the control. Two conditions were applied to each treatment: no voltage (without an electrical field) and a direct current (DC) electrical field (1 V cm(-1) with switching polarity every day). Results indicated that Cd concentrations in S. alfredii were significantly (p < 0.05) increased by application of the electrical field and soil amendments (pig manure compost, humic acid, and EDTA). By switching the polarity of the DC electrical field, significant pH variation from anode to cathode can be avoided, and no significant impact was observed on shoot biomass production. Electrical field application increased DTPA-extractable Cd in soils and the Cd accumulation in shoots by 6.06-15.64 and 24.53-52.31%, respectively. The addition of pig manure compost and humic acid enhanced shoot Cd accumulation by 1.54- to 1.92- and 1.38- to 1.64-fold because of their simultaneous enhancement of Cd concentration in shoots and biomass production. However, no enhancement of Cd accumulation was found in the EDTA treatment, which can be ascribed to the inhibition of plant growth caused by EDTA. In conclusion, pig manure compost or humic acid addition in combination with the application of a switched-polarity DC electrical field could significantly enhance Cd phytoextraction by hyperaccumulator S. alfredii.

  12. Phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils: Role of organic acids in triggering uranium hyperaccumulation in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.W.; Blaylock, M.J.; Kapulnik, Y.; Ensley, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Uranium phytoextraction, the use of plants to extract U from contaminated soils, is an emerging technology. The authors report on the development of this technology for the cleanup of U-contaminated soils. In this research, they investigated the effects of various soil amendments on U desorption from soil to soil solution, studied the physiological characteristics of U uptake and accumulation in plants, and developed techniques to trigger U hyperaccumulation in plants. A key to the success of U phytoextraction is to increase soil U availability to plants. The authors have found that some organic acids can be added to soils to increase U desorption from soil to soil solution and to trigger a rapid U accumulation in plants. Of the organic acids (acetic acid, citric acid, and malic acid) tested, citric acid was the most effective in enhancing U accumulation in plants. Shoot U concentrations of Brassica juncea and Brassica chinensis grown in a U-contaminated soil increased from less than 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1} to more than 5,000 mg kg{sup {minus}1} in citric acid-treated soils. To their knowledge, this is the highest shoot U concentration reported for plants grown on U-contaminated soils. Using this U hyperaccumulation technique, they are now able to increase U accumulation in shoots of selected plant species grown in two U-contaminated soils by more than 1,000-fold within a few days. The results suggest that U phytoextraction may provide an environmentally friendly alternative for the cleanup of U-contaminated soils.

  13. A comprehensive set of transcript sequences of the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ya-Fen; Severing, Edouard I.; te Lintel Hekkert, Bas; Schijlen, Elio; Aarts, Mark G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens is an extremophile plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family. It has adapted to grow on soils containing high, normally toxic, concentrations of metals such as nickel, zinc, and cadmium. Next to being extremely tolerant to these metals, it is one of the few species known to hyperaccumulate these metals to extremely high concentrations in their aboveground biomass. In order to provide additional molecular resources for this model metal hyperaccumulator species to study and understand the mechanism of adaptation to heavy metal exposure, we aimed to provide a comprehensive database of transcript sequences for N. caerulescens. In this study, 23,830 transcript sequences (isotigs) with an average length of 1025 bp were determined for roots, shoots and inflorescences of N. caerulescens accession “Ganges” by Roche GS-FLEX 454 pyrosequencing. These isotigs were grouped into 20,378 isogroups, representing potential genes. This is a large expansion of the existing N. caerulescens transcriptome set consisting of 3705 unigenes. When translated and compared to a Brassicaceae proteome set, 22,232 (93.2%) of the N. caerulescens isotigs (corresponding to 19,191 isogroups) had a significant match and could be annotated accordingly. Of the remaining sequences, 98 isotigs resembled non-plant sequences and 1386 had no significant similarity to any sequence in the GenBank database. Among the annotated set there were many isotigs with similarity to metal homeostasis genes or genes for glucosinolate biosynthesis. Only for transcripts similar to Metallothionein3 (MT3), clear evidence for an additional copy was found. This comprehensive set of transcripts is expected to further contribute to the discovery of mechanisms used by N. caerulescens to adapt to heavy metal exposure. PMID:24999345

  14. Functional activity and role of cation-efflux family members in Ni hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense.

    PubMed

    Persans, M W; Nieman, K; Salt, D E

    2001-08-14

    The ability of Thlaspi goesingense to hyperaccumulate Ni seems to be governed in part by enhanced accumulation of Ni within leaf vacuoles. We have characterized genes from T. goesingense encoding putative vacuolar metal ion transport proteins, termed metal tolerance proteins (TgMTPs). These proteins contain all of the features of cation-efflux family members, and evidence indicates they are derived from a single genomic sequence (TgMTP1) that gives rise to an unspliced (TgMTP1t1) and a spliced (TgMTP1t2) transcript. Heterologous expression of these transcripts in yeast lacking the TgMTP1 orthologues COT1 and ZRC1 complements the metal sensitivity of these yeast strains, suggesting that TgMTP1s are able to transport metal ions into the yeast vacuole in a manner similar to COT1 and ZRC1. The unspliced and spliced TgMTP1 variants differ within a histidine-rich putative metal-binding domain, and these sequence differences are reflected as alterations in the metal specificities of these metal ion transporters. When expressed in yeast, TgMTP1t1 confers the highest level of tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn, whereas TgMTP1t2 confers the highest tolerance to Ni. TgMTP1 transcripts are highly expressed in T. goesingense compared with orthologues in the nonaccumulators Arabidopsis thaliana, Thlaspi arvense, and Brassica juncea. We propose that the high-level expression of TgMTP1 in T. goesingense accounts for the enhanced ability of this hyperaccumulator to accumulate metal ions within shoot vacuoles.

  15. Simultaneous hyperaccumulation of multiple heavy metals by Helianthus annuus grown in a contaminated sandy-loam soil.

    PubMed

    Cutright, Teresa; Gunda, Nagaraju; Kurt, Firat

    2010-08-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising means for the treatment of contamination arising from heavy metal spills. Although several species have been identified as hyperaccumulators, most of the studies were performed with only one heavy metal. Experiments were conducted with two cultivars of H. annuus exposed to different combinations of metal contamination (30 mg/kg Cd, Cr, Ni, As, and/or Fe). Cultivar efficiency was based on total metal uptake, as well as translocation and selectivity of each metal. The results for each cultivar were also compared after 0.1 g/kg or 0.3 g/kg EDTA was added to enhance metal bioavailability. The key finding was that H. annuus achieved hyperaccumulator status for multiple metals simultaneously: Cd, Cr, and As.

  16. Multi-element concentrations in plant parts and fluids of Malaysian nickel hyperaccumulator plants and some economic and ecological considerations.

    PubMed

    van der Ent, Antony; Mulligan, David

    2015-04-01

    Information about multi-elemental concentrations in different plant parts of tropical Ni hyperaccumulator species has the potential to provide insight into their unusual metabolism relative to a range of essential and non-essential elements, but this information is scant in the literature. As Ni hyperaccumulation, and possibly co-accumulation of other toxic elements, has been hypothesized to provide herbivore (insect) protection, there is a need to quantify a range of these elements in plant tissues and transport fluids to at least verify the possibility of this explanation. In this study, multiple elements were analyzed in a range of different plant parts and transport fluids from Ni hyperaccumulator species collected from Sabah (Malaysia). The results show preferential accumulation of Ni in leaves over woody parts, but the highest concentrations were found in the phloem tissue (up to 7.9 % in Rinorea bengalensis) and phloem sap (up to 16.9 % in Phyllanthus balgooyi), visible by a bright green coloration in the field fresh material. The amount of Ni contained in one mature R. bengalensis tree was calculated at 4.77 kg. The high Ni concentration in the flowers of Phyllanthus securinegoides could affect insect floral visitors and pollination. High concentrations of Ni in the seeds of this species also could supply the seedling with Ni and aid in herbivory protection during the first stages of development. Foliar Ca and Ni in P. cf. securinegoides and R. bengalensis are positively correlated. Low accumulation of Ca is desirable for phytomining but concentrations of Ca are high in most Ni hyperaccumulators examined, and this could have consequences for the economic viability of Ni extraction from bio ore if these species were to be used as 'metal crops'.

  17. Differential generation of hydrogen peroxide upon exposure to zinc and cadmium in the hyperaccumulating plant specie (Sedum alfredii Hance)*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yue-en; Zhang, Min; Tian, Sheng-ke; Lu, Ling-li; Yang, Xiao-e

    2008-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance has been identified as zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) co-hyperaccumulator. In this paper the relationships of Zn or Cd hyperaccumulation to the generation and the role of H2O2 in Sedum alfredii H. were examined. The results show that Zn and Cd contents in the shoots of Sedum alfredii H. treated with 1000 μmol/L Zn2+ and/or 200 μmol/L Cd2+ increased linearly within 15 d. Contents of total S, glutathione (GSH) and H2O2 in shoots also increased within 15 d, and then decreased. Total S and GSH contents in shoots were higher under Cd2+ treatment than under Zn2+ treatment. However, reverse trends of H2O2 content in shoots were obtained, in which much higher H2O2 content was observed in Zn2+-treated shoots than in Cd2+-treated shoots. Similarly, the microscopic imaging of H2O2 accumulation in leaves using H2O2 probe technique showed that much higher H2O2 accumulation was observed in the Zn2+-treated leaf than in the Cd2+-treated one. These results suggest that there are different responses in the generation of H2O2 upon exposure to Zn2+ and Cd2+ for the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii H. And this is the first report that the generation of H2O2 may play an important role in Zn hyperaccumulation in the leaves. Our results also imply that GSH may play an important role in the detoxification of dissociated Zn/Cd and the generation of H2O2. PMID:18357627

  18. Differential generation of hydrogen peroxide upon exposure to zinc and cadmium in the hyperaccumulating plant species (Sedum alfredii Hance).

    PubMed

    Chao, Yue-en; Zhang, Min; Tian, Sheng-ke; Lu, Ling-li; Yang, Xiao-e

    2008-03-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance has been identified as zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) co-hyperaccumulator. In this paper the relationships of Zn or Cd hyperaccumulation to the generation and the role of H2O2 in Sedum alfredii H. were examined. The results show that Zn and Cd contents in the shoots of Sedum alfredii H. treated with 1000 micromol/L Zn2+ and/or 200 micromol/L Cd2+ increased linearly within 15 d. Contents of total S, glutathione (GSH) and H2O2 in shoots also increased within 15 d, and then decreased. Total S and GSH contents in shoots were higher under Cd2+ treatment than under Zn2+ treatment. However, reverse trends of H2O2 content in shoots were obtained, in which much higher H2O2 content was observed in Zn2+-treated shoots than in Cd2+-treated shoots. Similarly, the microscopic imaging of H2O2 accumulation in leaves using H2O2 probe technique showed that much higher H2O2 accumulation was observed in the Zn2+-treated leaf than in the Cd2+-treated one. These results suggest that there are different responses in the generation of H2O2 upon exposure to Zn2+ and Cd2+ for the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii H. And this is the first report that the generation of H2O2 may play an important role in Zn hyperaccumulation in the leaves. Our results also imply that GSH may play an important role in the detoxification of dissociated Zn/Cd and the generation of H2O2.

  19. Bob McCall signs the Centennial of Flight mural in the artist's studio in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-05

    Artist Bob McCall signs the Centennial of Flight Mural in his Paradise Valley, Arizona Studio. The mural was created to celebrate the achievements of Wilbur and Orville Wright and to commemorate a century of powered flight. Many of the epic flights represented in the painting took place in the skies over NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. An equally important goal of this celebration is to encourage the values that have characterized 100 years of aviation history: ingenuity, inventiveness, persistence, creativity and courage. These values hold true not just for pioneers of flight, but also for all pioneers of invention and innovation, and they will remain an important part of America's future. "Celebrating One Hundred Years of Powered Flight, 1903-2003", documents many significant achievements in aeronautics and space flight from the dawn of powered flight to the present. Historic aircraft and spacecraft serve as the backdrop, highlighting six figures representing the human element that made these milestones possible. These figures stand, symbolically supported by the words of Wilbur Wright, "It is my belief that flight is possible…" The quote was taken from a letter written to his father on September 3rd, 1900, announcing Wilbur's intention to make "some experiments with a flying machine" at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. "This year, Bob is helping us commemorate the Centennial of Flight with a beautiful mural slated for placement in our Dryden Flight Research Center that documents the history of flight from the Wright Flyer to the International Space Station. We should all take note, I think, that in the grand scheme of things, one hundred years is a very short period of time. In that blink of an eye we've gone from Kitty Hawk to Tranquility Base and now look forward to our rovers traversing the surface of Mars. Despite the challenges we face, the future we envision, like the future depicted in the artwork of Bob McCall, is a future of boundless possibility. "

  20. Transcriptomic diversification of developing cumulus and mural granulosa cells in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, Karen; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cumulus cells and mural granulosa cells (MGCs) have functionally distinct roles in antral follicles, and comparison of their transcriptomes at a global and systems level can propel future studies on mechanisms underlying their functional diversity. These cells were isolated from small and large antral follicles before and after stimulation of immature mice with gonadotropins, respectively. Both cell types underwent dramatic transcriptomic changes, and differences between them increased with follicular growth. Although cumulus cells of both stages of follicular development are competent to undergo expansion in vitro, they were otherwise remarkably dissimilar with transcriptomic changes quantitatively equivalent to those of MGCs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that cumulus cells of small follicles were enriched in transcripts generally associated with catalytic components of metabolic processes, while those from large follicles were involved in regulation of metabolism, cell differentiation, and adhesion. Contrast of cumulus cells versus MGCs revealed that cumulus cells were enriched in transcripts associated with metabolism and cell proliferation while MGCs were enriched for transcripts involved in cell signaling and differentiation. In vitro and in vivo models were used to test the hypothesis that higher levels of transcripts in cumulus cells versus MGCs is the result of stimulation by oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs). Surprisingly ∼48% of transcripts higher in cumulus cells than MGCs were not stimulated by ODPFs. Those stimulated by ODPFs were mainly associated with cell division, mRNA processing, or the catalytic pathways of metabolism, while those not stimulated by ODPFs were associated with regulatory processes such as signaling, transcription, phosphorylation, or the regulation of metabolism.

  1. Virtual monoenergetic reconstruction of contrast-enhanced dual energy CT at 70keV maximizes mural enhancement in acute small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Darras, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Kang, Heejun; Black, Brian; Walshe, Triona; Chang, Silvia D; Harris, Alison C; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2016-05-01

    In patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO), it is challenging to detect early ischemia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative benefits of virtual monoenergetic image (VMI) reconstruction in the assessment of small bowel mural enhancement on dual source dual energy computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen. Institutional review board approval was obtained, for this retrospective analysis. 72 consecutive patients with acute SBO were scanned using a second generation 128-slice dual source, CT system. Images were reconstructed at VMI energy levels from 40 to 110keV in 10keV increments and were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Contrast to noise ratios (CNR) and signal to noise ratios (SNR) for mural enhancement were recorded for all VMI datasets and compared to conventional polychromatic images (PCI) at 120kVp. Subjective analysis of mural enhancement on VMI and PCI was performed by 3 blinded readers. Optimal CNR values for small intestinal mural enhancement were observed at 70keV. Qualitative assessment revealed that there was no statistical difference in diagnostic accuracy between VMI and PCI. All readers reported improved confidence when assessing the contrast enhancement on the 70keV VMI dataset and in our series, 2 additional cases of ischemia were identified on this reconstruction. Contrast-enhanced dual source dual energy CT with VMI reconstruction at 70keV maximizes the CNR of small bowel mural enhancement and increases the overall diagnostic confidence in assessing mural enhancement in patients with SBO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Zinc and Cadmium Hyperaccumulation in Three Noccaea (Brassicaceae) Populations from Non-metalliferous Sites in the Eastern Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Sáez, Llorenç; López-Alvarado, Javier; Cabot, Catalina; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The Southern slope of the Pyrenees is the meridional limit for the distribution of several Noccaea populations. However, the systematic description of these populations and their hyperaccumulation mechanisms are not well established. Morphological and genetic analysis (ITS and 3 chloroplast regions) were used to identify Noccaea populations localized on non-metallicolous soils during a survey in the Catalonian Pyrenees. Cd and Zn concentrations were analyzed in soils and plants both sampled in the field and grown hydroponically. The expression of selected metal transporter genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. The populations were identified as Noccaea brachypetala (Jord.) F.K. Mey by conspicuous morphological traits. Principal component analysis provided a clear separation among N. brachypetala, Noccaea caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl and Noccaea occitanica (Jord.) F.K. Mey., three Noccaea species reported in the Pyrenees. Contrastingly, ITS and cpDNA analyses were unable to clearly differentiate these taxa. Differences in the expression of the metal transporter genes HMA3, HMA4, and MTP1 between N. caerulescens and N. brachypetala, and those amongst the N. brachypetala populations suggest differences in the strategies for handling enhanced Cd and Zn availability. This is the first report demonstrating Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation by N. brachypetala both in the field and in hydroponics. This comprehensive study based on taxonomic, molecular, and physiological data allows both the correct identification of this species and the characterization of population differences in hyperaccumulation and tolerance of Zn and Cd. PMID:26904085

  3. Assessment of plants from the Brassicaceae family as genetic models for the study of nickel and zinc hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Peer, Wendy Ann; Mahmoudian, Mehrzad; Freeman, John L; Lahner, Brett; Richards, Elizabeth L; Reeves, Roger D; Murphy, Angus S; Salt, David E

    2006-01-01

    We report on the second phase of a programme to select a relative of Arabidopsis thaliana for use in large-scale molecular genetic studies of nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation. We also report on the relatedness among Thlaspi caerulescens accessions and the utility of using O-acetyl-L-serine as a marker for Ni and Zn hyperaccumulation potential. Twenty-seven new accessions of metal-accumulating species collected in the Czech Republic, France, Greece, Italy, Slovenia and the USA during Spring-Summer 2002 were evaluated. The criteria established for selection were hyperaccumulation of metals (Ni and Zn); compact growth habit; reasonable time to flowering; production of > or = 1000 seeds per plant; self-fertility; compact diploid genome; high sequence similarity to A. thaliana; > or = 0.1% transformation efficiency with easy selection. We conclude that the best candidate identified in the first phase was the best candidate overall: T. caerulescens accession St Félix de Pallières.

  4. Quantitative micro-PIXE comparison of elemental distribution in Ni-hyperaccumulating and non-accumulating genotypes of Senecio coronatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.

    1997-07-01

    The Ni hyperaccumulator, plant species Senecio coronatus (Thunb.) Harv., Asteraceae is an example of plant adaptation mechanisms to different ecological conditions. This widespread species can inter alia be found on serpentine outcrops and the genotypes growing in serpentine soils show different ways of adaptation. The populations from two distant localities take up and translocate Ni in concentrations which are normally phytotoxic, while plants growing on a different site, in the vicinity of another hyperaccumulating species, absorb amounts which are typical for most of the plants found on serpentine soils. The NAC nuclear microprobe was used to compare the distribution of Ni and other elements in selected organs and cells with simultaneous use of PIXE and proton BackScattering (BS). Quantitative maps of stems showed large differences in concentrations and distributions of major and trace elements. In hyperaccumulating genotypes Ni is present everywhere within stem tissues, but the highest concentrations were found in the epidermis, cortex and phloem. In non-accumulating plants Ni was concentrated in the phloem. In the leaf epidermis Ni was concentrated in the cell walls for both accumulating and non-accumulating plants. These results suggest that biochemical diversity is more than morphological, because investigated genotypes belong to the same taxon.

  5. Hyperaccumulator oilcake manure as an alternative for chelate-induced phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Kumar, Chitranjan; Patel, Niraj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The ability of hyperaccumulator oilcake manure as compared to chelates was investigated by growing Calendula officinalis L for phytoremediation of cadmium and lead contaminated alluvial soil. The combinatorial treatment T6 [2.5 g kg(-1) oilcake manure+5 mmol kg(-1) EDDS] caused maximum cadmium accumulation in root, shoot and flower up to 5.46, 4.74 and 1.37 mg kg(-1) and lead accumulation up to 16.11, 13.44 and 3.17 mg kg(-1), respectively at Naini dump site, Allahabad (S3). The treatment showed maximum remediation efficiency for Cd (RR=0.676%) and Pb (RR=0.202%) at Mumfordganj contaminated site (S2). However, the above parameters were also observed at par with the treatment T5 [2.5 g kg(-1) oilcake manure +2 g kg(-1) humic acid]. Applied EDDS altered chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, and carotene contents of plants while application of oilcake manure enhanced their contents in plant by 3.73-8.65%, 5.81-17.65%, and 7.04-17.19%, respectively. The authors conclude that Calendula officinalis L has potential to be safely grown in moderately Cd and Pb-contaminated soils and application of hyperaccumulator oilcake manure boosts the photosynthetic pigments of the plant, leading to enhanced clean-up of the cadmium and lead-contaminated soils. Hence, the hyperaccumulator oilcake manure should be preferred over chelates for sustainable phytoremediation through soil-plant rhizospheric process.

  6. Simultaneous compartmentalization of lead and arsenic in co-hyperaccumulator Viola principis H. de Boiss.: an application of SRXRF microprobe.

    PubMed

    Lei, Mei; Chen, Tong-Bin; Huang, Ze-Chun; Wang, Yao-Dong; Huang, Yu-Ying

    2008-08-01

    The cellular distributions of Pb and As in the leaves of co-hyperaccumulator Viola principis H. de Boiss. were inspected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SRXRF). The results revealed that Pb and As had similar compartmentalization patterns in the leaves. Both elements were enriched in the bundle sheath and the palisade mesophyll. In comparison with the sheath and the mesophyll, the vascular bundle and the epidermis contained lower levels of Pb and As. The palisade enrichment of Pb and As indicated that V. principis H. de Boiss. may have a special mechanism on detoxification of toxic metals within the mesophyll cells. Relative concentrations of both Pb and As in trichome bases were higher than those in trichome rays. The results of hierarchical cluster analysis and correlation analysis confirmed that the distribution of Pb was similar to that of As in the leaves, and their distribution patterns were different from the nutrient elements, such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. In vivo cellular localization of Pb and As in the leaves provides insight into the physiological mechanisms of metal tolerance and hyperaccumulation in the hyperaccumulators.

  7. Characterization of Zinc and Cadmium Hyperaccumulation in Three Noccaea (Brassicaceae) Populations from Non-metalliferous Sites in the Eastern Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Sáez, Llorenç; López-Alvarado, Javier; Cabot, Catalina; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The Southern slope of the Pyrenees is the meridional limit for the distribution of several Noccaea populations. However, the systematic description of these populations and their hyperaccumulation mechanisms are not well established. Morphological and genetic analysis (ITS and 3 chloroplast regions) were used to identify Noccaea populations localized on non-metallicolous soils during a survey in the Catalonian Pyrenees. Cd and Zn concentrations were analyzed in soils and plants both sampled in the field and grown hydroponically. The expression of selected metal transporter genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. The populations were identified as Noccaea brachypetala (Jord.) F.K. Mey by conspicuous morphological traits. Principal component analysis provided a clear separation among N. brachypetala, Noccaea caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl and Noccaea occitanica (Jord.) F.K. Mey., three Noccaea species reported in the Pyrenees. Contrastingly, ITS and cpDNA analyses were unable to clearly differentiate these taxa. Differences in the expression of the metal transporter genes HMA3, HMA4, and MTP1 between N. caerulescens and N. brachypetala, and those amongst the N. brachypetala populations suggest differences in the strategies for handling enhanced Cd and Zn availability. This is the first report demonstrating Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation by N. brachypetala both in the field and in hydroponics. This comprehensive study based on taxonomic, molecular, and physiological data allows both the correct identification of this species and the characterization of population differences in hyperaccumulation and tolerance of Zn and Cd.

  8. Copper changes the yield and cadmium/zinc accumulation and cellular distribution in the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Non-accumulated metals in mixed metal contaminated soils may affect hyperaccumulator growth and metal accumulation and thus remediation efficiency. Two hydroponics experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper (Cu) on cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation by the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola, Cu toxicity and plant detoxification using chemical sequential extraction of metals, sub-cellular separation, micro synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the control (0.31 μM Cu), 5-50 μM Cu had no significant effect on Cd/Zn accumulation, but Cu at 200 μM induced root cell plasmolysis and disordered chloroplast structure. The plants held Cu in the roots and cell walls and complexed Cu in insoluble forms as their main detoxification mechanisms. Exposure to 200 μM Cu for 4 days inhibited plant Cd uptake and translocation but did not affect Zn concentrations in roots and stems. Moreover, unloading of Cd and Zn from stem to leaf was restrained compared to control plants, perhaps due to Cu accumulation in leaf veins. Copper may thus interfere with root Cd uptake and restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves. Further investigation of how Cu affects plant metal uptake may help elucidate the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulating mechanisms of S. plumbizincicola. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The metal transporter PgIREG1 from the hyperaccumulator Psychotria gabriellae is a candidate gene for nickel tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Merlot, Sylvain; Hannibal, Laure; Martins, Sara; Martinelli, Laëtitia; Amir, Hamid; Lebrun, Michel; Thomine, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    Nickel is an economically important metal and phytotechnologies are being developed to limit the impact of nickel mining on the environment. More than 300 plant species are known to hyperaccumulate nickel. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in nickel accumulation in plants is very limited because it has not yet been possible to study these hyperaccumulators at the genomic level. Here, we used next-generation sequencing technologies to sequence the transcriptome of the nickel hyperaccumulator Psychotria gabriellae of the Rubiaceae family, and used yeast and Arabidopsis as heterologous systems to study the activity of identified metal transporters. We characterized the activity of three metal transporters from the NRAMP and IREG/FPN families. In particular, we showed that PgIREG1 is able to confer nickel tolerance when expressed in yeast and in transgenic plants, where it localizes in the tonoplast. In addition, PgIREG1 shows higher expression in P. gabriellae than in the related non-accumulator species Psychotria semperflorens. Our results designate PgIREG1 as a candidate gene for nickel tolerance and hyperaccumulation in P. gabriellae. These results also show how next-generation sequencing technologies can be used to access the transcriptome of non-model nickel hyperaccumulators to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  10. Brevibacterium picturae sp. nov., isolated from a damaged mural painting at the Saint-Catherine chapel (Castle Herberstein, Austria).

    PubMed

    Heyrman, Jeroen; Verbeeren, Jens; Schumann, Peter; Devos, Joke; Swings, Jean; De Vos, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Three strains showing highly similar (GTG)5-PCR patterns were isolated from a heavily damaged mural painting at the Saint-Catherine chapel (Castle Herberstein, Austria). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the strains were attributed to Brevibacterium, with Brevibacterium casei (96.7 %), Brevibacterium iodinum (96.7 %) and Brevibacterium linens (96.6 %) as the closest related species. Chemotaxonomic data [peptidoglycan contains meso-diaminopimelic acid; mycolic acids absent; MK-8(H2) as the major menaquinone; polar lipids phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol present; anteiso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) as major fatty acids] supported the affiliation of the strains to the genus Brevibacterium. Additional physiological and biochemical tests confirmed the taxonomic position of the strains and allowed phenotypic differentiation from Brevibacterium species with validly published names. The isolates from the mural painting, therefore, represent a novel species, for which the name Brevibacterium picturae sp. nov. is proposed, with LMG 22061T (= DSM 16132T) as the type strain.

  11. Halophilic Microorganisms Are Responsible for the Rosy Discolouration of Saline Environments in Three Historical Buildings with Mural Paintings

    PubMed Central

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z.; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory. PMID:25084531

  12. Evaluation of specimen preparation techniques for micro-PIXE localisation of elements in hyperaccumulating plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachenko, Anthony G.; Siegele, Rainer; Bhatia, Naveen P.; Singh, Balwant; Ionescu, Mihail

    2008-04-01

    Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus, a rare Australian Ni-hyperaccumulating shrub and Pityrogramma calomelanos var. austroamericana, an Australian naturalized As-hyperaccumulating fern are promising species for use in phytoremediation of contaminated sites. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) spectroscopy was used to map the elemental distribution of the accumulated metal(loid)s, Ca and K in leaf or pinnule tissues of the two plant species. Samples were prepared by two contrasting specimen preparation techniques: freeze-substitution in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and freeze-drying. The specimens were analysed to compare the suitability of each technique in preserving (i) the spatial elemental distribution and (ii) the tissue structure of the specimens. Further, the μ-PIXE results were compared with concentration of elements in the bulk tissue obtained by ICP-AES analysis. In H. floribundus subsp. floribundus, μ-PIXE analysis revealed Ni, Ca and K concentrations in freeze-dried leaf tissues were at par with bulk tissue concentrations. Elemental distribution maps illustrated that Ni was preferentially localised in the adaxial epidermal tissues (1% DW) and least concentration was found in spongy mesophyll tissues (0.53% DW). Conversely, elemental distribution maps of THF freeze-substituted tissues indicated significantly lower Ni, Ca and K concentrations than freeze-dried specimens and bulk tissue concentrations. Moreover, Ni concentrations were uniform across the whole specimen and no localisation was observed. In P. calomelanos var. austroamericana freeze-dried pinnule tissues, μ-PIXE revealed statistically similar As, Ca and K concentrations as compared to bulk tissue concentrations. Elemental distribution maps showed that As localisation was relatively uniform across the whole specimen. Once again, THF freeze-substituted tissues revealed a significant loss of As compared to freeze-dried specimens and the concentrations obtained by bulk tissue analysis

  13. Effect of different nitrogenous nutrients on the cadmium hyperaccumulation efficiency of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Ji, Dandan; Twardowska, Irena; Li, Yunmeng; Zhu, Jiangong

    2015-02-01

    This experiment was used to explore whether the 11 nitrogenous nutrients affect the hyperaccumulation of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell. to Cd. Pot culture experiments using soil spiked with Cd as CdCl2·2.5H2O and 11 nitrogen-containing chemicals were conducted to determine the efficiency of the accumulation of Cd by R. globosa. Application of all 11 nitrogenous nutrients significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced Cd accumulation by R. globosa (Turcz.) Thell. Two major modes of Cd accumulation were observed: (i) through increase of biomass yield without reduction of Cd uptake and (ii) through increase of Cd uptake efficiency in parallel with increase of biomass yield. Bicarbonate > phosphate > chloride compounds of NH4 enhanced the biomass yield to the greatest extent, while oxalate > nitrate > chloride > and bicarbonate caused a significant increase of Cd uptake by R. globosa. Competition between N and Cd translocation caused either significant reduction of Cd translocation factor or decrease of biomass yield. Of studied nutrients, ammonium bicarbonate NH4HCO3 and ammonium chloride NH4Cl exerted the best joint effect of these two processes on the efficiency of R. globosa as a Cd hyperaccumulator. Application of these chemicals caused increase of Cd concentrations in roots of R. globosa by 35.1 and 41.1 %, and in shoots by 13.9 and 56.4 %, while biomasses of roots increased by 5.8- and 3.8-fold and in shoots by 7.4-fold, and 6.4-fold, respectively, compared to the control. As a result, accumulated load (μg pot(-1)) of Cd in roots increased by 8.2- and 5.8-fold and in shoots by 8.6- and 10.6-fold in both pots. Consequently, chemicals (NH4HCO3 and NH4Cl) that enhanced both Cd enrichment and biomass yield had the greatest effect on the bioaccumulation capacity of R. globosa.

  14. Molecular physiology of zinc transport in the Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Lasat, M M; Pence, N S; Garvin, D F; Ebbs, S D; Kochian, L V

    2000-01-01

    In this manuscript, recent research from this laboratory into physiological and molecular aspects of heavy metal (Zn) transport in the hyperaccumulating plant species, Thlaspi caerulescens is reviewed. This research is aimed at elucidating the processes that underlie the accumulation of extraordinarily high levels of Zn in the T. caerulescens shoot (up to 3% Zn dry wt.) without any associated toxicity symptom. Physiological studies focused on the use of radiotracer flux techniques (65Zn2+) to characterize zinc transport and compartmentation in the root, and translocation and accumulation in the shoot of T. caerulescens in comparison with a related non-accumulator, T. arvense. These studies indicated that Zn transport was stimulated at a number of sites in T. caerulescens, contributing to the hyperaccumulation trait. The transport processes that were stimulated included Zn influx into both root and leaf cells, and Zn loading into the xylem. The 4- to 5-fold stimulation of Zn influx into the root was hypothesized to be due to an increased abundance of Zn transporters in T. caerulescens root cells. Additionally, compartmental analysis (radiotracer wash out or efflux techniques) was used to show that Zn was sequestered in the vacuoles of T. arvense root cells which retarded Zn translocation to the shoot in this non-accumulator species. Molecular studies have focused on the cloning and characterization of Zn transport genes in T. caerulescens. Complementation of a yeast Zn transport-defective mutant with a T. caerulescens cDNA library resulted in the recovery of a cDNA, ZNT1, that encodes a Zn transporter. Sequence analysis of ZNT1 indicated it is a member of a recently discovered micronutrient transport gene family which includes the Arabidopsis Fe transporter, IRT1, and the ZIP Zn transporters. Expression of ZNT1 in yeast allowed for a physiological characterization of this transporter. It was shown to encode a high affinity Zn transporter which can also mediate low

  15. Mycorrhizae increase arsenic uptake by the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.).

    PubMed

    Al Agely, Abid; Sylvia, David M; Ma, Lena Q

    2005-01-01

    Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.) is a hyperaccumulator of arsenic (As) that grows naturally on soils in the southern United States. It is reasonable to expect that mycorrhizal symbiosis may be involved in As uptake by this fern. This is because arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have a well-documented role in increasing plant phosphorus (P) uptake, P and As have similar chemical properties, and ferns are known to be colonized by AM fungi. We conducted a factorial greenhouse experiment with three levels of As (0, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1)) and P (0, 25, and 50 mg kg(-1)) and with and without Chinese brake fern colonized by a community of AM fungi from an As-contaminated site. We found that the AM fungi not only tolerated As amendment, but their presence increased frond dry mass at the highest As application rate. Furthermore, the AM fungi increased As uptake across a range of P levels, while P uptake was generally increased only when there was no As amendment. These data indicate that AM fungi have an important role in arsenic accumulation by Chinese brake fern. Therefore, to effectively phytoremediate As-contaminated soils, the mycorrhizal status of ferns needs to be taken into account.

  16. Thiol synthesis and arsenic hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Cai, Yong; Downum, Kelsey R; Ma, Lena Q

    2004-10-01

    Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) has potential for phytoremediation of As-contaminated sites. In this study, the synthesis of total thiols and acid-soluble thiols in P. vittata was investigated under arsenic exposure. The strong and positive correlation between As concentration and acid-soluble thiols in plant leaflets suggests that acid-soluble thiols may play a role in As detoxification. A major As-induced thiol was purified and characterized. A molecular ion (M + 1) of 540 m/z suggests that the thiol was a phytochelatin (PC) with two base units (PC(2)). However, the ratios of acid-soluble thiols to As in leaflets exposed to As ranged from 0.012 to 0.026, suggesting that only a very small part of As is complexed by PC(2). PCs could play a minor detoxification role in this hyperaccumulator. A PC-independent mechanism appears to be mainly involved in As tolerance, while PC-dependent detoxification seems to be a supplement.

  17. Characterization of arsenic-resistant endophytic bacteria from hyperaccumulators Pteris vittata and Pteris multifida.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Jia; Guan, Dong-Xing; Luo, Jun; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2014-10-01

    We isolated and characterized As-resistant endophytic bacteria (AEB) from two arsenic hyperaccumulators. Their plant growth promoting traits and the relation between As tolerance and transformation were evaluated. A total of 41 and 33 AEB were isolated from Pteris vittata (PV) and Pteris multifida (PM) respectively. PV AEB represented 2genera while PM AEB comprised of 12 genera, with Bacillus sp. being the most dominant bacteria from both plants. All AEB had limited ability in solubilizing P and producing indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderophore. All isolates tolerated 10mM arsenate (As(V)), with PV isolates being more tolerant to As(V) and PM more tolerant to arsenite (As(III)). Bacterial arsenic tolerance was related to their ability in As(III) oxidation and As(V) reduction as well as their ability to retain As in the biomass to a varying extent. Though AEB showed limited plant growth promoting traits, they were important in arsenic tolerance and speciation in plants.

  18. Hormesis phenomena under Cd stress in a hyperaccumulator--Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lian; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhouli; Huang, Yanqing; Yu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate possible hormetic response induced by cadmium (Cd) in a potential hyperaccumulator-Lonicera japonica Thunb. The results showed that Cd at low concentrations induced a significant increase in plant growth, leaf water content and content of photosynthetic pigments in L. japonica, but decreased them at high concentrations, displayed inverted U-shaped dose response curves, confirming a typical biphasic hormetic response. The U-shaped dose response curves were displayed in malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage in leaves at low doses of Cd, indicating reduce oxidative stress and toxic effect. The increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was observed along with the increased Cd concentration, indicative of increase in anti-oxidative capacity that ensures redox homeostasis is maintained. After 28 days exposure to 10 mg L(-1) Cd, stem and leaf Cd concentrations reached 502.96 ± 28.90 and 103.22 ± 5.62 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively and the plant had high bioaccumulation coefficient (BC) and translocation factor (TF'). Moreover, the maximum TF value was found at 2.5 mg L(-1) Cd treatment, implying that low Cd treatment improved the ability to transfer Cd from medium via roots to aerial structures. Taking together, L. japonica could be considered as a new plant to investigate the underlying mechanisms of hormesis and Cd tolerance. Our results suggest that hormetic effects should be taken into consideration in phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil.

  19. Tolerance and hyperaccumulation of cadmium by a wild, unpalatable herb Coronopus didymus (L.) Sm. (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Gagan Preet Singh; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy R; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The potential of a wild, unpalatable plant Coronopus didymus was investigated for the first time in terms of its capability to tolerate and accumulate cadmium (Cd) for phytoremediation purposes. A screenhouse experiment for 6 weeks was conducted to evaluate the effect of Cd from 100 to 400mgkg(-1) on growth, biomass, photosynthetic apparatus, Cd uptake and accumulation in C. didymus plants. Application of Cd facilitates the growth of the plants whereas at higher levels a slight reduction was noticed. The concentration of Cd in roots and shoots reached a maximum of 867.2 and 864.5mgkg(-1) DW respectively, at 400mgkg(-1)Cd treatment. Cd exposure increased the generation of superoxide anion (O2(•-)), H2O2 content, MDA level and antioxidative response (SOD, CAT and POD) in roots and shoots of C. didymus. However, a slight decline in SOD and CAT activities were noticed in roots at highest Cd treatment (400mgkg(-1)). The bioconcentration (BCF) values for all the concentrations were ˃1 and the translocation factor (TF) values were ˂ 1 at lower level but reached 1 at highest Cd concentration. Thus, C. didymus satisfies the conditions required for hyperaccumulator plants and may be practically employed to alleviate Cd from contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential regulation of serine acetyltransferase is involved in nickel hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense.

    PubMed

    Na, GunNam; Salt, David E

    2011-11-25

    When growing in its native habitat, Thlaspi goesingense can hyperaccumulate 1.2% of its shoot dry weight as nickel. We reported previously that both constitutively elevated activity of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and concentration of glutathione (GSH) are involved in the ability of T. goesingense to tolerate nickel. A feature of SAT is its feedback inhibition by L-cysteine. To understand the role of this regulation of SAT by Cys on GSH-mediated nickel tolerance in T. goesingense, we characterized the enzymatic properties of SATs from T. goesingense. We demonstrate that all three isoforms of SAT in T. goesingense are insensitive to inhibition by Cys. Further, two amino acids (proline and alanine) in the C-terminal region of the cytosolic SAT (SAT-c) from T. goesingense are responsible for converting the enzyme from a Cys-sensitive to a Cys-insensitive form. Furthermore, the Cys-insensitive isoform of SAT-c confers elevated resistance to nickel when expressed in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, supporting a role for altered regulation of SAT by Cys in nickel tolerance in T. goesingense.

  1. Phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils: natural hyperaccumulation versus chemically enhanced phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; Dunham, S J; McGrath, S P

    2001-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to compare two strategies of phytoremediation: natural phytoextraction using the Zn and Cd hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl versus chemically enhanced phytoextraction using maize (Zea mays L.) treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The study used an industrially contaminated soil and an agricultural soil contaminated with metals from sewage sludge. Three crops of T. caerulescens grown over 391 d removed more than 8 mg kg(-1) Cd and 200 mg kg(-1) Zn from the industrially contaminated soil, representing 43 and 7% of the two metals in the soil. In contrast, the high concentration of Cu in the agricultural soil severely reduced the growth of T. caerulescens, thus limiting its phytoextraction potential. The EDTA treatment greatly increased the solubility of heavy metals in both soils, but this did not result in a large increase in metal concentrations in the maize shoots. Phytoextraction of Cd and Zn by maize + EDTA was much smaller than that by T. caerulescens from the industrially contaminated soil, and was either smaller (Cd) or similar (Zn) from the agricultural soil. After EDTA treatment, soluble heavy metals in soil pore water occurred mainly as metal-EDTA complexes, which were persistent for several weeks. High concentrations of heavy metals in soil pore water after EDTA treatment could pose an environmental risk in the form of ground water contamination.

  2. Effects of selenium on arsenic uptake in arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrittunjai; Ma, Lena Q; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Srivastava, Pratibha

    2009-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is a non-metallic element, which has the capability to increase the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance of plants to heavy metals. Plants vary considerably in their physiological response to Se. The reported research investigated the effects of Se on arsenic (As) uptake by As hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. and determined possible mechanisms of interaction. Pteris vittata plants were exposed hydroponically to 0, 150 or 300 microM of Na(2)HAsO(4) in the presence of 0, 5 or 10 microM of Na(2)SeO(4) for 5 or 10d. Application of 5 microM Se enhanced As concentration by P. vittata fronds by 7-45%. At 5 microM, Se acted as an antioxidant, inhibiting lipid peroxidation (reduced by 26-42% in the fronds) via increased levels of thiols and glutathione (increased by 24% in the fronds). The results suggest that Se is either an antioxidant or it activates plant protective mechanisms, thereby alleviating oxidative stress and improving arsenic uptake in P. vittata.

  3. Evaluation of novel starch-deficient mutants of Chlorella sorokiniana for hyper-accumulation of lipids

    PubMed Central

    Vonlanthen, Sofie; Dauvillée, David; Purton, Saul

    2015-01-01

    When green algae are exposed to physiological stresses such as nutrient deprivation, growth is arrested and the cells channel fixed carbon instead into storage compounds, accumulating first starch granules and then lipid bodies containing triacylglycerides. In recent years there has been significant interest in the commercial exploitation of algal lipids as a sustainable source of biodiesel. Since starch and lipid biosynthesis involves the same C3 precursor pool, it has been proposed that mutations blocking starch accumulation should result in increased lipid yields, and indeed several studies have supported this. The fast-growing, thermotolerant alga Chlorella sorokiniana represents an attractive strain for industrial cultivation. We have therefore generated and characterized starch-deficient mutants of C. sorokiniana and determined whether lipid levels are increased in these strains under stress conditions. One mutant (ST68) is shown to lack isoamylase, whilst two others (ST3 and ST12) are defective in starch phosphorylase. However, we find no significant change in the accumulation or profile of fatty acids in these mutants compared to the wild-type, suggesting that a failure to accumulate starch per se is not sufficient for the hyper-accumulation of lipid, and that more subtle regulatory steps underlie the partitioning of carbon to the two storage products. PMID:26865991

  4. Repeated phytoextraction of four metal-contaminated soils using the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Luo, Yongming; Zhang, Hao; Christie, Peter

    2014-06-01

    A cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator extracted metals from four contaminated soils over three years in a glasshouse experiment. Changes in plant metal uptake and soil total (aqua regia-extractable) and available metals were investigated. Plant Cd concentrations in a high-Cd acid soil and plant Zn concentrations in two acid soils decreased during repeated phytoextraction and were predicted by soil available metal concentrations. However, on repeated phytoextraction, plant Cd concentrations remained constant in lightly Cd-polluted acid soils, as did plant Cd and Zn in alkaline soils, although soil available metal concentrations decreased markedly. After phytoextraction acid soils showed much higher total metal removal efficiencies, indicating possible suitability of phytoextraction for acid soils. However, DGT-testing, which takes soil metal re-supply into consideration, showed substantial removal of available metal and distinct decreases in metal supply capacity in alkaline soils after phytoextraction, suggesting that a strategy based on lowering the bioavailable contaminant might be feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of soil pH on as hyperaccumulation capacity in fern species, Pityrogramma calomelanos.

    PubMed

    Anh, B T Kim; Kim, D D; Kuschk, P; Tua, T V; Hue, N T; Minh, N N

    2013-03-01

    Arsenic uptake by hyperaccumulator plant species depends on many different environmental factors. Soil pH is one of the most important factors due to its combined effect on both chemical and biological processes. In greenhouse experiment, the effect of pH (within the pH range 3.6 - 8.9) on As uptake as well as biomass of Pityrogramma calomelanos was evaluated. The plants were grown in mining soil containing 645.6 mg As kg(-1) for 14 weeks. Within this time, the plant biomass growth was 3.78 - 8.64 g d. wt. per plant and the removal amounted 6.3-18.4 mg As per plant. Translocation factor (ratio of As in fronds to roots) of the fern was 3.6 - 9.7, indicating its potential in phytoremediation of As contaminated soil. Influence of pH on As bioavailability was visible as the available As concentration was higher in acidic soil compared to alkaline soil. Furthermore, it was found that As accumulation by Pityrogramma calomelanos was optimum in the soil of pH 3.6. Nevertheless, the results of this study demonstrate that remediation of As-contaminated mining soils, by this fern, can be improved by changing the soil pH from 4.6 to 6.8.

  6. Formation of biomineral iron oxides compounds in a Fe hyperaccumulator plant: Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv.

    PubMed

    Fuente, V; Rufo, L; Juárez, B H; Menéndez, N; García-Hernández, M; Salas-Colera, E; Espinosa, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed work of composition and location of naturally formed iron biominerals in plant cells tissues grown in iron rich environments as Imperata cylindrica. This perennial grass grows on the Tinto River banks (Iberian Pyritic Belt) in an extreme acidic ecosystem (pH∼2.3) with high concentration of dissolved iron, sulphate and heavy metals. Iron biominerals were found at the cellular level in tissues of root, stem and leaf both in collected and laboratory-cultivated plants. Iron accumulated in this plant as a mix of iron compounds (mainly as jarosite, ferrihydrite, hematite and spinel phases) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetometry (SQUID), electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX; TEM-EDX; HRSTEM). A low fraction of phosphorous was detected in this iron hyperaccumulator plant. Root and rhizomes tissues present a high proportion of ferromagnetic iron oxide compounds. Iron oxides-rich zones are localized in electron dense intra and inter-cellular aggregates that appear as dark deposits covering the inner membrane and organelles of the cell. This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of accumulation, transport, distribution of iron in Imperata cylindrica.

  7. Prosopis laevigata a potential chromium (VI) and cadmium (II) hyperaccumulator desert plant.

    PubMed

    Buendía-González, L; Orozco-Villafuerte, J; Cruz-Sosa, F; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2010-08-01

    The bioaccumulation of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) in Prosopis laevigata and the effect of these heavy metals on plant growth were assessed. P. laevigata seeds were cultured during 50 days on modified Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with four different concentrations of Cr(VI) (0-3.4mM) and Cd(II) (0-2.2mM), respectively. Heavy metals did not stop germination, but smaller plants with fewer leaves and secondary roots were produced. Seedlings showed an accumulation of 8176 and 21,437 mg Cd kg(-1) and of 5461 and 8090 mg Cr kg(-1) dry weight, in shoot and root, when cultured with 0.65 mM Cd(II) and 3.4mM Cr(VI), respectively. These results indicated that significant translocation from the roots unto aerial parts took place. A bioaccumulation factor greater than 100 for Cd and 24 for Cr was exhibited by the seedlings. P. laevigata can be considered as a potential hyperaccumulator of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) species and considered as a promising candidate for phytoremediation purposes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthetic characteristics of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Di, Zhenzhen; Lu, Fan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2015-07-01

    The combined effects of elevated CO2 and cadmium (Cd) on photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence and Cd accumulation in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance were investigated to predict plant growth under Cd stress with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Both pot and hydroponic experiments were conducted and the plants were grown under ambient (350 µL L(-1)) or elevated (800 µL L(-1)) CO2 . Elevated CO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased Pn (105%-149%), Pnmax (38.8%-63.0%) and AQY (20.0%-34.8%) of S. alfredii in all the Cd treatments, but reduced chlorophyll concentration, dark respiration and photorespiration. After 10 days growth in medium with 50 µM Cd under elevated CO2 , PSII activities were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) with Pm, Fv/Fm, Φ(II) and qP increased by 66.1%, 7.5%, 19.5% and 16.4%, respectively, as compared with ambient-grown plants. Total Cd uptake in shoot of S. alfredii grown under elevated CO2 was increased by 44.1%-48.5%, which was positively correlated with the increase in Pn. These results indicate that elevated CO2 promoted the growth of S. alfredii due to increased photosynthetic carbon uptake rate and photosynthetic light-use efficiency, and showed great potential to improve the phytoextraction of Cd by S. alfredii. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. Differential Regulation of Serine Acetyltransferase Is Involved in Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense*

    PubMed Central

    Na, GunNam; Salt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    When growing in its native habitat, Thlaspi goesingense can hyperaccumulate 1.2% of its shoot dry weight as nickel. We reported previously that both constitutively elevated activity of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and concentration of glutathione (GSH) are involved in the ability of T. goesingense to tolerate nickel. A feature of SAT is its feedback inhibition by l-cysteine. To understand the role of this regulation of SAT by Cys on GSH-mediated nickel tolerance in T. goesingense, we characterized the enzymatic properties of SATs from T. goesingense. We demonstrate that all three isoforms of SAT in T. goesingense are insensitive to inhibition by Cys. Further, two amino acids (proline and alanine) in the C-terminal region of the cytosolic SAT (SAT-c) from T. goesingense are responsible for converting the enzyme from a Cys-sensitive to a Cys-insensitive form. Furthermore, the Cys-insensitive isoform of SAT-c confers elevated resistance to nickel when expressed in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, supporting a role for altered regulation of SAT by Cys in nickel tolerance in T. goesingense. PMID:21930704

  10. Increased cadmium and lead uptake of a cadmium hyperaccumulator tomato by cadmium-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Lin-Yan; Chen, Zhao-Jin; Ren, Gai-Di; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Qian, Meng; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2009-07-01

    Two cadmium (Cd)-resistant strains Pseudomonas sp. RJ10 and Bacillus sp. RJ16 were investigated for their effects on the soil Cd and lead (Pb) solubilization and promotion of plant growth and Cd and Pb uptakes of a Cd-hyperaccumulator tomato. In the heavy metal-contaminated inoculated soil, the CaCl(2)-extractable Cd and Pb were increased by 58-104% and 67-93%, respectively, compared to the uninoculation control. The bacteria produced indole acetic acid, siderophore and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase. Root elongation assay conducted on tomato under gnotobiotic conditions demonstrated increase in root elongation of inoculated tomato seedlings compared to the control plants. An increase in Cd and Pb contents of above-ground tissues varied from 92% to 113% and from 73% to 79% in inoculated plants growing in heavy metal-contaminated soil compared to the uninoculation control, respectively. These results show that the bacteria could be exploited for bacteria enhanced-phytoextraction of Cd- and Pb-polluted soils.

  11. Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture induces changes in heavy metal and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Pongrac, Paula; Kump, Peter; Necemer, Marijan; Regvar, Marjana

    2006-01-01

    Plants of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) inoculated or not with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mixture were grown in a highly Cd, Zn and Pb contaminated substrate in order to evaluate the functionality of symbiosis and assess the possible impact of AM colonisation on heavy metal uptake and tolerance. The results suggest AM development in the metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox is favoured at elevated nutrient demands, e.g. during the reproductive period. AM colonisation parameters positively correlated with total soil Cd and Pb. Colonised plants showed significantly improved nutrient and a decreased Cd and Zn uptake as revealed by TRXRF, thus confirming the functionality of the symbiosis. Reduced heavy metal uptake, especially at higher soil metal contents, indicates a changed metal tolerance strategy in colonised T. praecox plants. This is to our knowledge the first report on AM colonisation of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator T. praecox in a greenhouse experiment.

  12. Endogenous jasmonic and salicylic acids levels in the Cd-hyperaccumulator Noccaea (Thlaspi) praecox exposed to fungal infection and/or mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Llugany, M; Martin, S R; Barceló, J; Poschenrieder, C

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity to Erysiphe in Noccaea praecox with low metal supply is related to the failure in enhancing SA. Cadmium protects against fungal-infection by direct toxicity and/or enhanced fungal-induced JA signaling. Metal-based defense against biotic stress is an attractive hypothesis on evolutionary advantages of plant metal hyperaccumulation. Metals may compensate for a defect in biotic stress signaling in hyperaccumulators (metal-therapy) by either or both direct toxicity to pathogens and by metal-induced alternative signaling pathways. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are well-established components of stress signaling pathways. However, few studies evaluate the influence of metals on endogenous concentrations of these defense-related hormones. Even less data are available for metal hyperaccumulators. To further test the metal-therapy hypothesis we analyzed endogenous SA and JA concentrations in Noccaea praecox, a cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator. Plants treated or not with Cd, were exposed to mechanical wounding, expected to enhance JA signaling, and/or to infection by biotrophic fungus Erysiphe cruciferarum for triggering SA. JA and SA were analyzed in leaf extracts using LC-ESI(-)-MS/MS. Plants without Cd were more susceptible to fungal attack than plants receiving Cd. Cadmium alone tended to increase leaf SA but not JA. Either or both fungal attack and mechanical wounding decreased SA levels and enhanced JA in the Cd-rich leaves of plants exposed to Cd. High leaf Cd in N. praecox seems to hamper biotic-stress-induced SA, while triggering JA signaling in response to fungal attack and wounding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the endogenous JA and SA levels in a Cd-hyperaccumulator exposed to different biotic and abiotic stresses. Our results support the view of a defect in SA stress signaling in Cd hyperaccumulating N. praecox.

  13. Selenium hyperaccumulator plants Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus are colonized by Se-resistant, Se-excluding wasp and beetle seed herbivores.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine C; Devonshire, Jean; McGrath, Steve P; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plants can concentrate the toxic element Se up to 1% of shoot (DW) which is known to protect hyperaccumulator plants from generalist herbivores. There is evidence for Se-resistant insect herbivores capable of feeding upon hyperaccumulators. In this study, resistance to Se was investigated in seed chalcids and seed beetles found consuming seeds inside pods of Se-hyperaccumulator species Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata. Selenium accumulation, localization and speciation were determined in seeds collected from hyperaccumulators in a seleniferous habitat and in seed herbivores. Astragalus bisulcatus seeds were consumed by seed beetle larvae (Acanthoscelides fraterculus Horn, Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and seed chalcid larvae (Bruchophagus mexicanus, Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae). Stanleya pinnata seeds were consumed by an unidentified seed chalcid larva. Micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µXANES) and micro-X-Ray Fluorescence mapping (µXRF) demonstrated Se was mostly organic C-Se-C forms in seeds of both hyperaccumulators, and S. pinnata seeds contained ∼24% elemental Se. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of Se-compounds in S. pinnata seeds detected the C-Se-C compound seleno-cystathionine while previous studies of A. bisulcatus seeds detected the C-Se-C compounds methyl-selenocysteine and γ-glutamyl-methyl-selenocysteine. Micro-XRF and µXANES revealed Se ingested from hyperaccumulator seeds redistributed throughout seed herbivore tissues, and portions of seed C-Se-C were biotransformed into selenocysteine, selenocystine, selenodiglutathione, selenate and selenite. Astragalus bisulcatus seeds contained on average 5,750 µg Se g(-1), however adult beetles and adult chalcid wasps emerging from A. bisulcatus seed pods contained 4-6 µg Se g(-1). Stanleya pinnata seeds contained 1,329 µg Se g(-1) on average; however chalcid wasp larvae and adults emerging from S. pinnata seed pods contained 9 and 47 µg Se g(-1). The

  14. Selenium Hyperaccumulator Plants Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus Are Colonized by Se-Resistant, Se-Excluding Wasp and Beetle Seed Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John L.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Devonshire, Jean; McGrath, Steve P.; Quinn, Colin F.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plants can concentrate the toxic element Se up to 1% of shoot (DW) which is known to protect hyperaccumulator plants from generalist herbivores. There is evidence for Se-resistant insect herbivores capable of feeding upon hyperaccumulators. In this study, resistance to Se was investigated in seed chalcids and seed beetles found consuming seeds inside pods of Se-hyperaccumulator species Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata. Selenium accumulation, localization and speciation were determined in seeds collected from hyperaccumulators in a seleniferous habitat and in seed herbivores. Astragalus bisulcatus seeds were consumed by seed beetle larvae (Acanthoscelides fraterculus Horn, Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and seed chalcid larvae (Bruchophagus mexicanus, Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae). Stanleya pinnata seeds were consumed by an unidentified seed chalcid larva. Micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µXANES) and micro-X-Ray Fluorescence mapping (µXRF) demonstrated Se was mostly organic C-Se-C forms in seeds of both hyperaccumulators, and S. pinnata seeds contained ∼24% elemental Se. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry of Se-compounds in S. pinnata seeds detected the C-Se-C compound seleno-cystathionine while previous studies of A. bisulcatus seeds detected the C-Se-C compounds methyl-selenocysteine and γ-glutamyl-methyl-selenocysteine. Micro-XRF and µXANES revealed Se ingested from hyperaccumulator seeds redistributed throughout seed herbivore tissues, and portions of seed C-Se-C were biotransformed into selenocysteine, selenocystine, selenodiglutathione, selenate and selenite. Astragalus bisulcatus seeds contained on average 5,750 µg Se g−1, however adult beetles and adult chalcid wasps emerging from A. bisulcatus seed pods contained 4–6 µg Se g−1. Stanleya pinnata seeds contained 1,329 µg Se g−1 on average; however chalcid wasp larvae and adults emerging from S. pinnata seed pods contained 9 and 47 µg Se g−1

  15. Hyperaccumulation of Cadmium and Zinc in Thlaspi caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri at the Leaf Cellular Level1

    PubMed Central

    Cosio, Claudia; Martinoia, Enrico; Keller, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Vacuolar compartmentalization or cell wall binding in leaves could play a major role in hyperaccumulation of heavy metals. However, little is known about the physiology of intracellular cadmium (Cd) sequestration in plants. We investigated the role of the leaf cells in allocating metal in hyperaccumulating plants by measuring short-term 109Cd and 65Zn uptake in mesophyll protoplasts of Thlaspi caerulescens “Ganges” and Arabidopsis halleri, both hyperaccumulators of zinc (Zn) and Cd, and T. caerulescens “Prayon,” accumulating Cd at a lower degree. The effects of low temperature, several divalent cations, and pre-exposure of the plants to metals were investigated. There was no significant difference between the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants of the three plants. It indicates that differences in metal uptake cannot be explained by different constitutive transport capacities at the leaf protoplast level and that plasma and vacuole membranes of mesophyll cells are not responsible for the differences observed in heavy metal allocation. This suggests the existence of regulation mechanisms before the plasma membrane of leaf mesophyll protoplasts. However, pre-exposure of the plants to Cd induced an increase in Cd accumulation in protoplasts of “Ganges,” whereas it decreased Cd accumulation in A. halleri protoplasts, indicating that Cd-permeable transport proteins are differentially regulated. The experiment with competitors has shown that probably more than one single transport system is carrying Cd in parallel into the cell and that in T. caerulescens “Prayon,” Cd could be transported by a Zn and Ca pathway, whereas in “Ganges,” Cd could be transported mainly by other pathways. PMID:14730081

  16. Arsenic hyperaccumulation by Pteris vittata from arsenic contaminated soils and the effect of liming and phosphate fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Caille, N; Swanwick, S; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2004-11-01

    Pot experiments were carried out to investigate the potential of phytoremediation with the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata in a range of soils contaminated with As and other heavy metals, and the influence of phosphate and lime additions on As hyperaccumulation by P. vittata. The fern was grown in 5 soils collected from Cornwall (England) containing 67-4550 mg As kg(-1) and different levels of metals. All soils showed a similar distribution pattern of As in different fractions in a sequential extraction, with more than 60% of the total As being associated with the fraction thought to represent amorphous and poorly-crystalline hydrous oxides of Fe and Al. The concentration of As in the fronds ranged from 84 to 3600 mg kg(-1), with 0.9-3.1% of the total soil As being taken up by P. vittata. In one soil which contained 5500 mg Cu kg(-1) and 1242 mg Zn kg(-1), P. vittata suffered from phytotoxicity and accumulated little As (0.002% of total). In a separate experiment, neither phosphate addition (50mg P kg(-1) soil) nor liming (4.6 g CaCO3 kg(-1) soil) was found to affect the As concentration in the fronds of P. vittata, even though phosphate addition increased the As concentration in the soil pore water. Between 4 and 7% of the total soil As was taken up by P. vittata in 4 cuttings in this experiment. The results indicate that P. vittata can hyperaccumulate As from naturally contaminated soils, but may be suitable for phytoremediation only in the moderately contaminated soils.

  17. Effects of Cu on the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Hara, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Kiminori

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between Cu and Cu-hyperaccumulator lichens is important for their application in monitoring and assessing heavy metal pollution. We investigated the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum at several Cu-polluted and control sites in Japan, and found the lichen to be widely distributed. Its concentrations of Cu, chlorophylls, and secondary metabolites, chlorophyll-related indices, and absorption spectra were measured, and we observed negative effects of Cu on these concentrations and indices. For highly Cu-polluted samples (>100ppm dry weight), however, we found significant linear correlations between Cu and chlorophyll concentrations. This can be considered as the response of the photobiont in S. japonicum to Cu stress. In highly Cu-polluted samples the chlorophyll-related indices and concentration of total secondary metabolites were almost constant regardless of Cu concentration. This suggests that the increase in chlorophyll concentration with the increase in Cu concentration enhances photosynthetic productivity per unit biomass, which will allow the production of extra structure and energy for maintaining the chlorophyll-related indices under Cu stress. The relationship between the increase in chlorophyll concentration of S. japonicum and the decrease in secondary metabolite concentration of the lichen can be explained by considering the balance of carbohydrates in the lichen. We found that a spectral index A372-A394 can be a useful index of the concentrations of Cu and total secondary metabolites in S. japonicum. These findings show the adjustment of the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in S. japonicum to Cu stress, and provide a better understanding of the relationship between Cu and the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen.

  18. In vivo localization of manganese in the hyperaccumulator Gossia bidwillii (Benth.) N. Snow & Guymer (Myrtaceae) by cryo-SEM/EDAX.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Denise R; Batianoff, George N; Baker, Alan J; Woodrow, Ian E

    2006-05-01

    Gossia bidwillii (Myrtaceae) is a manganese (Mn)-hyperaccumulating tree native to subtropical eastern Australia. It typically contains foliar Mn levels in excess of 1% dry weight. However, in G. bidwillii and other Mn-hyperaccumulating species, the cellular and subcellular localization of Mn has not been measured. Quantitative in vivo cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) was used to localize Mn and other elements in tissue collected from mature trees growing in a natural population. Cryo-SEM showed that the leaf mesophyll is differentiated as a double-layer palisade mesophyll above spongy mesophyll. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the palisade and epidermal cells are highly vacuolated. EDAX data were used to estimate in situ vacuolar Mn concentrations of all cell types in fresh cryo-fixed leaf tissues. The highest average vacuolar Mn concentration of over 500 mM was found in the upper-layer palisade mesophyll, while the lowest concentration of around 100 mM was found in the spongy mesophyll. Qualitative in vivo cryo-SEM/EDAX was employed to further investigate the spatial distribution of Mn in fresh leaf tissues and young bark tissue, which was also found to have a high Mn concentration. It is concluded that Mn distribution in G. bidwillii is quantitatively different to metal distribution in other hyperaccumulating species where the highest localized concentrations of these elements occur in non-photosynthmetic tissues such as epidermal cells and associated dermal structures including trichomes and leaf hairs.

  19. Mural folliculitis and alopecia caused by infection with goat-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus in two sika deer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Timothy B; Li, Hong; Rosenburg, Stuart R; Norhausen, Robert W; Garner, Michael M

    2002-09-15

    Two sika deer from a zoo in Florida were examined because of chronic hair loss and skin lesions. No common causes of alopecia were identified in either deer. One deer was treated with prednisone, but the condition worsened when the dosage was decreased. Both deer were euthanatized after several months because of continued disease. The predominant histologic lesion in skin specimens was granulomatous mural folliculitis. Serologic testing and sequencing of fragments produced with a consensus polymerase chain reaction assay indicated that both deer were infected with caprine herpesvirus-2, a newly recognized member of the malignant catarrhal fever group of viruses. Disease in these deer was substantially different from that typically seen following infection with ovine herpesvirus-2, the sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus. Findings in these deer establish the pathogenicity of caprine herpesvirus-2 in sika deer and illustrate the ability of this group of complex herpesviruses to cause a wide variety of clinical abnormalities in diverse species.

  20. Giovanni Battista Morgagni in the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Estañol, Bruno; Delgado, Guillermo R

    2014-07-01

    The Italian physician Giovanni Battista Morgagni was the founder of the clinico-anatomical method. His masterpiece De sedibus, et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis represented a major breakthrough in the history of medicine. In the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology, Morgagni appears at the center of the fresco. With his left index finger points to the chest of a dying patient with a bulging pulsating aortic aneurysm below the left clavicle, and with his right hand, that holds a scalpel, shows the aneurysm found at the autopsy table. With this striking image the clinico-anatomical method is succinctly depicted. Professor Ignacio Chávez, the founder of the National Institute of Cardiology, gave the artist the elements to draw Morgagni, but the disposition and the importance of Morgagni in the fresco were due to the talent of Rivera.

  1. Reduced mural cell coverage and impaired vessel integrity after angiogenic stimulation in the Alk1-deficient brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Guo, Yi; Walker, Espen J.; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; Oh, S. Paul; Degos, Vincent; Lawton, Michael T.; Tihan, Tarik; Davalos, Dimitrios; Akassoglou, Katerina; Nelson, Jeffrey; Pile-Spellman, John; Su, Hua; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vessels in brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) are prone to rupture. The underlying pathogenesis is not clear. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2 (HHT2) patients with activin receptor-like kinase 1 (Alk1) mutation have a higher incidence of bAVM than the general population. We tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) impairs vascular integrity in the Alk1-deficient brain through reduction of mural cell-coverage. Methods and Results Adult Alk11f/2f mice (loxP sites flanking exons 4-6) and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with 2×107 PFU Ad-Cre and 2×109 genome copies of AAV-VEGF to induce focal homozygous Alk1 deletion (in Alk11f/2f mice) and angiogenesis. Brain vessels were analyzed eight weeks later. Compared to WT mice, the Alk1-deficient brain had more fibrin (99±30×103 pixels/mm2 vs. 40±13×103, P=0.001), iron deposition (508±506 pixels/mm2 vs. 6 ±49, P=0.04), and Iba1+ microglia/macrophage infiltration (888±420 Iba1+ cells/mm2 vs. 240±104 Iba1+, P=0.001) after VEGF stimulation. In the angiogenic foci, the Alk1-deficient brain had more α-SMA- vessels (52±9% vs. 12±7%, P<0.001), fewer vascular associated pericytes (503±179/mm2 vs. 931±115, P<0.001), and reduced PDGFR-β expression (26±9%, P<0.001). Conclusion Reduction of mural cell coverage in response to VEGF stimulation is a potential mechanism for the impairment of vessel wall integrity in HHT2-associated bAVM. PMID:23241407

  2. Selection of appropriate organic additives for enhancing Zn and Cd phytoextraction by hyperaccumulators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-tang; Deng, Jin-chuan; Long, Xin-xian; Morel, Jean-louis; Schwartz, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Chelant-enhanced phytoextraction is one of the most promising technologies to remove heavy metals from soil. The key of the technology is to choose suitable additives in combination with a suitable plant. In the present study, laboratory batch experiment of metal solubilization, cress seeds germination were undertaken to investigate the metal-mobilizing capability and the phytotoxicity of organic additives, including ethylene diamine triacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, acetic acid, oxalic acid, glutamine and monosodium glutamate waste liquid (MGWL) from food industry. Experiments in pots were carried out to study the effects of the additives on Zn and Cd phytoextraction. Furthermore, a leaching experiment with lysimeter was performed to evaluate the environmental risks of additive-induced leaching to underground water. The results showed that EDTA had a strong mobilizing ability for Zn and Cd, followed by mixed reagent (MR) and MGWL. MGWL and acetic acid at 5 mmol equivalent per liter resulted in seed germination index less than 2%. Experiments in pots verified the phytotoxicity of acetic acid and MGWL. Addition of the mixed reagent at 6-10 mmol/kg significantly increased Zn phytoextraction by Thlaspi caerulescens. The same for EDTA and the mixed reagent at 10 mmol/kg by Sedum alfredii. But only mixed reagents could significantly increase Cd phytoextraction by the studied hyperaccumulators. This suggested that the strong chelant was not always the good agent to enhance phytoextraction. S. alfredii combined with 2-10 mmol/kg soil MR was preferred for phytoremediation of Cd/Zn contaminated soils in southern China, this could result in high phytoextraction of Cd/Zn and reduce the leaching risk to underground water than EDTA assisted phytoextration.

  3. Chromate and phosphate inhibited each other's uptake and translocation in arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Letúzia M; Lessl, Jason T; Gress, Julia; Tisarum, Rujira; Guilherme, Luiz R G; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the effects of chromate (CrVI) and phosphate (P) on their uptake and translocation in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV). Plants were exposed to 1) 0.10 mM CrVI and 0, 0.25, 1.25, or 2.50 mM P or 2) 0.25 mM P and 0, 0.50, 2.5 or 5.0 mM CrVI for 24 h in hydroponics. PV accumulated 2919 mg/kg Cr in the roots at CrVI₀.₁₀, and 5100 and 3500 mg/kg P in the fronds and roots at P₀.₂₅. When co-present, CrVI and P inhibited each other's uptake in PV. Increasing P concentrations reduced Cr root concentrations by 62-82% whereas increasing CrVI concentrations reduced frond P concentrations by 52-59% but increased root P concentrations by 11-15%. Chromate reduced P transport, with more P being accumulated in PV roots. Though CrVI was supplied, 64-78% and 92-93% CrIII were in PV fronds and roots. Based on X-ray diffraction, Cr₂O₃ was detected in the roots confirming CrVI reduction to CrIII by PV. In short, CrVI and P inhibited each other in uptake and translocation by PV, and CrVI reduction to CrIII in PV roots served as its detoxification mechanism. The finding helps to understand the interactions of P and Cr during their uptake in PV.

  4. Functional analysis of the three HMA4 copies of the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Nouet, Cécile; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Farnir, Frédéric; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis halleri, the HMA4 gene has an essential function in Zn/Cd hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation by mediating root-to-shoot translocation of metals. Constitutive high expression of AhHMA4 results from a tandem triplication and cis-activation of the promoter of all three copies. The three AhHMA4 copies possess divergent promoter sequences, but highly conserved coding sequences, and display identical expression profiles in the root and shoot vascular system. Here, an AhHMA4::GFP fusion was expressed under the control of each of the three A. halleri HMA4 promoters in a hma2hma4 double mutant of A. thaliana to individually examine the function of each AhHMA4 copy. The protein showed non-polar localization at the plasma membrane of the root pericycle cells of both A. thaliana and A. halleri. The expression of each AhHMA4::GFP copy complemented the severe Zn-deficiency phenotype of the hma2hma4 mutant by restoring root-to-shoot translocation of Zn. However, each copy had a different impact on metal homeostasis in the A. thaliana genetic background: AhHMA4 copies 2 and 3 were more highly expressed and provided higher Zn tolerance in roots and accumulation in shoots than copy 1, and AhHMA4 copy 3 also increased Cd tolerance in roots. These data suggest a certain extent of functional differentiation among the three A. halleri HMA4 copies, stemming from differences in expression levels rather than in expression profile. HMA4 is a key node of the Zn homeostasis network and small changes in expression level can have a major impact on Zn allocation to root or shoot tissues. PMID:26044091

  5. Functional analysis of the three HMA4 copies of the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Nouet, Cécile; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Farnir, Frédéric; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-09-01

    In Arabidopsis halleri, the HMA4 gene has an essential function in Zn/Cd hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation by mediating root-to-shoot translocation of metals. Constitutive high expression of AhHMA4 results from a tandem triplication and cis-activation of the promoter of all three copies. The three AhHMA4 copies possess divergent promoter sequences, but highly conserved coding sequences, and display identical expression profiles in the root and shoot vascular system. Here, an AhHMA4::GFP fusion was expressed under the control of each of the three A. halleri HMA4 promoters in a hma2hma4 double mutant of A. thaliana to individually examine the function of each AhHMA4 copy. The protein showed non-polar localization at the plasma membrane of the root pericycle cells of both A. thaliana and A. halleri. The expression of each AhHMA4::GFP copy complemented the severe Zn-deficiency phenotype of the hma2hma4 mutant by restoring root-to-shoot translocation of Zn. However, each copy had a different impact on metal homeostasis in the A. thaliana genetic background: AhHMA4 copies 2 and 3 were more highly expressed and provided higher Zn tolerance in roots and accumulation in shoots than copy 1, and AhHMA4 copy 3 also increased Cd tolerance in roots. These data suggest a certain extent of functional differentiation among the three A. halleri HMA4 copies, stemming from differences in expression levels rather than in expression profile. HMA4 is a key node of the Zn homeostasis network and small changes in expression level can have a major impact on Zn allocation to root or shoot tissues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Daclatasvir inhibits hepatitis C virus NS5A motility and hyper-accumulation of phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Berger, Kristi L.; Kelly, Sean M.; Thomas, Meryl; Deiters, Alexander; Randall, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have the potential to revolutionize the HCV therapeutic regime. An integral component of DAA combination therapies are HCV NS5A inhibitors. It has previously been proposed that NS5A DAAs inhibit two functions of NS5A: RNA replication and virion assembly. In this study, we characterize the impact of a prototype NS5A DAA, daclatasvir (DCV), on HCV replication compartment formation. DCV impaired HCV replicase localization and NS5A motility. In order to characterize the mechanism behind altered HCV replicase localization, we examined the impact of DCV on the interaction of NS5A with its essential cellular cofactor, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase III α (PI4KA). We observed that DCV does not inhibit PI4KA directly, nor does it impair early events of the NS5A-PI4KA interaction that can occur when NS5A is expressed alone. NS5A functions that are unaffected by DCV include PI4KA binding, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and a basal accumulation of the PI4KA product, PI4P. However, DCV impairs late steps in PI4KA activation that requires NS5A expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein. These NS5A functions include hyper-stimulation of PI4P levels and appropriate replication compartment formation. The data are most consistent with a model wherein DCV inhibits conformational changes in the NS5A protein or protein complex formations that occur in the context of HCV polyprotein expression and stimulate PI4P hyper-accumulation and replication compartment formation. PMID:25546252

  7. Effects of bacteria on cadmium bioaccumulation in the cadmium hyperaccumulator plant Beta vulgaris var. cicla L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su; Chao, Lei; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of two cadmium-tolerant bacteria, Staphylococcus pasteuri (S. pasteuri X1) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens X2), on cadmium uptake by the cadmium hyperaccumulator plant Beta vulgaris var. cicla L., a pot experiment with artificially contaminated soil was conducted. The results demonstrated that both cadmium-tolerant bacteria enhanced the dry weight of Beta vulgaris var. cicla L. The total dry weights of plants in the control CK20, S. pasteuri X1 and A. tumefaciens X2 treatments were 0.85, 1.13, and 1.38 g/pot, respectively. Compared with the control CK20 findings, the total dry weight of plants was increased by 32.8 and 61.1% after inoculation with S. pasteuri X1 and A. tumefaciens X2, respectively, indicating that A. tumefaciens X2 more strongly promoted the growth of Beta vulgaris var. cicla L. than S. pasteuri X1. In addition, inoculation with S. pasteuri X1 and A. tumefaciens X2 significantly (p < 0.05) promoted cadmium uptake by plants and improved the bioaccumulation of cadmium by the plants from the soil. Moreover, the inoculation of S. pasteuri X1 and A. tumefaciens X2 effectively facilitated the transfer of cadmium in the soil from the Fe-Mn oxide and residual fractions to the soluble plus exchangeable and weakly specially adsorbed fractions in the rhizosphere soils of plants. The bacterial enhancement of cadmium phytoavailability might provide a potential and promising method to increase the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  8. Cd-induced changes in leaf proteome of the hyperaccumulator plant Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Le; Sun, Yong-Le; Cui, Su-Xia; Chen, Mei; Yang, Hao-Meng; Liu, Hui-Min; Chai, Tuan-Yao; Huang, Fang

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is highly toxic to all organisms. Soil contamination by Cd has become an increasing problem worldwide due to the intensive use of Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and industrial zinc mining. Phytolacca americana L. is a Cd hyperaccumulator plant that can grow in Cd-polluted areas. However, the molecular basis for its remarkable Cd resistance is not known. In this study, the effects of Cd exposure on protein expression patterns in P.americana was investigated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). 2-DE profiles of leaf proteins from both control and Cd-treated (400μM, 48h) seedlings were compared quantitatively using ImageMaster software. In total, 32 differentially expressed protein spots were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry coupled to protein database search, corresponding to 25 unique gene products. Of those 14 were enhanced/induced while 11 reduced under Cd treatment. The alteration pattern of protein expression was verified for several key proteins involved in distinct metabolic pathways by immuno-blot analysis. Major changes were found for the proteins involved in photosynthetic pathways as well as in the sulfur- and GSH-related metabolisms. One-third of the up-regulated proteins were attributed to transcription, translation and molecular chaperones including a protein belonging to the calreticulin family. Other proteins include antioxidative enzymes such as 2-cys-peroxidase and oxidoreductases. The results of this proteomic analysis provide the first and primary information regarding the molecular basis of Cd hypertolerance in P. americana. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  10. Terrestrial Invertebrate Arsenic Accumulation Associated With an Arsenic Hyperaccumulating Fern, Pteris vittata (Polypodiales: Pteridaceae).

    PubMed

    Jaffe, B D; Ketterer, M E; Hofstetter, R W

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic (As) can play an important role in the contamination of soils, waters, and air. The toxicity of As to most organisms is well established, but little is known about the interactions between environmental As and terrestrial invertebrates and the fate of As through trophic levels. Pteris vittata L. (Polypodiales: Pteridaceae), a fern that hyperaccumulates arsenic, serves as a potential mechanism to facilitate interactions between environmental arsenic and other biota. We compared invertebrate arsenic concentrations (hereafter as [As]) and bioaccumulation factors associated with soil and fern [As] to elucidate relationships between invertebrate and environmental As exposure. We collected invertebrates in pitfall traps from field sites associated with P. vittata, and identified them to order for whole body arsenic analysis and subsequently family for classification into functional feeding groups. We found that overall [As] in invertebrates increased with soil [As], but not with fern [As]. The absence of a relationship between fern [As] and invertebrate [As] may indicate invertebrates are avoiding the fern. Individual taxonomic groups significantly differed in whole body [As], and individual taxa also varied in their relationship between whole body [As] relative to soil and fern [As]. Overall invertebrate abundance decreased as invertebrate [As] load increased but varied across taxa. One particular herbivore, Callopistria floridensis (Florida fern caterpillar), associated with relatively low environmental As exposure contained over 4,000 mg kg(-1) As. Our results show that As bioaccumulates into higher trophic levels and invertebrate body [As] covary with exposure to naturally occurring environmental [As] associated with P. vittata. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Soil pollution assessment and identification of hyperaccumulating plants in chromated copper arsenate (CCA) contaminated sites, Korea.

    PubMed

    Usman, Adel R A; Lee, Sang Soo; Awad, Yasser M; Lim, Kyoung Jae; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik

    2012-05-01

    In recent decades, heavy metal contamination in soil adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has received increasing attention. This study was conducted to determine the pollution level (PL) based on the concentrations of Cr, Cu and As in soils and to evaluate the remediative capacity of native plant species grown in the CCA contaminated site, Gangwon Province, Korea. The pollution index (PI), integrated pollution index (IPI), bioaccumulation factors (BAF(shoots) and BAF(roots)) and translocation factor (TF) were determined to ensure soil contamination and phytoremediation availability. The 19 soil samples from 10 locations possibly contaminated with Cr, Cu and As were collected. The concentrations of Cr, Cu and As in the soil samples ranged from 50.56-94.13 mg kg(-1), 27.78-120.83 mg kg(-1), and 0.13-9.43 mg kg(-1), respectively. Generally, the metal concentrations decreased as the distance between the CCA-treated wood structure and sampling point increased. For investigating phytoremediative capacity, the 19 native plant species were also collected in the same area with soil samples. Our results showed that only one plant species of Iris ensata, which presented the highest accumulations of Cr (1120 mg kg(-1)) in its shoot, was identified as a hyperaccumulator. Moreover, the relatively higher values of BAF(shoot) (3.23-22.10) were observed for Typha orientalis, Iris ensata and Scirpus radicans Schk, suggesting that these plant species might be applicable for selective metal extraction from the soils. For phytostabilization, the 15 plant species with BAF(root) values>1 and TF values<1 were suitable; however, Typha orientalis was the best for Cr.

  12. A native Zn/Cd transporting P1B ATPase from natural overexpression in a hyperaccumulator plant reveals post-translational processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    TcHMA4 is a P1B-type ATPase that is highly expressed in the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi caerulescens and contains a C-terminal 9-histidine repeat. After isolation from roots, we purified TcHMA4 protein via metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein exhibited Cd- and Zn activated AT...

  13. Characterization of the high affinity Zn transporter from Noccaea caerulescens, NcZNT1, and dissection of its promoter for its role in Zn uptake and hyperaccumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper, we conducted a detailed analysis of the ZIP family transporter, NcZNT1, in the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerulescens, formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens. NcZNT1 was previously suggested to be the primary root Zn/Cd uptake transporter. Both a characterization ...

  14. Elevated expression of TcHMA3 plays a key role in the extreme Cd tolerance exhibited by a Cd-hyperaccumulating ecotype of Thlaspi caerulescens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic heavy metal for plants, but several unique Cd hyperaccumulating plant species are able to accumulate this metal to extraordinary concentrations in the above-ground tissues without showing any toxic symptoms. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this hyper-tole...

  15. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by Noccaea caerulescens results in a cascade of stress responses and changes in the elemental profile.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Siavash; Baker, Alan J M; Roessner, Ute; Johnson, Alexander A T; Bacic, Antony; Callahan, Damien L

    2014-09-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (J. & C. Presl) F. K. Meyer is a metal hyperaccumulating plant which can accumulate more than 2% zinc (Zn) dry tissue mass in its aerial tissues. At this concentration Zn is toxic to most plants due to inhibition of enzyme function, oxidative damage and mineral deficiencies. In this study the elemental and metabolite profiles of N. caerulescens plants grown in four different Zn concentrations were measured. This revealed broad changes in the metabolite and elemental profiles with the hyperaccumulation of Zn. The Zn treated plants exhibited no typical signs of stress such as chlorosis or reduced biomass, however, a range of metabolic stress responses, such as the modification of galactolipids and the major membrane lipids of plastids, and increases in oxylipins, which are precursors to the signalling molecules jasmonic and abscisic acids, as well as the increased synthesis of glucosinolates, was observed. Increases in particular organic acids and the ubiquitous metal cation chelator nicotianamine were also observed. The small molecule metabolite changes observed, however, did not account for the extreme Zn concentrations in the leaf tissue showing that the increase in nicotianamine production most likely negates Fe deficiency. The elemental analyses also revealed significant changes in other essential micronutrients, in particular, significantly lower Mn concentrations in the high Zn accumulating plants, yet higher Fe concentrations. This comprehensive elemental and metabolite analysis revealed novel metabolite responses to Zn and offers evidence against organic acids as metal-storage ligands in N. caerulescens.

  16. Selenium biofortification of broccoli and carrots grown in soil amended with Se-enriched hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Gary S; Arroyo, Irvin; Pickering, Ingrid J; Yang, Soo In; Freeman, John L

    2015-01-01

    Amending soils with Se-hyperaccumulator plant derived sources of selenium (Se) may be useful for increasing the Se content in food crops in Se-deficient regions of the world. In this study we evaluated total Se and the different chemical species of Se in broccoli and carrots grown in soils amended with ground shoots of the Se-hyperaccumulator Stanleyapinnata. With increasing application rates of S. pinnata, total plant Se concentrations increased to nutritionally ideal levels inside edible parts. Selenium compounds in aqueous extracts were analyzed by SAX-HPLC-ICPMS and identified as a variety of mainly organic-Se forms. Together with bulk Se K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis performed on broccoli florets, carrot roots and shoots, dried ground S. pinnata, and the amended soil at post-plant, we demonstrate that Se-enriched S. pinnata is valuable as a soil amendment for enriching broccoli and carrots with healthful forms of organic-Se.

  17. Molecular Dissection of the Role of Histidine in Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense (Hálácsy)1

    PubMed Central

    Persans, Michael W.; Yan, Xiange; Patnoe, Jean-Marc M.L.; Krämer, Ute; Salt, David E.

    1999-01-01

    To understand the role of free histidine (His) in Ni hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense, we investigated the regulation of His biosynthesis at both the molecular and biochemical levels. Three T. goesingense cDNAs encoding the following His biosynthetic enzymes, ATP phosphoribosyltransferase (THG1, GenBank accession no. AF003347), imidazoleglycerol phosphate dehydratase (THB1, GenBank accession no. AF023140), and histidinol dehydrogenase (THD1, GenBank accession no. AF023141) were isolated by functional complementation of Escherichia coli His auxotrophs. Northern analysis of THG1, THD1, and THB1 gene expression revealed that each gene is expressed in both roots and shoots, but at the concentrations and dosage times of Ni treatment used in this study, these genes failed to show any regulation by Ni. We were also unable to observe any increases in the concentration of free His in root, shoot, or xylem sap of T. goesingense in response to Ni exposure. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of root and shoot tissue from T. goesingense and the non-accumulator species Thlaspi arvense revealed no major differences in the coordination of Ni by His in these tissues. We therefore conclude that the Ni hyperaccumulation phenotype in T. goesingense is not determined by the overproduction of His in response to Ni. PMID:10594099

  18. Root development of non-accumulating and hyperaccumulating plants in metal-contaminated soils amended with biochar.

    PubMed

    Rees, Frédéric; Sterckeman, Thibault; Morel, Jean Louis

    2016-01-01

    Biochar may be used as an amendment in contaminated soils in phytoremediation processes. The mechanisms controlling plant metal uptake in biochar-amended soils remain however unclear. This work aimed at evaluating the influence of biochar on root development and its consequence on plant metal uptake, for two non-hyperaccumulating plants (Zea mays and Lolium perenne) and one hyperaccumulator of Cd and Zn (Noccaea caerulescens). We conducted rhizobox experiments using one acidic and one alkaline soil contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn. Biochar was present either homogeneously in the whole soil profile or localized in specific zones. A phenomenon of root proliferation specific to biochar-amended zones was seen on the heterogeneous profiles of the acidic soil and interpreted by a decrease of soil phytotoxicity in these zones. Biochar amendments also favored root growth in the alkaline soil as a result of the lower availability of certain nutrients in the amended soil. This increase of root surface led to a higher accumulation of metals in roots of Z.mays in the acidic soil and in shoots of N. caerulescens in the alkaline soil. In conclusion, biochar can have antagonist effects on plant metal uptake by decreasing metal availability, on one hand, and by increasing root surface and inducing root proliferation, on the other hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative transcriptome analysis of duckweed (Landoltia punctata) in response to cadmium provides insights into molecular mechanisms underlying hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Yu, Changjiang; Xia, Xinli; Li, Mingliang; Li, Huiguang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Congpeng; Ma, Yubin; Zhou, Gongke

    2017-09-30

    Cadmium (Cd) is a detrimental environmental pollutant. Duckweeds have been considered promising candidates for Cd phytoremediation. Although many physiological studies have been conducted, the molecular mechanisms underlying Cd hyperaccumulation in duckweeds are largely unknown. In this study, clone 6001 of Landoltia punctata, which showed high Cd tolerance, was obtained by large-scale screening of over 200 duckweed clones. Subsequently, its growth, Cd flux, Cd accumulation, and Cd distribution characteristics were investigated. To further explore the global molecular mechanism, a comprehensive transcriptome analysis was performed. For RNA-Seq, samples were treated with 20 μM CdCl2 for 0, 1, 3, and 6 days. In total, 9,461, 9,847, and 9615 differentially expressed unigenes (DEGs) were discovered between Cd-treated and control (0 day) samples. DEG clustering and enrichment analysis identified several biological processes for coping with Cd stress. Genes involved in DNA repair acted as an early response to Cd, while RNA and protein metabolism would be likely to respond as well. Furthermore, the carbohydrate metabolic flux tended to be modulated in response to Cd stress, and upregulated genes involved in sulfur and ROS metabolism might cause high Cd tolerance. Vacuolar sequestration most likely played an important role in Cd detoxification in L. punctata 6001. These novel findings provided important clues for molecular assisted screening and breeding of Cd hyperaccumulating cultivars for phytoremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation of Althaea rosea Cav. and its potential as a hyperaccumulator under chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia Nv; Zhou, Qi Xing; Wang, Song; Sun, Ting

    2009-02-01

    The role of ornamental plants has drawn much attention as the urban pollution levels exacerbate. Althaea rosea Cav. had showed its strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd in our previous work, thus, the effects of ethylenediamine triacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenegluatarotriacetic acid (EGTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on its Cd phytoremediation capacity were further investigated in this work. It reconfirmed that the species had strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd. Particularly, the species can be regarded as a potential Cd-hyperaccumulator through applying chemical agents. However, different chelators and surfactants had great differences in affecting hyperaccumulating characteristics of the species. EGTA and SDS could not only increase the dry biomass of the plants, but also promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots. On the contrary, EDTA was toxic to the species by restraining the growth of plants, although it could promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots of the plants to a certain extent. Thus, EGTA and SDS were effective in enhancing phytoremediation with Althaea rosea Cav. for Cd contaminated soils, while EDTA is ineffective in this regard.

  1. Tonoplast- and Plasma Membrane-Localized Aquaporin-Family Transporters in Blue Hydrangea Sepals of Aluminum Hyperaccumulating Plant

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takashi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Masatake; Mano, Shoji; Nishimura, Mikio; Yoshida, Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) is tolerant of acidic soils in which toxicity generally arises from the presence of the soluble aluminum (Al) ion. When hydrangea is cultivated in acidic soil, its resulting blue sepal color is caused by the Al complex formation of anthocyanin. The concentration of vacuolar Al in blue sepal cells can reach levels in excess of approximately 15 mM, suggesting the existence of an Al-transport and/or storage system. However, until now, no Al transporter has been identified in Al hyperaccumulating plants, animals or microorganisms. To identify the transporter being responsible for Al hyperaccumulation, we prepared a cDNA library from blue sepals according to the sepal maturation stage, and then selected candidate genes using a microarray analysis and an in silico study. Here, we identified the vacuolar and plasma membrane-localized Al transporters genes vacuolar Al transporter (VALT) and plasma membrane Al transporter 1 (PALT1), respectively, which are both members of the aquaporin family. The localization of each protein was confirmed by the transient co-expression of the genes. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting results indicated that VALT and PALT1 are highly expressed in sepal tissue. The overexpression of VALT and PALT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred Al-tolerance and Al-sensitivity, respectively. PMID:22952644

  2. Characterization of a selenium-tolerant rhizosphere strain from a novel Se-hyperaccumulating plant Cardamine hupingshanesis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xinzhao; Yuan, Linxi; Luo, Lei; Yin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    A novel selenium- (Se-) hyperaccumulating plant, Cardamine hupingshanesis, accumulating Se as a form of SeCys2, was discovered in Enshi, Hubei, China, which could not be explained by present selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT) theory. However, it is interesting to investigate if rhizosphere bacteria play some roles during SeCys2 accumulation. Here, one Se-tolerant rhizosphere strain, Microbacterium oxydans, was isolated from C. hupingshanesis. Phylogenetic analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequences determined the strain as a kind of Gram positive bacillus and belonged to the family Brevibacterium frigoritolerans. Furthermore, Se tolerance test indicated the strain could grow in extreme high Se level of 15.0 mg Se L(-1). When exposed to 1.5 mg Se L(-1), SeCys2 was the predominant Se species in the bacteria, consistent with the Se species in C. hupingshanesis. This coincidence might reveal that this strain played some positive effect in SeCys2 accumulation of C. hupingshanesis. Moreover, when exposed to 1.5 mg Se L(-1) or 15.0 mg Se L(-1), As absorption diminished in the logarithmic phase. In contrast, As absorption increased when exposed to 7.5 mg Se L(-1), indicating As metabolism processes could be affected by Se on this strain. The present study provided a sight on the role of rhizosphere bacteria during Se accumulation for Se-hyperaccumulating plant.

  3. Phytochelatin synthesis plays a similar role in shoots of the cadmium hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii as in non-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Chun; Chen, Bo-Xia; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2010-08-01

    Phytochelatin (PC) synthesis is considered necessary for Cd tolerance in non-resistant plants, but roles for PCs in hyper-accumulating species are currently unknown. In the present study, the relationship between PC synthesis and Cd accumulation was investigated in the Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. PCs were most abundant in leaves followed by stems, but hardly detected by the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in roots. Both PC synthesis and Cd accumulation were time-dependent and a linear correlation between the two was established with about 1:15 PCs : Cd stoichiometry in leaves. PCs were found in the elution fractions, which were responsible for Cd peaks in the anion exchange chromatograph assay. About 5% of the total Cd was detected in these elution fractions as PCs were found. Most Cd was observed in the cell wall and intercellular space of leaf vascular cells. These results suggest that PCs do not detoxify Cd in roots of S. alfredii. However, like in non-resistant plants, PCs might act as the major intracellular Cd detoxification mechanism in shoots of S. alfredii.

  4. Characterization of arsenate reductase in the extract of roots and fronds of Chinese brake fern, an arsenic hyperaccumulator.

    PubMed

    Duan, Gui-Lan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Tong, Yi-Ping; Cai, Chao; Kneer, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    Root extracts from the arsenic (As) hyperaccumulating Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) were shown to be able to reduce arsenate to arsenite. An arsenate reductase (AR) in the fern showed a reaction mechanism similar to the previously reported Acr2p, an AR from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), using glutathione as the electron donor. Substrate specificity as well as sensitivity toward inhibitors for the fern AR (phosphate as a competitive inhibitor, arsenite as a noncompetitive inhibitor) was also similar to Acr2p. Kinetic analysis showed that the fern AR had a Michaelis constant value of 2.33 mM for arsenate, 15-fold lower than the purified Acr2p. The AR-specific activity of the fern roots treated with 2 mM arsenate for 9 d was at least 7 times higher than those of roots and shoots of plant species that are known not to tolerate arsenate. A T-DNA knockout mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with disruption in the putative Acr2 gene had no AR activity. We could not detect AR activity in shoots of the fern. These results indicate that (1) arsenite, the previously reported main storage form of As in the fern fronds, may come mainly from the reduction of arsenate in roots; and (2) AR plays an important role in the detoxification of As in the As hyperaccumulating fern.

  5. Characterization of Arsenate Reductase in the Extract of Roots and Fronds of Chinese Brake Fern, an Arsenic Hyperaccumulator1

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Gui-Lan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Tong, Yi-Ping; Cai, Chao; Kneer, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Root extracts from the arsenic (As) hyperaccumulating Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) were shown to be able to reduce arsenate to arsenite. An arsenate reductase (AR) in the fern showed a reaction mechanism similar to the previously reported Acr2p, an AR from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), using glutathione as the electron donor. Substrate specificity as well as sensitivity toward inhibitors for the fern AR (phosphate as a competitive inhibitor, arsenite as a noncompetitive inhibitor) was also similar to Acr2p. Kinetic analysis showed that the fern AR had a Michaelis constant value of 2.33 mm for arsenate, 15-fold lower than the purified Acr2p. The AR-specific activity of the fern roots treated with 2 mm arsenate for 9 d was at least 7 times higher than those of roots and shoots of plant species that are known not to tolerate arsenate. A T-DNA knockout mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with disruption in the putative Acr2 gene had no AR activity. We could not detect AR activity in shoots of the fern. These results indicate that (1) arsenite, the previously reported main storage form of As in the fern fronds, may come mainly from the reduction of arsenate in roots; and (2) AR plays an important role in the detoxification of As in the As hyperaccumulating fern. PMID:15834011

  6. Interaction of cadmium and zinc on accumulation and sub-cellular distribution in leaves of hyperaccumulator Potentilla griffithii.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rong-Liang; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Hu, Peng-Jie; Senthilkumar, Palaninaicker; Ying, Rong-Rong; Tang, Ye-Tao

    2011-02-28

    Potentilla griffithii Hook is a newly found hyperaccumulator plant capable of high tolerance and accumulation of Zn and Cd. We investigated the interactive effects between Cd and Zn on accumulation and vacuolar sequestration in P. griffithii. Stimulatory effect of growth was noted at 0.2 mM Cd and 1.25 and 2.5 mM Zn tested. Accumulation of Zn and Cd in roots, petioles and leaves were increased significantly with addition of these metals individually. However, the Zn supplement decreased root Cd accumulation but increased the concentration of Cd in petioles and leaves. The results from sub-cellular distribution showed that up to 94% and 70% of the total Zn and Cd in the leaves were present in the protoplasts, and more than 90% Cd and Zn in the protoplasts were localized in the vacuoles. Nearly, 88% and 85% of total Cd and Zn were extracted in the cell sap of the leaves suggesting that most of the Cd and Zn in the leaves were available in soluble form. The present results indicate that Zn supplement significantly enhanced the petiole accumulation of Cd and further vacuolar sequestration plays an important role in tolerance, detoxification and hyperaccumulation of these metals in P. griffithii. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biofortification of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit with the anticancer compound methylselenocysteine using a selenocysteine methyltransferase from a selenium hyperaccumulator.

    PubMed

    Brummell, David A; Watson, Lyn M; Pathirana, Ranjith; Joyce, Nigel I; West, Phillip J; Hunter, Donald A; McKenzie, Marian J

    2011-10-26

    Methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys) is an amino acid derivative that possesses potent anticancer activity in animals. Plants that can tolerate growth on soils with high Se content, known as Se hyperaccumulators, do so by converting inorganic Se to MeSeCys by the enzyme selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT). A cDNA encoding the SMT from a Se hyperaccumulator was overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Transgenic plants were provided with selenite or selenate to the roots during fruit development, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to show that MeSeCys accumulated in the fruit but not in the leaves. Depending on the transgenic line and Se treatment, up to 16% of the total Se in the fruit was present as MeSeCys. MeSeCys was produced more effectively from selenite on a percentage conversion basis, but greater accumulation of MeSeCys could be achieved from selenate due to its better translocation from the roots. MeSeCys was heat stable and survived processing of the fruit to tomato juice.

  8. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and mobility control of heavy metals in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Liang, Chengfeng; Shohag, M J I; Yang, Xiaoe; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-11-01

    The complexation of Zn, Cd and Pb with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and a non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii was measured using resin equilibration method. After the growth of HE S. alfredii, the rhizosphere soil pH was reduced by 0.27-0.33 units, due to enhanced DOM derived from root exudation. For both ecotypes of S. alfredii, the fraction of free metal as a percentage of soluble metal varied from 22.1 to 42.5% for Zn(2+), from 8.1 to 15.5% for Cd(2+), and from 4.5 to 10.4% for Pb(2+). Resin equilibration experiment results indicated that HE-DOM had greater ability to form complexes with Zn, Cd and Pb than NHE-DOM, Visual MINTEQ model gave excellent predictions of the complexation of Zn and Cd by DOM (R(2) > 0.97). DOM in the rhizosphere of HE S. alfredii could significantly increase metal mobility through the formation of soluble DOM-metal complexes.

  9. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid* #

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of 109Cd increased significantly, and higher 109Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the 109Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  10. Root and shoot transcriptome analysis of two ecotypes of Noccaea caerulescens uncovers the role of NcNramp1 in Cd hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Milner, Matthew J; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Yamaji, Naoki; Yokosho, Kengo; Craft, Eric; Fei, Zhangjun; Ebbs, Stephen; Clemencia Zambrano, M; Ma, Jian Feng; Kochian, Leon V

    2014-05-01

    The Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator, Noccaea caerulescens, has been studied extensively for its ability to accumulate high levels of Zn and Cd in its leaves. Previous studies have indicated that the Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation trait exhibited by this species involves different transport and tolerance mechanisms. It has also been well documented that certain ecotypes of N. caerulescens are much better Cd hyperaccumulators than others. However, there does not seem to be much ecotypic variation for Zn hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens. In this study we employed a comparative transcriptomics approach to look at root and shoot gene expression in Ganges and Prayon plants in response to Cd stress to identify transporter genes that were more highly expressed in either the roots or shoots of the superior Cd accumulator, Ganges. Comparison of the transcriptomes from the two ecotypes of Noccaea caerulescens identified a number of genes that encoded metal transporters that were more highly expressed in the Ganges ecotype in response to Cd stress. Characterization of one of these transporters, NcNramp1, showed that it is involved in the influx of Cd across the endodermal plasma membrane and thus may play a key role in Cd flux into the stele and root-to-shoot Cd transport. NcNramp1 may be one of the main transporters involved in Cd hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens and copy number variation appears to be the main reason for high NcNramp1 gene expression underlying the increased Cd accumulation in the Ganges ecotype. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sulfate and chromate increased each other's uptake and translocation in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Letúzia M; Gress, Julia; De, Jaysankar; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Marchi, Giuliano; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of chromate (CrVI) and sulfate on their uptake and translocation in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. Plants were exposed to 1) 0.1 mM CrVI and 0, 0.25, 1.25 or 2.5 mM sulfate or 2) 0.25 mM sulfate and 0, 0.5, 2.5 or 5.0 mM CrVI for 1 d in hydroponics. P. vittata accumulated 26 and 1261 mg kg(-1) Cr in the fronds and roots at CrVI0.1, and 2197 and 1589 mg kg(-1) S in the fronds and roots at S0.25. Increasing sulfate concentrations increased Cr root concentrations by 16-66% and helped CrVI reduction to CrIII whereas increasing CrVI concentrations increased frond sulfate concentrations by 3-27%. Increasing sulfate concentrations enhanced TBARS concentrations in the biomass, indicating oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation in plant cell membranes. However, addition of 0.25-2.5 mM sulfate alleviated CrVI's toxic effects and decreased TBARS from 23.5 to 9.46-12.3 μmol g(-1) FW. Though CrVI was supplied, 78-96% of CrIII was in the biomass, indicating efficient CrVI reduction to CrIII by P. vittata. The data indicated the amazing ability of P. vittata in Cr uptake at 289 mg kg(-1) h(-1) with little translocation to the fronds. These results indicated that P. vittata had potential in Cr phytoremediation in contaminated sites but further studies are needed to evaluate this potential. The facts that CrVI and sulfate helped each other in uptake by P. vittata suggest that CrVI was not competing with sulfate uptake in P. vittata. However, the mechanisms of how sulfate and CrVI enhance each other's accumulation in P. vittata need further investigation.

  12. Nitrate facilitates cadmium uptake, transport and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengjie; Yin, Yong-Gen; Ishikawa, Satoru; Suzui, Nobuo; Kawachi, Naoki; Fujimaki, Shu; Igura, Masato; Yuan, Cheng; Huang, Jiexue; Li, Zhu; Makino, Tomoyuki; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Wu, Longhua

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate whether and how the nitrogen form (nitrate (NO3 (-)) versus ammonium (NH4 (+))) influences cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation and subsequent Cd phytoextraction by the hyperaccumulator species Sedum plumbizincicola. Plants were grown hydroponically with N supplied as either NO3 (-) or NH4 (+). Short-term (36 h) Cd uptake and translocation were determined innovatively and quantitatively using a positron-emitting (107)Cd tracer and positron-emitting tracer imaging system. The results show that the rates of Cd uptake by roots and transport to the shoots in the NO3 (-) treatment were more rapid than in the NH4 (+) treatment. After uptake for 36 h, 5.6 (0.056 μM) and 29.0 % (0.290 μM) of total Cd in the solution was non-absorbable in the NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) treatments, respectively. The local velocity of Cd transport was approximately 1.5-fold higher in roots (3.30 cm h(-1)) and 3.7-fold higher in shoots (10.10 cm h(-1)) of NO3 (-)- than NH4 (+)-fed plants. Autoradiographic analysis of (109)Cd reveals that NO3 (-) nutrition enhanced Cd transportation from the main stem to branches and young leaves. Moreover, NO3 (-) treatment increased Cd, Ca and K concentrations but inhibited Fe and P in the xylem sap. In a 21-day hydroponic culture, shoot biomass and Cd concentration were 1.51 and 2.63 times higher in NO3 (-)- than in NH4 (+)-fed plants. We conclude that compared with NH4 (+), NO3 (-) promoted the major steps in the transport route followed by Cd from solution to shoots in S. plumbizincicola, namely its uptake by roots, xylem loading, root-to-shoot translocation in the xylem and uploading to the leaves. S. plumbizincicola prefers NO3 (-) nutrition to NH4 (+) for Cd phytoextraction.

  13. Expression and functional analysis of metal transporter genes in two contrasting ecotypes of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Sonia; Tearall, Kathryn L; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Buchner, Peter; McGrath, Steve P; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2007-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation is a constitutive property of Thlaspi caerulescens, whereas cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulation varies greatly among different ecotypes. The molecular basis of this variation is unknown. Ecotypic differences in the sequences and expression of four representative ZIP family transporter genes were investigated. Genome analysis indicated the presence of at least two closely related copies of the TcIRT1 gene in both Ganges (high Cd accumulating) and Prayon (low Cd accumulating) ecotypes, with different copies being expressed in each, and, furthermore, the two genes potentially encode different length transcripts. The predominant transcript in Prayon was truncated, missing sequence coding for the putative metal-binding site and the five C-terminal transmembrane helices. The two ecotypes were grown hydroponically +/-Fe and Cd, and mRNA abundance determined for four ZIP genes. The four ZIP genes studied (TcIRT1, TcIRT2, TcZNT1, and TcZNT5) were expressed in roots only. TcIRT1 expression (full-length in Ganges, TcIRT1-1G; truncated in Prayon, TcIRT1-2P) was enhanced by Fe deficiency or by exposure to Cd. TcIRT2 expression was induced by Fe deficiency, but was unaffected by Cd exposure. TcZNT5-G showed greater expression in Prayon compared with Ganges. The functions of TcIRT1 from Ganges and Prayon and the Arabidopsis homologue were analysed by heterologous expression in yeast. All three IRT1 genes were able to facilitate growth on low Fe concentrations. Cd sensitivity of yeast was conferred in the order AtIRT1>TcIRT1-1G>TcIRT1-2P (truncated). Cd uptake after 4 h was only detectable following complementation by AtIRT1. The results suggest that although TcIRT1-G may be involved in Cd hyperaccumulation in the Ganges ecotype of T. caerulescens, the transporter expressed in yeast does not have an enhanced ability to transport Cd compared with AtIRT1. Therefore, the unique Cd-accumulating ability of the T. caerulescens Ganges ecotype must be due to the

  14. Elevated CO2 concentration increase the mobility of Cd and Zn in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Liang, Chengfeng; Yang, Xiaoe

    2014-05-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 on metal species and mobility in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator are not well understood. We report an experiment designed to compare the effects of elevated CO2 on Cd/Zn speciation and mobility in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and a non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii grown under ambient (350 μl l(-1)) or elevated (800 μl l(-1)) CO2 conditions. No difference in solution pH of NHE was observed between ambient and elevated CO2 treatments. For HE, however, elevated CO2 reduced soil solution pH by 0.22 unit, as compared to ambient CO2 conditions. Elevated CO2 increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and organic acid levels in soil solution of both ecotypes, but the increase in HE solution was much greater than in NHE solution. After the growth of HE, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in soil solution decreased significantly regardless of CO2 level. The visual MINTEQ speciation model predicted that Cd/Zn-DOM complexes were the dominant species in soil solutions, followed by free Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) species for both ecotypes. However, Cd/Zn-DOM complexes fraction in soil solution of HE was increased by the elevated CO2 treatment (by 8.01 % for Cd and 8.47 % for Zn, respectively). Resin equilibration experiment results indicated that DOM derived from the rhizosphere of HE under elevated CO2 (HE-DOM-E) (90 % for Cd and 73 % for Zn, respectively) showed greater ability to form complexes with Cd and Zn than those under ambient CO2 (HE-DOM-A) (82 % for Cd and 61 % for Zn, respectively) in the undiluted sample. HE-DOM-E showed greater ability to extract Cd and Zn from soil than HE-DOM-A. It was concluded that elevated CO2 could increase the mobility of Cd and Zn due to the enhanced formation of DOM-metal complexes in the rhizosphere of HE S. alfredii.

  15. A hyperaccumulation pathway to three-dimensional hierarchical porous nanocomposites for highly robust high-power electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Shan, Yu; Wang, Tao; Sun, Hongtao; Zhao, Zipeng; Mei, Lin; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Zhi; Shakir, Imran; Huang, Yu; Lu, Bingan; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-11-01

    Natural plants consist of a hierarchical architecture featuring an intricate network of highly interconnected struts and channels that not only ensure extraordinary structural stability, but also allow efficient transport of nutrients and electrolytes throughout the entire plants. Here we show that a hyperaccumulation effect can allow efficient enrichment of selected metal ions (for example, Sn2+, Mn2+) in the halophytic plants, which can then be converted into three-dimensional carbon/metal oxide (3DC/MOx) nanocomposites with both the composition and structure hierarchy. The nanocomposites retain the 3D hierarchical porous network structure, with ultrafine MOx nanoparticles uniformly distributed in multi-layers of carbon derived from the cell wall, cytomembrane and tonoplast. It can simultaneously ensure efficient electron and ion transport and help withstand the mechanical stress during the repeated electrochemical cycles, enabling the active material to combine high specific capacities typical of batteries and the cycling stability of supercapacitors.

  16. A hyperaccumulation pathway to three-dimensional hierarchical porous nanocomposites for highly robust high-power electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian; Shan, Yu; Wang, Tao; Sun, Hongtao; Zhao, Zipeng; Mei, Lin; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Zhi; Shakir, Imran; Huang, Yu; Lu, Bingan; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Natural plants consist of a hierarchical architecture featuring an intricate network of highly interconnected struts and channels that not only ensure extraordinary structural stability, but also allow efficient transport of nutrients and electrolytes throughout the entire plants. Here we show that a hyperaccumulation effect can allow efficient enrichment of selected metal ions (for example, Sn2+, Mn2+) in the halophytic plants, which can then be converted into three-dimensional carbon/metal oxide (3DC/MOx) nanocomposites with both the composition and structure hierarchy. The nanocomposites retain the 3D hierarchical porous network structure, with ultrafine MOx nanoparticles uniformly distributed in multi-layers of carbon derived from the cell wall, cytomembrane and tonoplast. It can simultaneously ensure efficient electron and ion transport and help withstand the mechanical stress during the repeated electrochemical cycles, enabling the active material to combine high specific capacities typical of batteries and the cycling stability of supercapacitors. PMID:27853174

  17. Seed germination of a newly discovered hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum L. affected by illumination and seed-soaking reagent.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Hu, Yahu; Srivastava, Mrittunjai; Zhou, Qixing; Niu, Rongcheng; Li, Yunmeng; Wu, Zhijie; Sun, Tieheng

    2009-10-30

    Solanum nigrum is a newly found Cd-hyperaccumulator which showed very high remediation efficiency in polluted soil. Seed germination experiments with different illumination and seed-soaking reagents were conducted in constant temperature box and greenhouse with soil as burgeon base. The results showed that the germination rate with alternating light/dark photoperiod was about twice of that without lighting (p < 0.05), suggesting that illumination is one of the important conditions for seed germination of S. nigrum. All treatments with seed-soaking reagents significantly increased the seed germination rate of S. nigrum (p < 0.05). Treatment with H2O2 (0.1%) had the shortest germination time. The germination rate of seeds that were not washed in water following soaking was 2-3 times higher than that of seeds that were washed after soaking.

  18. ST Elevation Infarction after Heart Transplantation Induced by Coronary Spasms and Mural Thrombus Detected by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Niels Ramsing; Eiskjær, Hans; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Maeng, Michael; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Christiansen, Evald Høj

    2016-01-01

    The case illustrates the possible link between coronary spasms, intraluminal thrombus formation, and widespread organized and layered thrombi in HTx patients. Furthermore, the case underlines the clinical value of OCT as a novel method for high-resolution vessel imaging in heart-transplanted (HTx) patients with coronary spasms and suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary spasms and sudden death are frequent complications after HTx. The underlying mechanisms leading to these complications are unknown. The present case displays the clinical course of a 19-year-old HTx patient who was hospitalized due to acute myocardial infarction induced by severe coronary spasms. The patients remained unstable on conservative therapy. Therefore, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed and revealed massive, organized thrombi in the left main coronary artery, the circumflex coronary artery, and the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patient was stabilized after percutaneous coronary intervention. As a mural thrombus often goes undetected by coronary angiography, OCT may prove benefit in HTx patients with myocardial infarction or suspected coronary spasms. PMID:27980873

  19. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  20. Large-scale investigation of plaster detachments in historical murals by acoustic stimulation and video-holographic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelker, Gerd; Hinsch, Klaus D.; Joost, Holger

    2001-10-01

    In the conservation of historical murals an important issue is the detection of plaster or paint layers that detach from the supporting material and thus threaten to fall off. Commonly, walls are inspected by the acoustic response to a gentle finger-tapping (percussion method). Since this is a costly and cumbersome technique there is need for a metrological instrument serving the same purpose. In the last few years we have shown, that a time-average version of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) with increased sensitivity in combination with acoustic excitation of the object can be a powerful tool for monitoring of loose areas. It offers full-field, video real time capability and has the advantage of non-contact and remote operation which, for example, is extremely useful in large buildings. Recently, a fully computer-based evaluation and control system was added to the system to assist in the introduction of the method as a generally approved tool in artwork monitoring. Principles of the method and instrumental features of the equipment are presented and some results and their interpretation obtained with the computerized system in the church and chapel at St. John's convent at Mnstair, Switzerland are demonstrated.

  1. Identification of green pigments from fragments of Roman mural paintings of three Roman sites from north of Germania Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debastiani, Rafaela; Simon, Rolf; Goettlicher, Joerg; Heissler, Stefan; Steininger, Ralph; Batchelor, David; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-10-01

    Roman mural green pigment painting fragments from three Roman sites in the north of the Roman province Germania Superior: Koblenz Stadtwald Remstecken (KOSR), Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann" (WEIS) and Mendig Lungenkärchen (MELU), dating from second and third centuries AD were analyzed. The experiments were performed nondestructively using synchrotron-based scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-MA-XRF), synchrotron-based scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF), synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Correlation between SR-MA-XRF, SR-μ-XRF elemental map distributions and optical images of scanned areas was mainly found for the elements Ca, Fe and K. With XRF, Fe and K were identified correlated with green pigment, but in samples from two sites, Mendig Lungenkärchen and Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann", also Cu was detected in minor concentration. The results of SR-XRD and Raman spectroscopy were limited to one sample from Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann". In this sample, green earth and calcium carbonate were identified by SR-XRD and, additionally, malachite by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Elucidating the selenium and arsenic metabolic pathways following exposure to the non-hyperaccumulating Chlorophytum comosum, spider plant

    PubMed Central

    Afton, Scott E.; Catron, Brittany; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have investigated the metabolism of selenium and arsenic in hyperaccumulating plants for phytoremediation purposes, few have explored non-hyperaccumulating plants as a model for general contaminant exposure to plants. In addition, the result of simultaneous supplementation with selenium and arsenic has not been investigated in plants. In this study, Chlorophytum comosum, commonly known as the spider plant, was used to investigate the metabolism of selenium and arsenic after single and simultaneous supplementation. Size exclusion and ion-pairing reversed phase liquid chromatography were coupled to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to obtain putative metabolic information of the selenium and arsenic species in C. comosum after a mild aqueous extraction. The chromatographic results depict that selenium and arsenic species were sequestered in the roots and generally conserved upon translocation to the leaves. The data suggest that selenium was directly absorbed by C. comosum roots when supplemented with SeVI, but a combination of passive and direct absorption occurred when supplemented with SeIV due to the partial oxidation of SeIV to SeVI in the rhizosphere. Higher molecular weight selenium species were more prevalent in the roots of plants supplemented with SeIV, but in the leaves of plants supplemented with SeVI due to an increased translocation rate. When supplemented as AsIII, arsenic is proposed to be passively absorbed as AsIII and partially oxidized to AsV in the plant root. Although total elemental analysis demonstrates a selenium and arsenic antagonism, a compound containing selenium and arsenic was not present in the general aqueous extract of the plant. PMID:19273464

  3. Genome Structure of the Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens and Its Stability on Metalliferous and Nonmetalliferous Soils1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mandáková, Terezie; Singh, Vasantika; Krämer, Ute; Lysak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens), an extremophile heavy metal hyperaccumulator model plant in the Brassicaceae family, is a morphologically and phenotypically diverse species exhibiting metal tolerance and leaf accumulation of zinc, cadmium, and nickel. Here, we provide a detailed genome structure of the approximately 267-Mb N. caerulescens genome, which has descended from seven chromosomes of the ancestral proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7) through an unusually high number of pericentric inversions. Genome analysis in two other related species, Noccaea jankae and Raparia bulbosa, showed that all three species, and thus probably the entire Coluteocarpeae tribe, have descended from the proto-Calepineae Karyotype. All three analyzed species share the chromosome structure of six out of seven chromosomes and an unusually high metal accumulation in leaves, which remains moderate in N. jankae and R. bulbosa and is extreme in N. caerulescens. Among these species, N. caerulescens has the most derived karyotype, with species-specific inversions on chromosome NC6, which grouped onto its bottom arm functionally related genes of zinc and iron metal homeostasis comprising the major candidate genes NICOTIANAMINE SYNTHASE2 and ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE1. Concurrently, copper and organellar metal homeostasis genes, which are functionally unrelated to the extreme traits characteristic of N. caerulescens, were grouped onto the top arm of NC6. Compared with Arabidopsis thaliana, more distal chromosomal positions in N. caerulescens were enriched among more highly expressed metal homeostasis genes but not among other groups of genes. Thus, chromosome rearrangements could have facilitated the evolution of enhanced metal homeostasis gene expression, a known hallmark of metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:26195571

  4. A proteomics approach to investigate the process of Zn hyperaccumulation in Noccaea caerulescens (J & C. Presl) F.K. Meyer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Persson, Daniel Pergament; Husted, Søren; Schellenberg, Maja; Gehrig, Peter; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico; Schjoerring, Jan K; Meyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element in all living organisms, but is toxic in excess. Several plant species are able to accumulate Zn at extraordinarily high concentrations in the leaf epidermis without showing any toxicity symptoms. However, the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon are still poorly understood. A state-of-the-art quantitative 2D liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics approach was used to investigate the abundance of proteins involved in Zn hyperaccumulation in leaf epidermal and mesophyll tissues of Noccaea caerulescens. Furthermore, the Zn speciation in planta was analyzed by a size-exclusion chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SEC-ICP-MS) method, in order to identify the Zn-binding ligands and mechanisms responsible for Zn hyperaccumulation. Epidermal cells have an increased capability to cope with the oxidative stress that results from excess Zn, as indicated by a higher abundance of glutathione S-transferase proteins. A Zn importer of the ZIP family was more abundant in the epidermal tissue than in the mesophyll tissue, but the vacuolar Zn transporter MTP1 was equally distributed. Almost all of the Zn located in the mesophyll was stored as Zn-nicotianamine complexes. In contrast, a much lower proportion of the Zn was found as Zn-nicotianamine complexes in the epidermis. However, these cells have higher concentrations of malate and citrate, and these organic acids are probably responsible for complexation of most epidermal Zn. Here we provide evidence for a cell type-specific adaptation to excess Zn conditions and an increased ability to transport Zn into the epidermal vacuoles. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Elucidating the selenium and arsenic metabolic pathways following exposure to the non-hyperaccumulating Chlorophytum comosum, spider plant.

    PubMed

    Afton, Scott E; Catron, Brittany; Caruso, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have investigated the metabolism of selenium and arsenic in hyperaccumulating plants for phytoremediation purposes, few have explored non-hyperaccumulating plants as a model for general contaminant exposure to plants. In addition, the result of simultaneous supplementation with selenium and arsenic has not been investigated in plants. In this study, Chlorophytum comosum, commonly known as the spider plant, was used to investigate the metabolism of selenium and arsenic after single and simultaneous supplementation. Size exclusion and ion-pairing reversed phase liquid chromatography were coupled to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to obtain putative metabolic information of the selenium and arsenic species in C. comosum after a mild aqueous extraction. The chromatographic results depict that selenium and arsenic species were sequestered in the roots and generally conserved upon translocation to the leaves. The data suggest that selenium was directly absorbed by C. comosum roots when supplemented with Se(VI), but a combination of passive and direct absorption occurred when supplemented with Se(IV) due to the partial oxidation of Se(IV) to Se(VI) in the rhizosphere. Higher molecular weight selenium species were more prevalent in the roots of plants supplemented with Se(IV), but in the leaves of plants supplemented with Se(VI) due to an increased translocation rate. When supplemented as As(III), arsenic is proposed to be passively absorbed as As(III) and partially oxidized to As(V) in the plant root. Although total elemental analysis demonstrates a selenium and arsenic antagonism, a compound containing selenium and arsenic was not present in the general aqueous extract of the plant.

  6. A significant positive correlation between endogenous trans-zeatin content and total arsenic in arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris cretica var. nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Yang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hongbin; Li, Qinchun; Wang, Haijuan; Li, Yanyan

    2017-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to compare the content of endogenous trans-zeatin (Z), plant arsenic (As) uptake and physiological indices in the fronds of As-hyperaccumulator (Pteris cretica var. nervosa) and non-hyperaccumulator (Pteris ensiformis). Furthermore, a stepwise regression method was used to study the relationship among determined indices, and the time-course effect of main indices was also investigated under 100mg/kg As stress with time extension. In the 100-200mg/kg As treatments, plant height showed no significant difference and endogenous Z content significantly increased in P. cretica var. nervosa compared to the control, but a significant decrease of height and endogenous Z was observed in P. ensiformis. The concentrations of As (III) and As (V) increased significantly in the fronds of two plants, but this increase was much higher in P. cretica var. nervosa. Compared to the control, the contents of chlorophyll and soluble protein were significantly increased in P. cretica var. nervosa but decreased in P. ensiformis in the 200mg/kg As treatment, respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between the contents of endogenous Z and total As in P. cretica var. nervosa, but such a correlation was not found in P. ensiformis. Additionally, in the time-course effect experiment, a peak value of each index was appeared in the 43rd day in two plants, except for chlorophyll in P. ensiformis, but this value was significantly higher in P. cretica var. nervosa than that in P. ensiformis. In conclusion, a higher endogenous Z content contributed to As accumulation of P. cretica var. nervosa under As stress.

  7. Zinc, cadmium and lead accumulation and characteristics of rhizosphere microbial population associated with hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Long, Xin-Xian; Zhang, Yu-Gang; Jun, Dai; Zhou, Qixing

    2009-04-01

    A field survey was conducted to study the characteristics of zinc, cadmium, and lead accumulation and rhizosphere microbial population associated with hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance growing natively on an old lead/zinc mining site. We found significant hyperaccumulation of zinc and cadmium in field samples of S. alfredii, with maximal shoot concentrations of 9.10-19.61 g kg(-1) zinc and 0.12-1.23 g kg(-1) cadmium, shoot/root ratios ranging from 1.75 to 3.19 (average 2.54) for zinc, 3.36 to 4.43 (average 3.85) for cadmium, shoot bioaccumulation factors of zinc and cadmium being 1.46-4.84 and 7.35-17.41, respectively. While most of lead was retained in roots, thus indicating exclusion as a tolerance strategy for lead. Compared to the non-rhizosphere soil, organic matter and total nitrogen and phosphorus content, CEC and water extractable zinc, cadmium, and lead concentration were significantly higher, but pH was smaller in rhizosphere soil. The rhizosphere soil of S. alfredii harbored a wide variety of microorganism. In general, significantly higher numbers of culturable bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi were found in the rhizosphere compared to bulk soil, confirming the stimulatory effect of the S. alfredii rhizosphere on microbial growth and proliferation. Analyses of BIOLOG data also showed that the growth of S. alfredii resulted in observable changes in BIOLOG metabolic profiles, utilization ability of different carbon substrates of microbial communities in the rhizosphere soil were also higher than the non-rhizosphere, confirming a functional effect of the rhizosphere of S. alfredii on bacterial population.

  8. Zinc compartmentation in root, transport into xylem, and absorption into leaf cells in the hyperaccumulating species of Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoe; Li, Tingqiang; Yang, Juncheng; He, Zhenli; Lu, Lingli; Meng, Fanhua

    2006-06-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance can accumulate Zn in shoots over 2%. Leaf and stem Zn concentrations of the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) were 24- and 28-fold higher, respectively, than those of the nonhyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE), whereas 1.4-fold more Zn was accumulated in the roots of the NHE. Approximately 2.7-fold more Zn was stored in the root vacuoles of the NHE, and thus became unavailable for loading into the xylem and subsequent translocation to shoot. Long-term efflux of absorbed 65Zn indicated that 65Zn activity was 6.8-fold higher in shoots but 3.7-fold lower in roots of the HE. At lower Zn levels (10 and 100 microM), there were no significant differences in 65Zn uptake by leaf sections and intact leaf protoplasts between the two ecotypes except that 1.5-fold more 65Zn was accumulated in leaf sections of the HE than in those of the NHE after exposure to 100 microM for 48 h. At 1,000 microM Zn, however, approximately 2.1-fold more Zn was taken up by the HE leaf sections and 1.5-fold more 65Zn taken up by the HE protoplasts as compared to the NHE at exposure times >16 h and >10 min, respectively. Treatments with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or ruptured protoplasts strongly inhibited 65Zn uptake into leaf protoplasts for both ecotypes. Citric acid and Val concentrations in leaves and stems significantly increased for the HE, but decreased or had minimal changes for the NHE in response to raised Zn levels. These results indicate that altered Zn transport across tonoplast in the root and stimulated Zn uptake in the leaf cells are the major mechanisms involved in the strong Zn hyperaccumulation observed in S. alfredii H.

  9. Hyperaccumulator of Pb in native plants growing on Peruvian mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Boluda, Rafael; Tume, Pedro; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sanchez, Isidoro

    2014-05-01

    samples were taken at four locations (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4) with different levels of Pb. The Pb soil content (mean ± standard deviation) in mg•kg-1 is as follows: CA1 3992 ± 301; CA2 10128 ± 2247, CA3 14197 ± 895, CA4 16060 ± 810. The non-polluted value around the mine was Pb 124 mg•kg-1. Unusual elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and TF greater than one were detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens). The location CA4 has the maximum content of Pb in the shoots of Ageratina sp. (5045±77 mg•kg-1), C. apalothica (3367±188 mg•kg-1), E. denticulatum (13599±848 mg•kg-1), T. officinalis (2533±47 mg•kg-1) and T. repens (2839±231 mg•kg-1). However, the BF (Bioaccumulation Factor) was smaller than one. Despite the low BF index, the great TFs for Pb indicate that these plant species effectively translocate this metal (i.e., 2.4 for Ageratina sp., 2.3 for C. apalothica, 1.6 for T. repens, 1.5 for A. alata, 1.3 for T. officinalis and 1.2 for E. denticulatum). It seems that the BF is not a reliable index when the metal soil concentration is extremely large. Controlled-environment studies must be performed to definitively confirm the Pb hyperaccumulation character of cited plant species.

  10. Recovering metals from sewage sludge, waste incineration residues and similar substances with hyperaccumulative plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisser, Johannes; Gattringer, Heinz; Iordanopoulos-Kisser, Monika

    2015-04-01

    observed in so-called hyperaccumulating metalophytes, which are studied for its suitability to be incorporated in metal recovery processes of elements that diffusely occur in different waste streams. In a systematic series of tests under laboratory conditions the accumulation behaviour for many different elements including rare earth metals of a selection of candidate plants growing on sewage sludge, incineration residues and industrial leftovers was assessed (quantitavely and qualitatively). Growth performance of these plants as well as the most suitable substrate properties were evaluated. The results of this project provided the groundwork for further research and development steps that might bring to practical implementation a technological option with potentially huge benefits: The recovery of valuable metal resources from sewage sludge, incineration ashes and metal rich wastewaters by environmentally friendly and low energy means. Simultaneous decontamination of the input substrates from heavy metals, opening the possibility for these nutrient streams to be redirected to biological regeneration processes (for example use as fertilizers in agriculture) without fear of polluting soils with heavy metal loads. Generation of biomass on contaminated substrates can yield usable energy surplus through incineration during or after processing.

  11. Both heavy metal-amendment of soil and aphid-infestation increase Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates of a metal-hyperaccumulating plant.

    PubMed

    Stolpe, Clemens; Giehren, Franziska; Krämer, Ute; Müller, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Plants that are able to hyperaccumulate heavy metals show increased concentrations of these metals in their leaf tissue. However, little is known about the concentrations of heavy metals and of organic defence metabolites in the phloem sap of these plants in response to either heavy metal-amendment of the soil or biotic challenges such as aphid-infestation. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy metal-exposure and of aphid-infestation on phloem exudate composition of the metal hyperaccumulator species Arabidopsis halleri L. O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (Brassicaceae). The concentrations of elements and of organic defence compounds, namely glucosinolates, were measured in phloem exudates of young and old (mature) leaves of plants challenged either by amendment of the soil with cadmium and zinc and/or by an infestation with the generalist aphid Myzus persicae. Metal-amendment of the soil led to increased concentrations of Cd and Zn, but also of two other elements and one indole glucosinolate, in phloem exudates. This enhanced defence in the phloem sap of heavy metal-hyperaccumulating plants can thus potentially act as effective protection against aphids, as predicted by the elemental defence hypothesis. Aphid-infestation also caused enhanced Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates. This result provides first evidence that metal-hyperaccumulating plants can increase heavy metal concentrations tissue-specifically in response to an attack by phloem-sucking herbivores. Overall, the concentrations of most elements, including the heavy metals, and glucosinolates were higher in phloem exudates of young leaves than in those of old leaves. This defence distribution highlights that the optimal defence theory, which predicts more valuable tissue to be better defended, is applicable for both inorganic and organic defences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Speciation and localization of Zn in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii by extended X-ray absorption fine structure and micro-X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingli; Liao, Xingcheng; Labavitch, John; Yang, Xiaoe; Nelson, Erik; Du, Yonghua; Brown, Patrick H; Tian, Shengke

    2014-11-01

    Differences in metal homeostasis among related plant species can give important information of metal hyperaccumulation mechanisms. Speciation and distribution of Zn were investigated in a hyperaccumulating population of Sedum alfredii by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure and micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), respectively. The hyperaccumulator uses complexation with oxygen donor ligands for Zn storage in leaves and stems, and variations in the Zn speciation was noted in different tissues. The dominant chemical form of Zn in leaves was most probably a complex with malate, the most prevalent organic acid in S. alfredii leaves. In stems, Zn was mainly associated with malate and cell walls, while Zn-citrate and Zn-cell wall complexes dominated in the roots. Two-dimensional μ-XRF images revealed age-dependent differences in Zn localization in S. alfredii stems and leaves. In old leaves of S. alfredii, Zn was high in the midrib, margin regions and the petiole, whereas distribution of Zn was essentially uniform in young leaves. Zinc was preferentially sequestered by cells near vascular bundles in young stems, but was highly localized to vascular bundles and the outer cortex layer of old stems. The results suggest that tissue- and age-dependent variations of Zn speciation and distribution occurred in the hyperaccumulator S. alfredii, with most of the Zn complexed with malate in the leaves, but a shift to cell wall- and citric acid-Zn complexes during transportation and storage in stems and roots. This implies that biotransformation in Zn complexation occurred during transportation and storage processes in the plants of S. alfredii.

  13. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    PubMed

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  14. Integration of small RNAs, degradome and transcriptome sequencing in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii uncovers a complex regulatory network and provides insights into cadmium phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojiao; Yin, Hengfu; Song, Xixi; Zhang, Yunxing; Liu, Mingying; Sang, Jiang; Jiang, Jing; Li, Jihong; Zhuo, Renying

    2016-06-01

    The hyperaccumulating ecotype of Sedum alfredii Hance is a cadmium (Cd)/zinc/lead co-hyperaccumulating species of Crassulaceae. It is a promising phytoremediation candidate accumulating substantial heavy metal ions without obvious signs of poisoning. However, few studies have focused on the regulatory roles of miRNAs and their targets in the hyperaccumulating ecotype of S. alfredii. Here, we combined analyses of the transcriptomics, sRNAs and the degradome to generate a comprehensive resource focused on identifying key regulatory miRNA-target circuits under Cd stress. A total of 87 721 unigenes and 356 miRNAs were identified by deep sequencing, and 79 miRNAs were differentially expressed under Cd stress. Furthermore, 754 target genes of 194 miRNAs were validated by degradome sequencing. A gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of differential miRNA targets revealed that auxin, redox-related secondary metabolism and metal transport pathways responded to Cd stress. An integrated analysis uncovered 39 pairs of miRNA targets that displayed negatively correlated expression profiles. Ten miRNA-target pairs also exhibited negative correlations according to a real-time quantitative PCR analysis. Moreover, a coexpression regulatory network was constructed based on profiles of differentially expressed genes. Two hub genes, ARF4 (auxin response factor 4) and AAP3 (amino acid permease 3), which might play central roles in the regulation of Cd-responsive genes, were uncovered. These results suggest that comprehensive analyses of the transcriptomics, sRNAs and the degradome provided a useful platform for investigating Cd hyperaccumulation in S. alfredii, and may provide new insights into the genetic engineering of phytoremediation.

  15. Zinc-dependent global transcriptional control, transcriptional deregulation, and higher gene copy number for genes in metal homeostasis of the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Talke, Ina N; Hanikenne, Marc; Krämer, Ute

    2006-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these extreme physiological traits, A. halleri phylogenetically belongs to the sister clade of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a combination of genome-wide cross species microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a set of candidate genes is identified for Zn hyperaccumulation, Zn and Cd hypertolerance, and the adjustment of micronutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Eighteen putative metal homeostasis genes are newly identified to be more highly expressed in A. halleri than in A. thaliana, and 11 previously identified candidate genes are confirmed. The encoded proteins include HMA4, known to contribute to root-shoot transport of Zn in A. thaliana. Expression of either AtHMA4 or AhHMA4 confers cellular Zn and Cd tolerance to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Among further newly implicated proteins are IRT3 and ZIP10, which have been proposed to contribute to cytoplasmic Zn influx, and FRD3 required for iron partitioning in A. thaliana. In A. halleri, the presence of more than a single genomic copy is a hallmark of several highly expressed candidate genes with possible roles in metal hyperaccumulation and metal hypertolerance. Both A. halleri and A. thaliana exert tight regulatory control over Zn homeostasis at the transcript level. Zn hyperaccumulation in A. halleri involves enhanced partitioning of Zn from roots into shoots. The transcriptional regulation of marker genes suggests that in the steady state, A. halleri roots, but not the shoots, act as physiologically Zn deficient under conditions of moderate Zn supply.

  16. Influence of the zinc hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl. and the nonmetal accumulator Trifolium pratense L. on soil microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Delorme, T A; Gagliardi, J V; Angle, J S; Chaney, R L

    2001-08-01

    Metal hyperaccumulator plants like Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl. are used for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. Since little is known about the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulators, the influence of T. caerulescens was compared with the effects of Trifolium pratense L. on soil microbes. High- and low-metal soils were collected near a zinc smelter in Palmerton, Penn. Soil pH was adjusted to 5.8 and 6.8 by the addition of Ca(OH)2. Liming increased bacterial populations and decreased metal toxicity to levels allowing growth of both plants. The effects of the plants on total (culturable) bacteria, total fungi, as well as cadmium- and zinc-resistant populations were assessed in nonrhizosphere and rhizosphere soil. Both plants increased microbial populations in rhizosphere soil compared with nonrhizosphere soil. Microbial populations were higher in soils planted with T. pratense, but higher ratios of metal-resistant bacteria were found in the presence of T. caerulescens. We hypothesize that T. caerutescens acidifies its rhizosphere. Soil acidification in the rhizosphere of T. caerulescens would affect metal uptake by increasing available metals around the roots and consequently, increase the selection for metal-resistant bacteria. Soil acidification may be part of the hyperaccumulation process enhancing metal uptake from soil.

  17. Phytomining of Ni from mineralized or contaminated soils available to industry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new technology is available to the Ni mining and remediation community to "phytomine" Ni from mineralized or contaminated soils using rare plants which hyperaccumulate Ni to over 1% of shoot dry matter. Research has identified useful plant species, and even bred improved cultivars of Alyssum mura...

  18. Installation of a Rudist Biostrome after the Late Aptian - Early Albian OAE1B (mural Formation, Southeastern Arizona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godet, A.; Helfrich-Dennis, M. M.; Suarez, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic climate change has been extensively studied in the Tethys, while their expression in the proto Gulf of Mexico can still be precised, especially for the time period straddling the Aptian-Albian boundary. During this time period, significant climatic events may correlate between the proto-Atlantic and the Tethys, amongst which the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1b that corresponds to a period of marine anoxia across this stage boundary. We hypothesized that this event may have impacted the shallow-marine carbonate factory that is now preserved near the town of Bisbee (Mule Mountains, southern Arizona). This sedimentary succession has been chosen because it documents a switch from a siliclastic- to carbonate-dominated sedimentation during the targeted time interval. Using carbon isotope chemostratigraphy, we were able to refine the stratigraphic framework of the Mural Formation, which was previously based on benthic organisms such as rudist bivalves and orbitolinids, such as Mesorbitolina texana. The OAE1b has been identified based on its peculiar δ13C signature supported by biostratigraphic data. Concurrently, microfacies analysis helped in reconstructing variations in sea levels. In southern Arizona, the OAE1b equivalent belongs to a third-order transgressive systems tract, and extends into the following highstand systems track. The maximum flooding surface is defined within a thick rudist biostrome with chondrodonts. It thus seems that the OAE1b did not strongly affected the carbonate factory in this region of the proto Gulf of Mexico. As a conclusion, limestone rocks now preserved in southeastern Arizona were deposited during the Late Aptian to Early Albian time period, during which the OAE1b developed. This paleoceanographic perturbation is expressed in the sedimentary record by its unique carbon isotope signature, with no significant impact on benthic ecosystems.

  19. Combined use of FORS, XRF and Raman spectroscopy in the study of mural paintings in the Aosta Valley (Italy).

    PubMed

    Appolonia, Lorenzo; Vaudan, Davide; Chatel, Valentina; Aceto, Maurizio; Mirti, Piero

    2009-12-01

    Mural paintings which decorate the external façade and the internal apsidal wall of a chapel dedicated to St. Maxime and located at Challand St. Victor in the Aosta Valley (Italy) have been analysed with a combined approach involving high-resolution fibre-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The paintings are attributed to Giacomino from Ivrea, a painter active around the mid-fifteenth century. In order to characterise the palette used by the painter and to yield information useful to restorers, the cited techniques were used either in situ with portable instruments and in laboratory, working on micro samples withdrawn from paintings. The global analytical approach, though not entirely non-invasive, can indeed be considered non-destructive as multiple analyses, including SEM-EDX, could be carried out on the micro samples, exploiting the features of each technique. On the basis of the information obtained, the palette was found to be composed of typical fresco pigments such as calcite, azurite, malachite, vermilion, red and yellow ochres. A particular situation was noted for black pigments since the presence of graphite, rather than wood or lamp carbon, was found, possibly related to the presence of graphite deposits in the Aosta Valley. Furthermore, the presence of smalt superimposed to azurite in areas showing evidence of repainting was detected, suggesting that paintings were subjected to retouching at a relatively early stage after the original execution. Finally, the presence of tin foils, used to decorate haloes of Evangelists, was ascertained.

  20. Effects of teat cistern mural biopsy and teatoscopy stab versus longitudinal incision with or without tube implant on incisional healing in lactating dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Tulleners, E; Hamir, A

    1990-08-01

    Effects of teat cistern mural biopsy and full-thickness stab and longitudinal incisional healing were evaluated experimentally on clinically normal teats in 12 lactating dairy cattle. Each teat on each cow was assigned by Latin-square design to 1 of 4 surgical interventions: (I) teatoscopy only; (II) teatoscopy, stab incision, and mural biopsy; (III) longitudinal incision and mural biopsy; and (IV) longitudinal incision, mural biopsy, and tube implantation. Teatoscopy was done with a 4-mm OD arthroscope introduced through the teat canal and attached to a television camera. Teatoscopy was quicker to perform and provided a more detailed videotaped examination of the teat and gland cistern, compared with gross inspection through a longitudinal incision. In intervention-II cows, the Ferris-Smith biopsy instrument jaws introduced through a longitudinal 1-cm midteat stab incision were easy to visualize and manipulate accurately. Stab incisions closed with only 1 or 2 skin sutures healed without complications in all 12 teats. On palpation, stab incisions were significantly (P less than 0.01) less thick than longitudinal incisions at 8 weeks and were microscopically indistinguishable from the normal tissue. However, in 24 teatoscopically examined teats, 9 (38%) had microscopic evidence of teat canal injury and 12 (50%) of the quarters developed mastitis. This was attributed to trauma resulting from introduction of the arthroscope through the teat canal. Intervention III yielded satisfactory results with the least complications. All 12 longitudinal incisions healed by primary intention, and all teats remained patent. Mastitis developed in 4 (33%) quarters. Intervention IV caused considerable complications associated with the tube implant and no improvement in biopsy site healing, compared with interventions II and III. Eleven longitudinal incisions healed by primary intention. One incision dehisced, 2 (17%) tube implants dislodged, 2 (17%) became obstructed proximally, and