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Sample records for hyperaldosteronism

  1. Hyperaldosteronism - primary and secondary

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Hyperaldosteronism is a disorder in which the adrenal gland releases too much of the hormone aldosterone into ... hyperaldosteronism is due to a problem of the adrenal glands themselves, which causes them to release too much ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial hyperaldosteronism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Advocacy Resources (1 link) Hormone Health Network: Primary Hyperaldosteronism Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Familial hyperaldosteronism type 3 Hyperaldosteronism, familial, type I ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (3 links) ...

  3. Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ravi Kumar; Söderkvist, Peter; Gimm, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5 This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights. PMID:27485459

  4. Hyperaldosteronism: diagnosis, lateralization, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrian M

    2014-06-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is an important and commonly unrecognized secondary cause of hypertension. This article provides an overview of the current literature with respect to screening, diagnosis, and lateralization. Selection and outcomes of medical and surgical treatment are discussed.

  5. [Pseudohypoparathyroidism associated with hyperaldosteronism and polyglobulia].

    PubMed

    Battaia, L; Pedrazzoli, M; Pachor, M L; Bambara, L M; Corrocher, R

    1984-04-01

    A new case of familial PHP, associated with polyglobulia and biochemical parameters of hyperaldosteronism has been described. This association represents a very rare entity. PHP has been documented by the common tests and the unresponsiveness of AMPc to PTH. The poliglobulia , which appears after a period of severe anaemia, needs now periodical blood subtraction; nevertheless a cerebral thrombosis with conseguent hemiparesis has recently occurred. The hyperaldosteronism has been documented by hypopotassiemia , a raised level of plasma aldosterone as well as suppressed plasma renin activity even after adequate stimulus. PMID:6374503

  6. Hyperaldosteronism, hyperparathyroidism, medullary sponge kidneys, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hellman, D E; Kartchner, M; Komar, N; Mayes, D; Pitt, M

    1980-09-19

    Hyperparathyroidism and hyperaldosteronism coexisted in association with medullary sponge kidneys in a 27-year-old woman with severe hypertension. A modest fall in systolic and diastolic pressure followed removal of a parathyroid adenoma. Blood pressure was controlled with spironolactone therapy and restored to normal after removal of an aldosterone-secreting adrenal tumor. Elevated levels of aldosterone may have been responsible for the severe hypertension, while hypercalcemia may have had a synergistic effect on the arteriolar response to circulating vasoactive peptides.

  7. An Association of Chronic Hyperaldosteronism with Medullary Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Sharma, Rajaram; Thakkar, Hemangini; Hira, Priya; Deshmukh, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background An association between chronic hyperaldosteronism and medullary nephrocalcinosis has rarely been made, with only a handful of cases described in literature. Case Report We describe five cases of hyperaldosteronism with a long- standing history in whom associated medullary nephrocalcinosis was established. Conclusions We infer that a chronic hyperaldosteronic status, whether primary or secondary, is a causal factor in the etiopathogenesis of medullary nephrocalcinosis. This article illustrates and summarizes various postulated theories that support our proposed association between hyperaldosteronism and nephrocalcinosis. We conclude that chronic hyperaldosteronism should be included as one of the causes of nephrocalcinosis and that our case series emphasizes the need of a well-organized retrospective study to prove it further. PMID:26413177

  8. Primary hyperaldosteronism: challenges in subtype classification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is a serious and potentially debilitating disease. Detailed guidelines have been written to guide endocrinologists in establishing the diagnosis of PA as well as in subtype classification of PA. The objective of this case report is to present a case where subtype classification of PA was challenging and repeated imaging of the adrenal glands helped establish the diagnosis in a patient with initial normal adrenal glands on CT and MRI images. Case presentation We report a case of a 29-year-old woman with an established diagnosis of PA, but unclear subtype, who presented to us for further management. She initially presented for medical evaluation of uncontrolled hypertension and spontaneous hypokalemia 4 years prior. In the investigation of secondary causes of hypertension, plasma aldosterone-to-plasma renin activity ratio was elevated on two separate occasions, and primary hyperaldosteronism was confirmed by saline infusion test. Also during this time, she had adrenal venous sampling done 3 times at multiple institutions yielding confusing results. Initially, imaging by CT and MRI showed normal adrenal glands. To help establish the subtype of PA, we reimaged this patient’s adrenal glands one year later revealing a 2 cm left adrenal adenoma. Laparoscopic left adrenalectomy improved her hypertension and was curative of her hypokalemia. Conclusion This case presents an unusual case where reimaging of the adrenal glands led to the discovery of a single adenoma, initially not observed on imaging studies. PMID:23110780

  9. [Primary hyperaldosteronism: problems of diagnostic approaches].

    PubMed

    Widimský, Jiří

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism (PH) is common cause of endocrine/secondary hypertension with autonomous aldosterone overproduction by adrenal cortex. PH is typically characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, high plasma aldosterone/renin ratio, high aldosterone, suppressed renin and nonsupressibilty of aldosterone during confirmatory tests. Diagnosis of PH can be difficult since hypokalemia is found only in 50 % of cases and measurement of the parameters of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can be influenced by several factors. Morphological dia-gnosis requires in majority of cases adrenal venous sampling. Early diagnostic and therapeutic measures are very important due to high prevalence of PH and potential cure. Patients with suspicion to PH should be investigated in experienced hypertensive centers due to relatively difficult laboratory and morphological diagnostic approaches. PMID:26075860

  10. Primary hyperaldosteronism, a mediator of progressive renal disease in cats.

    PubMed

    Javadi, S; Djajadiningrat-Laanen, S C; Kooistra, H S; van Dongen, A M; Voorhout, G; van Sluijs, F J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Boer, W H; Rijnberk, A

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in primary hyperaldosteronism, particularly because of its possible role in the progression of kidney disease. While most studies have concerned humans and experimental animal models, we here report on the occurrence of a spontaneous form of (non-tumorous) primary hyperaldosteronism in cats. At presentation, the main physical features of 11 elderly cats were hypokalemic paroxysmal flaccid paresis and loss of vision due to retinal detachment with hemorrhages. Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of plasma concentrations of aldosterone (PAC) and plasma renin activity (PRA), and the calculation of the PAC:PRA ratio. In all animals, PACs were at the upper end or higher than the reference range. The PRAs were at the lower end of the reference range, and the PAC:PRA ratios exceeded the reference range. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed no or only very minor changes in the adrenals compatible with nodular hyperplasia. Adrenal gland histopathology revealed extensive micronodular hyperplasia extending from zona glomerulosa into the zona fasciculata and reticularis. In three cats, plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were normal when hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed but thereafter increased to above the upper limit of the respective reference range. In the other eight cats, urea and creatinine concentrations were raised at first examination and gradually further increased. Even in end-stage renal insufficiency, there was a tendency to hypophosphatemia rather than to hyperphosphatemia. The histopathological changes in the kidneys mimicked those of humans with hyperaldosteronism: hyaline arteriolar sclerosis, glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The non-tumorous form of primary hyperaldosteronism in cats has many similarities with "idiopathic" primary hyperaldosteronism in humans. The condition is associated with progressive renal disease

  11. A patient with concurrent primary hyperaldosteronism and adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Francisco; Jackson, Thomas W; Isales, Carlos M

    2004-12-01

    A 73-year-old man with history of longstanding primary hyperaldosteronism developed adrenal insufficiency after he ruptured an abdominal aortic aneurysm and had a prolonged hypotensive episode. The patient presented as a diagnostic dilemma with recurrent hypotensive episodes and hypokalemia. A cosyntropin (Cortrosyn) stimulation test demonstrated a blunted cortisol response while at the same time having a suppressed plasma renin activity level and an elevated plasma aldosterone value. Diagnosis of Addison disease and concurrent primary hyperaldosteronism resulted in the patient's being treated with an unusual combination of prednisone and spironolactone followed by marked improvement in his symptoms.

  12. [Hypokalemia, a key clinical data for diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Maya, B; Rodríguez Goncer, I; Diego Hernández, C

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old man with a long history of hypertension under treatment, who was admitted at our institution with intense fatigue and weakness of lower limbs. The laboratory results at Emergency Department showed severe hypokalemia. A study of secondary hypertension was carried out. With the initial suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, complete blood test was done including plasma renine activity, which was completely suppressed, and plasma aldosterone concentration, which resulted normal. Likewise, an abdomen CT was performed and revealed a left adrenal mass consistent of suprarrenal adenoma. Therefore, a salt loading suppression test was done with subsequent measure of plasmatic renine activity, which was still suppressed, plasma aldosterone concentration, that persisted normal, and a 24-h urinary aldosterone excretion rate, which was clearly high, supporting the suspected diagnosis. After the adrenalectomy, the patient remained asymptomatic with normal blood pressure without treatment and with normal serum potassium levels. PMID:26869044

  13. [Hypokalemia, a key clinical data for diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Maya, B; Rodríguez Goncer, I; Diego Hernández, C

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old man with a long history of hypertension under treatment, who was admitted at our institution with intense fatigue and weakness of lower limbs. The laboratory results at Emergency Department showed severe hypokalemia. A study of secondary hypertension was carried out. With the initial suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, complete blood test was done including plasma renine activity, which was completely suppressed, and plasma aldosterone concentration, which resulted normal. Likewise, an abdomen CT was performed and revealed a left adrenal mass consistent of suprarrenal adenoma. Therefore, a salt loading suppression test was done with subsequent measure of plasmatic renine activity, which was still suppressed, plasma aldosterone concentration, that persisted normal, and a 24-h urinary aldosterone excretion rate, which was clearly high, supporting the suspected diagnosis. After the adrenalectomy, the patient remained asymptomatic with normal blood pressure without treatment and with normal serum potassium levels.

  14. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  15. Primary hyperaldosteronism: a case of unilateral adrenal hyperplasia with contralateral incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Vakkalanka, Sujit; Zhao, Andrew; Samannodi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is one of the most common causes of secondary hypertension but clear differentiation between its various subtypes can be a clinical challenge. We report the case of a 37-year-old African-American woman with refractory hypertension who was admitted to our hospital for palpitations, shortness of breath and headache. Her laboratory results showed hypokalaemia and an elevated aldosterone/renin ratio. An abdominal CT scan showed a nodule in the left adrenal gland but adrenal venous sampling showed elevated aldosterone/renin ratio from the right adrenal vein. The patient began a new medical regimen but declined any surgical options. We recommend clinicians to maintain a high level of suspicion to consider the less common subtypes of primary hyperaldosteronism, especially given the fact that the management greatly varies. PMID:27417992

  16. Polyuric-polydipsic syndrome in a pediatric case of non-glucocorticoid remediable familial hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Mussa, Alessandro; Camilla, Roberta; Monticone, Silvia; Porta, Francesco; Tessaris, Daniele; Verna, Francesca; Mulatero, Paolo; Einaudi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Familial hyperaldosteronism (FH) encompasses 3 types of autosomal dominant hyperaldosteronisms leading to inheritable hypertension. FH type II (FH-II), undistinguishable from sporadic hyperaldosteronism, represents the most frequent cause of inheritable hypertension and is believed to only manifest in adults. FH-III is a severe variety of PA resistant to pharmacotherapy and recently demonstrated to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding the potassium channel KCNJ5. In this report, we describe a FH pediatric patient, remarkable both for age at onset and unusual presentation: a two-years old girl with polyuric-polydipsic syndrome and severe hypertension, successfully treated with canrenone and amiloride. The girl had severe hypertension, hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, suppressed renin activity, high aldosterone, and unremarkable adrenal imaging. FH type I was ruled out by glucocorticoid suppression test, PCR test for CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene, and urinary 18-oxo-cortisol and 18-hydroxy-cortisol excretion, which was in FH-II range. In spite of a clear-cut FH-II phenotype, the girl and her mother were found to harbor a FH-III genotype with KCNJ5 mutation (c.452G>A). Treatment with canrenone was started, resulting in prompt normalization of electrolytes and remission of polyuric-polydypsic syndrome. The addition of amiloride led to a complete normalization of blood pressure. This report expands the phenotypic spectrum of FH-III to a milder end, mimiking FH-II phenotype demonstrating that pharmacotherapy may be effective. This also implies that FH-II/III should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypertensive children and, perhaps, that the offspring of patients with hyperaldosteronism should be screened for hypertension. PMID:22447138

  17. Consequences of Adrenal Venous Sampling in Primary Hyperaldosteronism and Predictors of Unilateral Adrenal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Aarti; Kemp, Clinton D; Dutta, Utpal; Baid, Smita; Ayala, Alejandro; Chang, Richard E; Steinberg, Seth M; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Lange, Eileen; Libutti, Steven K; Pingpank, James F; Alexander, H Richard; Phan, Giao Q; Hughes, Marybeth; Linehan, W Marston; Pinto, Peter A; Stratakis, Constantine A; Kebebew, Electron

    2010-01-01

    Background In patients with primary hyperaldosteronism, distinguishing between unilateral and bilateral adrenal hypersecretion is critical in assessing treatment options. Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) has been advocated by some to be the gold standard for localization of the responsible lesion however there remains a lack of consensus for the criteria and the standardization of technique. Study Design A retrospective study of 114 patients with a biochemical diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism who all underwent CT scan and AVS before and after ACTH stimulation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine what factors were associated with AVS lateralization, and which AVS values were the most accurate criteria for lateralization. Results Eighty-five patients underwent surgery at our institution for unilateral hyperaldosteronism. Of the 57 patients that demonstrated unilateral abnormalities on CT, AVS localized to the contralateral side in 5 patients and revealed bilateral hyperplasia in 6 patients. Of the 52 patients who showed bilateral disease on CT scan, 43 lateralized with AVS. The most accurate criterion on AVS for lateralization was the post-ACTH stimulation values. Factors associated with AVS lateralization included a low renin value, high plasma aldosterone-to plasma-renin ratio, and adrenal mass ≥ 3cm on CT scan. Conclusions Because 50% of patients would have been inappropriately managed based on CT scan findings, patients with biochemical evidence of primary hyperaldosteronism and considering adrenalectomy should have AVS. The most accurate measurement for AVS lateralization was the post-ACTH stimulation values. Although several factors predict successful AVS lateralization, none are accurate enough to perform AVS selectively. PMID:20800196

  18. Adrenal Histologic Findings Show No Difference in Clinical Presentation and Outcome in Primary Hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Allison B.; Webb, Richard C.; Mathur, Aarti; Barak, Stephanie; Abraham, Smita Baid; Nilubol, Naris; Quezado, Martha; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Kebebew, Electron

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary hyperaldosteronism is most commonly due to a solitary cortical adenoma. Thus, some surgeons have suggested a subtotal adrenalectomy is a reasonable approach when a mass can be identified. On the other hand, adrenal vein sampling (AVS) is being used more frequently to distinguish patients with unilateral disease for adrenalectomy, even if a discrete mass is not identified on axial imaging. In these cases, surgical pathology may reveal a cortical adenoma, a cortical adenoma with hyperplasia, or cortical hyperplasia. The goal of this study was to compare the presentation and outcome among patients undergoing adrenalectomy and found to have different histologic features. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. Ninety-five patients had an adrenalectomy for unilateral disease. The preoperative clinical and laboratory, and postoperative outcome of three aforementioned histologic groups were compared. Results Ninety-five patients underwent an adrenalectomy. We found no significant difference in age, gender, body mass index, duration of hypertension, number of antihypertensive medications, serum aldosterone level, serum renin level or adrenal vein sampling ratios among the 3 histologic categories. We also found no significant difference among the three categories in postoperative cure rate. Conclusion The rate of unilateral hyperplasia in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (16%) is likely higher than previously reported which may be due to the increasing use of AVS. The clinical presentation and outcome of patients regardless of the histologic findings are similar. Our data also suggests that subtotal adrenalectomy would not be appropriate in patients with primary aldosteronism. PMID:23090573

  19. Iatrogenic myxoedema madness following radioactive iodine ablation for Graves' disease, with a concurrent diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Snell, L; Morris, D V

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myxoedema madness was first described as a consequence of severe hypothyroidism in 1949. Most cases were secondary to long-standing untreated primary hypothyroidism. We present the first reported case of iatrogenic myxoedema madness following radioactive iodine ablation for Graves' disease, with a second concurrent diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism. A 29-year-old woman presented with severe hypothyroidism, a 1-week history of psychotic behaviour and paranoid delusions 3 months after treatment with radioactive iodine ablation for Graves' disease. Her psychiatric symptoms abated with levothyroxine replacement. She was concurrently found to be hypertensive and hypokalemic. Primary hyperaldosteronism from bilateral adrenal hyperplasia was diagnosed. This case report serves as a reminder that myxoedema madness can be a complication of acute hypothyroidism following radioactive iodine ablation of Graves' disease and that primary hyperaldosteronism may be associated with autoimmune hyperthyroidism. Learning points Psychosis (myxoedema madness) can present as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of acute hypothyroidism following radioactive iodine ablation of Graves' disease.Primary hyperaldosteronism may be caused by idiopathic bilateral adrenal hyperplasia even in the presence of an adrenal adenoma seen on imaging.Adrenal vein sampling is a useful tool for differentiating between a unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma, which is managed surgically, and an idiopathic bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, which is managed medically.The management of autoimmune hyperthyroidism, iatrogenic hypothyroidism and primary hyperaldosteronism from bilateral idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia in patients planning pregnancy includes delaying pregnancy 6 months following radioactive iodine treatment and until patient is euthyroid for 3 months, using amiloride as opposed to spironolactone, controlling blood pressure with agents safe in pregnancy such as nifedipine and avoiding

  20. Severe hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism developing in a patient with hyperaldosteronism and renal resistance to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Park-Sigal, Jennifer; Don, Burl R; Porzig, Anne; Recker, Robert; Griswold, Virginia; Sebastian, Anthony; Duh, Quan-Yang; Portale, Anthony A; Shoback, Dolores; Schambelan, Morris

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated an African American woman referred in 1986 at age 33 years because of renal potassium and calcium wasting and chronic hip pain. She presented normotensive, hypokalemic, hypocalcemic, normophosphatemic, and hypercalciuric. Marked hyperparathyroidism was evident. Urinary cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) excretion did not increase in response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) infusion, indicating renal resistance to PTH. X-rays and bone biopsy revealed severe osteitis fibrosa cystica, confirming skeletal responsiveness to PTH. Renal potassium wasting, suppressed plasma renin activity, and elevated plasma and urinary aldosterone levels accompanied her hypokalemia, suggesting primary hyperaldosteronism. Hypokalemia resolved with spironolactone and, when combined with dietary sodium restriction, urinary calcium excretion fell and hypocalcemia improved, in accord with the known positive association between sodium intake and calcium excretion. Calcitriol and oral calcium supplements did not suppress the chronic hyperparathyroidism nor did they reduce aldosterone levels. Over time, hyperparathyroid bone disease progressed with pathologic fractures and persistent pain. In 2004, PTH levels increased further in association with worsening chronic kidney disease. Eventually hypercalcemia and hypertension developed. Localizing studies in 2005 suggested a left inferior parathyroid tumor. After having consistently declined, the patient finally agreed to neck exploration in January 2009. Four hyperplastic parathyroid glands were removed, followed immediately by severe hypocalcemia, attributed to "hungry bone syndrome" and hypoparathyroidism, which required prolonged hospitalization, calcium infusions, and oral calcitriol. Although her bone pain resolved, hyperaldosteronism persisted.

  1. 4-Hydroxychalcone Attenuates Hyperaldosteronism, Inflammation, and Renal Injury in Cryptochrome-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qi; Dai, Bingguang; Yang, Bo; Li, Xuelian; Liu, Yimin; Zhang, Fuling

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the preventive effects of 4-hydroxychalcone (4HCH) on resistant hypertension. We used cryptochrome-null mice, which characteristically show high plasma aldosterone levels, inflammation, and renal injury. The cryptochrome-null mice received high-salt treatment and were treated orally with 4HCH 10 mg/kg, 4HCH 20 mg/kg, and 4HCH 40 mg/kg, respectively. The salt administration in cryptochrome-null mice is able to induce an increase in systolic pressure which is associated with hyperaldosteronism, inflammation, and kidney injury. Treatment with 40 mg/kg 4HCH reduced systolic hypertension, serum IL-1β, and TNF-α levels and suppressed the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and renal injury. The impact of 4HCH on the hyperaldosteronism, inflammation, and kidney injury provides new insights for future development of therapeutic strategies in resistant hypertension. PMID:25003119

  2. A novel genetic locus for low renin hypertension: familial hyperaldosteronism type II maps to chromosome 7 (7p22)

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, A.; Torpy, D.; Stowasser, M.; Taymans, S.; Lin, J. P.; Huggard, P.; Gordon, R.; Stratakis, C.

    2000-01-01

    Familial hyperaldosteronism type II (FH-II) is caused by adrenocortical hyperplasia or aldosteronoma or both and is frequently transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Unlike FH type I (FH-I), which results from fusion of the CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 genes, hyperaldosteronism in FH-II is not glucocorticoid remediable. A large family with FH-II was used for a genome wide search and its members were evaluated by measuring the aldosterone:renin ratio. In those with an increased ratio, FH-II was confirmed by fludrocortisone suppression testing. After excluding most of the genome, genetic linkage was identified with a maximum two point lod score of 3.26 at θ=0, between FH-II in this family and the polymorphic markers D7S511, D7S517, and GATA24F03 on chromosome 7, a region that corresponds to cytogenetic band 7p22. This is the first identified locus for FH-II; its molecular elucidation may provide further insight into the aetiology of primary aldosteronism.


Keywords: chromosome 7; aldosterone; familial hyperaldosteronism type II; hypertension PMID:11073536

  3. Galectin-3 blockade inhibits cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in experimental hyperaldosteronism and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rousseau, Elodie; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is accompanied by molecular inflammation and fibrosis, 2 mechanisms that finally affect cardiac function. At cardiac level, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis, although the precise mechanisms are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We herein investigated whether Gal-3 inhibition could block aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis and its potential role in cardiac damage associated with hypertension. Aldosterone-salt-treated rats presented hypertension, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis that were prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 with modified citrus pectin. Cardiac inflammation and fibrosis presented in spontaneously hypertensive rats were prevented by modified citrus pectin treatment, whereas Gal-3 blockade did not modify blood pressure levels. In the absence of blood pressure modifications, Gal-3 knockout mice were resistant to aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation. In human cardiac fibroblasts, aldosterone increased Gal-3 expression via its mineralocorticoid receptor. Gal-3 and aldosterone enhanced proinflammatory and profibrotic markers, as well as metalloproteinase activities in human cardiac fibroblasts, effects that were not observed in Gal-3-silenced cells treated with aldosterone. In experimental hyperaldosteronism, the increase in Gal-3 expression was associated with cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, alterations that were prevented by Gal-3 blockade independently of blood pressure levels. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a new molecular mechanism linking cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in situations with high-aldosterone levels, such as hypertension.

  4. Hyperaldosteronism and cardiovascular risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Silvia; Petramala, Luigi; Mastroluca, Daniela; Petraglia, Emanuela; Di Gaeta, Alessandro; Indino, Elena; Panebianco, Valeria; Ciccariello, Mauro; Shahabadi, Hossein H; Galani, Alessandro; Letizia, Claudio; D'Angelo, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), often discovered before the onset of renal failure, albeit the pathogenetic mechanisms are not well elucidated. Hyperaldosteronism in ADPKD may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and progression of cardiorenal disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in ADPKD patients and identify some surrogate biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.We have enrolled 27 hypertensive ADPKD patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min, evaluating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), inflammatory indexes, nutritional status, homocysteine (Hcy), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), mineral metabolism, microalbuminuria, and surrogate markers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), ankle/brachial index (ABI), flow mediated dilation (FMD), renal resistive index (RRI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI)]. Furthermore, we have carried out the morpho-functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-field 3 T Magnetom Avanto.We have divided patients into group A, with normal plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and group B with PA, present in 9 (33%) of overall ADPKD patients. Respect to group A, group B showed a significant higher mean value of LVMI, HOMA-IR and Hcy (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, P = 0.018; respectively), and a lower value of FMD and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-VitD) (P = 0.037, P = 0.019; respectively) with a higher prevalence of non-dipper pattern at Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) (65% vs 40%, P < 0.05) at an early stage of the disease.In this study, we showed a high prevalence of PA in ADPKD patients, associated to higher LVMI, HOMA-IR, Hcy, lower FMD, and 25-OH-VitD, considered as surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, compared to ADPKD patients with normal PAC values. Our

  5. Idiopathic primary hyperaldosteronism: normalization of plasma aldosterone after one month withdrawal of long-term therapy with aldosterone-receptor antagonist potassium canrenoate.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; Scaroni, C; Mattarello, M J; Fiore, C; Albiger, N; Sartorato, P

    2005-03-01

    We have re-evaluated 15 patients with idiopathic primary aldosteronism one month after withdrawal of therapy with aldosterone-receptor antagonist potassium canrenoate. Therapy had lasted for 3 to 24 yr. Median blood pressure (BP) in the sitting position at the time of diagnosis was 160/100 (ranges 150-200/95-110 mmHg); while 1 month after withdrawal of therapy median BP was 145/90 (ranges 125-160/80-100 mmHg). One month after withdrawal, the ratio aldosterone (ng/dl)/plasma renin activity (ng/ml/h) in the upright position was increased only in 3 cases (median 18, range 6.1-125). We found a significant inverse correlation between the upright aldosterone/plasma renin activity (aldo/PRA) ratio, 1 month after withdrawal, and the number of years of therapy with potassium canrenoate. We conclude that long-term therapy with the aldosterone-receptor blocker, potassium canrenoate, can normalize the aldo/PRA ratio in many cases of idiopathic primary hyperaldosteronism after one-month withdrawal of the drug. These data are consistent with possible regression of idiopathic primary hyperaldosteronism after long-term therapy with potassium canrenoate, or in alternative to a persistent effect of potassium canrenoate, on aldosterone synthesis. PMID:15952408

  6. Novel Somatic Mutations in Primary Hyperaldosteronism are related to the Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Healy, James M.; Thiel, Anne; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Brown, Taylor C.; Kunstman, John W.; Horne, Matthew J.; Dietrich, Dimo; Riemer, Jasmin; Kücükköylü, Seher; Reimer, Esther N.; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Goh, Gerald; Kristiansen, Glen; Mahajan, Amit; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Carling, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are important causes of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CTNNB1 have been described in APAs. Objective To characterize clinical-pathological features in APAs and unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and correlate them with genotypes. Design Retrospective study. Subjects and Measurements Clinical and pathological characteristics of 90 APAs and 7 diffusely or focally hyperplastic adrenal glands were reviewed, and samples were examined for mutations in known disease genes by Sanger or exome sequencing. Results Mutation frequencies were: KCNJ5, 37.1%; CACNA1D, 10.3%; ATP1A1, 8.2%; ATP2B3, 3.1%; CTNNB1, 2.1%. Previously unidentified mutations included I157K, F154C and 2 insertions (I150_G151insM and I144_E145insAI) in KCNJ5, all close to the selectivity filter, V426G_V427Q_A428_L433del in ATP2B3, and A39Efs*3 in CTNNB1. Mutations in KCNJ5 were associated with female, and other mutations with male gender (p=0.007). On computed tomography, KCNJ5-mutant tumors displayed significantly greater diameter (p=0.023), calculated area (p=0.002) and lower pre-contrast Hounsfield Units (p=0.0002) vs. tumors with mutations in other genes. Accordingly, KCNJ5-mutant tumors were predominantly comprised of lipid-rich fasciculata-like clear cells, whereas other tumors were heterogeneous (p=5×10−6 vs. non-KCNJ5 mutant and p=0.0003 vs. wild type tumors, respectively). CACNA1D mutations were present in two samples with hyperplasia without adenoma. Conclusions KCNJ5 mutant tumors appear to be associated with fasciculata-like clear cell predominant histology and tend to be larger with a characteristic imaging phenotype. Novel somatic KCNJ5 variants likely cause adenomas by loss of potassium selectivity, similar to previously described mutations. PMID:26252618

  7. Resolution of Hyperreninemia, Secondary Hyperaldosteronism, and Hypokalemia With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy in a Patient With Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-11-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with a history of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and recurrent episodes of severe hypokalemia requiring hospitalization. Imaging revealed a pancreatic mass with liver metastases, histologically confirmed to be a neuroendocrine tumor. Elevated active renin and aldosterone levels were identified, and the patient was treated with 4 induction cycles of Lu-DOTATATE, which resolved the diarrhea, nausea, and hypokalemia, and normalized the renin and aldosterone levels. After 3 additional maintenance Lu-DOTATATE treatments, the pancreatic tumor had decreased in size, was deemed operable, and was resected. She remains on maintenance Lu-DOTATATE therapy with progression-free survival of 45 months thus far.

  8. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  9. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension. PMID:14665720

  10. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    ... in uncontrolled diabetes and during recovery from acute kidney failure High blood calcium level ( hypercalcemia ) Hyperaldosteronism Malabsorption syndromes, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease Malnutrition Medicines including amphotericin, ...

  11. A curious case of paralysis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is found in up to 13% of patients with hypertension. This article describes a patient with hypokalemia, hypertension, and periodic paralysis that were caused by primary hyperaldosteronism. Plasma aldosterone concentration to plasma renin activity ratio is a common screening test, and adrenal vein sampling can be performed to determine which gland is overproducing aldosterone. Treatment with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists or adrenalectomy gives similar reductions in BP.

  12. [Use of C-arm CT for improving the hit rate for selective blood sampling from adrenal veins].

    PubMed

    Georgiades, C; Kharlip, J; Valdeig, S; Wacker, F K; Hong, K

    2009-09-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is the most common curable cause of hypertension with a prevalence of up to 12% among patients with hypertension. Selective blood sampling from adrenal veins is considered the diagnostic gold standard. However, it is underutilized due to the high technical failure rate. The use of C-arm CT during the sampling procedure can reduce or even eliminate this failure rate. If adrenal vein sampling is augmented by native C-arm CT to check for the correct catheter position, the technical success rate increases substantially. General use of this technique will result in correct diagnosis and treatment for patients with primary hyperaldosteronism.

  13. Serum aldosterone and cortisol concentrations before and after suppression with fludrocortisone in cats: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Mayu; Behrend, Ellen N; Kemppainen, Robert; Refsal, Kent; Johnson, Aime; Lee, Hollie

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is an increasingly recognized syndrome in cats, and diagnosis can be difficult. A potential diagnostic method has been reported, utilizing oral fludrocortisone administered twice daily for 4 days followed by collection of urine. In the current study, we sought to determine if blood sampling and a shorter dosing period would provide a possible means to test for primary hyperaldosteronism. Also, cortisol concentrations were measured to assess the potential of fludrocortisone to act as a glucocorticoid in cats. In phase I, 8 healthy laboratory cats were studied in a placebo-controlled, crossover design. Serum aldosterone and cortisol concentrations were measured before and on the second, third, and fourth day of treatment and compared within groups. In phase II, based on the results obtained in phase I, 8 healthy client-owned cats were administered 3 doses of fludrocortisone or placebo. Serum aldosterone and cortisol concentrations were compared before and after treatment within groups. In both phases, serum aldosterone and cortisol concentrations were significantly suppressed in fludrocortisone-treated cats. Thus, it was determined that oral administration of fludrocortisone causes suppression of serum aldosterone in healthy adult cats after only 3 doses. Further research is needed to determine the effects of oral fludrocortisone in cats with primary hyperaldosteronism and cats with other disorders causing hypertension and/or hypokalemia to determine if this protocol can be used as a tool for the definitive diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism.

  14. An Endocrine Cause of Acute Post-partum Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bretherton, Ingrid; Pattison, David; Pattison, Sarah; Varadarajan, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of acute peri-partum hypertension secondary to Conn's syndrome. The timing of presentation offers a rare insight into the hormonal physiology of pregnancy and its impact on blood pressure regulation. This case highlights the challenges of diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism in the peripartum period and the high index of suspicion required by the obstetric physician.

  15. Some considerations about evolution of idiopathic primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; Fiore, C

    2009-07-01

    The prevalence of primary aldosteronism has increased since many patients who were previously considered as being affected by low renin essential hypertension are actually satisfying the new diagnostic criteria using plasma aldosterone/ plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio. Many of these cases could be classified as subclinical hyperaldosteronism, having normal aldosterone and low PRA, or in alternative the normal range of aldosterone should be revised. Idiopathic hyperaldosteronism can, in many cases, be considered as an evolutive disease: it can be hypothesized that the biochemical picture can be preceded by essential hypertension and that, after several years, primary aldosteronism can evolve back to essential hypertension due to age-related reduced vascular and adrenal sensitivity to angiotensin II. This effect is also evident after longterm treatment with aldosterone receptors blockers and therefore it possible that aldosterone-receptors blockers are able to normalize the sensitivity of glomerulosa to angiotensin II even after long-term withdrawal. The use of aldosterone receptors blockers prevents cardiovascular complications due to local aldosterone effect at the level of endothelium and mononuclear leukocytes; therefore, these drugs should be also considered for therapy of patients with hypertension. It is not excluded that aldosterone receptor blockers could prevent the onset of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism and its complications in patients with hypertension without primary hyperaldosteronism. From all these considerations it follows that the concept of normal range of aldosterone should be revised and the use of aldosterone receptor blockers should be revisited. PMID:19893360

  16. Pituitary prolactinoma, pancreatic glucagonomas, and aldosterone-producing adrenal cortical adenoma: a suggested variant of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I.

    PubMed

    Gould, E; Albores-Saavedra, J; Shuman, J

    1987-12-01

    A case of a pituitary prolactinoma, pancreatic glucagonoma, and an aldosterone-producing adrenal cortical adenoma coexisting in a 65-year-old man is reported. This case may represent a sporadic variant of the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type I first manifested by hyperaldosteronism.

  17. Laparoscopic Single Site Adrenalectomy Using a Conventional Laparoscope and Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Modesto J; LeMasters, Patrick; Newell, Phillipa; Divino, Celia; Weber, Kaare J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We present a case of Laparoendoscopic Single Site Surgery (LESS) left adrenalectomy performed with a conventional laparoscope and instruments. Methods: A 45-year-old male was diagnosed with hyperaldosteronism. Computed tomography detected a left adrenal nodule. Bilateral adrenal vein sampling was consistent with a left-sided source for hyperaldosteronism. Results: Total operative time for LESS left adrenalectomy was 120 minutes. The surgery was performed with conventional instruments, a standard 5-mm laparoscope, and a SILS port, with no additional incisions or trocars needed. No complications occurred, and the patient reported an uneventful recovery. Conclusions: LESS adrenalectomy is a feasible procedure. Although articulating instruments and laparoscopes may offer advantages, LESS adrenalectomy can be done without these. PMID:21902983

  18. Use of computed tomography in diagnosing the cause of primary aldosteronism

    SciTech Connect

    White, E.A.; Schambelan, M.; Rost, C.R.; Biglieri, E.G.; Moss, A.A.; Korobkin, M.

    1980-12-25

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 22 consecutive patients with primary aldosteronism to evaluate the usefulness of this technique in diagnosing and locating aldosterone-producing adenomas. Sixteen patients had severe hypokalemia, hyperaldosteronism, and elevated plasma levels of 18-hydroxycorticosterone suggestive of an adenoma. In 12 of these 16, a unilateral adrenal mass was demonstrated clearly, and in all 11 who had surgery an adenoma was confirmed. In the other four patients in this group, one adrenal gland was normal and the other was either not seen adequately or had minor abnormalities that could not be definitely classified; and adenoma was found in the poorly visualized gland in each of the two patients who had surgery. The remaining six patients, who had milder biochemical abnormalities suggestive of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism, had bilateral adrenal enlargement or normal-appearing glands on scan and were not surgically explored.

  19. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as diuretics: Can congestive heart failure learn from liver failure?

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Amirali; Ortiz, Fernando; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Schrier, Robert W; Colombo, Paolo C

    2015-05-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, understanding the pathophysiology and management of the patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic resistance, yet to be clearly defined, is a major hurdle. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is a pivotal factor in pathogenesis of sodium retention, refractory congestion in heart failure (HF) as well as diuretic resistance. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis who suffer from ascites, similar pathophysiological complications have been recognized. Administration of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has been well established in management of cirrhotic patients. However, this strategy in patients with ADHF has not been well studied. This article will discuss the potential use of natriuretic doses of MRAs to overcome the secondary hyperaldosteronism as an alternative diuretic regimen in patients with HF.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as diuretics: Can congestive heart failure learn from liver failure?

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Fernando; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Schrier, Robert W.; Colombo, Paolo C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, understanding the pathophysiology and management of the patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic resistance, yet to be clearly defined, is a major hurdle. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is a pivotal factor in pathogenesis of sodium retention, refractory congestion in heart failure (HF) as well as diuretic resistance. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis who suffer from ascites, similar pathophysiological complications have been recognized. Administration of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has been well established in management of cirrhotic patients. However, this strategy in patients with ADHF has not been well studied. This article will discuss the potential use of natriuretic doses of MRAs to overcome the secondary hyperaldosteronism as an alternative diuretic regimen in patients with HF. PMID:25447845

  1. Plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension in the absence of left ventricular heart failure: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Landzberg, Michael J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Waxman, Aaron B.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Elevated levels of the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone are recognized as a modifiable contributor to the pathophysiology of select cardiovascular diseases due to left heart failure. In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary vascular remodelling induces right ventricular dysfunction and heart failure in the absence of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Hyperaldosteronism has emerged as a promoter of pulmonary vascular disease in experimental animal models of PAH; however, the extent to which hyperaldosteronism is associated with PAH in patients is unknown. Thus, the central aim of the current study is to determine if hyperaldosteronism is an unrecognized component of the PAH clinical syndrome. Methods and results Plasma aldosterone levels and invasive cardiopulmonary haemodynamic measurements were obtained for 25 patients referred for evaluation of unexplained dyspnoea or pulmonary hypertension. Compared with controls (n = 5), patients with PAH (n = 18) demonstrated significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels (1200.4 ± 423.9 vs. 5959.1 ± 2817.9 pg/mL, P < 0.02), mean pulmonary artery pressure (21.4 ± 5.0 vs. 45.5 ± 10.4 mmHg, P < 0.002), and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (1.41 ± 0.6 vs. 7.3 ± 3.8 Wood units, P < 0.003) without differences in LV ejection fraction or pulmonary capillary wedge pressure between groups. Among patients not prescribed PAH-specific pharmacotherapy prior to cardiac catheterization, a subgroup of the cohort with severe pulmonary hypertension, aldosterone levels correlated positively with PVR (r = 0.72, P < 0.02) and transpulmonary gradient (r = 0.69, P < 0.02), but correlated inversely with cardiac output (r = –0.79, P < 0.005). Conclusions These data demonstrate a novel cardiopulmonary haemodynamic profile associated with hyperaldosteronism in patients: diminished cardiac output due to pulmonary vascular disease in the absence of LV heart failure. PMID:23111998

  2. Nephrocalcinosis as adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Luiken, G P M; van Riemsdijk, I C; Petrij, F; Zandbergen, A A M; Dees, A

    2014-02-01

    Bartter syndrome consists a group of rare autosomal-recessive renal tubulopathies characterised by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria and hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism. It is classified into five types. Mutations in the KCNJ1 gene (classified as type II) usually cause the neonatal form of Bartter syndrome. We describe an adult patient with a homozygous KCNJ1 mutation resulting in a remarkably mild phenotype of neonatal type Bartter syndrome. PMID:24659592

  3. [Newborn infants of mothers with endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Ponte, C

    1989-01-01

    When pregnancy and endocrinological disease evolve together, the course of the endocrinological disease and/or the pregnancy and/or the development of the fetus can be altered. Pathophysiological interactions and their therapeutic consequences are reviewed regarding 21-hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia, ovary and adrenal virilizing tumours, Addison disease, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, Graves' disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, primary hypothyroidism, primary hypo- and hyperparathyroidism and bromocriptine treatment of hyperprolactinaemia.

  4. Peripheral Plasma 18-Oxocortisol Can Discriminate Unilateral Adenoma from Bilateral Diseases in Primary Aldosteronism Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Iwakura, Yoshitsugu; Omata, Kei; Kudo, Masataka; Takase, Kei; Seiji, Kazumasa; Sasamoto, Hidehiko; Honma, Seijiro; Okuyama, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kouwa; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Rainey, William E.; Arai, Yoichi; Sasano, Hironobu; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal venous sampling is currently the only reliable method to distinguish unilateral from bilateral diseases in primary aldosteronism. In this study, we attempted to determine whether peripheral plasma levels of 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol could contribute to the clinical differentiation between aldosteronoma and bilateral hyperaldosteronism in 234 patients with primary aldosteronism, including CT-detectable aldosteronoma (n=113) and bilateral hyperaldosteronism (n=121), all of whom underwent CT and adrenal venous sampling. All aldosteronomas were surgically resected and the accuracy of diagnosis was clinically and histopathologically confirmed. 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol were measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. ROC analysis of 18-oxocortisol discrimination of adenoma from hyperplasia demonstrated sensitivity/specificity of 0.83/0.99 at a cutoff value of 4.7ng/dL, compared to that based upon 18-hydroxycortisol (sensitivity/specificity: 0.62/0.96). 18-oxocortisol levels above 6.1ng/dL and/or of aldosterone above 32.7ng/dL were found in 95 of 113 aldosteronoma patients (84%) but in none of 121 bilateral hyperaldosteronism, 30 of whom harbored CT-detectable unilateral nonfunctioning nodules in their adrenals. In addition, 18-oxocortisol levels below 1.2ng/dL, the lowest in aldosteronoma, were found 52 out of the 121 (43%) patients with bilateral hyperaldosteronism. Further analysis of 27 patients with CT-undetectable micro aldosteronomas revealed that eight of these 27 patients had CT-detectable contralateral adrenal nodules, the highest values of 18-oxocortisol and aldosterone were 4.8 and 24.5ng/dL, respectively, both below their cutoff levels indicated above. The peripheral plasma 18-oxocortisol concentrations served not only to differentiate aldosteronoma, but also could serve to avoid unnecessary surgery for nonfunctioning adrenocortical nodules concurrent with hyperplasia or microadenoma. PMID:25776074

  5. Functioning unilateral adrenocortical carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gójska-Zygner, Olga; Lechowski, Roman; Zygner, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    An 11-year-old, 24-kg, intact female Siberian husky dog in anestrus had a 2-month history of polyuria and polydipsia. The dog had signs of mineralocorticoid excess such as hypertension and hypokalemia refractory to potassium supplementation. Abdominal ultrasound revealed an irregular mass in the left adrenal gland. The ACTH stimulation test for aldosterone concentration did not reveal hyperaldosteronism. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed and histopathology identified adrenal cortical carcinoma. All clinical signs of mineralocorticoid excess ceased after surgery.

  6. The Current Role of Venous Sampling in the Localization of Endocrine Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jeshen H. G. Drake, William; Matson, Matthew

    2007-07-15

    Endocrine venous sampling plays a specific role in the diagnosis of endocrine disorders. In this article, we cover inferior petrosal sinus sampling, selective parathyroid venous sampling, hepatic venous sampling with arterial stimulation, adrenal venous sampling, and ovarian venous sampling. We review their indications and the scientific evidence justifying these indications in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic endocrine tumors, Conn's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytomas, and androgen-secreting ovarian tumors. For each sampling technique, we compare its diagnostic accuracy with that of other imaging techniques and, where possible, look at how it impacts patient management. Finally, we incorporate venous sampling into diagnostic algorithms used at our institution.

  7. Endocrine hypertension in small animals.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Claudia E; Schellenberg, Stefan; Wenger, Monique

    2010-03-01

    Hypertension is classified as idiopathic or secondary. In animals with idiopathic hypertension, persistently elevated blood pressure is not caused by an identifiable underlying or predisposing disease. Until recently, more than 95% of cases of hypertension in humans were diagnosed as idiopathic. New studies have shown, however, a much higher prevalence of secondary causes, such as primary hyperaldosteronism. In dogs and cats, secondary hypertension is the most prevalent form and is subclassified into renal and endocrine hypertension. This review focuses on the most common causes of endocrine hypertension in dogs and cats.

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  9. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  10. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  11. Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Florencia; Dluhy, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    Glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is a hereditary form of primary hyperaldosteronism and the most common monogenic cause of hypertension. A chimeric gene duplication leads to ectopic aldosterone synthase activity in the cortisol-producing zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex, under the regulation of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). Hypertension typically develops in childhood, and may be refractory to standard therapies. Hypokalemia is uncommon in the absence of treatment with diuretics. The discovery of the genetic basis of the disorder has permitted the development of accurate diagnostic testing. Glucocorticoid suppression of ACTH is the mainstay of treatment; alternative treatments include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

  12. Hypertensive Crisis and Left Ventricular Thrombi after an Upper Respiratory Infection during the Long-term Use of Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Natsuko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Kato, Yukari; Suga, Norihiro; Yoshino, Masabumi; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman who had been using oral contraceptives for 10 years developed hypertensive crisis with papilloedema after an upper respiratory infection. Laboratory data showed hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism and elevated levels of fibrinogen, fibrin, and fibrinogen degradation products. Echocardiography demonstrated two masses (18 mm) in the left ventricle. On the fourth hospital day, cerebral infarction, renal infarction, and upper mesenteric artery occlusion suddenly occurred despite the blood pressure being well-controlled using anti-hypertensive drugs. Echocardiography revealed the disappearance of the left ventricular masses, which suggested left ventricular thrombi. Cessation of the contraceptives and administration of heparin, warfarin, and anti-platelets drugs improved her general condition.

  13. Outcomes of drug-based and surgical treatments for primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Olivier; Lorthioir, Aurelien; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Plouin, Pierre-François; Amar, Laurence

    2015-05-01

    Treatments for primary aldosteronism (PA) aim to correct or prevent the deleterious consequences of hyperaldosteronism: hypertension, hypokalemia, and direct target organ damage. Patients with unilateral PA considered fit for surgery can undergo laparoscopic adrenalectomy, which significantly decreases blood pressure (BP) and medications in most cases and cures hypertension in about 40%. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA) are used to treat patients with bilateral PA and those with unilateral PA if surgery is not possible or not desired. Spironolactone is more potent than eplerenone, but high doses are poorly tolerated in men. MRA can be replaced or complemented with epithelial sodium channel blockers, such as amiloride. Thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers are used when the first-line drugs are insufficient to control BP. Dietary sodium restriction should be implemented in all cases because the deleterious consequences of hyperaldosteronism are dependent on salt loading. Several studies comparing the results of surgery and MRA have reported no differences in terms of BP, serum potassium concentration, or cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, although the benefits of treatment tend to be observed sooner with surgery. Patients with PA display relative glomerular hyperfiltration, which is reversed by specific treatment, revealing CKD in 30% of patients. However, further kidney damage is lessened by the treatment of PA. PMID:25908468

  14. Gene mutations that promote adrenal aldosterone production, sodium retention, and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moraitis, Andreas G; Rainey, William E; Auchus, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common form of secondary hypertension, found in about 5% of all hypertension cases, and up to 20% of resistant hypertension cases. The most common forms of PA are an aldosterone-producing adenoma and idiopathic (bilateral) hyperaldosteronism. Rare genetic forms of PA exist and, until recently, the only condition with a known genetic mechanism was familial hyperaldosteronism type 1, also known as glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (FHA1/GRA). FHA type 3 has now been shown to derive from germline mutations in the KCNJ5 gene, which encodes a potassium channel found on the adrenal cells. Remarkably, somatic mutations in KCNJ5 are found in about one-third of aldosterone-producing adenomas, and these mutations are likely to be involved in their pathogenesis. Finally, mutations in the genes encoding an L-type calcium channel (CACNA1D) and in genes encoding a sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (ATP1A1) or a calcium adenosine triphosphatase (ATP2B3) are found in other aldosterone-producing adenomas. These findings provide a working model, in which adenoma formation and/or aldosterone production in many cases derives from increased calcium entry, which drives the pathogenesis of primary aldosteronism. PMID:24399884

  15. Aldosterone increases kidney tubule cell oxidants through calcium-mediated activation of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Schinzel, Reinhard; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic hyperaldosteronism has been associated with an increased cancer risk. We recently showed that aldosterone causes an increase in cell oxidants, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying aldosterone-induced increase in cell oxidants in kidney tubule cells. Aldosterone caused an increase in both reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen (RNS) species. The involvement of the activation of NADPH oxidase in the increase in cellular oxidants was demonstrated by the inhibitory action of the NADPH oxidase inhibitors DPI, apocynin, and VAS2870 and by the migration of the p47 subunit to the membrane. NADPH oxidase activation occurred as a consequence of an increase in cellular calcium levels and was mediated by protein kinase C. The prevention of RNS increase by BAPTA-AM, W-7, and L-NAME indicates a calcium-calmodulin activation of NOS. A similar pattern of effects of the NADPH oxidase and NOS inhibitors was observed for aldosterone-induced DNA damage and NF-κB activation, both central to the pathogenesis of chronic aldosteronism. In summary, this paper demonstrates that aldosterone, via the mineralocorticoid receptor, causes an increase in kidney cell oxidants, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation through a calcium-mediated activation of NADPH oxidase and NOS. Therapies targeting calcium, NOS, and NADPH oxidase could prevent the adverse effects of hyperaldosteronism on kidney function as well as its potential oncogenic action.

  16. Abnormal membrane sodium transport in Liddle's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J D; Lapey, A; Simopoulos, P; Bravo, E L

    1971-11-01

    We have documented the presence of abnormal sodium transport in Liddle's syndrome by measuring sodium concentration, sodium influx, and fractional sodium outflux in vitro in erythrocytes from normal subjects, two patients with Liddle's syndrome, and one patient with primary hyperaldosteronism. Sodium influx and fractional sodium outflux, but not sodium concentration, were significantly increased in patients with Liddle's syndrome. Sodium outflux in a patient with primary hyperaldosteronism did not differ significantly from normal. These alterations of sodium transport in erythrocytes from patients with Liddle's syndrome were not attributable to circulating levels of aldosterone, renin, angiotensin, or serum potassium. Furthermore, changes in aldosterone secretory rate and levels of circulating renin produced by varying dietary sodium intake, did not alter sodium influx or fractional sodium outflux in either patients with Liddle's syndrome or normal subjects. The response of fractional sodium outflux and sodium influx to ouabain, ethacrynic acid, and to changes in the cation composition of the incubation medium suggests that the increased sodium fluxes in Liddle's syndrome do not result solely from a quantitative increase in those components of sodium transport which occur in normal human erythrocytes. Instead, at least a portion of the increased erythrocyte sodium transport in Liddle's syndrome represents a component of sodium transport which does not occur in normal human erythrocytes.

  17. Myocardial pathology induced by aldosterone is dependent on non-canonical activities of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cannavo, Alessandro; Liccardo, Daniela; Eguchi, Akito; Elliott, Katherine J.; Traynham, Christopher J.; Ibetti, Jessica; Eguchi, Satoru; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-aldosteronism is associated with myocardial dysfunction including induction of cardiac fibrosis and maladaptive hypertrophy. Mechanisms of these cardiotoxicities are not fully understood. Here we show that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation by aldosterone leads to pathological myocardial signalling mediated by mitochondrial G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) pro-death activity and GRK5 pro-hypertrophic action. Moreover, these MR-dependent GRK2 and GRK5 non-canonical activities appear to involve cross-talk with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R). Most importantly, we show that ventricular dysfunction caused by chronic hyper-aldosteronism in vivo is completely prevented in cardiac Grk2 knockout mice (KO) and to a lesser extent in Grk5 KO mice. However, aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is totally prevented in Grk5 KO mice. We also show human data consistent with MR activation status in heart failure influencing GRK2 levels. Therefore, our study uncovers GRKs as targets for ameliorating pathological cardiac effects associated with high-aldosterone levels. PMID:26932512

  18. Management of hypertension in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Aronova, Anna; Iii, Thomas J Fahey; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2014-05-26

    Hypertension causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, owing to its deleterious effects on the cardiovascular and renal systems. Primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of reversible hypertension, affecting 5%-18% of adults with hypertension. PA is estimated to result from bilateral adrenal hyperplasia in two-thirds of patients, and from unilateral aldosterone-secreting adenoma in approximately one-third. Suspected cases are initially screened by measurement of the plasma aldosterone-renin-ratio, and may be confirmed by additional noninvasive tests. Localization of aldostosterone hypersecretion is then determined by computed tomography imaging, and in selective cases with adrenal vein sampling. Solitary adenomas are managed by laparoscopic or robotic resection, while bilateral hyperplasia is treated with mineralocorticoid antagonists. Biochemical cure following adrenalectomy occurs in 99% of patients, and hemodynamic improvement is seen in over 90%, prompting a reduction in quantity of anti-hypertensive medications in most patients. End-organ damage secondary to hypertension and excess aldosterone is significantly improved by both surgical and medical treatment, as manifested by decreased left ventricular hypertrophy, arterial stiffness, and proteinuria, highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperaldosteronism. Although numerous independent predictors of resolution of hypertension after adrenalectomy for unilateral adenomas have been described, the Aldosteronoma Resolution Score is a validated multifactorial model convenient for use in daily clinical practice. PMID:24944753

  19. Management of hypertension in primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, Anna; III, Thomas J Fahey; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, owing to its deleterious effects on the cardiovascular and renal systems. Primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of reversible hypertension, affecting 5%-18% of adults with hypertension. PA is estimated to result from bilateral adrenal hyperplasia in two-thirds of patients, and from unilateral aldosterone-secreting adenoma in approximately one-third. Suspected cases are initially screened by measurement of the plasma aldosterone-renin-ratio, and may be confirmed by additional noninvasive tests. Localization of aldostosterone hypersecretion is then determined by computed tomography imaging, and in selective cases with adrenal vein sampling. Solitary adenomas are managed by laparoscopic or robotic resection, while bilateral hyperplasia is treated with mineralocorticoid antagonists. Biochemical cure following adrenalectomy occurs in 99% of patients, and hemodynamic improvement is seen in over 90%, prompting a reduction in quantity of anti-hypertensive medications in most patients. End-organ damage secondary to hypertension and excess aldosterone is significantly improved by both surgical and medical treatment, as manifested by decreased left ventricular hypertrophy, arterial stiffness, and proteinuria, highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperaldosteronism. Although numerous independent predictors of resolution of hypertension after adrenalectomy for unilateral adenomas have been described, the Aldosteronoma Resolution Score is a validated multifactorial model convenient for use in daily clinical practice. PMID:24944753

  20. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  1. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of mineralocorticoid disorders.

    PubMed

    Magill, Steven B

    2014-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is a major regulator of blood pressure control, fluid, and electrolyte balance in humans. Chronic activation of mineralocorticoid production leads to dysregulation of the cardiovascular system and to hypertension. The key mineralocorticoid is aldosterone. Hyperaldosteronism causes sodium and fluid retention in the kidney. Combined with the actions of angiotensin II, chronic elevation in aldosterone leads to detrimental effects in the vasculature, heart, and brain. The adverse effects of excess aldosterone are heavily dependent on increased dietary salt intake as has been demonstrated in animal models and in humans. Hypertension develops due to complex genetic influences combined with environmental factors. In the last two decades, primary aldosteronism has been found to occur in 5% to 13% of subjects with hypertension. In addition, patients with hyperaldosteronism have more end organ manifestations such as left ventricular hypertrophy and have significant cardiovascular complications including higher rates of heart failure and atrial fibrillation compared to similarly matched patients with essential hypertension. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of primary aldosteronism will be extensively reviewed. There are many pitfalls in the diagnosis and confirmation of the disorder that will be discussed. Other rare forms of hyper- and hypo-aldosteronism and unusual disorders of hypertension will also be reviewed in this article.

  2. Reversible cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by conditional expression of an antisense mRNA of the mineralocorticoid receptor in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Ahmed T.; Escoubet, Brigitte; Puttini, Stefania; Cailmail, Stephane; Delage, Vanessa; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Bocchi, Brigitte; Peuchmaur, Michel; Delcayre, Claude; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a common feature in the evolution of cardiac disease. Among the determinants of cardiac failure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system has a central role, and antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we questioned the role of the MR, not of aldosterone, on heart function, using an inducible and cardiac-specific transgenic mouse model. We have generated a conditional knock-down model by expressing solely in the heart an antisense mRNA directed against the murine MR, a transcription factor with unknown targets in cardiomyocytes. Within 2–3 mo, mice developed severe heart failure and cardiac fibrosis in the absence of hypertension or chronic hyperaldosteronism. Moreover, cardiac failure and fibrosis were fully reversible when MR antisense mRNA expression was subsequently suppressed. PMID:11997477

  3. Update on diagnosis and treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2011-07-01

    Resistant hypertension is an increasingly common medical problem, and patients with this condition are at a high risk of cardiovascular events. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is unknown, but data from clinical trials suggest that 20% to 30% of hypertensive individuals may be resistant to antihypertensive treatment. The evaluation of these patients is focused on identifying true resistant hypertension and contributing and secondary causes of hypertension, including hyperaldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic kidney disease, renal artery stenosis, and pheochromocytoma. Treatment includes removal of contributing factors, appropriate management of secondary causes, and use of effective multidrug regimens. More established approaches, such as low dietary salt and mineralocorticoid receptor blockers, and new technologies, such as carotid stimulation and renal denervation, have been used in the management of patients with resistant hypertension.

  4. [Diuretic-Abuse in Chronic Bulimia Nervosa--Case Report and Clinical Management].

    PubMed

    Greetfeld, Martin; Bröckel-Ristevski, Nicole; Fumi, Markus; Cuntz, Ulrich; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    We give account of a patient, who works in health care, with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a long term abuse of Furosemide. Due to patients' tendency to conceal addictive behavior and symptoms of BN, the prevalence of purging behavior caused by the intake of diuretics is difficult to quantify 10% of BN patients exhibit a long-term harmful abuse. Discontinuation of diuretics causes the development of edema, attributable to pathophysiological changes with hyperaldosteronism. These can lead to renewed escalation of purging behaviour, provoked either by phobia of weight gain or by unbearable feelings of tension in the facial area or in the legs. For an adequate clinical management, it is vital to have thorough knowledge of the pathophysiological context which consists of psychoeducation, provision of information, treatment of water-electrolyte imbalance and, in individual cases, the administration of aldosterone antagonists.

  5. [Arterial hypertension secondary to endocrine disorders].

    PubMed

    Minder, Anna; Zulewski, Henryk

    2015-06-01

    Endocrine hypertension offers a potentially curative therapy if the underlying cause is identified and treated accordingly. In contrast to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension especially in the elderly, the classical endocrine causes remain a rare entity. Among patients with arterial hypertension the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome or pheochromocytoma is less than 1%. Primary hyperaldosteronism is more frequent with a reported prevalence of up to 9%. In order to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially harmful evaluations and therapies due to the limited sensitivity and specificity of the critical endocrine tests it is mandatory to limit the exploration for endocrine causes to preselected patients with high pretest probability for an endocrine disorder. Younger age at manifestation of arterial hypertension or drug resistant hypertension together with other clinical signs of an endocrine disorder should raise the suspicion and prompt the appropriate evaluation.

  6. [New insights into the pathophysiology of oedema in nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rondon-Berrios, H

    2011-01-01

    Oedema is a common clinical manifestation of nephrotic syndrome. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of sodium retention in nephrotic syndrome has been intensely debated for decades. Several clinical and experimental observations argue against the classic or "underfill" hypothesis of oedema formation in nephrotic syndrome. In many patients, oedema formation in nephrotic syndrome is due to the kidney being intrinsically unable to excrete salt and is unrelated to systemic factors (i.e. hypoalbuminaemia, decreased “effective” arterial blood volume, and secondary hyperaldosteronism). The cortical collecting duct is the nephron site of sodium retention in nephrotic syndrome. Activation of the epithelial sodium channel in the cortical collecting duct is responsible for sodium retention in nephrotic syndrome. In nephrotic syndrome, a defective glomerular filtration barrier allows the passage of proteolytic enzymes or their precursors, which have the ability to activate the epithelial sodium channel, thereby causing the the subsequent sodium retention and oedema.

  7. [The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system during the extraction, concentration and reinfusion of ascitic fluid in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Giorcelli, V; Fossale, P G

    1983-01-01

    The course of hepatic cirrhosis involves alterations to the sodium-water balance, the aetiopathogenetic causes of which are still not entirely known. At first major importance was assigned to the role of secondary hyperaldosteronism which develops during the ascitic phase. This was subsequently recognised to have only a permissive rather than determinant function. Changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system and variations in hydrosaline balance as the extracellular volume (ECV) expands during the reinfusion of concentrated ascitic fluid have been studied. The data reported show that ECV expansion causes increased diuresis, natriuresis and osmolar clearance. The RAA system is suppressed and at the same time kaliuresis increases. The latter factor points up the role played by increased solute flow to the distal tube in the diuretico-metabolic response, where aldosterone plays a purely permissive part. PMID:6675585

  8. Genetic analysis in Bartter syndrome from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Sharma, Rachna; Ankur, Kumar; Khilnani, Praveen; Aggarwal, Vinay Kumar; Cheong, Hae

    2014-10-01

    Bartter syndrome is a group of inherited, salt-losing tubulopathies presenting as hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with normotensive hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism. Around 150 cases have been reported in literature till now. Mutations leading to salt losing tubulopathies are not routinely tested in Indian population. The authors have done the genetic analysis for the first time in the Bartter syndrome on two cases from India. First case was antenatal Bartter syndrome presenting with massive polyuria and hyperkalemia. Mutational analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1(ROMK) gene [p(Leu220Phe), p(Thr191Pro)]. Second case had a phenotypic presentation of classical Bartter syndrome however, genetic analysis revealed only heterozygous novel mutation in SLC12A gene p(Ala232Thr). Bartter syndrome is a clinical diagnosis and genetic analysis is recommended for prognostication and genetic counseling. PMID:24696311

  9. [Gitelman's Syndrome: from diagnosis to follow-up during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rafael Brito Foureaux; da Silveira Junior, Sérgio Antônio Dias; Silva, Cristiane Calaça Borges; Gontijo, Gisele Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Gitelman's Syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive salt-wasting nephropathy, classically characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria, metabolic alkalosis and low blood pressure. Fatigue, muscle weakness and muscle paralysis are common symptoms. Besides the typical electrolyte disturbances, others laboratory findings include hyperreninemia and secondary hyperaldosteronism. Bilateral nephrocalcinosis may occur. The treatment consists of potassium replacement and use of aldosterone antagonists. The best approach to pregnant women with GS is yet to be defined. However, we emphasize the need for ions supplementation, weight control as a clinical tool for assessing the water balance, and frequent monitoring of the fetus and amniotic fluid levels. The surgical risk associated with cesarean section in a patient with GS is not yet defined. Despite the risks related to symptomatic episodes of hypokalemia/hypomagnesemia, GS has a good prognosis when treated properly. Pregnancy imposes the need for more intensive control of the disease, but has a good prognosis for the mother and neonate. PMID:26154648

  10. Pregnancy, Primary Aldosteronism, and Adrenal CTNNB1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ada E.D.; Garg, Sumedha; Shaikh, Lalarukh Haris; Zhou, Junhua; Frankl, Fiona E. Karet; Gurnell, Mark; Happerfield, Lisa; Marker, Alison; Bienz, Mariann; Azizan, Elena A.B.; Brown, Morris J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent discoveries of somatic mutations permit the recognition of subtypes of aldosterone-producing adenomas with distinct clinical presentations and pathological features. Here we describe three women with hyperaldosteronism, two who presented in pregnancy and one who presented after menopause. Their aldosterone-producing adenomas harbored activating mutations of CTNNB1, encoding β-catenin in the Wnt cell-differentiation pathway, and expressed LHCGR and GNRHR, encoding gonadal receptors, at levels that were more than 100 times as high as the levels in other aldosterone-producing adenomas. The mutations stimulate Wnt activation and cause adrenocortical cells to de-differentiate toward their common adrenal–gonadal precursor cell type. PMID:26397949

  11. Inhibition of Galectin-3 Pathway Prevents Isoproterenol-Induced Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vergaro, Giuseppe; Prud'homme, Mathilde; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Regine; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Cohen Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is involved in inflammation, fibrogenesis, and cardiac remodeling. Previous evidence shows that Gal-3 interacts with aldosterone in promoting macrophage infiltration and vascular fibrosis and that Gal-3 genetic and pharmacological inhibition prevents remodeling in a pressure-overload animal model of heart failure. We aimed to explore the contribution of Gal-3 and aldosterone in mechanisms leading to heart failure in a murine model. Male mice with cardiac-specific hyperaldosteronism underwent isoproterenol subcutaneous injections, to be then randomized to receive placebo, a Gal-3 inhibitor (modified citrus pectin [MCP]), an aldosterone antagonist (potassium canrenoate), or MCP+canrenoate for 14 days. Isoproterenol induced a rapid and persistent decrease in left ventricular fractional shortening (-20% at day 14); this was markedly improved by treatment with either MCP or canrenoate (both P<0.001 versus placebo). MCP and canrenoate also reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and the expression of genes involved in fibrogenesis (Coll-1 and Coll-3) and macrophage infiltration (CD-68 and MCP-1). After isoproterenol, Gal-3 gene expression (P<0.05 versus placebo) and protein levels (-61% and -69% versus placebo) were decreased by both canrenoate and MCP. The combined use of antagonists of Gal-3 and aldosterone resulted in more pronounced effects on cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, when compared with either MCP or canrenoate alone. Inhibition of Gal-3 and aldosterone can reverse isoproterenol-induced left ventricular dysfunction, by reducing myocardial inflammation and fibrogenesis. Gal-3 likely participates in mechanisms of aldosterone-mediated myocardial damage in a heart failure murine model with cardiac hyperaldosteronism. Gal-3 inhibition may represent a new promising therapeutic option in heart failure. PMID:26781273

  12. [Hypokalemia in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; Falconi, Daniela; De Prisco, Ornella; Gherzi, Maurizio; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Formica, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) is a childhood epileptic encephalopathy. Incidence: 1/1.000.000/year, prevalence: 15/100.000. LGS covers 5-10% of epileptic patients and 1-2% of childhood epilepsies. Also referred to as cryptogenic or symptomatic generalized epilepsy. LGS is characterized by: multiple seizures (atypical absences, axial tonic seizures and sudden atonic or myoclonic falls), diffuse slow cryptic EEG waves when awake (<3 Hz), fast rhythmic peaks (10 Hz) during sleep, mental retardation and personality disorders. The LGS is not responding to treatment. Some new drugs have proven to be effective in controlling the disease (Felbamate, Lamotrigine, Topiramate, Levetiracetam). The mortality rate is about 5%; only rarely death is due to epilepsy, which is usually caused by stroke or epileptic episodes. Here we describe the case of a 45-year-old female patient with LGS, severe hypokalemia, mental retardation and focal seizures. Normal renal function: creatinine 0.9 mg/dl, urea 26 mg/dl, creatinine clearance 96 ml/min, serum potassium levels to the minimum: 3.5 mEq/L. This level of potassium, however, had been achieved with the assumption of 8 oral tablets/day of potassium chloride. Osmotic diuresis, use of diuretics, Bartter, Gitelman (normal urinary calcium and magnesium) and pseudo-Bartter syndromes were all excluded whereas aldosteronism was found. Our findings lead to hypokalemia related to assumption of topiramate and hyperaldosteronism. Reduction in drug intake was not effective due to the increased seizures, so the drug was maintained, along with potassium supplementation. In conclusion, the patient has been diagnosed with hypokalemia and iatrogenic hyperaldosteronism, rare in our outpatient practice.

  13. Predictors of Successful Outcome After Adrenalectomy for Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hu, WeiLie; Zhang, XiaoMing; Wang, BangQi; Bin, Chen; Huang, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The underlying cause of resistant hypertension after adrenalectomy for primary hyperaldosteronism remains controversial. The objective of this study was to identify preoperative factors predictive of resistant hypertension in patients after undergoing retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy. Between 2003 and 2009, 124 patients with unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma or unilateral adrenal hyperplasia underwent retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy at our institution. Clinical and biochemical data were reviewed retrospectively at baseline and after a median follow-up time of 59.2 ± 37.2 months. Adrenalectomy cured hypertension in 68 patients (54.8%) and 43 (34.8%) had persistent hypertension that was much easier to control after surgery, whereas 13 patients (10.4%) had continued hypertension and poor blood pressure control. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the main determinants of postoperative cure were duration of hypertension less than 5 years [odds ratio (OR): 6.515, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.278–10.293), number of antihypertensive medications ≤2 (OR: 2.939, 95% CI 1.254–5.235), preoperative response to spironolactone (OR: 3.405, 95% CI 1.681–6.985), the TT genotype of the CYP11B2 gene (344 C/T) (OR: 2.765, 95% CI 1.221–4.986), and the presence of adenoma rather than hyperplasia (OR: 5.274, 95% CI 2.150–8.141). The main determinants of surgical cure or control of hypertension in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were duration of hypertension, number of antihypertensive medications, preoperative response to spironolactone, the presence of adenoma, and CYP11B2 (344 C/T) genotype. Consideration of these factors may help in the evaluation of patients for surgery and for the identification of patients with continued postoperative hypertension that may require more long-term monitoring and treatment. PMID:23102075

  14. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone induces depression-like behaviours and gene expression changes relevant to major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hlavacova, Natasa; Wes, Paul D; Ondrejcakova, Maria; Flynn, Marianne E; Poundstone, Patricia K; Babic, Stanislav; Murck, Harald; Jezova, Daniela

    2012-03-01

    The potential role of aldosterone in the pathophysiology of depression is unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that prolonged elevation of circulating aldosterone induces depression-like behaviour accompanied by disease-relevant changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Subchronic (2-wk) treatment with aldosterone (2 μg/100 g body weight per day) or vehicle via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps was used to induce hyperaldosteronism in male rats. All rats (n = 20/treatment group) underwent a modified sucrose preference test. Half of the animals from each treatment group were exposed to the forced swim test (FST), which served both as a tool to assess depression-like behaviour and as a stress stimulus. Affymetrix microarray analysis was used to screen the entire rat genome for gene expression changes in the hippocampus. Aldosterone treatment induced an anhedonic state manifested by decreased sucrose preference. In the FST, depressogenic action of aldosterone was manifested by decreased latency to immobility and increased time spent immobile. Aldosterone treatment resulted in transcriptional changes of genes in the hippocampus involved in inflammation, glutamatergic activity, and synaptic and neuritic remodelling. Furthermore, aldosterone-regulated genes substantially overlapped with genes affected by stress in the FST. This study demonstrates the existence of a causal relationship between the hyperaldosteronism and depressive behaviour. In addition, aldosterone treatment induced changes in gene expression that may be relevant to the aetiology of major depressive disorder. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone represents a new animal model of depression, which may contribute to the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression.

  15. [Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Germain, Alfredo M; Kottman, Cristián; Valdés, Gloria

    2002-12-01

    Based on two patients, we discuss the difficulties in diagnosing and managing primary aldosteronism in pregnancy, which derive from changes of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis, from the uncertainty regarding blood pressure control along gestation and postpartum, and from the contraindication to the use of spironolactone. The first case is a 27 years old woman with a long standing refractory hypertension, a hemorrhagic stroke with left brachial hemiplegia and crural hemiparesia, two miscarriages, one stillbirth and one offspring with intrauterine growth retardation. Due to hypokalemia, a plasma aldosterone/renin activity ratio of 91, and a negative genetic screening for glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA), a primary hyperaldosteronism with normal adrenals in CT scan was diagnosed, and good blood pressure control was attained with spironolactone. After two and a half years of normotension, a fifth pregnancy, managed with methyldopa evolved with satisfactory blood pressures, plasma potassium, fetal growth, uterine and umbilical arterial resistance indexes, and maternal endothelial function. At 37 1/2 weeks of pregnancy the patient delivered a healthy newborn weighing 2,960 g. Blood pressure rose during the 48 hours of postpartum in the absence of proteinuria and required i.v. hydralazine. The second patient is a 37 years old woman, with known refractory hypertension for 7 years, hypokalemia, plasma aldosterone/renin activity ratio greater than 40, normal adrenals in the CAT scan, and a negative genetic screening for GRA. She had normotensive pregnancies 5 and 3 years prior to the detection of hypertension, with hypertensive crisis in both postpartum periods, retrospectively considered as expressions of primary hyperaldosteronism. PMID:12611241

  16. Aldosterone Inhibits the Fetal Program and Increases Hypertrophy in the Heart of Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azibani, Feriel; Devaux, Yvan; Coutance, Guillaume; Schlossarek, Saskia; Polidano, Evelyne; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Regine; Carrier, Lucie; Solal, Alain Cohen; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Launay, Jean-Marie; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Delcayre, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension (AH) induces cardiac hypertrophy and reactivation of “fetal” gene expression. In rodent heart, alpha-Myosin Heavy Chain (MyHC) and its micro-RNA miR-208a regulate the expression of beta-MyHC and of its intronic miR-208b. However, the role of aldosterone in these processes remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings RT-PCR and western-blot were used to investigate the genes modulated by arterial hypertension and cardiac hyperaldosteronism. We developed a model of double-transgenic mice (AS-Ren) with cardiac hyperaldosteronism (AS mice) and systemic hypertension (Ren). AS-Ren mice had increased (x2) angiotensin II in plasma and increased (x2) aldosterone in heart. Ren and AS-Ren mice had a robust and similar hypertension (+70%) versus their controls. Anatomical data and echocardiography showed a worsening of cardiac hypertrophy (+41%) in AS-Ren mice (P<0.05 vs Ren). The increase of ANP (x 2.5; P<0.01) mRNA observed in Ren mice was blunted in AS-Ren mice. This non-induction of antitrophic natriuretic peptides may be involved in the higher trophic cardiac response in AS-Ren mice, as indicated by the markedly reduced cardiac hypertrophy in ANP-infused AS-Ren mice for one month. Besides, the AH-induced increase of ßMyHC and its intronic miRNA-208b was prevented in AS-Ren. The inhibition of miR 208a (−75%, p<0.001) in AS-Ren mice compared to AS was associated with increased Sox 6 mRNA (x 1.34; p<0.05), an inhibitor of ßMyHC transcription. Eplerenone prevented all aldosterone-dependent effects. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that increased aldosterone in heart inhibits the induction of atrial natriuretic peptide expression, via the mineralocorticoid receptor. This worsens cardiac hypertrophy without changing blood pressure. Moreover, this work reveals an original aldosterone-dependent inhibition of miR-208a in hypertension, resulting in the inhibition of β-myosin heavy chain expression through the induction of

  17. Approach to the Patient with an Adrenal Incidentaloma

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2010-01-01

    Unsuspected adrenal masses, or incidentalomas, are increasingly found with the widespread use of thoracic and abdominal imaging. These masses may be hormonally active or nonfunctional and malignant or benign. Clinicians must determine the nature of the mass to decide what treatment, if any, is needed. Measurement of precontrast Hounsfield units (HU) and contrast washout on computed tomography scan provide useful diagnostic information. All patients should undergo biochemical testing for pheochromocytoma, either with plasma or urinary catecholamine measurements. This is particularly important before surgical resection, which is routinely recommended for masses larger than 4 cm in diameter without a clear-cut diagnosis and for others with hormonal secretion or ominous imaging characteristics. Hypertensive patients should undergo biochemical testing for hyperaldosteronism. Patients with features consistent with Cushing’s syndrome, such as glucose intolerance, weight gain, and unexplained osteopenia, should be evaluated for cortisol excess. Here, the dexamethasone suppression test and late-night salivary cortisol may be preferred over measurement of urine cortisol. The ability of surgical resection to reverse features of mild hypercortisolism is not well established. For masses that appear to be benign (<10 HU; washout, >50%), small (<3 cm), and completely nonfunctioning, imaging and biochemical reevaluation (pheochromocytoma and hypercortisolism only) at 1–2 yr (or more) is appropriate. For more indeterminate lesions, repeat evaluation for growth after 3–12 months is useful, with subsequent testing intervals based on the rate of growth. PMID:20823463

  18. A fatal case of hypernatraemic dehydration in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Staub, Eveline; Wilkins, Barry

    2012-09-01

    Problems with lactation can result in hypernatraemic dehydration in the neonate, with potentially severe adverse consequences. This is illustrated in this fatal case of a 10 day old neonate who presented with excessive hypernatraemic dehydration due to insufficient breast milk intake, resulting in cerebral sinus vein thrombosis with cerebral haemorrhage and infarction. Differential diagnosis included excessive sodium intake (through inappropriately mixed formula or house remedies or through hyperaldosteronism) and high water deficit (renal or gastrointestinal losses, nephrogenic or central diabetes insipidus), all of which were ruled out by specific investigations or history. No evidence was found for inborn error of metabolism. The dehydration in this baby, however, was accentuated by trans-epidermal water loss due to an ichthyosiform skin condition. This first ever reported Australian fatality from neonatal hypernatraemic dehydration supports the concern of health care professionals over rising incidences of this entity in exclusively breastfed infants, and should encourage endorsement of improved monitoring of weight loss in newborns and breastfeeding support for their mothers.

  19. Blood pressure, magnesium and other mineral balance in two rat models of salt-sensitive, induced hypertension: effects of a non-peptide angiotensin II receptor type 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rondón, Lusliany Josefina; Marcano, Eunice; Rodríguez, Fátima; del Castillo, Jesús Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in regulating arterial blood pressure (BP). Inappropriate angiotensin type-1 receptor activation by angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is related to increased arterial BP. Mg has a role in BP; it can affect cardiac electrical activity, myocardial contractility, and vascular tone. To evaluate the relationship between high BP induced by a high sodium (Na) diet and Mg, and other mineral balances, two experimental rat models of salt-sensitive, induced-hypertension were used: Ang-II infused and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We found that: 1) Ang-II infusion progressively increased BP, which was accompanied by hypomagnesuria and signs of secondary hyperaldosteronism; 2) an additive effect between Ang-II and a high Na load may have an effect on strontium (Sr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) balances; 3) Dahl SS rats fed a high Na diet had a slow pressor response, accompanied by altered Mg, Na, potassium (K), and phosphate (P) balances; and 4) losartan prevented BP increases induced by Ang II-NaCl, but did not modify mineral balances. In Dahl SS rats, losartan attenuated high BP and ameliorated magnesemia, Na and K balances. Mg metabolism maybe considered a possible defect in this strain of rat that may contribute to hypertension.

  20. Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Reducing Right Heart Failure Associated Mortality in Fibrotic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Levy, Matthew; Oyenuga, Olusegun

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic lung diseases carry a significant mortality burden worldwide. A large proportion of these deaths are due to right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Underlying contributory factors which appear to play a role in the mechanism of progression of right heart dysfunction include chronic hypoxia, defective calcium handling, hyperaldosteronism, pulmonary vascular alterations, cyclic strain of pressure and volume changes, elevation of circulating TGF-β, and elevated systemic NO levels. Specific therapies targeting pulmonary hypertension include calcium channel blockers, endothelin (ET-1) receptor antagonists, prostacyclin analogs, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, and rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. Newer antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory agents may exert beneficial effects on heart failure in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, right ventricle-targeted therapies, aimed at mitigating the effects of functional right ventricular failure, include β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, antioxidants, modulators of metabolism, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-2B (5-HT2B) receptor antagonists. Newer nonpharmacologic modalities for right ventricular support are increasingly being implemented. Early, effective, and individualized therapy may prevent overt right heart failure in fibrotic lung disease leading to improved outcomes and quality of life. PMID:26583148

  1. ARMC5 mutation analysis in patients with primary aldosteronism and bilateral adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Mulatero, P; Schiavi, F; Williams, T A; Monticone, S; Barbon, G; Opocher, G; Fallo, F

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia is the most common subtype of primary aldosteronism (PA). The pathogenesis of IHA is still unknown, but the bilateral disease suggests a potential predisposing genetic alteration. Heterozygous germline mutations of armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) have been shown to be associated with hypercortisolism due to sporadic primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and are also observed in African-American PA patients. We investigated the presence of germline ARMC5 mutations in a group of PA patients who had bilateral computed tomography-detectable adrenal alterations. We sequenced the entire coding region of ARMC5 and all intron/exon boundaries in 39 patients (37 Caucasians and 2 black Africans) with confirmed PA (8 unilateral, 27 bilateral and 4 undetermined subtype) and bilateral adrenal lesions. We identified 11 common variants, 5 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1% and 2 new variants not previously reported in public databases. We did not detect by in silico analysis any ARMC5 sequence variations that were predicted to alter protein function. In conclusion, ARMC5 mutations are not present in a fairly large series of Caucasian patients with PA associated to bilateral adrenal disease. Further studies are required to definitively clarify the role of ARMC5 in the pathogenesis of adrenal nodules and aldosterone excess in patients with PA. PMID:26446392

  2. Effect of aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid on the protein expression of PAI-1 and p22(phox) in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Zaghetto, Francesca; Pagnin, Elisa; Davis, Paul A; De Mozzi, Paola; Sartorato, Paola; Martire, Giuseppe; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio

    2004-04-01

    Aldosterone excess can produce heart and kidney fibrosis, which seem to be related to a direct effect of aldosterone at the level of specific receptors. We report a direct, mineralocorticoid-mediated effect on the protein expression of two markers of oxidative stress after incubation of mononuclear leukocytes with 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.38 +/- 0.05 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.05). The same effect was also found with 3 x 10(-5) M glycyrrhetinic acid, the principal constituent of licorice root (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.37 +/- 0.97 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.04). The effect of both aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid is blocked by incubation with added 1 x 10(-6) M of receptor-antagonist canrenone. Canrenone alone did not show any effect. PAI-1 related protein was also found using 4 x 10(-9) M aldosterone. Incubations with 1 x 10(-9) M for 3 hours as well as 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone for 5, 10, and 20 minutes were ineffective for both proteins. These data support the previous finding of an involvement of mononuclear leukocytes in the pathogenesis of the oxidative stress induced by hyperaldosteronism. In addition, the results confirm our previous data on a direct effect of glycyrrhetinic acid at the level of mineralocorticoid receptors. PMID:15070972

  3. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Catherine B; Shaikh, Lalarukh Haris; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E D; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B; Azizan, Elena A B; Brown, Morris J

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  4. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  5. Endocrine hypertension: An overview on the current etiopathogenesis and management options

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reena M; Ruel, Ewa; Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn Ch; Corsino, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension include primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, cushing’s syndrome, hyperparathyroidism and hypo- and hyperthyroidism. They comprise of the 5%–10% of the causes of secondary hypertension. Primary hyperaldosteronism, the most common of the endocrine cause of hypertension often presents with resistant or difficult to control hypertension associated with either normo-or hypokalemia. Pheochromocytoma, the great mimicker of many conditions, is associated with high morbidity and mortality if left untreated. A complete history including pertinent family history, physical examination along with a high index of suspicion with focused biochemical and radiological evaluation is important to diagnose and effectively treat these conditions. The cost effective targeted genetic screening for current known mutations associated with pheochromocytoma are important for early diagnosis and management in family members. The current review focuses on the most recent evidence regarding causes, clinical features, methods of diagnosis, and management of these conditions. A multidisciplinary approach involving internists, endocrinologists and surgeons is recommended in optimal management of these conditions. PMID:26413481

  6. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  7. A review of the anatomy and clinical significance of adrenal veins.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Du Plessis, Maira; Iannatuono, Mark; Shah, Sameer; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    The adrenal veins may present with a multitude of anatomical variants, which surgeons must be aware of when performing adrenalectomies. The adrenal veins originate during the formation of the prerenal inferior vena cava (IVC) and are remnants of the caudal portion of the subcardinal veins, cranial to the subcardinal sinus in the embryo. The many communications between the posterior cardinal, supracardinal, and subcardinal veins of the primordial venous system provide an explanation for the variable anatomy. Most commonly, one central vein drains each adrenal gland. The long left adrenal vein joins the inferior phrenic vein and drains into the left renal vein, while the short right adrenal vein drains immediately into the IVC. Multiple variations exist bilaterally and may pose the risk of surgical complications. Due to the potential for collaterals and accessory adrenal vessels, great caution must be taken during an adrenalectomy. Adrenal venous sampling, the gold standard in diagnosing primary hyperaldosteronism, also requires the clinician to have a thorough knowledge of the adrenal vein anatomy to avoid iatrogenic injury. The adrenal vein acts as an important conduit in portosystemic shunts, thus the nature of the anatomy and hypercoagulable states pose the risk of thrombosis.

  8. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely "functional," i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  9. Recent Developments in Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Asbach, E; Williams, T A; Reincke, M

    2016-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most frequent endocrine cause of secondary arterial hypertension. Sporadic forms of PA caused mainly by an aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) or idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia (IAH) predominate; in contrast, familial forms (familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III) affect only a minor proportion of PA patients. Patient based registries and biobanks, international networks and next generation sequencing technologies have emerged over recent years. Somatic hot-spot mutations in the potassium channel GIRK4 (encoded by KCNJ5), in ATPases and a L-type voltage-gated calcium-channel correlate with the autonomous aldosterone production in approximately half of all APAs. The recently discovered form FH III is caused by different germline KCNJ5 mutations with variable clinical presentations and severity. Autoantibodies to the angiotensin II Type 1 receptor have been identified in patients with PA and possibly play a pathophysiological role in the development of PA. Adrenal vein sampling (AVS) represents the gold standard in differentiating unilateral and bilateral forms of PA. Recent consensus papers have tried to implement current guidelines in order to standardise the technique of AVS. New techniques like segmental AVS might allow a finer mapping of the aldosterone production within the adrenal gland. The measurement of the steroids 18-hydroxycortisol and 18-oxocortisol by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been shown to be useful to distinguish between unilateral and bilateral forms of PA. PMID:27219889

  10. Association of adrenal medullar and cortical nodular hyperplasia: a report of two cases with clinical and morpho-functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Gloria; Roessler, Eric; Salazar, Iván; Rosenberg, Helmar; Fardella, Carlos; Martínez, Pedro; Velasco, Alfredo; Velasco, Soledad; Orellana, Pilar

    2006-12-01

    Arterial hypertension of adrenal etiology is mainly attributed to primary hyperaldosteronism. However, subtle expressions of hyperadrenergic or glucocorticoid excess can also generate arterial hypertension. The present report describes two hypertensive patients cataloged as resistant essential hypertensives, in whom adrenal masses were found incidentally, who highlight the need to recognize these tenuous clinical or laboratory presentations. Case 1 was a 50-yr-old female with hyperadrenergic hypertension associated to a left adrenal node, normal cortisol and aldosterone:renin ratio, marginally increased urinary normetanephrine, and a positive 131I MIBG radioisotope scan. Adrenalectomy normalized blood pressure and urinary metanephrines. Pathology showed a hyperplastic adrenal medulla associated to a multinodular cortical hyperplasia. Case 2 was a 62- yr-old female with progressive hypertension, a slight Cushing phenotype, non-suppressible hypercortisolism, normal urinary metanephrines, and bilateral adrenal nodes. Bilateral adrenalectomy and subsequent replacement normalized blood pressure and phenotypic stigmata. Pathology demonstrated bilateral cortical multinodular hyperplasia and medullary hyperplasia. The clinical study in both patients was negative for MEN. The apparently rare association of cortical and medullary lesions presented by both patients is probably overlooked in routine pathology exams, but should be meticulously searched since the crosstalk between the adrenal cortex and medulla may prompt dual abnormalities.

  11. Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from the dysfunction of ion channels located in the membranes of all cells and many cellular organelles. These include diseases of the nervous system (e.g., generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia, and hyperkalemic and hypokalemic periodic paralysis), the cardiovascular system (e.g., long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia), the respiratory system (e.g., cystic fibrosis), the endocrine system (e.g., neonatal diabetes mellitus, familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and familial hyperaldosteronism), the urinary system (e.g., Bartter syndrome, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia), and the immune system (e.g., myasthenia gravis, neuromyelitis optica, Isaac syndrome, and anti-NMDA [N-methyl-D-aspartate] receptor encephalitis). The field of channelopathies is expanding rapidly, as is the utility of molecular-genetic and electrophysiological studies. This review provides a brief overview and update of channelopathies, with a focus on recent advances in the pathophysiological mechanisms that may help clinicians better understand, diagnose, and develop treatments for these diseases. PMID:24578711

  12. Identification of compound heterozygous KCNJ1 mutations (encoding ROMK) in a kindred with Bartter's syndrome and a functional analysis of their pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalabh; Li, Dimin; Edwards, Noel; Hynes, Ann-M; Wood, Katrina; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Wroe, Anna C; Reaich, David; Moochhala, Shabbir H; Welling, Paul A; Sayer, John A

    2013-11-01

    A multiplex family was identified with biochemical and clinical features suggestive of Bartter's syndrome (BS). The eldest sibling presented with developmental delay and rickets at 4 years of age with evidence of hypercalciuria and hypokalemia. The second sibling presented at 1 year of age with urinary tract infections, polyuria, and polydipsia. The third child was born after a premature delivery with a history of polyhydramnios and neonatal hypocalcemia. Following corrective treatment she also developed hypercalciuria and a hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis. There was evidence of secondary hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism in all three siblings consistent with BS. Known BS genes were screened and functional assays of ROMK (alias KCNJ1, Kir1.1) were carried out in Xenopus oocytes. We detected compound heterozygous missense changes in KCNJ1, encoding the potassium channel ROMK. The S219R/L220F mutation was segregated from father and mother, respectively. In silico modeling of the missense mutations suggested deleterious changes. Studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that both S219R and L220F had a deleterious effect on ROMK-mediated potassium currents. Coinjection to mimic the compound heterozygosity produced a synergistic decrease in channel function and revealed a loss of PKA-dependent stabilization of PIP2 binding. In conclusion, in a multiplex family with BS, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1. Functional studies of ROMK confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations and defined the mechanism of channel dysfunction. PMID:24400161

  13. Adrenal Venous Sampling: Where Is the Aldosterone Disappearing to?

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, Miroslav; Ceral, Jiri; Krajina, Antonin; Ballon, Marek; Malirova, Eva; Brodak, Milos; Cap, Jan

    2010-08-15

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is generally considered to be the gold standard in distinguishing unilateral and bilateral aldosterone hypersecretion in primary hyperaldosteronism. However, during AVS, we noticed a considerable variability in aldosterone concentrations among samples thought to have come from the right adrenal glands. Some aldosterone concentrations in these samples were even lower than in samples from the inferior vena cava. We hypothesized that the samples with low aldosterone levels were unintentionally taken not from the right adrenal gland, but from hepatic veins. Therefore, we sought to analyze the impact of unintentional cannulation of hepatic veins on AVS. Thirty consecutive patients referred for AVS were enrolled. Hepatic vein sampling was implemented in our standardized AVS protocol. The data were collected and analyzed prospectively. AVS was successful in 27 patients (90%), and hepatic vein cannulation was successful in all procedures performed. Cortisol concentrations were not significantly different between the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava samples, but aldosterone concentrations from hepatic venous blood (median, 17 pmol/l; range, 40-860 pmol/l) were markedly lower than in samples from the inferior vena cava (median, 860 pmol/l; range, 460-4510 pmol/l). The observed difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Aldosterone concentrations in the hepatic veins are significantly lower than in venous blood taken from the inferior vena cava. This finding is important for AVS because hepatic veins can easily be mistaken for adrenal veins as a result of their close anatomic proximity.

  14. Pseudohyperaldosteronism: pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Calò, Lorenzo; Semplicini, Andrea

    2003-06-01

    Pseudohyperaldosteronism is characterized by a clinical picture of hyperaldosteronism with suppression of plasma renin activity and aldosterone. Pseudohyperaldosteronism can be due to a direct mineralocorticoid effect, as with desoxycorticosterone, fluorohydrocortisone, fluoroprednisolone, estrogens, and the ingestion of high amounts of glycyrrhetinic acid. A block of 11-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 2 (11HSD2), the enzyme that converts cortisol into cortisone, at the level of epithelial target tissues of aldosterone, is involved in other cases. This mechanism is related either to a mutation of the gene, which encodes 11HSD2 (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome and some cases of low renin hypertension) or to an acquired reduction of the activity of the enzyme due to glycyrrhetinic acid, carbenoxolone, and grapefruit juice. In other cases saturation of 11HSD2 may be involved as in severe Cushing's syndrome and chronic therapy with some corticosteroids. Recently, an activating mutation of the mineralocorticoid receptor gene has been described. Another genetic cause of pseudohyperaldosteronism is the syndrome of Liddle, which is due to a mutation of the gene encoding for beta and gamma subunits of the sodium channels. PMID:12892318

  15. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, Assessment of Risk, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander A; Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; McBrien, Kerry; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Harris, Kevin C; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force provides annually updated, evidence-based recommendations to guide the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we present 4 new recommendations, as well as revisions to 2 previous recommendations. In the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension, automated office blood pressure, taken without patient-health provider interaction, is now recommended as the preferred method of measuring in-office blood pressure. Also, although a serum lipid panel remains part of the routine laboratory testing for patients with hypertension, fasting and nonfasting collections are now considered acceptable. For individuals with secondary hypertension arising from primary hyperaldosteronism, adrenal vein sampling is recommended for those who are candidates for potential adrenalectomy. With respect to the treatment of hypertension, a new recommendation that has been added is for increasing dietary potassium to reduce blood pressure in those who are not at high risk for hyperkalemia. Furthermore, in selected high-risk patients, intensive blood pressure reduction to a target systolic blood pressure ≤ 120 mm Hg should be considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in hypertensive individuals with uncomplicated, stable angina pectoris, either a β-blocker or calcium channel blocker may be considered for initial therapy. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these recommendations are discussed. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will continue to provide annual updates. PMID:27118291

  16. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, Assessment of Risk, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander A; Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; McBrien, Kerry; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Harris, Kevin C; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force provides annually updated, evidence-based recommendations to guide the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we present 4 new recommendations, as well as revisions to 2 previous recommendations. In the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension, automated office blood pressure, taken without patient-health provider interaction, is now recommended as the preferred method of measuring in-office blood pressure. Also, although a serum lipid panel remains part of the routine laboratory testing for patients with hypertension, fasting and nonfasting collections are now considered acceptable. For individuals with secondary hypertension arising from primary hyperaldosteronism, adrenal vein sampling is recommended for those who are candidates for potential adrenalectomy. With respect to the treatment of hypertension, a new recommendation that has been added is for increasing dietary potassium to reduce blood pressure in those who are not at high risk for hyperkalemia. Furthermore, in selected high-risk patients, intensive blood pressure reduction to a target systolic blood pressure ≤ 120 mm Hg should be considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in hypertensive individuals with uncomplicated, stable angina pectoris, either a β-blocker or calcium channel blocker may be considered for initial therapy. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these recommendations are discussed. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will continue to provide annual updates.

  17. Junctional Bradycardia as Early Sign of Digoxin Toxicity in a Premature Infant with Congestive Heart Failure due to a Left to Right Shunt.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Soham; Aly, Ashraf M; Jain, Sunil K

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Congestive heart failure due to left to right cardiac shunt is usually managed medically with diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and, in some cases, with the addition of digoxin. Case We report a 31-week gestation premature male infant who did not respond to such treatment and developed hyperaldosteronism and severe hypokalemia secondary to activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system. The hypokalemia was not responsive to intravenous KCL supplementation and induced digoxin toxicity despite a relatively normal digoxin level. The earliest signs of digoxin toxicity in the patient were junctional rhythm and bradycardia. The discontinuation of digoxin and the administration of digoxin specific immunoglobulin fragments (Fab) reversed those changes. The addition of spironolactone (an aldosterone antagonist) had a dramatic effect, resulting in clinical improvement of the patient coupled with normalization of Q4 serum and urine electrolytes. Conclusion Serum Digoxin level alone may fail as an independent guide in the diagnosis of digoxin toxicity when hypokalemia is present. In premature infants with congestive heart failure and hypokalemia, addition of an aldosterone antagonist should be considered.

  18. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Catherine B.; Haris Shaikh, Lalarukh; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E. D.; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B.; Azizan, Elena A. B.; Brown, Morris J.

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  19. Colonic H(+)-K(+)-ATPase in K(+) conservation and electrogenic Na(+) absorption during Na(+) restriction.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Z; Clarke, L L; Gawenis, L R; Shull, G E

    2001-12-01

    Upregulation of the colonic H(+)-K(+)- ATPase (cHKA) during hyperaldosteronism suggests that it functions in both K(+) conservation and electrogenic Na(+) absorption in the colon when Na(+)-conserving mechanisms are activated. To test this hypothesis, wild-type (cHKA(+/+)) and cHKA-deficient (cHKA(-/-)) mice were fed Na(+)-replete and Na(+)-restricted diets and their responses were analyzed. In both genotypes, Na(+) restriction led to reduced plasma Na(+) and increased serum aldosterone, and mRNAs for the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) beta- and gamma-subunits, channel-inducing factor, and cHKA were increased in distal colon. Relative to wild-type controls, cHKA(-/-) mice on a Na(+)-replete diet had elevated fecal K(+) excretion. Dietary Na(+) restriction led to increased K(+) excretion in knockout but not in wild-type mice. The amiloride-sensitive, ENaC-mediated short-circuit current in distal colon was significantly reduced in knockout mice maintained on either the Na(+)-replete or Na(+)-restricted diet. These results demonstrate that cHKA plays an important role in K(+) conservation during dietary Na(+) restriction and suggest that cHKA-mediated K(+) recycling across the apical membrane is required for maximum electrogenic Na(+) absorption. PMID:11705741

  20. Resistant hypertension in office practice: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi; Brietzke, Stephen A; Sowers, James R

    2010-11-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure uncontrolled to guideline levels despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medications. When evaluating patients with resistant hypertension, it is important to consider issues such as blood pressure measurement technique, lifestyle, other comorbid conditions and medications, and the white coat effect. To this point, potential contributing factors include obstructive sleep apnea, excess alcohol intake, and use of blood pressure-elevating medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sympathomimetics, certain anorexic agents, and oral contraceptives. Secondary causes of hypertension are common in patients with resistant hypertension and appropriate screening tests should be performed as suggested by signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities. In this regard, there is increasing evidence that hyperaldosteronism is common in the resistant hypertensive patient group. Pharmacologic therapy in patients with resistant hypertension is centered on drug combinations that have different mechanisms of action, including diuretics, which are essential in maximizing antihypertensive effects. The role of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists is expanding, especially in patients with the metabolic syndrome, where aldosterone excess is increasingly recognized as an etiology of resistant hypertension. Finally, when appropriate, specialist referral may be necessary to appropriately assess and treat these patients. PMID:21068532

  1. HOMEOSTATIC PROBLEMS IN GENERAL SURGERY.

    PubMed

    LUPPI, A P

    1965-06-01

    For electrolyte problems that arise during surgical procedures, the surgeon must be versed in the physiologic function of the organs that play vital roles in homeostasis. Pulmonary and renal evaluation before operation can give forewarning of potential dangers. Hyperaldosteronism, a disease entity influencing electrolytic changes and causing other pathophysiological effects, should be understood by the surgeon. Not only should he understand the causes of dehydration, hyperhydration, metabolic and respiratory acidosis and metabolic and respiratory alkalosis, he should also be able to recognize their deleterious effects clinically, know how to make use of adequate laboratory procedures to substantiate a diagnosis and determine the effect of treatment. The effect of water deficit and water excess, and of deficits and excesses of such ions as sodium, potassium, calcium, carbon dioxide and bicarbonate on the renal, cardiac, pulmonary and neuromuscular systems must be considered.Tetany before or after operation challenges a surgeon's diagnostic acuity. Relying on laboratory tests only, without correlating the results with history and clinical features, may lead to errors in the administration of electrolytic fluids.

  2. Unmasked renal impairment and prolonged hyperkalemia after unilateral adrenalectomy for primary aldosteronism coexisting with primary hyperparathyroidism: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yatsuka; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Hasegawa, Midori; Ogawa, Kimio; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Shibata, Masahiro; Kagawa, Chikara; Mizuno, Yutaka; Yuzawa, Yukio; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Iwase, Katsumi

    2015-02-01

    We herein report the case of a patient with critical hyperkalemia after unilateral adrenalectomy (ADX) for aldosterone-producing adenomas, which were coexisting with primary hyperparathyroidism. A right adrenal tumor oversecreting mineral corticoid was identified in a 62-year-old female whose kidney function had been impaired due to primary hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism. The ADX improved her hypertension with normalization of the plasma aldosterone concentration, but without adequately increasing her plasma renin activity. Her eGFR further decreased postoperatively, hyperkalemia appeared and the serum potassium level rose to 6.3 mEq/L at 3 months after ADX. Then, treatment with calcium polystyrene sulfonate jelly was started. Eight months after ADX, a left lower parathyroidectomy was performed, and the serum calcium and intact parathyroid hormone levels decreased to the normal range. The hyperkalemia was difficult to control within 20 months postoperatively without treatment with calcium polystyrene sulfonate jelly or hydrocortisone. This suggests that unmasking the renal impairment and relative hypoaldosteronism after ADX might induce critical hyperkalemia.

  3. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory hormones.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, A; Brown, J M; Williams, J S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of a clinically relevant interplay between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory systems. Classically, the former is considered a key regulator of sodium and volume homeostasis, while the latter is most often associated with skeletal health. However, emerging evidence suggests an overlap in regulatory control. Hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism represent pathophysiologic conditions that may contribute to or perpetuate each other; aldosterone regulates parathyroid hormone and associates with adverse skeletal complications, and parathyroid hormone regulates aldosterone and associates with adverse cardiovascular complications. As dysregulation in both systems is linked to poor cardiovascular and skeletal health, it is increasingly important to fully characterize how they interact to more precisely understand their impact on human health and potential therapies to modulate these interactions. This review describes the known clinical interactions between these two systems including observational and interventional studies. Specifically, we review studies describing the inhibition of renin activity by calcium and vitamin D, and a potentially bidirectional and stimulatory relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone. Deciphering these relationships might clarify variability in outcomes research, inform the design of future intervention studies and provide insight into the results of prior and ongoing intervention studies. However, before these opportunities can be addressed, more effort must be placed on shifting observational data to the proof of concept phase. This will require reallocation of resources to conduct interventional studies and secure the necessary talent.

  4. Altered potassium homeostasis in cirrhosis of the liver and Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Bossaller, C.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of patients (pts) with cirrhosis of the liver (Ci) and Crohn's disease (CD) frequently noticed arrhythmias of the heart, weakness and adynamic ileus suggest alterations in the potassium (K) homeostasis. It is the purpose of the study to assess the role of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump mechanism in intracellular and extracellular K homeostasis. Relative total body potassium (TBK), serum potassium (K-S), and the number of red blood cell ouabain binding sites (n-ATPase) was studied in 21 pts with Ci, 31 pts with CD and in 31 controls (C), all were not on digitalis. TBK was measured by equilibrium binding of H-3-ouabain. A significant reduction in TBK was accompanied by normal serum potassium levels, whereas the number of Na-K pumps is increased. The results support the suggestion that changes in TBK may regulate the synthesis of Na-K pump molecules. Secondary hyperaldosteronism and diarrhea e.g. may be responsible for chronic potassium depletion. The need for a nutritional support is discussed.

  5. Expression of adiponectin receptors in mouse adrenal glands and the adrenocortical Y-1 cell line: adiponectin regulates steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Sun, Fei; Cao, Huang-Ming; Ma, Qin-Yun; Pan, Chun-Ming; Ma, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Na; Jiang, He; Song, Huai-Dong; Chen, Ming-Dao

    2009-12-25

    Obesity is frequently associated with malfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and hyperaldosteronism, but the mechanism underlying this association remains unclear. Since the adrenal glands are embedded in adipose tissue, direct cross-talk between adipose tissue and the adrenal gland has been proposed. A previous study found that adiponectin receptor mRNA was expressed in human adrenal glands and aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the expression of adiponectin receptors in adrenal glands has not been confirmed at the protein level or in other species. Furthermore, it is unclear whether adiponectin receptors expressed in adrenal cells are functional. We found, for the first time, that adiponectin receptor (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mRNA and protein were expressed in mouse adrenal and adrenocortical Y-1 cells. However, adiponectin itself was not expressed in mouse adrenal or Y-1 cells. Furthermore, adiponectin acutely reduced basal levels of corticosterone and aldosterone secretion. ACTH-induced steroid secretion was also inhibited by adiponectin, and this was accompanied by a parallel change in the expression of the key genes involved in steroidogenesis. These findings indicate that adiponectin may take part in the modulation of steroidogenesis. Thus, adiponectin is likely to have physiological and/or pathophysiological significance as an endocrine regulator of adrenocortical function.

  6. Ultrasonographical examination of feline adrenal glands: intra- and inter-observer variability.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Stock, Emmelie; Van der Vekens, Elke; Duchateau, Luc; Van Ryssen, Bernadette; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-12-01

    Interpretation of ultrasonographical measurements requires an understanding of the source and the magnitude of variation. A substantial part of the variation can be attributed to the observer, the equipment or the animal. The aim of this study was to evaluate which adrenal gland measurement is the least variable within and between observers. Three experienced ultrasonographers examined six cats at three different times on the same day, more than 1 h apart, according to a strict scanning protocol. Seven ultrasonographical measurements were performed on each adrenal gland (maximal length on sagittal images, maximal height at the cranial and caudal poles on sagittal and transverse images, and maximal width of the cranial and caudal poles on transverse images). Height measurements in both planes showed the lowest variability within and between observers compared with length and width measurements. Descriptive ultrasonographical features, such as echogenicity of the gland, presence of hyperechoic spots or layering assessment, demonstrated satisfactory-to-good intra- and inter-observer agreement, whereas the shape assessment showed very poor inter-observer agreement. The results of this study describe a reliable scanning protocol that can be the basis for future adrenal ultrasonographical examinations for cats suspected of adrenal disease (eg, hyperaldosteronism, hyperadrenocorticism, sex hormone-producing tumours).

  7. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  8. [Resistant hypertension: evaluation and treatment].

    PubMed

    Girerd, Xavier; Rosenbaum, David; Villeneuve, Frédéric

    2009-04-01

    Treatment resistant hypertension is defined as a blood pressure not achieving a goal blood pressure (< 140/90 mm Hg). The diagnosis of resistant hypertension requires use of good blood pressure technique to confirm persistently elevated blood pressure levels. Pseudoresistance, including lack of blood pressure control secondary to poor medication adherence or white coat hypertension, must be excluded. The evaluation of patients with resistant hypertension is focused on identifying contributing and secondary causes of hypertension which are guided by the clinical feature of hypertension: metabolic (obstructive sleep apnea, kidney disease), vascular (renal artery atheroma stenosis), endocrine (hyperaldosteronism), familial (renal artery fibrodyspalsia, adrenal causes). Treatment includes removal of contributing factors, appropriate management of secondary causes, and use of effective multidrug regimens. Three antihypertensive medications including ARB or ACEI in addition to calcium channel blocker and to thiazide diuretics is able to control 75% of hypertensive subjects when prescribed in effective doses. The addition of low dose spironolactone to this triple treatment induces significant BP reduction in most patients with resistant hypertension. PMID:19297124

  9. Hypertension due to loss of clock: novel insight from the molecular analysis of Cry1/Cry2-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hitoshi; Doi, Masao; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Fustin, Jean-Michel

    2011-04-01

    In our consumer-oriented society, in which productivity requires around-the-clock activity and demanding shift work, the biologic system that regulates our internal rhythms is being compromised. Poor sleep patterns and hectic lifestyle are detrimental to harmonious physiological and metabolic body systems, with severe impact on public health. Over a trillion peripheral cellular clocks throughout the body, supervised by the master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, govern most aspects of physiology and behavior. To exemplify the importance of the biologic clock for health, we have recently demonstrated that mice that are arrhythmic because of the deletion of Cry1 and Cry2 clock genes suffer from salt-sensitive hypertension. In these mice, a novel 3β-hydroxyl-steroid dehydrogenase (3β-Hsd) gene under clock control is severely overexpressed specifically in aldosterone-producing cells in the adrenal cortex, leading to hyperaldosteronism and ultimately to salt-sensitive hypertension. The human homologue of this aldosterone-producing, cell-specific enzyme was also characterized and represents a new possibility in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  10. The kidney is the principal organ mediating klotho effects.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Karolina; Amin, Risul; Moe, Orson W; Hu, Ming-Chang; Erben, Reinhold G; Östman Wernerson, Annika; Lanske, Beate; Olauson, Hannes; Larsson, Tobias E

    2014-10-01

    Klotho was discovered as an antiaging gene, and α-Klotho (Klotho) is expressed in multiple tissues with a broad set of biologic functions. Membrane-bound Klotho binds fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), but a soluble form of Klotho is also produced by alternative splicing or cleavage of the extracellular domain of the membrane-bound protein. The relative organ-specific contributions to the levels and effects of circulating Klotho remain unknown. We explored these issues by generating a novel mouse strain with Klotho deleted throughout the nephron (Six2-KL(-/-)). Klotho shedding from Six2-KL(-/-) kidney explants was undetectable and the serum Klotho level was reduced by approximately 80% in Six2-KL(-/-) mice compared with wild-type littermates. Six2-KL(-/-) mice exhibited severe growth retardation, kyphosis, and premature death, closely resembling the phenotype of systemic Klotho knockout mice. Notable biochemical changes included hyperphosphatemia, hypercalcemia, hyperaldosteronism, and elevated levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and Fgf23, consistent with disrupted renal Fgf23 signaling. Kidney histology demonstrated interstitial fibrosis and nephrocalcinosis in addition to absent dimorphic tubules. A direct comparative analysis between Six2-KL(-/-) and systemic Klotho knockout mice supports extensive, yet indistinguishable, extrarenal organ manifestations. Thus, our data reveal the kidney as the principal contributor of circulating Klotho and Klotho-induced antiaging traits.

  11. From laparoscopic training on an animal model to retroperitoneoscopic or coelioscopic adrenal and renal surgery in human.

    PubMed

    de Cannière, L; Lorge, F; Rosière, A; Joucken, K; Michel, L A

    1995-06-01

    So far, laparoscopic approaches to kidney and adrenal have been limited because of their retroperitoneal location. We here report eight renal and adrenal endoscopic procedures performed in seven patients: two adrenalectomies for hyperaldosteronism, one adrenalectomy for isolated metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of the lung; two nephrectomies for end-stage infected hydronephrosis, two partial nephrectomies for small circumscribed lesions of the kidney, and one endoscopic resection for pain relief of a voluminous cyst at the kidney. The approach was transperitoneal in two cases and retroperitoneal in five cases using the retropneumoperitoneum insufflation technique. One patient was operated by a combined approach using the retro- and transperitoneal routes. All procedures were successfully completed endoscopically. The retroperitoneoscopic approach of the kidney is safe and does not interfere with the peritoneal organs. Its working space is tenuous, but allows a direct access on the kidney with good exposure of its pedicle. For adrenal surgery, the retroperitoneoscopic dissection is more difficult, because movements of instruments are often impaired by the closeness of the costal margin and the iliac crest. However, in case of difficulties we found it very convenient to switch from a retroperitoneal endoscopic approach to a combined coelioscopic and retroperitoneoscopic operation. Far from excluding each other, both approaches are complementary, particularly for difficult situations (i.e., previous peritoneal or retroperitoneal surgery).

  12. Approach to the patient with an adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Lynnette K

    2010-09-01

    Unsuspected adrenal masses, or incidentalomas, are increasingly found with the widespread use of thoracic and abdominal imaging. These masses may be hormonally active or nonfunctional and malignant or benign. Clinicians must determine the nature of the mass to decide what treatment, if any, is needed. Measurement of precontrast Hounsfield units (HU) and contrast washout on computed tomography scan provide useful diagnostic information. All patients should undergo biochemical testing for pheochromocytoma, either with plasma or urinary catecholamine measurements. This is particularly important before surgical resection, which is routinely recommended for masses larger than 4 cm in diameter without a clear-cut diagnosis and for others with hormonal secretion or ominous imaging characteristics. Hypertensive patients should undergo biochemical testing for hyperaldosteronism. Patients with features consistent with Cushing's syndrome, such as glucose intolerance, weight gain, and unexplained osteopenia, should be evaluated for cortisol excess. Here, the dexamethasone suppression test and late-night salivary cortisol may be preferred over measurement of urine cortisol. The ability of surgical resection to reverse features of mild hypercortisolism is not well established. For masses that appear to be benign (<10 HU; washout, >50%), small (<3 cm), and completely nonfunctioning, imaging and biochemical reevaluation (pheochromocytoma and hypercortisolism only) at 1-2 yr (or more) is appropriate. For more indeterminate lesions, repeat evaluation for growth after 3-12 months is useful, with subsequent testing intervals based on the rate of growth.

  13. Congenital chloride diarrhoea. Clinical analysis of 21 Finnish patients.

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, C; Perheentupa, J; Launiala, K; Hallman, N

    1977-01-01

    Clinical findings in 21 Finnish children with congenital chloride diarrhoea are reported. Inheritance of this disease by the autosomal recessive mode is established. All children were born 1-8 weeks prematurely. Hydramnios was present in every case and no meconium was observed; intrauterine onset of diarrhoea is thus apparent. In most cases the diarrhoea or passing of large volumes of "urine" was noted on the first day of life and the abdomen was usually large and distended. The neonatla weight loss was abnormally large, and was associated with hypochloraemia and hyponatraemia. Some infants survived the neonatal period without adequate therapy. They presented later with failure to thrive and usually had hypochloraemia, hypokalaemia, and metabolic alkalosis associated with hyperaldosteronism. However, these features may be absent and the diagnosis is based on a history of hydramnios and diarrhoea, and a faecal Cl- concentration which always exceeds 90 mmol/l when fluid and electrolyte deficits have been corrected. Lower faecal Cl- concentrations were seen only in chronic hypochloraemia, which is also associated with achloriduria. Adequate treatment consists of full continuous replacement of the faecal losses of water, NaCl, and KCl. This should be given intravenously in the early neonatal period; later a solution can be taken orally with meals. The dose has to be adjusted to maintain normal serum electrolyte concentrations, normal blood pH, and some chloriduria. This therapy prevents the renal lesions and the retarded growth and psychomotor development which were seen in the children who were diagnosed late and in those who received inadequate replacement therapy. The watery diarrhoea persists and increases slightly with age, though patients learn to live with their disease and to make an adequate social adjustment. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 10 PMID:324405

  14. Aldosterone induces fibrosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage in livers of male rats independent of blood pressure changes

    SciTech Connect

    Queisser, Nina; Happ, Kathrin; Link, Samuel; Jahn, Daniel; Zimnol, Anna; Geier, Andreas; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers show antifibrotic potential in hepatic fibrosis. The mechanism of this protective effect is not known yet, although reactive oxygen species seem to play an important role. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated levels of aldosterone (Ald), the primary ligand of the mineralocorticoid receptor, on livers of rats in a hyperaldosteronism model: aldosterone-induced hypertension. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were treated for 4 weeks with aldosterone. To distinguish if damage caused in the liver depended on increased blood pressure or on increased Ald levels, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone was given in a subtherapeutic dose, not normalizing blood pressure. To investigate the impact of oxidative stress, the antioxidant tempol was administered. Aldosterone induced fibrosis, detected histopathologically, and by expression analysis of the fibrosis marker, α-smooth muscle actin. Further, the mRNA amount of the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β was increased significantly. Fibrosis could be reduced by scavenging reactive oxygen species, and also by blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, aldosterone treatment caused oxidative stress and DNA double strand breaks in livers, as well as the elevation of DNA repair activity. An increase of the transcription factor Nrf2, the main regulator of the antioxidative response could be observed, and of its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. All these effects of aldosterone were prevented by spironolactone and tempol. Already after 4 weeks of treatment, aldosteroneinfusion induced fibrosis in the liver. This effect was independent of elevated blood pressure. DNA damage caused by aldosterone might contribute to fibrosis progression when aldosterone is chronically increased. - Highlights: • Aldosterone has direct profibrotic effects on the liver independent of blood pressure. • Fibrosis is mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor and

  15. A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study of Lipid-Rich Adrenal Incidentalomas: No Tumor Growth or Development of Hormonal Hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    Raade, Merja; Hämäläinen, Esa; Sane, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for follow-up of adrenal incidentalomas are extensive and hampered by lack of follow-up studies. We tested the hypothesis that small lipid-rich adrenal incidentalomas, initially characterized by tumor size <40 mm and <10 Hounsfield units (HUs) on unenhanced computed tomography (CT) may not demonstrate excessive growth/hormonal hypersecretion on follow-up. Methods Sixty-nine incidentalomas in 56 patients were restudied with unenhanced CT and screening for hypercortisolism (dexamethasone suppression test [DST], plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone) and pheochromocytoma (24-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines) 5 years later. Primary hyperaldosteronism was excluded at base-line. Results Tumor (n=69) size was similar before and after 5 years follow-up (19±6 mm vs. 20±7 mm). Mean tumor growth was 1±2 mm. Largest increase in tumor size was 8 mm, this tumor was surgically removed and histopathology confirmed cortical adenoma. DST was normal in 54 patients and two patients (3.6%) were still characterized by subclinical hypercortisolism. Initial tumor size was >20 mm for the patient with largest tumor growth and those with subclinical hypercortisolism. All patients had normal 24-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines. Low attenuation (<10 HU) was demonstrated in 97% of 67 masses re-evaluated with unenhanced CT. Conclusion None of the patients developed clinically relevant tumor growth or new subclinical hypercortisolism. Biochemical screening for pheochromocytoma in incidentalomas demonstrating <10 HU on unenhanced CT is not needed. For such incidentalomas <40 mm, it seems sufficient to perform control CT and screen for hypercortisolism after 5 years. PMID:26354488

  16. Bartter- and Gitelman-like syndromes: salt-losing tubulopathies with loop or DCT defects.

    PubMed

    Seyberth, Hannsjörg W; Schlingmann, Karl P

    2011-10-01

    Salt-losing tubulopathies with secondary hyperaldosteronism (SLT) comprise a set of well-defined inherited tubular disorders. Two segments along the distal nephron are primarily involved in the pathogenesis of SLTs: the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The functions of these pre- and postmacula densa segments are quite distinct, and this has a major impact on the clinical presentation of loop and DCT disorders - the Bartter- and Gitelman-like syndromes. Defects in the water-impermeable thick ascending limb, with its greater salt reabsorption capacity, lead to major salt and water losses similar to the effect of loop diuretics. In contrast, defects in the DCT, with its minor capacity of salt reabsorption and its crucial role in fine-tuning of urinary calcium and magnesium excretion, provoke more chronic solute imbalances similar to the effects of chronic treatment with thiazides. The most severe disorder is a combination of a loop and DCT disorder similar to the enhanced diuretic effect of a co-medication of loop diuretics with thiazides. Besides salt and water supplementation, prostaglandin E2-synthase inhibition is the most effective therapeutic option in polyuric loop disorders (e.g., pure furosemide and mixed furosemide-amiloride type), especially in preterm infants with severe volume depletion. In DCT disorders (e.g., pure thiazide and mixed thiazide-furosemide type), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers might be indicated after salt, potassium, and magnesium supplementation are deemed insufficient. It appears that in most patients with SLT, a combination of solute supplementation with some drug treatment (e.g., indomethacin) is needed for a lifetime.

  17. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  18. A case of bilateral aldosterone-producing adenomas differentiated by segmental adrenal venous sampling for bilateral adrenal sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, R; Satani, N; Iwakura, Y; Ono, Y; Kudo, M; Nezu, M; Omata, K; Tezuka, Y; Seiji, K; Ota, H; Kawasaki, Y; Ishidoya, S; Nakamura, Y; Arai, Y; Takase, K; Sasano, H; Ito, S; Satoh, F

    2016-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism due to unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) is a surgically curable form of hypertension. Bilateral APA can also be surgically curable in theory but few successful cases can be found in the literature. It has been reported that even using successful adrenal venous sampling (AVS) via bilateral adrenal central veins, it is extremely difficult to differentiate bilateral APA from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) harbouring computed tomography (CT)-detectable bilateral adrenocortical nodules. We report a case of bilateral APA diagnosed by segmental AVS (S-AVS) and blood sampling via intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins to localize the sites of intra-adrenal hormone production. A 36-year-old man with marked long-standing hypertension was referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of bilateral APA. He had typical clinical and laboratory profiles of marked hypertension, hypokalaemia, elevated plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) of 45.1 ng dl(-1) and aldosterone renin activity ratio of 90.2 (ng dl(-1) per ng ml(-1 )h(-1)), which was still high after 50 mg-captopril loading. CT revealed bilateral adrenocortical tumours of 10 and 12 mm in diameter on the right and left sides, respectively. S-AVS confirmed excess aldosterone secretion from a tumour segment vein and suppressed secretion from a non-tumour segment vein bilaterally, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral APA. The patient underwent simultaneous bilateral sparing adrenalectomy. Histopathological analysis of the resected adrenals together with decreased blood pressure and PAC of 5.2 ng dl(-1) confirmed the removal of bilateral APA. S-AVS was reliable to differentiate bilateral APA from IHA by direct evaluation of intra-adrenal hormone production. PMID:26538381

  19. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  20. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1*

    PubMed Central

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R.; Khan, Junaid A.; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. PMID:26203193

  1. Aldosterone Increases Oxidant Stress to Impair Guanylyl Cyclase Activity by Cysteinyl Thiol Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E.; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO·); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO· to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10-9-10-7 mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a β1-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO· sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC β1-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H2O2 did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO·-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC. PMID:19141618

  2. Aldosterone Inactivates the Endothelin-B Receptor via a Cysteinyl Thiol Redox Switch to Decrease Pulmonary Endothelial Nitric Oxide Levels and Modulate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; White, Kevin; Chan, Stephen Y.; Handy, Diane E.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized, in part, by decreased endothelial nitric oxide (NO•) production and elevated levels of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 is known to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the endothelin-B receptor (ETB), suggesting that this signaling pathway is perturbed in PAH. Endothelin-1 also stimulates adrenal aldosterone synthesis; in systemic blood vessels, hyperaldosteronism induces vascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreasing NO• levels. We hypothesized that aldosterone modulates PAH by disrupting ETB-eNOS signaling through a mechanism involving increased pulmonary endothelial oxidant stress. Methods and Results In rats with PAH, elevated endothelin-1 levels were associated with elevated aldosterone levels in plasma and lung tissue and decreased lung NO• metabolites in the absence of left heart failure. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), endothelin-1 increased aldosterone levels via PGC-1α/steroidogenesis factor-1-dependent upregulation of aldosterone synthase. Aldosterone also increased ROS production, which oxidatively modified cysteinyl thiols in the eNOS-activating region of ETB to decrease endothelin-1-stimulated eNOS activity. Substitution of ETB-Cys405 with alanine improved ETB-dependent NO• synthesis under conditions of oxidant stress, confirming that Cys405 is a redox sensitive thiol that is necessary for ETB-eNOS signaling. In HPAECs, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone decreased aldosterone-mediated ROS generation and restored ETB-dependent NO• production. Spironolactone or eplerenone prevented or reversed pulmonary vascular remodeling and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics in two animal models of PAH in vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that aldosterone modulates an ETB cysteinyl thiol redox switch to decrease pulmonary endothelium-derived NO• and promote PAH

  3. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  4. Syndromes that Mimic an Excess of Mineralocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Sabbadin, Chiara; Armanini, Decio

    2016-09-01

    Pseudohyperaldosteronism is characterized by a clinical picture of hyperaldosteronism with suppression of renin and aldosterone. It can be due to endogenous or exogenous substances that mimic the effector mechanisms of aldosterone, leading not only to alterations of electrolytes and hypertension, but also to an increased inflammatory reaction in several tissues. Enzymatic defects of adrenal steroidogenesis (deficiency of 17α-hydroxylase and 11β-hydroxylase), mutations of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and alterations of expression or saturation of 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Cushing's syndrome, excessive intake of licorice, grapefruits or carbenoxolone) are the main causes of pseudohyperaldosteronism. In these cases treatment with dexamethasone and/or MR-blockers is useful not only to normalize blood pressure and electrolytes, but also to prevent the deleterious effects of prolonged over-activation of MR in epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. Genetic alterations of the sodium channel (Liddle's syndrome) or of the sodium-chloride co-transporter (Gordon's syndrome) cause abnormal sodium and water reabsorption in the distal renal tubules and hypertension. Treatment with amiloride and thiazide diuretics can respectively reverse the clinical picture and the renin aldosterone system. Finally, many other more common situations can lead to an acquired pseudohyperaldosteronism, like the expansion of volume due to exaggerated water and/or sodium intake, and the use of drugs, as contraceptives, corticosteroids, β-adrenergic agonists and FANS. In conclusion, syndromes or situations that mimic aldosterone excess are not rare and an accurate personal and pharmacological history is mandatory for a correct diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary tests and mistreatments. PMID:27251484

  5. Classification and surgical treatment for 180 cases of adrenocortical hyperplastic disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review and discuss the diagnostic and surgical therapeutic methods of adrenocortical hyperplastic disease. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done to 180 adrenocortical hyperplasia patients (74 males, 109 females, aged 6~76 (average 40.1). Studies were done to the relationship between patients’ clinical characteristics, biochemical, endocrinological and imaging examination results, the therapeutic effects. Results: Among all 180 cases, there are 107 Cushing disease (CD), 19 ectopic adrenocorticotropin adrenal hyperplasia (EAAH), 28 adrenocorticotropin independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH), 4 primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PPNAH), and 28 Idiopathic Hyperaldosteronism (IHA). Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol (24 h UFC) excretion of CD, EAAH, AIMAH and PPNAH patients were 95.2~535.7 µg (average 287.6 µg), 24.8~808.2 µg (average 307.9 µg), 102.5~3127.0 µg (average 852.5 µg), and 243.8~1124.6 µg (average 564.3 µg). Both low and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests (DDST) were not suppressed in AIMAH, PPNAH and EAAH groups, but HDDST was suppressed in CD group. CT thin scanning results of 180 patients all showed enlargements in the affected side adrenal gland. Unilateral adrenalectomies were performed in 102 hypercortisolism cases. Local lesion excisions were done to 21 IHA patients. 57 patients had surgeries in both sides of the adrenal glands (39 bilateral total adrenalectomies, 16 total adrenalectomy in one side andsubtotal adrenalectomy in the other, 2 bilateral subtotal adrenalectomies). 106 (59%) patients were followed up for 4~158 (average 32) months. Conclusion: Unilateral adrenalectomy was the first choice for operable adrenocortical hyperplasia patients. The operation mode for the other adrenal gland should be based on the type of hyperplasia and clinical observation. PMID:26770569

  6. Activation of mTORC1 in collecting ducts causes hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Dong, Heling; Jia, Chunhong; Song, Qiancheng; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yue; Lai, Pinglin; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Miao; Lin, Jun; Yang, Cuilan; Li, Ming; Gao, Tianming; Bai, Xiaochun

    2014-03-01

    Mutation of TSC (encoding tuberous sclerosis complex protein) and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several renal diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease. However, the role of mTOR in renal potassium excretion and hyperkalemia is not known. We showed that mice with collecting-duct (CD)-specific ablation of TSC1 (CDTsc1KO) had greater mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the CD and demonstrated features of pseudohypoaldosteronism, including hyperkalemia, hyperaldosteronism, and metabolic acidosis. mTORC1 activation caused endoplasmic reticulum stress, columnar cell lesions, and dedifferentiation of CD cells with loss of aquaporin-2 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes. Of note, mTORC1 activation also reduced the expression of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1, a crucial regulator of potassium homeostasis in the kidney, and decreased the expression and/or activity of epithelial sodium channel-α, renal outer medullary potassium channel, and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the CD, which probably contributed to the aldosterone resistance and hyperkalemia in these mice. Rapamycin restored these phenotypic changes. Overall, this study identifies a novel function of mTORC1 in regulating potassium homeostasis and demonstrates that loss of TSC1 and activation of mTORC1 results in dedifferentiation and dysfunction of the CD and causes hyperkalemia. The CDTsc1KO mice provide a novel model for hyperkalemia induced exclusively by dysfunction of the CD. PMID:24203997

  7. Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: Spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different mutations.

    PubMed

    Al Shibli, Amar; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Bartter and Gitelman syndromes (BS and GS) are inherited disorders resulting in defects in renal tubular handling of sodium, potassium and chloride. Previously considered as genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneous diseases, recent evidence suggests that they constitute a spectrum of disease caused by different genetic mutations with the molecular defects of chloride reabsorption originating at different sites of the nephron in each condition. Although they share some characteristic metabolic abnormalities such as hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus with hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism, the clinical and laboratory manifestations may not always allow distinction between them. Diuretics tests, measuring the changes in urinary fractional excretion of chloride from baseline after administration of either hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide show very little change (< 2.3%) in the fractional excretion of chloride from baseline in GS when compared with BS, except when BS is associated with KCNJ1 mutations where a good response to both diuretics exists. The diuretic test is not recommended for infants or young children with suspected BS because of a higher risk of volume depletion in such children. Clinical symptoms and biochemical markers of GS and classic form of BS (type III) may overlap and thus genetic analysis may specify the real cause of symptoms. However, although genetic analysis is available, its use remains limited because of limited availability, large gene dimensions, lack of hot-spot mutations, heavy workup time and costs involved. Furthermore, considerable overlap exists between the different genotypes and phenotypes. Although BS and GS usually have distinct presentations and are associated with specific gene mutations, there remains considerable overlap between their phenotypes and genotypes. Thus, they are better described as a spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different gene mutations. PMID:26140272

  8. A case of bilateral aldosterone-producing adenomas differentiated by segmental adrenal venous sampling for bilateral adrenal sparing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, R; Satani, N; Iwakura, Y; Ono, Y; Kudo, M; Nezu, M; Omata, K; Tezuka, Y; Seiji, K; Ota, H; Kawasaki, Y; Ishidoya, S; Nakamura, Y; Arai, Y; Takase, K; Sasano, H; Ito, S; Satoh, F

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism due to unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) is a surgically curable form of hypertension. Bilateral APA can also be surgically curable in theory but few successful cases can be found in the literature. It has been reported that even using successful adrenal venous sampling (AVS) via bilateral adrenal central veins, it is extremely difficult to differentiate bilateral APA from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) harbouring computed tomography (CT)-detectable bilateral adrenocortical nodules. We report a case of bilateral APA diagnosed by segmental AVS (S-AVS) and blood sampling via intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins to localize the sites of intra-adrenal hormone production. A 36-year-old man with marked long-standing hypertension was referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of bilateral APA. He had typical clinical and laboratory profiles of marked hypertension, hypokalaemia, elevated plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) of 45.1 ng dl−1 and aldosterone renin activity ratio of 90.2 (ng dl−1 per ng ml−1 h−1), which was still high after 50 mg-captopril loading. CT revealed bilateral adrenocortical tumours of 10 and 12 mm in diameter on the right and left sides, respectively. S-AVS confirmed excess aldosterone secretion from a tumour segment vein and suppressed secretion from a non-tumour segment vein bilaterally, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral APA. The patient underwent simultaneous bilateral sparing adrenalectomy. Histopathological analysis of the resected adrenals together with decreased blood pressure and PAC of 5.2 ng dl−1 confirmed the removal of bilateral APA. S-AVS was reliable to differentiate bilateral APA from IHA by direct evaluation of intra-adrenal hormone production. PMID:26538381

  9. Reduced parenteral nutrition requirements following anastomosis of a short residual colonic segment to a short jejunum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine H; Saunders, John A; Nugent, Karen P; Jackson, Alan A; Stroud, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    A 22-year-old man suffered an acute small bowel infarct leading to extensive bowel resection, resulting in only 20 cm of jejunum to a jejunostomy, although he also had 50 cm of residual colon with a mucous fistula. The patient was out on long-term home parenteral nutrition (PN) but endured high stomal losses of 5-6 L per day and, despite all conventional measures, required 6.1 L of fluid (including PN) and 555 mmol sodium per day. Although body mass index was maintained, he suffered debilitating malaise and recurrent episodes of catheter-related sepsis and also developed persistently abnormal liver function tests. He was considered a potential intestinal transplant patient, but before taking that step, he opted for reanastomosis of his residual colon to his jejunum, ending in a colostomy. At surgery, only 30 cm of additional bowel lengthening could be achieved, but despite this, the patient's stomal losses reduced to 2.5 L per day, intravenous fluid requirements reduced to 4.1 L per day, and liver function normalized. The patient also gained 7.5 kg despite no change in PN caloric prescription, and his quality of life was dramatically enhanced. The case illustrates that even a small length of colon can grant significant improvements, probably via improvements in small bowel transit and adaptive changes, better sodium and water resorption with decreased hyperaldosteronism, and enhanced energy and nitrogen recovery. Reanastomosis of defunctioned colon should therefore always be considered a management option in short bowel syndrome. PMID:22042049

  10. [Edematous syndromes caused by capillary hyperpermeability. Diffuse angioedema].

    PubMed

    Lagrue, G; Behar, A; Maurel, A

    1989-01-01

    Edema due to increased capillary permeability (ICP) may be diffuse or localized. Local edemas (Quincke edema, angioneurotic edema) are most often allergic or very rarely due to a defect in C1-inhibitor. Generalized edemas due to ICP share the following clinical features: Fluid retention (subcutaneous edema and diffused swelling) is predominant in lower limbs; it is worsened by orthostatism and warmth and alleviated by decubitus and cold, with important weight variations between morning and evening. It is associated with enhanced thirst, hypotension, oliguria, headaches and blood volume reduction; secondary hyperaldosteronism is the main mechanism. These troubles are due to ICP, associated with lymphatic drainage abnormalities; ICP is measured by the isotopic Landis Test. This abnormality is present in several diseases. Idiopathic orthostatic edema (IOE) is frequent and often unrecognized, occurring mainly in women, often associated with luteal insufficiency. Iatrogenic complications (diuretic and laxative abuses) are frequently superimposed. ICP may be corrected by vitamins P (rutin, anthocyanosides, diosmin, Ginkgo biloba extracts...) Cyclic shock due to ICP is rare. It is characterized by cyclic edema and shock with hypovolemia, hypoproteinemia; the mechanism of shock is a severe loss of fluid and protein from the vascular bed. It is often associated with monoclonal gammapathy and complement activation. In our personal case, the trouble in CP was present all along the disease with permanent edema and low blood pressure (especially in orthostatism). Vit "P" and Ginkgo biloba extracts were able to partially improve CP and the clinical troubles. However, in spite of this treatment a fatal shock occurred after ten years follow-up. Episodic angioedema associated with eosinophilia was first described by Gleich.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2778397

  11. Repeated resections for liver metastasis from primary adrenocortical carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryosuke; Satoh, Daisuke; Nakajima, Hirochika; Yoshimura, Yuri; Miyoshi, Hisanobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Ichimura, Kouichi; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare type of tumor that generally has a poor prognosis. Little has been reported on repeated liver resections with recurrent metastasis still confined to the liver. In this report, we describe a case of functioning ACC in a 65-year-old woman with 2 liver metastases of the ACC (at 1.5 and 4 years) after the right adrenalectomy. Presentation of case A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital based on a suspicion of hyperaldosteronism. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a lesion at the right adrenal gland; therefore, we performed right adrenalectomy and subsequently diagnosed the lesion as ACC. However, follow-up computed tomography at 1.5 and 4 years after the right adrenalectomy revealed liver metastasis of ACC; liver resection was performed for both metastases. Discussion Complete surgical resection is the established approach for the treatment of ACC. The prognosis of ACC is usually dismal, and recurrence rates of up to 85% have been reported. However, the appropriate treatment for recurrent ACC is not well established, and the effectiveness of other modalities, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is not proven. Therefore, surgical resection may currently be the most appropriate treatment modality, as the patient achieved a disease-free interval of 2.5 years after the first liver resection. Conclusion In selected patients with recurrent or metastatic ACC, resection is likely to be associated with prolonged survival. However, a full cure is generally not achievable, and a multidisciplinary approach is likely needed to achieve long-term disease-free status and survival. PMID:25765741

  12. Aldosterone increases oxidant stress to impair guanylyl cyclase activity by cysteinyl thiol oxidation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maron, Bradley A; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2009-03-20

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO(.)); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO(.) to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10(-9)-10(-7) mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a beta(1)-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO(.) sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC beta(1)-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H(2)O(2) did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO(.)-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC.

  13. Ultrasonographic measurements of adrenal glands in cats with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Vandermeulen, Eva; Duchateau, Luc; Peremans, Kathelijne; Daminet, Sylvie; Saunders, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    Feline hyperthyroidism is potentially associated with exaggerated responsiveness of the adrenal gland cortex. The adrenal glands of 23 hyperthyroid cats were examined ultrasonographically and compared to the adrenal glands of 30 control cats. Ten hyperthyroid cats had received antithyroid drugs until 2 weeks before sonography, the other 13 were untreated. There was no difference in adrenal gland shape between healthy and hyperthyroid cats: bean-shaped, well-defined, hypoechoic structures surrounded by a hyperechoic halo in 43/60 (71.6%) healthy cats and 34/46 (73.9%) hyperthyroid cats; more ovoid in 13/60 (21.6%) healthy cats and 9/46 (19.6%) hyperthyroid cats while more elongated in 4/60 (6.7%) healthy cats, 3/46 (6.5%) hyperthyroid cats. Hyperechoic foci were present in 9/23 (39.1%) hyperthyroid cats and 2/30 (6.7%) healthy cats. The adrenal glands were significantly larger in hyperthyroid cats, although there was overlap in size range. The mean difference between hyperthyroid cats and healthy cats was 1.6 and 1.7 mm in left and right adrenal gland length, 0.8 and 0.9 mm in left and right cranial adrenal gland height, and 0.4 and 0.9 mm in left and right caudal adrenal gland height. There was no significant difference between the adrenal gland measurements in treated and untreated hyperthyroid cats. The adrenomegaly was most likely associated with the hypersecretion of the adrenal cortex documented in hyperthyroid cats. Hyperthyroidism should be an alternative to hyperadrenocorticism, hyperaldosteronism, and acromegaly in cats with bilateral moderate adrenomegaly.

  14. SY 15-4 ROLE OF HISTONE DEACETYLASES IN REGULATING ENDOTHELIAL AND VASCULAR FUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Kim, InKyeom

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) act as co-repressors in gene transcription by erasing the acetylation of histones, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. Recent studies revealed that HDAC inhibitors attenuated blood pressure of several hypertensive animal models such as spontaneously hypertensive rats, hyperaldosteronism rats, angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats and pulmonary hypertensive rats. Unexpectedly, microarray studies uncovered that administration of HDAC inhibitors decreased expression of some genes for example extracellular matrix proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, cytokines, chemokines and ion transporters, mostly targets of corticoid receptors. Corticoid-induced hypertensive animal model was established by infusion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (40 ng/kg/day), deoxycorticosterone acetate (40 mg/kg), and dexamethasone (100 μg/kg/day) with osmotic mini-pump. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I and IIa HDAC inhibitor administration significantly decreased corticoid-induced hypertension. VPA administration increased acetylation level of Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which was closely related with decreased binding affinity with hormone response element in the promoters of target genes such as glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (Gilz) and serum glucocorticoid regulated kinase-1 (Sgk-1). HDAC3 and HDAC4 were interacted with MR after stimulation of aldosterone (10 nmol/L) for 30 min. HDAC4 inhibitor showed no effect on acetylation level and promoter binding affinity of MR. HDAC4 played a role as a scaffold between MR and HDAC3. In conclusion, HDAC inhibitors increased acetylation of corticoid receptor, resulted in decreased transcriptional activity of it and blocked corticoid induced-hypertension. PMID:27643134

  15. GATA6, SF1, NGFIB and DAX1 in the remodeled subcapsular zones in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Kurotaki, Yumi; Ise, Kazue; Felizola, Saulo J A; McNamara, Keely M; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the cases diagnosed as primary aldosteronism (PA) are caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) or idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA). Histopathologically, both IHA and adjacent adrenal glands of APA demonstrate remodeled subcapsular zone (RSZ) but these zones in two disorders are markedly different in terms of steroidogenesis. 3β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ⁵-Δ⁴ isomerase (3β-HSD) expression has been known to be activated synergistically by GATA6 and SF1, and repressed by DAX1 through abolishing the activation. Nerve growth factor-induced clone B (NGFIB) is also known as one of the transcription factors to bind to and activate 3β-HSD promoter. The results of our immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the expression levels of 3β-HSD in RSZ of IHA were higher than in RSZ of adjacent adrenals of APA, while those in the zona glomerulosa (ZG) of normal adrenal gland (NA) were in between these two RSZs. The expression levels of GATA6, SF1 and DAX1 did not prominently differ among these three types of adrenals, especially between in RSZs of IHA and APA cases, indicating the marked difference of 3β-HSD expression was unlikely to be explained by the levels of these three factors. However, the levels of NGFIB expression were significantly higher in RSZ of IHA than in RSZ of adjacent adrenals of APA and the ZG of NA (P<0.05), which may partly account for the expression levels of 3β-HSD among the three groups of adrenals. These results may imply NGFIB plays important roles in the marked differences in steroidogenic functions in the two distinct types of RSZ of PA cases. PMID:24531914

  16. A Novel Form of Human Mendelian Hypertension Featuring Nonglucocorticoid-Remediable Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Geller, David S.; Zhang, Junhui; Wisgerhof, Max V.; Shackleton, Cedric; Kashgarian, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Primary aldosteronism is a leading cause of secondary hypertension (HTN), but the mechanisms underlying the characteristic renin-independent secretion of aldosterone remain unknown in most patients. Objectives: We report a new familial form of aldosteronism in a father and two daughters. All were diagnosed with severe HTN refractory to medical treatment by age 7 yr. We performed a variety of clinical, biochemical, and genetic studies to attempt to clarify the underlying molecular defect. Results: Biochemical studies revealed hyporeninemia, hyperaldosteronism, and very high levels of 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol, steroids that reflect oxidation by both steroid 17-α hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase. These enzymes are normally compartmentalized in the adrenal fasciculata and glomerulosa, respectively. Administration of dexamethasone failed to suppress either aldosterone or cortisol secretion; these findings distinguish this clinical syndrome from glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism, another autosomal dominant form of HTN, and suggest a global defect in the regulation of adrenal steroid production. Genetic studies excluded mutation at the aldosterone synthase locus, further distinguishing this disorder from glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism. Because of unrelenting HTN, all three subjects underwent bilateral adrenalectomy, which in each case corrected the HTN. Adrenal glands showed dramatic enlargement, with paired adrenal weights as high as 82 g. Histology revealed massive hyperplasia and cellular hypertrophy of a single cortical compartment that had features of adrenal fasciculata or a transitional zone, with an atrophic glomerulosa. Conclusion: These findings define a new inherited form of aldosteronism and suggest that identification of the underlying defect will provide insight into normal mechanisms regulating adrenal steroid biosynthesis. PMID:18505761

  17. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE consensus on primary aldosteronism, part 5: Genetic diagnosis of primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    While the majority of cases of primary aldosteronism (PA) are sporadic, four forms of autosomal-dominant inheritance have been described: familial hyperaldosteronism (FH) types I to IV. FH-I, also called glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism, is characterized by early and severe hypertension, usually before the age of 20 years. It is due to the formation of a chimeric gene between the adjacent CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 genes (coding for aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase, respectively). FH-I is often associated with family history of stroke before 40years of age. FH-II is clinically and biochemically indistinguishable from sporadic forms of PA and is only diagnosed on the basis of two or more affected family members. No causal genes have been identified so far and no genetic test is available. FH-III is characterized by severe and early-onset hypertension in children and young adults, resistant to treatment and associated with severe hypokalemia. Mild forms, resembling FH-II, have been described. FH-III is due to gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ5 gene. Recently, a new autosomal-dominant form of familial PA, FH-IV, associated with mutations in the CACNA1H gene, was described in patients with hypertension and PA before the age of 10years. In rare cases, PA may be associated with complex neurologic disorder involving epileptic seizures and cerebral palsy (Primary Aldosteronism, Seizures, and Neurologic Abnormalities [PASNA]) due to de novo germline CACNA1D mutations. PMID:27315758

  18. Adrenal incidentalomas: A collection of six interesting cases and brief review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panchani, Roopal; Goyal, Ashutosh; Varma, Tarun; Gupta, Nitinranjan; Tripathi, Sudhir; Kumar, Surender

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenal incidentalomas (AI) are detected in approximately 4-7% of patients in imaging studies. Majority are benign, but careful evaluation is warranted to rule out carcinoma and functional adenomas. Aim: The purpose of presenting these cases is to highlight the approach to management of AI in terms of diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment. Materials and Methods: Seven patients presenting in the endocrine clinic with AI were evaluated for their presenting clinical features and investigated. Results: Case 1 was a 49-year-old female, with adrenal androgen secreting adrenocortical carcinoma with amenorrhoea which was mistaken as menopause. She had minimal hirsutism, which was mistaken as postmenopausal hirsutism. Case 2 was a 39-year-old male, presenting with hyperglycemia found to have Conns’ syndrome with aldosterone producing adenoma on routine ultrasound. Case 3 was a 32-year-old male, presenting with gastritis and bloating, where ultrasound showed bilateral large adrenal masses revealed as diffuse large B cell lymphoma on biopsy. Case 4 was a 21-year-old boy, who had pheochromocytoma misdiagnosed as benign intracranial hypertension (HTN). Case 5 was a 59-year-old hypertensive male, presenting with fever had pheochromocytoma with catecholamine excess, producing fever. Case 6 was isolated adrenal tuberculosis who presented with chronic diarrhea. Conclusion: AI are common, though prevalence varies depending on the reason for scanning, the characteristics of the population studied, and the radiological techniques used. Most are non-secreting cortical adenomas. AI should be evaluated both biochemically and radiologically. When a hormonal disorder is suspected clinically, targeted, diagnostic testing for autonomous cortisol secretion, pheochromocytoma, and hyperaldosteronism is indicated. PMID:23565436

  19. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  20. Hyper- and hypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Torpy, D J; Stratakis, C A; Chrousos, G P

    1999-01-01

    Aldosterone participates in blood volume and serum potassium homeostasis, which in turn regulate aldosterone secretion by the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Autonomous aldosterone hypersecretion leads to hypertension and hypokalemia. Improved screening techniques have led to a re-evaluation of the frequency of primary aldosteronism among adults with hypertension, recognizing that normokalemic cases are more frequent than was previously appreciated. The genetic basis of glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism has been elucidated and adequately explains most of the pathophysiologic features of this disorder. A new form of familial aldosteronism has been described, familial hyperaldosteronism type II; linkage analysis and direct mutation screening has shown that this disorder is unrelated to mutations in the genes for aldosterone synthase or the angiotensin II receptor. The features of aldosterone hypersecretion may be due to non-aldosterone-mediated mineralocorticoid excess. These include two causes of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (11 beta-hydroxylase deficiency and 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency), the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) due to 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-HSD) deficiency, primary glucocorticoid resistance, Liddle's syndrome due to activating mutations of the renal epithelial sodium channel, and exogenous sources of mineralocorticoid, such as licorice, or drugs, such as carbenoxolone. The features of mineralocorticoid excess are also often seen in Cushing's syndrome. Hypoaldosteronism may lead to hypotension and hyperkalemia. Hypoaldosteronism may be due to inadequate stimulation of aldosterone secretion (hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism), defects in adrenal synthesis of aldosterone, or resistance to the ion transport effects of aldosterone, such as are seen in pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (PHA I). PHA I is frequently due to mutations involving the amiloride sensitive epithelial sodium channel. Gordon

  1. Activation of mTORC1 in Collecting Ducts Causes Hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenguo; Dong, Heling; Jia, Chunhong; Song, Qiancheng; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yue; Lai, Pinglin; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Miao; Lin, Jun; Yang, Cuilan; Li, Ming; Gao, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of TSC (encoding tuberous sclerosis complex protein) and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several renal diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease. However, the role of mTOR in renal potassium excretion and hyperkalemia is not known. We showed that mice with collecting-duct (CD)–specific ablation of TSC1 (CDTsc1KO) had greater mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the CD and demonstrated features of pseudohypoaldosteronism, including hyperkalemia, hyperaldosteronism, and metabolic acidosis. mTORC1 activation caused endoplasmic reticulum stress, columnar cell lesions, and dedifferentiation of CD cells with loss of aquaporin-2 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes. Of note, mTORC1 activation also reduced the expression of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1, a crucial regulator of potassium homeostasis in the kidney, and decreased the expression and/or activity of epithelial sodium channel-α, renal outer medullary potassium channel, and Na+, K+-ATPase in the CD, which probably contributed to the aldosterone resistance and hyperkalemia in these mice. Rapamycin restored these phenotypic changes. Overall, this study identifies a novel function of mTORC1 in regulating potassium homeostasis and demonstrates that loss of TSC1 and activation of mTORC1 results in dedifferentiation and dysfunction of the CD and causes hyperkalemia. The CDTsc1KO mice provide a novel model for hyperkalemia induced exclusively by dysfunction of the CD. PMID:24203997

  2. Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: Spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different mutations

    PubMed Central

    Al Shibli, Amar; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Bartter and Gitelman syndromes (BS and GS) are inherited disorders resulting in defects in renal tubular handling of sodium, potassium and chloride. Previously considered as genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneous diseases, recent evidence suggests that they constitute a spectrum of disease caused by different genetic mutations with the molecular defects of chloride reabsorption originating at different sites of the nephron in each condition. Although they share some characteristic metabolic abnormalities such as hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus with hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism, the clinical and laboratory manifestations may not always allow distinction between them. Diuretics tests, measuring the changes in urinary fractional excretion of chloride from baseline after administration of either hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide show very little change (< 2.3%) in the fractional excretion of chloride from baseline in GS when compared with BS, except when BS is associated with KCNJ1 mutations where a good response to both diuretics exists. The diuretic test is not recommended for infants or young children with suspected BS because of a higher risk of volume depletion in such children. Clinical symptoms and biochemical markers of GS and classic form of BS (type III) may overlap and thus genetic analysis may specify the real cause of symptoms. However, although genetic analysis is available, its use remains limited because of limited availability, large gene dimensions, lack of hot-spot mutations, heavy workup time and costs involved. Furthermore, considerable overlap exists between the different genotypes and phenotypes. Although BS and GS usually have distinct presentations and are associated with specific gene mutations, there remains considerable overlap between their phenotypes and genotypes. Thus, they are better described as a spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different gene mutations. PMID:26140272

  3. HW 01-3 CARDIAC AND VASCULAR MRI IN HYPERTENSION EVALUATION.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Chol

    2016-09-01

    ventriculo-arterial coupling can be even more accurate when CMR is utilized.CMR also gives the ability to assess the possibility of secondary hypertension such as renovascular hypertension, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, or coarctation of aorta.As these and many other aspects of hypertension and its complications can be easily elucidated with just one diagnostic technique, CMR should be utilized more and more in the evaluation of hypertensive patients especially longstanding or refractory hypertension or subjects who are at high risk of complications of hypertension. PMID:27643092

  4. Effect of eplerenone on insulin action in essential hypertension: a randomised, controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    McMurray, E M; Wallace, I R; Ennis, C; Hunter, S J; Atkinson, A B; Bell, P M

    2014-10-01

    An association exists between hyperaldosteronism, hypertension and impaired insulin action. Eplerenone is a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist; however, little is known about its effects on insulin action. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of eplerenone on insulin action in hypertensive adults, using the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. A randomised, controlled, double-blind, crossover design was employed. After a 6-week washout period, hypertensive, non-diabetic patients were treated with either eplerenone 25 mg twice daily or doxazosin 2 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. After each treatment period, insulin action was assessed by a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, with isotope dilution methodology. After washout, treatment groups were crossed over. Fifteen patients completed the study. There were no differences in fasting glucose, or fasting insulin between treatment with eplerenone or doxazosin. The measure of overall insulin sensitivity, exogenous glucose infusion rates during the last 30 min of the clamp, was similar with both treatments; 23.4 (3.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) after eplerenone and 23.3 (3.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) after doxazosin (P=0.83). Isotopically determined fasting endogenous glucose production rates were similar after both treatments (eplerenone 9.4 (0.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs doxazosin 10.6 (0.7) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). There was a trend for lower endogenous glucose production rates during hyperinsulinaemia following eplerenone compared with doxazosin (2.0 (0.8) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs 4.1 (0.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). There was no difference in insulin stimulated peripheral glucose utilisation rates after treatment with eplerenone or doxazosin (25.4 (3.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs 27.0 (3.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). This study gives reassuring evidence of the neutral effect of eplerenone on insulin action in hypertensive, non-diabetic patients.

  5. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2003-01-01

    The specific binding of digitalis glycosides to Na,K-ATPase is used as a tool for Na,K-ATPase quantification with high accuracy and precision. In myocardial biopsies from patients with heart failure, total Na,K-ATPase concentration is decreased by around 40%; a correlation exists between a decrease in heart function and a decrease in Na,K-ATPase concentration. During digitalization, around 30% of remaining pumps are occupied by digoxin. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase is also influenced by other drugs used for the treatment of heart failure. Thus, potassium loss during diuretic therapy has been found to reduce myocardial Na,K-ATPase, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may stimulate Na,K pump activity. Furthermore, hyperaldosteronism induced by heart failure has been found to decrease Na,K-ATPase activity. Accordingly, treatment with the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, may also influence Na,K-ATPase activity. The importance of Na,K pump modulation with heart disease, inhibition in digitalization and other effects of medication should be considered in the context of sodium, potassium and calcium regulation. It is recommended that digoxin be administered to heart failure patients who, after institution of mortality-reducing therapy, still have heart failure symptoms, and that the therapy be continued if symptoms are revealed or reduced. Digitalis glycosides are the only safe inotropic drugs for oral use that improve hemodynamics in heart failure. An important aspect of myocardial Na,K pump affection in heart disease is its influence on extracellular potassium (Ke) homeostasis. Two important aspects should be considered: potassium handling among myocytes, and effects of potassium entering the extracellular space of the heart via the bloodstream. It should be noted that both of these aspects of Ke homeostasis are affected by regulatory aspects, eg, regulation of the Na,K pump by physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as by medical

  6. SY 14-3 PRIMARY ALDOSTERONISM IN RESISTANT HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David

    2016-09-01

    : Resistant hypertension refers to patients with difficult-to-treat hypertension, generally defined as needing three or more medications of different classes, including, if tolerated, a diuretic. Observational studies indicate that the prevalence of resistant hypertension based on the preceding definition of needing 3 or medications for blood pressure (BP) control is approximately 15-20% of patients being treated for hypertension. However, causes of pseudoresistance are common, including poor BP technique, poor adherence, white coat effects, and under-treatment, all of which must be identified in order to distinguish apparent resistance from true treatment resistance. Multiple studies indicate that primary aldosteronism is an especially common cause of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Observational studies from different clinics worldwide have demonstrated a prevalence of primary aldosteronism of approximately 20% of patients with confirmed resistant hypertension. Additional studies indicate, however, that is 20% is likely an under estimate of the role that hyperaldosteronism plays in contributing to pharmacologic treatment resistance. Studies based on indices of volume status, aldosterone levels, and aldosterone to renin ratio levels, provide evidence of aldosterone-related fluid retention in up to 60-70% of patients with resistant hypertension. The etiology of this degree of aldosterone excess remains obscure, but recent analyses of large cohorts of patients with resistant hypertension specifically indicate a strong positive correlation between increasing body weight and increasing aldosterone levels. This observation suggests that adipocytes may serve as an important source of an aldosterone-stimulating factor contributing to excess aldosterone release in patients with resistant hypertension. The relation between increasing aldosterone levels and increasing body mass index (BMI) is true of both men and women with resistant hypertension, but the positive

  7. BR 04-1MANAGEMENT OF TREATMENT-RESISTANT HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Webb, David John

    2016-09-01

    .Treatment of TRH includes appropriate life-style change (focused on diet, salt intake, exercise, weight), withdrawal or minimization of offending drugs (including alcohol), and the use of effective multi-drug regimens. Pre-existing drug treatment should ideally combine a thiazide-like diuretic (TLD), calcium channel blocker, and ACE inhibitor/ARB. Optimising diuretic use appears very important, so use of a long-acting TLD, such as chlortalidone or indapamide, may help. Loop diuretics should be considered in CKD patients. Low-dose spironolactone (25 mg, increased to 50 mg, once daily) or eplerenone (both mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) are now guideline approved as suitable 4th line agents in patients with TRH. Their success may be accounted for by the elevated aldosterone levels frequently found in TRH, either through undetected primary hyperaldosteronism or because aldosterone secretion escapes renin-angiotensin system blockade. Vital new evidence for the effectiveness of spironolactone in TRH comes from PATHWAY-2 (Williams et al., Lancet 2016). This randomised double-blind crossover trial involved sequential treatment with spironolactone (n = 285), an α1 blocker doxazosin (n = 282), β blocker bisoprolol (n = 285) and placebo (n = 274), each for 12 weeks. Spironolactone led to significantly greater mean reductions in systolic blood pressure than placebo (-10 [-11.7 to -8.74] mmHg, p < 0.001), doxazosin (-5.64 [-69.1 to -4.36], p < 0.001) and bisoprolol (-5.98 [-7.45 to -4.51] mmHg, p < 0.0001) on home systolic BP readings taken at the final visit of each treatment cycle. The magnitude of BP lowering with spironolactone was inversely proportional to plasma renin concentration, an association not observed with either bisoprolol or doxazosin, supporting the role of sodium retention, volume expansion and low plasma renin in TRH. As well as clearly demonstrating the superiority of spironolactone in TRH, the drug was shown to be safe and

  8. SY 03-3 OVERVIEW OF SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND EPIGENETIC REGULATION OF ALDOSTERONE PRODUCING ADENOMA (APA).

    PubMed

    Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders including both sporadic and familial forms (familial hyperaldosteronism type I, II and III). PA is the most frequent endocrine cause of secondary hypertension and associated with a higher rate of cardiovascular complications, compared with essential hypertension.Here I review the recent progress in understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms leading to autonomous aldosterone production in PA.Systematic screening detects primary aldosteronism in 5 to 10% of all patients with hypertension and in approximately 20% of patients with resistant hypertension. A unilateral APA is the most common curable cause of hypertension. Early detection of an APA is important both to cure of hypertension by means of adenoma removal and to prevent the onset of resistant hypertension and the risk of long-term cardiovascular complications, such as left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. (Hypertens 2013; 62: 331)(1) Novel somatic mutations in APARecent advances in genome technology have allowed researchers to unravel part of the genetic abnormalities underlying the development of APA. Pathogenic mechanisms of APA by the somatic mutation are as follows.The majority of the GIRK4 APA mutations (KCNJ5) lie in or within the close proximity of the ion selectivity filter of the K+ channel and result in the indiscriminate conductance of Na+ that causes membrane depolarization, Ca2+ influx, and increased aldosterone biosynthesis.Mutations in the Na+/K+- ATPase 1 (ATP1A1) produce a decrease in K+ binding that results in the reduced import of K+ and export of Na+ and also causes cell depolarization. This in turn results in the opening of voltage- gated Ca2+-channels.In contrast, the Ca2+-ATPase mutations (ATP2B3) were proposed to affect the clearance of cytoplasmic calcium ions. The net result of mutations in both ATPases is therefore likely to cause