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Sample records for hypercoordinate silicon compounds

  1. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  2. [Biological function of some elements and their compounds. IV. Silicon, silicon acids, silicones].

    PubMed

    Puzanowska-Tarasiewicz, Helena; Kuźmicka, Ludmiła; Tarasiewicz, Mirosław

    2009-11-01

    The review is devoted for the occurance, meaning of silicon and their compounds, especially silicon acids and silicones. Silicon participates in biosynthesis of collagen, the basic component of connective tissue. It strengthens and makes the walls of blood vessels more flexible, diminishes capillaries permeability, accelerates healing processes, has a sebostatic activity, strengthens hair and nails. This element has a beneficial effect on phosphorylation of proteins saccharides, and nucleotides. It is also essential for the formation of cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of mechanical or supportive function. Silicon is an initial substrate for obtaining silicones. These are synthetic polymers, in which silicon atoms are bound by oxygen bridges. They are used in almost all kinds of products due to their most convenient physical and chemical properties: moistening and film-forming, giving liquid form increasing solubility. Silicon acids form colloid gel, silica gel, with absorptive abilities, like active carbon. PMID:19999810

  3. Development of a silicone transfer molding compound

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1992-05-01

    Molding compound MS 2072067, designated BRP 50206, is currently used in the manufacture of bobbins and coils. This material was developed as a compression molding compound and is reinforced with 1/4 inch glass fibers. The production yield for coils and bobbins has improved over the years; however, it is still not at a desirable level. A milled glass reinforced version of MS 2072067 silicone molding compound was developed in the laboratory. Milled glass fibers with lengths of 1/32, 1/16, and 1/8 inch were used in place of the 1/4 inch chopped glass fibers in the formulations. The tensile strength, tensile moduli, thermal expansion, and flow properties of these materials were evaluated. These materials exhibited improved flow properties over the existing 1/4 inch glass fiber reinforced material. The new materials also had the same or better tensile strength, as compared to the current production material, and maintained similar thermal expansion characteristics.

  4. Silicones As Connector-Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Bickler, Marjorie S.

    1988-01-01

    Report evaluates silicone potting materials for electrical connectors. Describes tests of connector specimens made with CV-2510 and DC-6-1104 silicones with dibutyl tin dilaurate catalyst and evaluates test results in light of previously published test results for polyurethanes. Discusses requirements for connector-potting materials, methods used to evaluate silicones, techniques for preparing specimens, and results of tests. Identifies commercial sources of silicone potting materials.

  5. CB7-: Experimental and Theoretical Evidence Against Hypercoordinated Planar Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Leiming; Huang, Wei; Averkiev, Boris B.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-06-11

    The B82– cluster was previously shown to possess a planar molecular wheel structure with a heptacoordinated boron. Substitution of one B– by C in B82– is expected to yield a closed shell CB7– molecular wheel, which has been produced experimentally in a cluster beam and probed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations show that the CB7– cluster possesses an extremely stable planar C2v structure, in which the C atom substitutes a B– atom at the edge of the B82– molecular wheel, whereas the D7h structure with a heptacoordinated C is a high-lying isomer 63.2 kcal/mol (CCSD(T)/6-311+G(2df)//CCSD(T)/6-311+G*) above the global minimum. The combined experimental and ab initio study demonstrates that a heptacoordinated planar carbon in CB7– is extremely unfavorable and is not a viable candidate for experimental realization of hypercoordinated planar carbon molecules.

  6. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  7. Development of a silicone transfer molding compound. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1992-05-01

    Molding compound MS 2072067, designated BRP 50206, is currently used in the manufacture of bobbins and coils. This material was developed as a compression molding compound and is reinforced with 1/4 inch glass fibers. The production yield for coils and bobbins has improved over the years; however, it is still not at a desirable level. A milled glass reinforced version of MS 2072067 silicone molding compound was developed in the laboratory. Milled glass fibers with lengths of 1/32, 1/16, and 1/8 inch were used in place of the 1/4 inch chopped glass fibers in the formulations. The tensile strength, tensile moduli, thermal expansion, and flow properties of these materials were evaluated. These materials exhibited improved flow properties over the existing 1/4 inch glass fiber reinforced material. The new materials also had the same or better tensile strength, as compared to the current production material, and maintained similar thermal expansion characteristics.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of CB8-:Towards Rational Design of Hypercoordinated Planar Chemical Species

    SciTech Connect

    Averkiev, Boris B.; Wang, Leiming; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated in our joint photoelectron spectroscopic and ab initio study that wheel-type structures with a boron ring are not appropriate for designing planar molecules with a hypercoordinate central carbon on the example of CB8, and CB8 clusters. According to our chemical bonding model, in the wheel type structures the central atom is involved in delocalized bonding, while peripheral atoms are involved in both delocalized bonding and 2c-2e -bonding. Since carbon is more electronegative than boron it favors peripheral positions where it can participate in 2c-2e -bonding. To design a chemical species with a central hypercoordinate carbon atom, one should consider electropositive ligands, which would have lone pairs instead of 2c-2e peripheral bonds. We presented a chemical bonding model capable of rationalizing and predicting structures either with a boron ring or a central planar carbon. This represents the first step toward rational design of nano- and subnano-structures with tailored properties.

  9. Two-dimensional Cu2Si monolayer with planar hexacoordinate copper and silicon bonding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Bačić, Vladimir; Popov, Ivan A; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Heine, Thomas; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-02-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with planar hypercoordinate motifs are extremely rare due to the difficulty in stabilizing the planar hypercoordinate configurations in extended systems. Furthermore, such exotic motifs are often unstable. We predict a novel Cu2Si 2D monolayer featuring planar hexacoordinate copper and planar hexacoordinate silicon. This is a global minimum in 2D space which displays reduced dimensionality and rule-breaking chemical bonding. This system has been studied with density functional theory, including molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations. Bond order analysis and partitioning reveals 4c-2e σ bonds that stabilize the two-dimensional structure. We find that the system is quite stable during short annealing simulations up to 900 K, and predict that it is a nonmagnetic metal. This work opens up a new branch of hypercoordinate two-dimensional materials for study.

  10. Volatile organic silicon compounds: the most undesirable contaminants in biogases.

    PubMed

    Ohannessian, Aurélie; Desjardin, Valérie; Chatain, Vincent; Germain, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Recently a lot of attention has been focused on volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiC) present in biogases. They induce costly problems due to silicate formation during biogas combustion in valorisation engine. The cost of converting landfill gas and digester gas into electricity is adversely affected by this undesirable presence. VOSiC in biogases spark off formation of silicate deposits in combustion chambers. They engender abrasion of the inner surfaces leading to serious damage, which causes frequent service interruptions, thus reducing the economic benefit of biogases. It is already known that these VOSiC originate from polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) hydrolysis. PDMS (silicones) are used in a wide range of consumer and industrial applications. PDMS are released into the environment through landfills and wastewater treatment plants. There is a lack of knowledge concerning PDMS biodegradation during waste storage. Consequently, understanding PDMS behaviour in landfill cells and in sludge digester is particularly important. In this article, we focused on microbial degradation of PDMS through laboratory experiments. Preliminary test concerning anaerobic biodegradation of various PDMS have been investigated. Results demonstrate that the biotic step has an obvious influence on PDMS biodegradation. PMID:19029718

  11. The coordination number of silicon in silicon-oxygen compounds: the special case of 6-fold coordination in thaumasite.

    PubMed

    Duffy, J A; Macphee, D E

    2007-08-01

    In most silicon-oxygen compounds, the silicon atom is 4-fold coordinated. Exceptionally, silicon is found in 6-fold coordination, as in the mineral thaumasite, which also may be formed in the degradation, and sometimes subsequent weakening, of certain concretes. The connection between coordination number and chemical bonding in oxidic compounds generally is explored using the optical basicity concept to estimate the extent of negative charge provided by oxide(-II) donor atoms in the coordination sphere. A correlation is established between this charge and the heat of formation of silicate (per oxide(-II) atom), which indicates that reduction in charge decreases thermodynamic stability. Calculations for thaumasite show that 4-fold coordination would provide a very small charge, but that 6-fold provides a charge comparable with that for stable 4-fold coordinated silicates such as K2Si2O5. PMID:17608517

  12. FeB6 Monolayers: The Graphene-like Material with Hypercoordinate Transition Metal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Li, Yafei; Hou, Jianhua; Tu, Kaixiong; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-05-01

    By means of density functional theory (DFT) computations and global minimum search using particle-swarm optimization (PSO) method, we predicted three FeB6 monolayers, namely α-FeB6, β-FeB6 and γ-FeB6, which consist of the Fe©Bx (x = 6, 8) wheels with planar hypercoordinate Fe atoms locating at the center of six- or eight-membered boron rings. In particular, the α-FeB6 sheet constructed by Fe©B8 motifs is the global minimum due to completely shared and well delocalized electrons. The two-dimensional (2D) boron networks are dramatically stabilized by the electron transfer from Fe atoms, and the FeB6 monolayers have pronounced stabilities. The α-FeB6 monolayer is metallic, while the β-FeB6 and γ-FeB6 sheets are semiconductors with indirect band gaps and significant visible-light absorptions. Besides the novel chemical bonding, the high feasibility for experimental realization, and unique electronic and optical properties, render them very welcome new members to the graphene-like materials family. PMID:27035286

  13. Compounds from Silicones Alter Enzyme Activity in Curing Barnacle Glue and Model Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. Methodology/Principal Findings GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Conclusions/Significance Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management. PMID:21379573

  14. Self-Assembly in Systems Containing Silicone Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Maira Silva; Loh, Watson

    2009-01-29

    Chemical systems formed by silicone solvents and surfactants have potential applications in a variety of industrial products. In spite of their technological relevance, there are few reports on the scientific literature that focus on characterizing such ternary systems. In this work, we have aimed to develop a general, structural investigation on the phase diagram of one system that typically comprises silicone-based chemicals, by means of the SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) technique. Important features such as the presence of diverse aggregation states in the overall system, either on their own or in equilibrium with other structures, have been detected. As a result, optically isotropic chemical systems (direct and/or reversed microemulsions) and liquid crystals with lamellar or hexagonal packing have been identified and characterized.

  15. Formation of dielectric silicon compounds by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, D. S.; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of reactive magnetron sputtering of the silicon target in the ambient of inert argon gas with reactive gas, nitrogen or oxygen. The magnetron was powered by two mid-frequency generators of a rectangular pulse of opposite polarity. The negative polarity pulse provides the sputtering of the target. The positive polarity pulse provides removal of accumulated charge from the surface of the target. This method does not require any special devices of resistances matching and provides continuous sputtering of the target.

  16. Volatile organic silicon compounds in biogases: development of sampling and analytical methods for total silicon quantification by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Chottier, Claire; Chatain, Vincent; Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES.

  17. Volatile Organic Silicon Compounds in Biogases: Development of Sampling and Analytical Methods for Total Silicon Quantification by ICP-OES

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES. PMID:25379538

  18. In depth study of molybdenum silicon compound formation at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoethout, Erwin; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Fred

    2016-09-01

    Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) has been employed to determine non-destructively the in-depth interface formation during thin film growth. Buried interfaces underneath the nanometer thick layers are probed by identifying the chemical shift of compound materials in photoelectron spectroscopy and using the angular response to quantify the compound amounts from the measured intensities. The thin interfaces in molybdenum-silicon multilayers grown at ambient temperature are investigated. This system is an example of an almost perfect 1D-system, where the interface region is only a small part of the individual layer thicknesses of 3 to 5 nm. Despite the low growth temperature, both the interfaces of this multilayer show layer thickness dependent interface formation. While the silicon-on-molybdenum interface shows a limited interface thickness of 0.4 nm of Mo5Si3, the molybdenum-on-silicon interface shows a more complex evolution. For this interface, the composition of the first 2.0 nm of deposited layer thickness is best described as a molybdenum-silicon compound layer with a molybdenum rich top and a MoSi2 bottom layer. After 2.5 nm of the deposited layer thickness, the molybdenum rich compound at the top has transformed into polycrystalline molybdenum on top of 1.8 nm MoSi2 at the interface. The formation of the 1.8 nm MoSi2 precedes the formation of polycrystalline molybdenum on top. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) is shown to be a good tool to study the interface phenomena beneath the nanometer thick top layers. In the case of Mo/Si multilayer mirrors, this ARXPS study shows that the compound formation at the interface accounts for the majority of the extreme ultraviolet reflectance loss.

  19. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  20. Evaluation of a Silicone Membrane as an Alternative to Human Skin for Determining Skin Permeation Parameters of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Takashi; Yakumaru, Masafumi; Nishioka, Keisuke; Higashi, Yoshihiro; Sano, Tomohiko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a silicone membrane as an alternative to human skin using the skin permeation parameters of chemical compounds. An in vitro permeation study using 15 model compounds was conducted, and permeation parameters comprising permeability coefficient (P), diffusion parameter (DL(-2)), and partition parameter (KL) were calculated from each permeation profile. Significant correlations were obtained in log P, log DL(-2), and log KL values between the silicone membrane and human skin. DL(-2) values of model compounds, except flurbiprofen, in the silicone membrane were independent of the lipophilicity of the model compounds and were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. For antipyrine and caffeine, which are hydrophilic, KL values in the silicone membrane were 100-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values, calculated as the product of a DL(-2) and KL, were similar. For lipophilic compounds, such as n-butyl paraben and flurbiprofen, KL values for silicone were similar to or 10-fold higher than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. Furthermore, for amphiphilic compounds with log Ko/w values from 0.5 to 3.5, KL values in the silicone membrane were 10-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 10-fold higher than those in human skin. The silicone membrane was useful as a human skin alternative in an in vitro skin permeation study. However, depending on the lipophilicity of the model compounds, some parameters may be over- or underestimated. PMID:27581638

  1. A study of the role of fillers in silicone rubber compounds for outdoor insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Luiz Henrique

    Polymeric materials are being used as a housing material on high voltage outdoor insulation as an alternative to porcelain or glass in line insulators, surge arresters, station posts, and bushings. Among the polymeric materials in use, silicone rubber has proven to have good aging performance under polluted conditions by keeping low levels of leakage current by virtue of its hydrophobicity. However, the exposure of polymeric materials to contaminated and humid environments can lead to certain surface conditions that reduces hydrophobicity increasing leakage current levels, giving rise to dry band arcing. Dry band arcing produces heat, which can result in tracking or erosion of the housing material. Although this dry band arcing does not harm porcelain or glass housings, it will erode pure silicone rubber to such an extent that its application in outdoor environments is not, practical. Fillers are added to silicone rubber to improve tracking and erosion resistance. Among the filler choices, alumina trihydrate (ATH) and silica have been extensively adopted in the compounding of polymeric housings. ATH is a flame retardant that has a molecular water in its formulation. Whenever the surface temperature of an ATH filled polymer reaches approximately 220°C, the water of hydration is released from the ATH molecule, what is recognized as an efficient way to cool down the surface, for example, in the case of dry band arcing. Alternatively, silica has very good bonding with the polymer backbone, imparting mechanical strength to the composite matrix. In addition, fillers such as ATH or silica increase the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites, which facilitates moving the heat away from its source, that is, from the origin of dry band arcing. Although heat is considered to be the main degradation factor when dry band arcing occurs, very little information is available on the thermal performance of filled silicone rubber. The standard methods available to test

  2. Facet-Selective Epitaxy of Compound Semiconductors on Faceted Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Gao, Ruixuan; No, You-Shin; Kim, Sun-Kyung; McClelland, Arthur A; Bell, David C; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Integration of compound semiconductors with silicon (Si) has been a long-standing goal for the semiconductor industry, as direct band gap compound semiconductors offer, for example, attractive photonic properties not possible with Si devices. However, mismatches in lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and polarity between Si and compound semiconductors render growth of epitaxial heterostructures challenging. Nanowires (NWs) are a promising platform for the integration of Si and compound semiconductors since their limited surface area can alleviate such material mismatch issues. Here, we demonstrate facet-selective growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on Si NWs. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that crystalline CdS is grown epitaxially on the {111} and {110} surface facets of the Si NWs but that the Si{113} facets remain bare. Further analysis of CdS on Si NWs grown at higher deposition rates to yield a conformal shell reveals a thin oxide layer on the Si{113} facet. This observation and control experiments suggest that facet-selective growth is enabled by the formation of an oxide, which prevents subsequent shell growth on the Si{113} NW facets. Further studies of facet-selective epitaxial growth of CdS shells on micro-to-mesoscale wires, which allows tuning of the lateral width of the compound semiconductor layer without lithographic patterning, and InP shell growth on Si NWs demonstrate the generality of our growth technique. In addition, photoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy show that the epitaxial shells display strong and clean band edge emission, confirming their high photonic quality, and thus suggesting that facet-selective epitaxy on NW substrates represents a promising route to integration of compound semiconductors on Si. PMID:26057208

  3. Unusual reinforcement of silicone rubber compounds containing mesoporous silica particles as inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norihiro; Kiba, Shosuke; Kamachi, Yuichiro; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2012-03-14

    We fabricate mesoporous silica/silicone composites in a simple way and systematically examine their thermal stability, swelling characteristic, mechanical strength, and transparency. Simple calculations show that more than 90 vol% of mesopores are filled with silicone rubbers. Compared to non-porous silica/silicone composites, mesoporous silica/silicone composites showed a lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CTE). In addition, dramatic improvements of the tensile strength and Young's modulus are obtained with mesoporous silica/silicone composites. Furthermore, mesoporous silica/silicone composites show higher transparency than non-porous silica/silicone composites.

  4. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  5. Extremely low-temperature properties of silicone compound used for thermal coupling in cryostat of SWIR/ASTER on TERRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Akao, Hiroshi; Akagi, Shigeki; Kikuchi, Masakuni; Tatsumi, Kenji; Kawada, Masakuni

    2014-07-01

    The SWIR(Short Wave-length Infrared Radiometer) is one of the optical sensors in ASTER(Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer). ASTER is installed in the EOS(Earth Observing System) TERRA spacecraft of NASA. TERRA was launched on December18, 1999, and is employed still on the orbit for 14 years in January, 2014, The detector of SWIR is cooled at temperature 77K by cryocooler with the optimum sensitivity. SWIR had continued to take the numerous image data for more than five years of the mission period on orbit, and the cryocooler is still operating normally. However, a gradual rise in temperature of the detector has been seen after launch. Silicone compound have been used in order to achieve heat transfer between the detector and the cryocooler. On investigation, we have found that thermal conductivity of the silicone compound has been gradually reduced. We evaluated the low temperature properties (such as thermal conductivity, strength etc.) of the silicone compound. In addition, we analyzed the temperature conditions and the thermal stress values of cryostat in the orbit. As a result, the silicone compound solidified at low temperature shows a behavior similar to adhesive. Depending on the thermal stress generated at a low temperature, there is a possibility that destruction such as peeling occurs.

  6. A study of the dynamic flammability of radiation cross-linked flame-retardant HDPE/EPDM/silicon-elastomer compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shaojin; Zhang, Zhicheng; Du, Zhiwen; Teng, Renrui; Wang, Zhengzhou

    2003-04-01

    A dynamic flammability study of flame-retardant compound consisting of HDPE, EPDM and silicon elastomer blended with additives, as wire and cable insulation was made before and after irradiation. The data of RHR, EHC, SEC and the concentration of CO and CO 2 from cone colorimeter shown in the burning process were accessed. By blending silicon elastomer, CO release rate was reduced and the thermal endurance was improved. Oxygen index, mechanical property, morphology of the char formed in dynamical flame and thermal stability were also investigated.

  7. Monolayer contact doping of silicon surfaces and nanowires using organophosphorus compounds.

    PubMed

    Hazut, Ori; Agarwala, Arunava; Subramani, Thangavel; Waichman, Sharon; Yerushalmi, Roie

    2013-12-02

    Monolayer Contact Doping (MLCD) is a simple method for doping of surfaces and nanostructures(1). MLCD results in the formation of highly controlled, ultra shallow and sharp doping profiles at the nanometer scale. In MLCD process the dopant source is a monolayer containing dopant atoms. In this article a detailed procedure for surface doping of silicon substrate as well as silicon nanowires is demonstrated. Phosphorus dopant source was formed using tetraethyl methylenediphosphonate monolayer on a silicon substrate. This monolayer containing substrate was brought to contact with a pristine intrinsic silicon target substrate and annealed while in contact. Sheet resistance of the target substrate was measured using 4 point probe. Intrinsic silicon nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism; gold nanoparticles were used as catalyst for nanowire growth. The nanowires were suspended in ethanol by mild sonication. This suspension was used to dropcast the nanowires on silicon substrate with a silicon nitride dielectric top layer. These nanowires were doped with phosphorus in similar manner as used for the intrinsic silicon wafer. Standard photolithography process was used to fabricate metal electrodes for the formation of nanowire based field effect transistor (NW-FET). The electrical properties of a representative nanowire device were measured by a semiconductor device analyzer and a probe station.

  8. Corrosion Processes of the CANDU Steam Generator Materials in the Presence of Silicon Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Velciu, Lucian; Lucan, Georgiana; Jinescu, Gheorghita

    2006-07-01

    The feedwater that enters the steam generators (SG) under normal operating conditions is extremely pure but, however, it contains low levels (generally in the {mu}g/l concentration range) of impurities such as iron, chloride, sulphate, silicate, etc. When water is converted into steam and exits the steam generator, the non-volatile impurities are left behind. As a result of their concentration, the bulk steam generator water is considerably higher than the one in the feedwater. Nevertheless, the concentrations of corrosive impurities are in general sufficiently low so that the bulk water is not significantly aggressive towards steam generator materials. The impurities and corrosion products existing in the steam generator concentrate in the porous deposits on the steam generator tubesheet. The chemical reactions that take place between the components of concentrated solutions generate an aggressive environment. The presence of this environment and of the tubesheet crevices lead to localized corrosion and thus the same tubes cannot ensure the heat transfer between the fluids of the primary and secondary circuits. Thus, it becomes necessary the understanding of the corrosion process that develops into SG secondary side. The purpose of this paper is the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubes materials (Incoloy-800) at the normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature = 2600 deg C, pressure = 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was demineralized water containing silicon compounds, at a pH=9.5 regulated with morpholine and cyclohexyl-amine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The paper presents the results of metallographic examinations as well as the results of electrochemical measurements. (authors)

  9. Toxic Compounds in Our Food: Arsenic Uptake By Rice and Potential Mitigation By Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfferth, A.; Gill, R.; Penido, E.

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element in soils worldwide and has the potential to negatively impact human and ecosystem health under certain biogeochemical conditions. While arsenic is relatively immobile in most oxidized soils due to a high affinity for soil solids, arsenic becomes mobilized under reduced soil conditions due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxides thereby releasing soil-bound arsenic. Since arsenic is a well-known carcinogen, this plant-soil process has the potential to negatively impact the lives of billions of rice consumers worldwide upon plant uptake and grain storage of released arsenic. Moreover, arsenic uptake by rice is excacerbated by the use of As-laden groundwater for rice irrigation. One proposed strategy to decrease arsenic uptake by rice plants is via an increase in dissolved silicon in paddy soil solution (pore-water), since silicic acid and arsenous acid share an uptake pathway. However, several soil processes that influence arsenic cycling may be affected by silicon including desorption from bulk soil, formation and mineralogy of iron(III) oxide plaque, and adsorption/desorption onto/from iron plaque; the effect of silicon on these soil processes will ultimately dictate the effectiveness of altered dissolved silicon in decreasing arsenic uptake at the root, which in turn dictates the concentration of arsenic found in grains. Furthermore, the source of silicon may impact carbon cycling and, in particular, methane emissions. Here, impacts of altered dissolved silicon on processes that affect rhizospheric biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and subsequent plant-uptake, and how it influences other biogeochemical cycles such as carbon and iron are investigated. We show that silicon can decrease arsenic uptake and grain storage under certain conditions, and that altered silicon affects the type of iron (III) oxide that comprises iron plaque.

  10. Effect of embedded metal compound on porosity of silica colloids prepared by spray reaction of silicon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hayano, Tomoe; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Kohzoh; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2006-03-15

    Attempts to prepare macroporous silica particles and metal-compound-nanoparticle-embedded silica microspheres were carried out using reactions between silicon tetrachloride and ultrasonic generating microdroplets including metal (Na, K, Al, Ni, Ti, Pt) compounds. Samples were collected by dry and wet processes. In the case of using nickel and aluminum compounds, acid-treated samples were also prepared. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, mercury porosimetry, and the nitrogen adsorption method. The macroporous silica particles were prepared by removing the salt crystals, such as NaCl and KCl, formed in the silica frame. For acid-resistant metals, platinum- and titanium-compound nanoparticles are easily embedded in silica microspheres using these metal-compound solutions. For acid-soluble metals, aluminum- and nickel-compound-nanoparticle-embedded silicas were prepared by applying neutralization of the collection water. Micropores and mesopores were produced in wet-process samples. Acid treatment induced the increase of micropore volumes. PMID:16246356

  11. Electrochemical stabilization of porous silicon multilayers for sensing various chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, M. S.; Sailor, M. J.; Harraz, F. A.; Sakka, T.; Ogata, Y. H.

    2006-10-15

    Porous silicon rugate filters are fabricated and investigated for their ability to sense chemical species. The durability of the filter is tested by allowing the structure to undergo many cycles of adsorption and desorption of vapor-phase ethanol molecules. The characteristic reflectivity peak of the structure exhibits a relative blueshift of 2.7% after 86 adsorption/desorption cycles. The observed shift is ascribed to the formation of silicon dioxide, which has a lower refractive index than that of silicon. In order to stabilize the structure against oxidation expected from cycling and environmental exposure, the filter is subjected to electrochemical oxidation in an aqueous sulfuric acid electrolyte. The treatment dramatically improves stability of the sensor; a relative blueshift of <0.4% is observed after 100 adsorption/desorption cycles for this sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor is also affected by electrochemical oxidation: the response to saturated ethanol in air changes from {delta}{lambda}=100 nm to {delta}{lambda}=70 nm, respectively. Theoretical calculations using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation and the characteristic matrix method indicate that up to 15% (by volume) of silicon is transformed to silicon dioxide by the electrochemical oxidation procedure. This volume ratio is close to that estimated from Auger electron spectroscopy measurements.

  12. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references. In memoriam of Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences M Yu Antipin (1951 - 2013), Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences M G Voronkov (1921 - 2014) and Dr. S P Knyazev, Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology (1949 - 2012).

  13. An ultra-high Q silicon compound cantilever resonator for Young's modulus measurements.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Thomas H; Liu, Xiao

    2013-07-01

    We describe the design of ultra-high Q mechanical cantilever resonators, fabricated from single-crystal silicon wafers. The mechanical resonance mode at f ≈ 8.5 kHz achieves a background damping of Q(-1) silicon torsional resonator with which the cantilever resonator shares several design elements. The new resonator can be used for accurate measurements of the Young's modulus and internal friction of thin films. It is compatible with both the mounting apparatus and measurement electronics of the torsional resonator, and the two resonators together can be used to provide a complete description of the elastic properties of isotropic thin films. PMID:23902093

  14. Lewis Acidity of Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane: Aldehyde Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by a Neutral Silicon Compound

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L.; Bergman, Robert G.; Tilley, T. Don

    2015-04-16

    Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane Si(cat(F)2 was prepared, and stoichiometric binding to Lewis bases was demonstrated with fluoride, triethylphosphine oxide, and N,N'-diisopropylbenzamide. The potent Lewis acidity of Si(cat(F)2 was suggested from catalytic hydrosilylation and silylcyanation reactions with aldehydes. Mechanistic studies of hydrosilylation using an optically active silane substrate, R-(+)-methyl-(1-naphthyl)phenylsilane, proceeded with predominant stereochemical retention at silicon, consistent with a carbonyl activation pathway. The enantiospecificity was dependent on solvent and salt effects, with increasing solvent polarity or addition of NBu4BAr(F)4 leading to a diminished enantiomeric ratio. The medium effects are consistent with an ionic mechanism, wherein hydride transfer occurs prior to silicon-oxygen bond formation.

  15. Lewis Acidity of Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane: Aldehyde Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by a Neutral Silicon Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L.; Bergman, Robert G.; Tilley, T. Don

    2015-04-16

    Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane Si(cat(F)2 was prepared, and stoichiometric binding to Lewis bases was demonstrated with fluoride, triethylphosphine oxide, and N,N'-diisopropylbenzamide. The potent Lewis acidity of Si(cat(F)2 was suggested from catalytic hydrosilylation and silylcyanation reactions with aldehydes. Mechanistic studies of hydrosilylation using an optically active silane substrate, R-(+)-methyl-(1-naphthyl)phenylsilane, proceeded with predominant stereochemical retention at silicon, consistent with a carbonyl activation pathway. The enantiospecificity was dependent on solvent and salt effects, with increasing solvent polarity or addition of NBu4BAr(F)4 leading to a diminished enantiomeric ratio. The medium effects are consistent with an ionic mechanism, wherein hydride transfer occurs prior to silicon-oxygen bond formation.

  16. Lewis Acidity of Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane: Aldehyde Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by a Neutral Silicon Compound.

    PubMed

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L; Bergman, Robert G; Tilley, T Don

    2015-04-29

    Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane Si(cat(F))2 was prepared, and stoichiometric binding to Lewis bases was demonstrated with fluoride, triethylphosphine oxide, and N,N'-diisopropylbenzamide. The potent Lewis acidity of Si(cat(F))2 was suggested from catalytic hydrosilylation and silylcyanation reactions with aldehydes. Mechanistic studies of hydrosilylation using an optically active silane substrate, R-(+)-methyl-(1-naphthyl)phenylsilane, proceeded with predominant stereochemical retention at silicon, consistent with a carbonyl activation pathway. The enantiospecificity was dependent on solvent and salt effects, with increasing solvent polarity or addition of NBu4BAr(F)4 leading to a diminished enantiomeric ratio. The medium effects are consistent with an ionic mechanism, wherein hydride transfer occurs prior to silicon-oxygen bond formation.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of polysilanes polymer based thin films and their applications in compound semiconductors and silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulachgar, El Hassane

    . This work has demonstrated that a polysilane polymeric source can be used to deposit a wide range of thin film materials exhibiting similar properties with conventional ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), silicon oxynitride (SiON), silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) silicon dioxide (SiO2) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). The strict control of the deposition process allows precise control of the electrical, optical and chemical properties of polymer-based thin films within a broad range. This work has also demonstrated for the first time that poly(dimethylsilmaes) polymers deposited by CVD can be used to effectively passivate both silicon and gallium arsenide MOS devices. This finding makes polymer-based thin films obtained by CVD very promising for the development of high-kappa dielectric materials for next generation high-mobility CMOS technology. Keywords. Thin films, Polymers, Vapor Phase Deposition, CVD, Nanodielectrics, Organosilanes, Polysilanes, GaAs Passivation, MOSFET, Silicon Oxynitride, Integrated Waveguide, Silicon Carbide, Compound Semiconductors.

  18. Photoluminescence-based measurement technique of surface recombination velocity for high efficiency silicon and compound semiconductor solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Yoh, K.; Hasegawa, H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows that the recently proposed photoluminescence surface state spectroscopy (PLS{sup 3}) technique allows an in-situ, contactless and non-destructive determination of the value of the effective surface recombination velocity (S) under sunlight illumination and the surface/interface state density (N{sub ss}) distributions. This technique is successfully applied to measurement of the values of S at variously passivated Si surfaces. A best value of 3,000 cm/s is obtained under 1 sun condition for thermal oxidation. S is greatly reduced under concentrated sunlight. N{sub ss} distributions at compound semiconductor surfaces and heterointerfaces are also characterized to optimize the fabrication process of compound semiconductor solar cells. Formation of Si interface control layer (ICL) between InGaAs and SiO{sub 2} greatly reduces the interface states. Growth interruption at AlGaAs/GaAs hetero-interface produces high density of interface states. InAlAs/InGaAs heterointerfaces are also investigated. These results indicate that the new PLS{sup 3} technique is useful for the characterization and optimization of the fabrication processes of the silicon and compound semiconductor solar cells.

  19. Elastic and Thermal Properties of Silicon Compounds from First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haijun; Zhu, H. J.; Cheng, W. H.; Xie, L. H.

    2016-07-01

    The structural and elastic properties of V-Si (V3Si, VSi2, V5Si3, and V6Si5) compounds are studied by using first-principles method. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and formation enthalpy are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. The calculated results indicate that the V-Si compounds are mechanically stable. Elastic properties including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are also obtained. The elastic anisotropies of V-Si compounds are investigated via the three-dimensional (3D) figures of directional dependences of reciprocals of Young's modulus. Finally, based on the quasi-harmonic Debye model, the internal energy, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, Grüneisen parameter, and Debye temperature of V-Si compounds have been calculated.

  20. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of sodium atoms encapsulated type-I silicon-clathrate compound under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qing-Yun; Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-10-01

    We calculated the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of alkali metal Na atoms doped type-I silicon-clathrate compound (Na8Si46) under pressure using first-principles methods. The obtained dependencies of bond lengths and bond angles on pressure show heterogeneous behaviors which may bring out a structural transition. By using the elastic stability criteria from the calculated elastic constants, we confirm that the Na8Si46 is elastically unstable under high pressure. Some of the mechanical and thermal quantities include bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Debye temperature, sound velocity, melting point, and hardness, which are also derived from the elastic constants. The calculated total and partial electron densities of states of Na8Si46 indicate a weak interaction between the encapsulated Na atoms and the silicon framework. Moreover, the effect of pressure on its electronic structure is also investigated, which suggests that pressure is not a good choice to enhance the thermoelectricity performance of Na8Si46. Project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347134 and 11304254) and the Doctor Foundation of Southwest University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 13zx7125).

  1. Development of a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for measuring partial pressures of volatile organic compounds in natural water.

    PubMed

    Ooki, Atsushi; Yokouchi, Yoko

    2008-08-01

    Methods for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water and air are required so that the VOCs' fluxes in water environments can be estimated. We developed a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for collecting gas-phase samples containing VOCs at equilibrium with natural water. The equilibrator consists of six silicone tubes housed in a polyvinyl chloride pipe. Equilibrated air samples collected from the equilibrator were analyzed with an automated preconcentration gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for hourly measurements of VOC partial pressures. The partial pressures of all the target VOCs reached equilibrium within 1 h in the equilibrator. The system was used to determine VOC partial pressures in Lake Kasumigaura, a shallow eutrophic lake with a high concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Compressed air was used daily to remove SPM deposited on the inner wall of the equilibrator and to maintain the equilibrium conditions for more than a week without the need to shut the system down. CH2Br2, CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CH2BrCl, C2H5I, C2Cl4, CH3I, and CH3Br in the lake were supersaturated with respect to the air, whereas CH3CI was undersaturated. CHCl3 had the highest flux (6.2 nmol m(-2) hr(-1)) during the observation period. PMID:18754497

  2. Polar intermetallic compounds of the silicon and arsenic family elements and their ternary hydrides and fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E.A.

    1996-10-17

    An investigation has been made on the effects of hydrogen and fluoride in the solid state chemistry of alkaline-earth and divalent rare-earth metal pnictide (Pn) and tetrelide (Tt) phases A{sub 5}(Pn,Tt,){sub 3}Z{sub x}, where A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sm, Eu, Yb; Pn = As, Sb, Bi; Tt = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb and Z = H, F. Several trivalent rare-earth-metal pnictides, RE{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} (RE = Y, La, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) and alkaline-earth-metal trielides, A{sub 5}Tr{sub 3}Z{sub x} (Tr = Ga, In, Tl) have been included in an effort to complete observed structural trends. Two main experimental techniques were followed throughout this work, (a) reactions in absence of hydrogen or under continuous high vacuum, and (b) reactions with binary metal hydrides, AH{sub x}, in closed containers. The results demonstrate that all the phases reported with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}-type structure in the A{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} systems are hydrogen-stabilized compounds. Reactions in absence of hydrogen lead to compounds with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type structure. The structure type {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} (= Ca{sub 5}SB{sub 3}F) was found to be characteristic of ternary systems and inaccurately associated with phases that form in the Y{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}-type. A new series of isomorphous Zintl compounds with the Ca{sub 16}Sb{sub 11}-type structure were prepared and studied as well. All the alkaline-earth-metal tetrelides, A{sub 5}Tt{sub 3}, that crystallize in the Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type structure can be interstitially derivatized by hydrogen or fluoride. Binary and ternary compounds were characterized by Guinier powder patterns, single crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. In an effort to establish property-structure relationships, electrical resistivity and magnetic measurements were performed on selected systems, and the results were explained in terms of the Zintl concepts, aided by extended Hueckel band calculations.

  3. Gravity segregation of complex intermetallic compounds in liquid aluminum-silicon alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shabestari, S.G.; Gruzleski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    Primary crystals of intermetallics that are rich in iron, manganese, and chromium form at temperatures above the liquidus, and because their density is higher than that of liquid aluminum, they cause gravity segregation in the melt. Segregation may occur either in the mold at slow cooling rates or in the bulk liquid in furnaces or ladles. The kinetics of settling of these intermetallic compounds in a melt of Al-12.5 pct Si having 1.2 pct Fe, 0.3 pct Mn, and 0.1 pct Cr has been studied. Sedimentation was investigated at 630 C for settling times of 30, 90, and 180 minutes in an electric resistance furnace. The effect of settling time and height of melt on the volume percent, number, and size of intermetallic compounds was studied by image analysis. The volume percent of intermetallics increases with distance from the melt surface. Both the number of particles and the average size increase during sedimentation. The rate of settling varies with position in the melt due to depletion of intermetallics near the surface and an increase near the bottom. The settling velocities obtained experimentally were compared with terminal velocities calculated by Stokes` law. Good agreement was generally found. The settling speed of intermetallics reaches the terminal velocity at very short times and very close to the liquid surface. Stokes` law is therefore applicable to virtually all locations within the melt.

  4. Integrating III-V compound semiconductors with silicon using wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yucai

    2000-12-01

    From Main Street to Wall Street, everyone has felt the effects caused by the Internet revolution. The Internet has created a new economy in the New Information Age and has brought significant changes in both business and personal life. This revolution has placed strong demands for higher bandwidth and higher computing speed due to high data traffic on today's information highway. In order to alleviate this problem, growing interconnection bottlenecks in digital designs have to be solved. The most feasible and practical way is to replace the conventional electrical interconnect with an optical interconnect. Since silicon does not have the optical properties necessary to accommodate these optical interconnect requirements, III-V based devices, most of which are GaAs-based or InP-based, must be intimately interconnected with the Si circuit at chip level. This monolithic integration technology enables the development of both intrachip and interchip optical connectors to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth provided by both high-performance very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits and allied fiber and free-space optical technologies. However, lattice mismatch and thermal expansion mismatches between III-V materials and Si create enormous challenges for developing a feasible technology to tackle this problem. Among all the available approaches today, wafer bonding distinguishes itself as the most promising technology for integration due to its ability to overcome the constraints of both lattice constant mismatch and thermal expansion coefficient differences and even strain due to the crystal orientation. We present our development of wafer bonding technology for integrating III-V with Si in my dissertation. First, the pick-and-place multiple-wafer bonding technology was introduced. Then we systematically studied the wafer bonding of GaAs and InP with Si. Both high temperature wafer fusion and low/room temperature (LT/RT) wafer bonding have been investigated for

  5. Sub-50 nm positioning of organic compounds onto silicon oxide patterns fabricated by local oxidation nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Losilla, N S; Oxtoby, N S; Martinez, J; Garcia, F; Garcia, R; Mas-Torrent, M; Veciana, J; Rovira, C

    2008-11-12

    We present a process to fabricate molecule-based nanostructures by merging a bottom-up interaction and a top-down nanolithography. Direct nanoscale positioning arises from the attractive electrostatic interactions between the molecules and silicon dioxide nanopatterns. Local oxidation nanolithography is used to fabricate silicon oxide domains with variable gap separations ranging from 40 nm to several microns in length. We demonstrate that an ionic tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) semiconductor can be directed from a macroscopic liquid solution (1 µM) and selectively deposited onto predefined nanoscale regions of a 1 cm(2) silicon chip with an accuracy of 40 nm.

  6. Modeling of growth and prediction of properties of electronic nanomaterials: Silicon thin films and compound semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.

    The enhanced functionality and tunability of electronic nanomaterials enables the development of next-generation photovoltaic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices, as well as biomolecular tags. Design and efficient synthesis of such semiconductor nanomaterials require a fundamental understanding of the underlying process-structure/composition-property-function relationships. To this end, this thesis focuses on a systematic, comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical phenomena that determine the composition and properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. Through synergistic combination of computational modeling and experimental studies, the thesis addresses the thermodynamics and kinetics that are relevant during synthesis and processing and their resulting impact on the properties of silicon thin films and ternary quantum dots (TQDs) of compound semiconductors. The thesis presents a computational study of the growth mechanisms of plasma deposited a-Si:H thin films based on kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations according to a transition probability database constructed by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on the results, a comprehensive model is proposed for a-Si:H thin-film growth by plasma deposition under conditions that make the silyl (SiH3) radical the dominant deposition precursor. It is found that the relative roles of surface coordination defects are crucial in determining the surface composition of plasma deposited a-Si:H films and should be properly accounted for. The KMC predictions for the temperature dependence (over the range from 300 K to 700 K) of the surface concentration of SiHx(s) (x = 1,2,3) surface hydride species, the surface hydrogen content, and the surface dangling-bond coverage are in agreement with experimental measurements. In addition, the thesis details a systematic analysis of equilibrium compositional distribution in TQDs and their effects on the electronic and optoelectronic properties

  7. Annealing group III-V compound doped silicon-germanium alloy for improved thermo-electric conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W. (Inventor); Wood, Charles (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The thermoelectric conversion efficiency of a GaP doped SiGe alloy is improved about 30 percent by annealing the alloy at a temperature above the melting point of the alloy, preferably stepwise from 1200 C to 1275 C in air to form large grains having a size over 50 microns and to form a GeGaP rich phase and a silicon rich phase containing SiP and SiO2 particles.

  8. Particle size distribution of aerosols sprayed from household hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based and silicone-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japan has published safety guideline on waterproof aerosol sprays. Furthermore, the Aerosol Industry Association of Japan has adopted voluntary regulations on waterproof aerosol sprays. Aerosol particles of diameter less than 10 µm are considered as "fine particles". In order to avoid acute lung injury, this size fraction should account for less than 0.6% of the sprayed aerosol particles. In contrast, the particle size distribution of aerosols released by hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based or silicone-based compounds have not been investigated in Japan. Thus, the present study investigated the aerosol particle size distribution of 16 household hand-pump sprays. In 4 samples, the ratio of fine particles in aerosols exceeded 0.6%. This study confirmed that several hand-pump sprays available in the Japanese market can spray fine particles. Since the hand-pump sprays use water as a solvent and their ingredients may be more hydrophilic than those of aerosol sprays, the concepts related to the safety of aerosol-sprays do not apply to the hand pump sprays. Therefore, it may be required for the hand-pump spray to develop a suitable method for evaluating the toxicity and to establish the safety guideline. PMID:26821469

  9. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  10. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  11. Fit of fluxes of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol:water (30:70) through human skin and silicone membrane to the Roberts-Sloan equation: the effect of polar vehicle (or water) solubility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Kenneth B; Devarajan-Ketha, Hemamalini; Synovec, Jennifer; Majumdar, Susruta

    2013-01-01

    It would be useful to develop a surrogate for animal skin, which could be use to predict flux through human skin. The fluxes (and physicochemical properties) of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol (PG):water (AQ), 30:70, through human skin have previously been reported. We measured the fluxes of several of those sunscreens and other compounds from PG:AQ, 30:70, through silicone membrane and fit both sets of data to the Roberts-Sloan (RS) equation to determine any similarities. For both sets of data, the fluxes were directly dependent on their solubilities in a lipid solvent [octanol (OCT), in this case] and in a polar solvent (PG:AQ, 30:70, or AQ in this case) and inversely on their molecular weights. The fit of the experimental (EXP) fluxes through human skin in vivo to RS was excellent: r² = 0.92 if the vehicle (VEH) PG:AQ, 30:70 was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.97 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The fit of the EXP fluxes through silicone membrane to RS was good: r² = 0.80 if the VEH PG:AQ, 30:70, was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.81 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The correlations between their EXP fluxes through human skin in vivo and their EXP fluxes through silicone membrane were good (r² = 0.85). In addition, the correlation between EXP fluxes from PG:AQ, 30:70, through human skin in vivo and their fluxes calculated from the coefficients of the fit of solubilities, molecular weights and fluxes from water through silicone membranes from a previous n = 22 database to RS was even better (r² = 0.94). These results suggest that flux through human skin can be calculated from flux through a silicone membrane.

  12. Fit of fluxes of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol:water (30:70) through human skin and silicone membrane to the Roberts-Sloan equation: the effect of polar vehicle (or water) solubility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Kenneth B; Devarajan-Ketha, Hemamalini; Synovec, Jennifer; Majumdar, Susruta

    2013-01-01

    It would be useful to develop a surrogate for animal skin, which could be use to predict flux through human skin. The fluxes (and physicochemical properties) of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol (PG):water (AQ), 30:70, through human skin have previously been reported. We measured the fluxes of several of those sunscreens and other compounds from PG:AQ, 30:70, through silicone membrane and fit both sets of data to the Roberts-Sloan (RS) equation to determine any similarities. For both sets of data, the fluxes were directly dependent on their solubilities in a lipid solvent [octanol (OCT), in this case] and in a polar solvent (PG:AQ, 30:70, or AQ in this case) and inversely on their molecular weights. The fit of the experimental (EXP) fluxes through human skin in vivo to RS was excellent: r² = 0.92 if the vehicle (VEH) PG:AQ, 30:70 was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.97 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The fit of the EXP fluxes through silicone membrane to RS was good: r² = 0.80 if the VEH PG:AQ, 30:70, was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.81 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The correlations between their EXP fluxes through human skin in vivo and their EXP fluxes through silicone membrane were good (r² = 0.85). In addition, the correlation between EXP fluxes from PG:AQ, 30:70, through human skin in vivo and their fluxes calculated from the coefficients of the fit of solubilities, molecular weights and fluxes from water through silicone membranes from a previous n = 22 database to RS was even better (r² = 0.94). These results suggest that flux through human skin can be calculated from flux through a silicone membrane. PMID:23752033

  13. Hypercoordinate ketone adducts of electrophilic η3-H2SiRR' ligands on ruthenium as key intermediates for efficient and robust catalytic hydrosilation.

    PubMed

    Lipke, Mark C; Tilley, T Don

    2014-11-19

    The electrophilic η(3)-H2SiRR' σ-complexes [PhBP(Ph)3]RuH(η(3)-H2SiRR') (RR' = MePh, 1a; Ph2, 1b; [PhBP(Ph)3](-) = [PhB(CH2PPh2)3](-)) are efficient catalysts (0.01-2.5 mol % loading) for the hydrosilation of ketones with PhMeSiH2, Ph2SiH2, or EtMe2SiH. An alkoxy complex [PhBP(Ph)3]Ru-OCHPh2 (4b) was observed (by (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy) as the catalyst resting state during hydrosilation of benzophenone with EtMe2SiH. A different catalyst resting state was observed for reactions using PhMeSiH2 or Ph2SiH2, and was identified as a silane σ-complex [PhBP(Ph)3]RuH[η(2)-H-SiRR'(OCHPh2)] (RR' = MePh, 5a; Ph2, 5b) using variable temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (-80 to 20 °C). The hydrosilation of benzophenone with PhMeSiH2 and 1a was examined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy at -18 °C (in CD2Cl2), and this revealed that either 1a, 5a, or both 1a and 5a could be observed as resting states of the catalytic cycle, depending on the initial [PhMeSiH2]:[benzophenone] ratio. Kinetic studies revealed two possible expressions for the rate of product formation, depending on which catalyst resting state was present (rate = kobs[PhMeSiH2][5a] and rate = k'obs[benzophenone][1a]). Computational methods (DFT, b3pw91, 6-31G(d,p)/LANL2DZ) were used to determine a model catalytic cycle for the hydrosilation of acetone with PhMeSiH2. A key step in this mechanism involves coordination of acetone to the silicon center of 1a-DFT, which leads to insertion of the carbonyl group into an Si-H bond (that is part of a Ru-H-Si 3c-2e bond). This generates an intermediate analogous to 5a (5a-i-DFT), and the final product is displaced from 5a-i-DFT by an associative process involving PhMeSiH2. PMID:25347044

  14. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  15. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  16. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems. PMID:27136720

  17. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems.

  18. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  19. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  20. Stabilization of elusive silicon oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Chen, Mingwei; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Schleyer, Paul von R; Robinson, Gregory H

    2015-06-01

    Molecular SiO2 and other simple silicon oxides have remained elusive despite the indispensable use of silicon dioxide materials in advanced electronic devices. Owing to the great reactivity of silicon-oxygen double bonds, as well as the low oxidation state of silicon atoms, the chemistry of simple silicon oxides is essentially unknown. We now report that the soluble disilicon compound, L:Si=Si:L (where L: = :C{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)CH}2), can be directly oxidized by N2O and O2 to give the carbene-stabilized Si2O3 and Si2O4 moieties, respectively. The nature of the silicon oxide units in these compounds is probed by spectroscopic methods, complementary computations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  1. Replacement of silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B and the subsequent characterization of the new cellular silicone materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to replace silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B produced by Vendor B. Silicone polymer B and the resulting B-50 cellular silicone have been used to produce cushions for the W87 program. Approximately 5.5 years of stress relaxation aging study data as well as actual part surveillance data have been collected, characterizing the stockpile life performance of the B-50 cellular silicone cushion material. Process characterization of new cellular silicone materials as a result of replacing silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B has been completed. Load deflection requirements for the new cellular silicone materials based on silicone polymer B have been met. The silicone polymer B based cellular silicone materials must be compounded at densities of approximately 0.03 g/cm{sup 3} less than the silicone polymer A based cellular silicone materials in order to achieve the same load deflection requirements has also been demonstrated. The change in silicone polymers from A to B involved a decrease in volatile content as well as a decrease in part shrinkage.

  2. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  3. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  4. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  5. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  6. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-05-05

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  7. Silicon-Containing GABA Derivatives, Silagaba Compounds, as Orally Effective Agents for Treating Neuropathic Pain without Central-Nervous-System-Related Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from neuronal damage. Pregabalin, the (S)-isomer of 3-isobutyl-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is widely used to treat neuropathic pain, despite the occurrence of central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects such as dizziness and somnolence. Here we describe the pharmacology of novel GABA derivatives containing silicon–carbon bonds, silagaba compounds. Silagaba131, 132, and 161 showed pregabalin-like analgesic activities in animal models of neuropathic pain, but in contrast to pregabalin they did not impair neuromuscular coordination in rotarod tests. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that brain exposure to silagaba compounds was lower than that to pregabalin. Surprisingly, despite their potent analgesic action in vivo, silagaba compounds showed only weak binding to α2-δ protein. These compounds may be useful to study mechanisms of neuropathic pain. Our results also indicate that silagaba132 and 161 are candidates for orally effective treatment of neuropathic pain without CNS-related side effects. PMID:24738473

  8. Ionization of the Nitroaromatic Compounds in an Ion Mobility Spectrometer with an Ion Source based on Porous Silicon Under Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, Igor; Kuzishchin, Yury; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Kotkovskii, Genadii; Chistyakov, Alexander

    Nowadays surface assisted laser desorption/ionization is widely used in different analytical methods. Some of the most interest methods are based on laser irradiation of nanostructured surfaces, porous silicon (pSi) in particular. This method already proved itself in mass spectrometry due to the combination of high sensitivity and possibility of investigation of small molecules because of the absence of the influence of a substrate on the ion signal. In this work we present summarized results of our investigations dedicated to the use of the surface assisted laser desorption/ionization on pSi in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), which is one of the most promising analytical methods in the area of fast detection of low concentrations of organic molecules. We use trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a substance to be investigated. Obtained results show that TNT ionization mechanism under laser irradiation is complicated and relates both to the electron emission process from the pSi surface and subsequent ion-molecular reactions in gas phase and to the surface proton transfer as well.

  9. Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, R.

    1999-02-12

    The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

  10. Silicon spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ron

    2012-04-23

    Worldwide efforts are underway to integrate semiconductors and magnetic materials, aiming to create a revolutionary and energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are encoded in the spin of electrons. Implementing spin functionality in silicon, the mainstream semiconductor, is vital to establish a spin-based electronics with potential to change information technology beyond imagination. Can silicon spintronics live up to the expectation? Remarkable advances in the creation and control of spin polarization in silicon suggest so. Here, I review the key developments and achievements, and describe the building blocks of silicon spintronics. Unexpected and puzzling results are discussed, and open issues and challenges identified. More surprises lie ahead as silicon spintronics comes of age.

  11. High-temperature- and high-pressure-induced formation of the Laves-phase compound XeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Xiang, Shikai; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    We explore the reactivity of xenon with sulfur under high pressure, using unbiased structure searching techniques combined with first-principles calculations, which identify a stable XeS2 compound crystallized in a Laves phase with hypercoordinated (16-fold) Xe at 191 GPa and 0 K. Taking the thermal effects into account, we find that increasing the temperature could further stabilize it. The formation of XeS2 is a consequence of pressure-induced charge transfer from Xe to S atoms and the delocalization of Xe 5 p and S 3 p electrons. Meanwhile, the stabilization into a Laves phase of XeS2 is the result of delocalized chemical bonding and the need for optimum structure packing. The present discussion of the formation mechanism in XeS2 is general, and conclusions can be used to understand the formation of other Laves-phase compounds and the Xe chemistry that allows closed-shell Xe to participate in chemical reactions.

  12. Exploring the Nature of Silicon-Noble Gas Bonds in H3SiNgNSi and HSiNgNSi Compounds (Ng = Xe, Rn)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio and density functional theory-based computations are performed to investigate the structure and stability of H3SiNgNSi and HSiNgNSi compounds (Ng = Xe, Rn). They are thermochemically unstable with respect to the dissociation channel producing Ng and H3SiNSi or HSiNSi. However, they are kinetically stable with respect to this dissociation channel having activation free energy barriers of 19.3 and 23.3 kcal/mol for H3SiXeNSi and H3SiRnNSi, respectively, and 9.2 and 12.8 kcal/mol for HSiXeNSi and HSiRnNSi, respectively. The rest of the possible dissociation channels are endergonic in nature at room temperature for Rn analogues. However, one three-body dissociation channel for H3SiXeNSi and one two-body and one three-body dissociation channels for HSiXeNSi are slightly exergonic in nature at room temperature. They become endergonic at slightly lower temperature. The nature of bonding between Ng and Si/N is analyzed by natural bond order, electron density and energy decomposition analyses. Natural population analysis indicates that they could be best represented as (H3SiNg)+(NSi)− and (HSiNg)+(NSi)−. Energy decomposition analysis further reveals that the contribution from the orbital term (ΔEorb) is dominant (ca. 67%–75%) towards the total attraction energy associated with the Si-Ng bond, whereas the electrostatic term (ΔEelstat) contributes the maximum (ca. 66%–68%) for the same in the Ng–N bond, implying the covalent nature of the former bond and the ionic nature of the latter. PMID:25809612

  13. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  14. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  15. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-03-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  16. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  17. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  18. Effect of water velocity on the uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by silicone rubber (SR) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers: an assessment of the efficiency of performance reference compounds (PRCs) in river-like flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Estoppey, Nicolas; Schopfer, Adrien; Omlin, Julien; Esseiva, Pierre; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Delémont, Olivier; De Alencastro, Luiz F

    2014-11-15

    One aim of this study is to determine the impact of water velocity on the uptake of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (iPCBs) by silicone rubber (SR) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers. A second aim is to assess the efficiency of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to correct for the impact of water velocity. SR and LDPE samplers were spiked with 11 or 12 PRCs and exposed for 6 weeks to four different velocities (in the range of 1.6 to 37.7 cm s(-1)) in river-like flow conditions using a channel system supplied with river water. A relationship between velocity and the uptake was found for each iPCB and enables to determine expected changes in the uptake due to velocity variations. For both samplers, velocity increases from 2 to 10 cm s(-1), 30 cm s(-1) (interpolated data) and 100 cm s(-1) (extrapolated data) lead to increases of the uptake which do not exceed a factor of 2, 3 and 4.5, respectively. Results also showed that the influence of velocity decreased with increasing the octanol-water coefficient partition (log K(ow)) of iPCBs when SR is used whereas the opposite effect was observed for LDPE. Time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of iPCBs in water were calculated from iPCB uptake and PRC release. These calculations were performed using either a single PRC or all the PRCs. The efficiency of PRCs to correct the impact of velocity was assessed by comparing the TWA concentrations obtained at the four tested velocities. For SR, a good agreement was found among the four TWA concentrations with both methods (average RSD<10%). Also for LDPE, PRCs offered a good correction of the impact of water velocity (average RSD of about 10 to 20%). These results contribute to the process of acceptance of passive sampling in routine regulatory monitoring programs.

  19. Powder containing 2H-type silicon carbide produced by reacting silicon dioxide and carbon powder in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Takiguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    The production of powder which contains silicon carbide consisting of 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide, beta type silicon carbide and less than 3% of nitrogen is discussed. The reaction temperature to produce the powder containing 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide is set at above 1550 degrees C in an atmosphere of aluminum or aluminum compounds and nitrogen gas or an antioxidation atmosphere containing nitrogen gas. The mixture ratio of silicon dioxide and carbon powder is 0.55 - 1:2.0 and the contents of aluminum or aluminum compounds within silicon dioxide is less than 3% in weight.

  20. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  1. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  2. A general classification of silicon utilizing organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon utilizing organisms may be defined as organisms with high silicon content (≥ 1% dry weight) and they can metabolize silicon with or without demonstrable silicon transporter genes (SIT) in them(Das,2010). Silicon is the second most abundant element in the lithosphere (27.70%) and it is as important as phosphorus and magnesium (0.03%) in the biota. Hydrated silica represents the second most abundant biogenic mineral after carbonate minerals. Silicon is accumulated and metabolized by some prokaryotes, and Si compounds can stimulate the growth of a range of fungi. It is well known that Si is essential for diatoms. In mammals, Si is considered an essential trace element, required in bone, cartilage and connective tissue formation, enzymatic activities and other metabolic processes. Silicon was suggested to act as a phosphoprotein effector in bone. In mammals, Si is also reported to positively influence the immune system and to be required for lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous chemistry of Si is dominated by silicic acid at biological pH ranges. Monosilicic acid can form stable complexes with organic hydroxy-containing molecules . Biosilica also has been identified associated with various biomolecules including proteins and carbohydrates. There are main seven groups of silicon utilizing organisms belonging to Gram positive bacteria, algae, protozoa, sponges, fungi, lichens, and monocotyledon plants. In each group again all the members are not silicon utilizing organisms, thus selective members in each group are further classified depending their degree of silicon utilization. Important silicon utilizing bacteria are Mycobacteria, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus spp. etc., Important silicon utilizing algae are Centrobacillariophyceae, Pennatibacillariophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Many protozoa belonging to Heterokonta, Choanoflagellida, Actinopoda are well known silicon utilizing microorganisms. Hexactinellida ( glass sponges

  3. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-11-25

    This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  4. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  5. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  6. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  7. Silicon micromachining based on porous silicon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Stevenson, J.O.; Howard, A.; Houston, J.E.; Tsao, S.S.

    1991-12-31

    We describe a new electrochemical processing technique based on porous silicon formation that can produce surface and buried insulators, conductors, and sacrificial layers required for silicon micromachining to fabricate micromechanical devices and sensors. Porosity and thickness of porous silicon layers for micromachining can be controlled to a relative precision better than 0.3% for porosities ranging from 20--80% and thicknesses ranging from sub- micron to hundreds of microns. The technique of using porous silicon has important implications for microfabrication of silicon electromechanical devices and sensors. The high relative precision in realizing a given thickness is superior to that obtained with conventional chemical etches. 8 refs.

  8. Silicon micromachining based on porous silicon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Stevenson, J.O.; Howard, A.; Houston, J.E.; Tsao, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a new electrochemical processing technique based on porous silicon formation that can produce surface and buried insulators, conductors, and sacrificial layers required for silicon micromachining to fabricate micromechanical devices and sensors. Porosity and thickness of porous silicon layers for micromachining can be controlled to a relative precision better than 0.3% for porosities ranging from 20--80% and thicknesses ranging from sub- micron to hundreds of microns. The technique of using porous silicon has important implications for microfabrication of silicon electromechanical devices and sensors. The high relative precision in realizing a given thickness is superior to that obtained with conventional chemical etches. 8 refs.

  9. Highly crosslinked silicon polymers for gas chromatography columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new highly crosslinked silicone polymer particle for gas chromatography application and a process for synthesizing such copolymer are described. The new copolymer comprises vinyltriethoxysilane and octadecyltrichlorosilane. The copolymer has a high degree of crosslinking and a cool balance of polar to nonpolar sites in the porous silicon polymer assuring fast separation of compounds of variable polarity.

  10. Upgrading Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L. M.; Moore, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    Closed-loop process produces semiconductor-grade silicon. Metallurgical-grade silicon converted to ultrapure silicon by reacting with hydrogen and silicon tetrahalide to form trihalosilane, purifying this intermediate and again decomposing to high purity silicon in third stage. Heterogeneously and homogeneously nucleated polycrystalline silicon used in semiconductor device applications and in silicon photovoltaic solar cell fabrication.

  11. Method to prevent recession loss of silica and silicon-containing materials in combustion gas environments

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Milivoj Konstantin; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2003-01-01

    While silicon-containing ceramics or ceramic composites are prone to material loss in combustion gas environments, this invention introduces a method to prevent or greatly reduce the thickness loss by injecting directly an effective amount, generally in the part per million level, of silicon or silicon-containing compounds into the combustion gases.

  12. Thin silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. B.; Bacon, C.; Direda, V.; Ford, D. H.; Ingram, A. E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J. A.; Ruffins, T. R.; Barnett, A. M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (less than 50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  13. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  14. Preparation of Graphene Encapsulated Silicon Nanoball.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huijin; So, Deasup; Park, Sungjin; Huh, Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Concerning application of graphene, a lot of efforts have been made to improve performance of nanomaterials in many fields, such as electric and electronic devices. Some examples are preparation of 3-dimension structured nanomaterials like nanoballs by CVD process and hybridizing with silicon. These graphene-based materials are proven to be available for secondary battery, EMI and ACF in electronics. Especially, some research has shown that they were very effective to enhance safety and volumetric capacity when they were used as anode materials of secondary battery. Although graphite and its compound with metal have been used as an anode material due to their high stability and reversibility, it still has lower charge capacity. On the contrary, silicon is known as a material which increases the charge capacity up to four times, compared with carbon-based materials, but it has lower stability and reversibility. For that reason, a few researchers just started to improve the charge capacity by hybridization of carbon-based material with silicon. In this paper, we prepared nanocarbon based material which has a new structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball as an anode material which is applicable to high-capacity secondary battery. In order to form a graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs, the polystyrene encapsulated silicon nanoballs were prepared by emulsion polymerization of styrene monomer with silicon nanoparticles. The resulting nanoballs were immersed in iron chloride solution and then dried. Finally they were treated in high temperature through CVD and etched by hydrogen chloride. Morphology of the graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs was observed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and the field emission transmission electron microscope (FETEM) to search for core-shell structured nanoball. Spherical structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball was investigated by the Raman, the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to

  15. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  16. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  17. Silicon material technology status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwack, R.

    Silicon has been the basic element for the electronic and photovoltaic industries. The use of silicon as the primary element for terrestrial photovoltaic solar arrays is projected to continue. The reasons for this projection are related to the maturity of silicon technology, the ready availability of extremely pure silicon, the performance of silicon solar cells, and the considerable present investment in technology and manufacturing facilities. The technologies for producing semiconductor grade silicon and, to a lesser extent, refined metallurgical grade silicon are considered. It is pointed out that nearly all of the semiconductor grade silicon is produced by processes based on the Siemens deposition reactor, a technology developed 26 years ago. The state-of-the-art for producing silicon by this process is discussed. It is expected that efforts to reduce polysilicon process costs will continue.

  18. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  19. Formation of metal nanoparticles in silicon nanopores: Plasmon resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisski, S.; Goller, B.; Heck, S. C.; Maier, S. A.; Fujii, M.; Kovalev, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for the formation of noble metal nanoparticle ensembles in nanostructured silicon. The key idea is based on the unique property of the large reduction potential of extended internal hydrogen-terminated porous silicon surfaces. The process of metal nanoparticle formation in porous silicon was experimentally traced using their optical plasmon resonance response. We also demonstrate that bimetallic compounds can be formed in porous silicon and that their composition can be controlled using this technique. Experimental results were found to contradict partially with considerations based on Mie theory.

  20. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  1. Photophysical properties of luminescent silicon nanoparticles surface-modified with organic molecules via hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Mari; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Wada, Satoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Ishioka, Junya; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent silicon nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention for their potential uses in various applications. Many approaches have been reported to protect the surface of silicon nanoparticles and prevent their easy oxidation. Various air-stable luminescent silicon nanoparticles have been successfully prepared. However, the effect of interactions of the π-electron system with the silicon surface on the excited state properties of silicon nanoparticles is unclear. In this study, we have successfully prepared silicon nanoparticles protected with three organic compounds (styrene, 1-decene, and 1-vinyl naphthalene) and have examined their photophysical properties. The ligand π-electron systems on the silicon surface promoted the light harvesting ability for the luminescence through a charge transfer transition between the protective molecules and silicon nanoparticles and also enhanced the radiative rate of the silicon nanoparticles.

  2. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Carleton, K.L.

    1982-06-10

    A process of producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  3. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  4. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  5. Efficient Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    High-purity silicon efficiently produced and transferred by continuous two-cycle reactor. New reactor operates in relatively-narrow temperature rate and uses large surfaces area to minimize heat expenditure and processing time in producing silicon by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane. Two cycles of reactor consists of silicon production and removal.

  6. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Mattei, R.C.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R.S.

    1981-09-29

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is then removed from the bath.

  7. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  8. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  9. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  10. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  11. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  12. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  13. Photovoltaic applications of Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a compound parabolic concentrator as field collector, in conjunction with a primary focusing concentrator for photovoltaic applications is studied. The primary focusing concentrator can be a parabolic reflector, an array of Fresnel mirrors, a Fresnel lens or some other lens. Silicon solar cell grid structures are proposed that increase efficiency with concentration up to 10 suns. A ray tracing program has been developed to determine energy distribution at the exit of a compound parabolic concentrator. Projected total cost of a CPC/solar cell system will be between 4 and 5 times lower than for flat plate silicon cell arrays.

  14. Silicone Wristbands as Personal Passive Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual’s exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log Kow from −0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  15. Silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Steven G; Kincl, Laurel D; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-03-18

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual's exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log K(ow) from -0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  16. Low-density silicon allotropes for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Goedecker, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Silicon materials play a key role in many technologically relevant fields, ranging from the electronic to the photovoltaic industry. A systematic search for silicon allotropes was performed by employing a modified ab initio minima hopping crystal structure prediction method. The algorithm was optimized to specifically investigate the hitherto barely explored low-density regime of the silicon phase diagram by imitating the guest-host concept of clathrate compounds. In total, 44 metastable phases are presented, of which 11 exhibit direct or quasidirect band gaps in the range of ≈1.0-1.8 eV, close to the optimal Shockley-Queisser limit of ≈1.4 eV, with a stronger overlap of the absorption spectra with the solar spectrum compared to conventional diamond silicon. Due to the structural resemblance to known clathrate compounds it is expected that the predicted phases can be synthesized.

  17. Silicone oil and fluorosilicone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Takeuchi, S

    2000-03-01

    Silicone oil has been used to fill the vitreous cavity for long-term or permanent internal tamponade in eyes with proliferative vitreoretinopathy or complicated retinal detachment due to ocular trauma, giant retinal tears, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and cytomegalovirus retinitis. Reports from the Silicone Study confirmed its efficacy in the treatment of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and addressed outcome differences in vitrectomized and nonvitrectomized eyes, combined retinotomy, silicone oil removal, and complications associated with silicone oil tamponade, such as intraocular pressure abnormalities and corneal abnormalities. Because silicone oil is lighter than water and not adequate in supporting the inferior quadrants, several heavier-than-water materials have been introduced for intraocular tamponade. Silicone oil can be a potential vehicle for delivering antiproliferative agents to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  18. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  19. Silicone Contamination Camera for Developed for Shuttle Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On many shuttle missions, silicone contamination from unknown sources from within or external to the shuttle payload bay has been a chronic problem plaguing experiment payloads. There is currently a wide range of silicone usage on the shuttle. Silicones are used to coat the shuttle tiles to enhance their ability to shed rain, and over 100 kg of RTV 560 silicone is used to seal white tiles to the shuttle surfaces. Silicones are also used in electronic components, potting compounds, and thermal control blankets. Efforts to date to identify and eliminate the sources of silicone contamination have not been highly successful and have created much controversy. To identify the sources of silicone contamination on the space shuttle, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a contamination camera. This specially designed pinhole camera utilizes low-Earth-orbit atomic oxygen to develop a picture that identifies sources of silicone contamination on shuttle-launched payloads. The volatile silicone species travel through the aperture of the pinhole camera, and since volatile silicone species lose their hydrocarbon functionalities under atomic oxygen attack, the silicone adheres to the substrate as SiO_x. This glassy deposit should be spatially arranged in the image of the sources of silicone contamination. To view the contamination image, one can use ultrasensitive thickness measurement techniques, such as scanning variable-angle ellipsometry, to map the surface topography of the camera's substrate. The demonstration of a functional contamination camera would resolve the controversial debate concerning the amount and location of contamination sources, would allow corrective actions to be taken, and would demonstrate a useful tool for contamination documentation on future shuttle payloads, with near negligible effect on cost and weight.

  20. Incorporation of capsaicin in silicone coatings for enhanced antifouling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Jaggari, Karunakar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    Successful use of capsaicin as insect and animal repellant propelled us to use it as a possible antifouling agent. Its non-toxic, non-biocidal, non-leaching properties make it a viable alternative to organotin compounds. In order to optimize the anti-fouling performance of the coating, silicone, the most effective foul-release marine coating, was chosen as the carrier. We have incorporated capsaicin into silicone coating, by both bulk entrapment and surface immobilization. Contact angle measurements on capsaicin-incorporated silicone exhibited an increase in wettability, owing to the presence of capsaicin. FTIR study further confirmed the incorporation of capsaicin in silicone. Bacterial attachment studies were conducted using lake Erie water. While bacteria liberally inhabited the control coating, their presence on the capsaicin-incorporated coating was found to be minimal. These preliminary studies indicate that capsaicin incorporated silicone could be a viable environment friendly alternative to currently used antifouling coatings.

  1. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  2. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  3. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  4. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  5. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  6. The Electrochemical Fluorination of Organosilicon Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaver, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    The electrochemical fluorination of tetramethylsilane, hexamethyl-disiloxane, diethyldichlorosilane, amyltrichlorosilane, and phenyltri-chlorosilane was conducted in an Inconel cell equipped with nickel electrodes. A potential of approximately 5.0 volts and a current of approximately 1.0 ampere were used for the electrolysis reaction. In all cases the fluorinations resulted in considerable scission of the carbon-silicon bonds yielding hydrogen and the various fluorinated decomposition products; no fluoroorganosilicon compounds were identified. The main decomposition products were silicon tetrafluoride, the corresponding fluorinated carbon compounds, and the various organofluorosilanes. It is suggested that this is due to the nucleophilic attack of the fluoride ion (or complex fluoride ion) on the carbon-silicon bond.

  7. Silicone-Rubber Tooling for Hollow Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Wave-free contour surface obtained by using flexible mold. Silicone-rubber layup tool, when used in conjunction with hard plastic laminating mold defining desired contour, produces panel with wave-free surface that accurately reproduces shape of mold. In addition to providing porous hollow-panel wing structure that acts as duct for transporting sucked boundary layer tooling, also used to fabricate high-strength lightweight door panels and any single-or compound-contour panel.

  8. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  9. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Jones, Michael G.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Luther, Thomas A.; Trowbridge, Tammy L.

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  10. Incorporation of dopant impurities into a silicon oxynitride matrix containing silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Fabien; Ulhaq-Bouillet, Corinne; Muller, Dominique; Slaoui, Abdelilah; Ferblantier, Gérald

    2016-05-01

    Dopant impurities, such as gallium (Ga), indium (In), and phosphorus (P), were incorporated into silicon-rich silicon oxynitride (SRSON) thin films by the ion implantation technique. To form silicon nanoparticles, the implanted layers were thermally annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C for 60 min. This thermal treatment generates a phase separation of the silicon nanoparticles from the SRSON matrix in the presence of the dopant atoms. We report on the position of the dopant species within the host matrix and relative to the silicon nanoparticles, as well as on the effect of the dopants on the crystalline structure and the size of the Si nanoparticles. The energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy technique is thoroughly used to identify the chemical species. The distribution of the dopant elements within the SRSON compound is determined using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping coupled with spectral imaging of silicon plasmons was performed to spatially localize at the nanoscale the dopant impurities and the silicon nanoparticles in the SRSON films. Three different behaviors were observed according to the implanted dopant type (Ga, In, or P). The In-doped SRSON layers clearly showed separated nanoparticles based on indium, InOx, or silicon. In contrast, in the P-doped SRSON layers, Si and P are completely miscible. A high concentration of P atoms was found within the Si nanoparticles. Lastly, in Ga-doped SRSON the Ga atoms formed large nanoparticles close to the SRSON surface, while the Si nanoparticles were localized in the bulk of the SRSON layer. In this work, we shed light on the mechanisms responsible for these three different behaviors.

  11. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  12. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  13. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  14. Silicon Stokes terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Klaassen, T. O.; Carder, D. A.; Phillips, P. J.; Redlich, B.; Riemann, H.; Zhukavin, R. Kh.; Shastin, V. N.

    2007-04-10

    A Raman-type silicon laser at terahertz frequencies has been realized. Stokes-shifted stimulated emission has been observed from silicon crystals doped by antimony donors when optically excited by an infrared free electron laser. The Raman lasing was obtained due to resonant scattering on electronic states of a donor atom.

  15. Cleaning up Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A development program that started in 1975 between Union Carbide and JPL, led to Advanced Silicon Materials LLC's, formerly ASiMI, commercial process for producing silane in viable quantities. The process was expanded to include the production of high-purity polysilicon for electronic devices. The technology came out of JPL's Low Cost Silicon Array Project.

  16. Silicon research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of solar cells suitable for space applications are discussed, along with the advantages and disadvantages of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells. The goal of a silicon solar cell with 18% efficiency has not been reached and does not appear promising in the near future.

  17. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  18. Reversible Cycling of Silicon and Silicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovac, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Lithium ion batteries typically use a graphite negative electrode. Silicon can store more lithium than any other element and has long been considered as an attractive replacement for graphite. The theoretical lithium storage capacity of silicon is nearly ten times higher than graphite volumetrically and three times higher gravimetrically. The equilibrium Si-Li binary system is well known. Completely new phase behaviors are observed at room temperature. This includes the formation of a new phase, Li15Si4, which is the highest lithium containing phase at room temperature [1]. The formation of Li15Si4 is accompanied by a 280 percent volume expansion of silicon. During de-alloying this phase contracts, forming amorphous silicon. The volume expansion of alloys can cause intra-particle fracture and inter-particle disconnection; leading to loss of cycle life. To overcome issues with volume expansion requires a detailed knowledge of Li-Si phase behavior, careful design of the composition and nanostructure of the alloy and the microstructure of the negative electrode [2]. In this presentation the phase behavior of the Li-Si system will be described. Using this knowledge alone, strategies can be developed so that silicon can be reversibly cycled in a battery hundreds of times. Further increases in energy density and efficiency can be gained by alloying silicon with other elements, while controlling microstructure [2]. Coupled with negative electrode design strategies, practical negative electrodes for lithium ion cells can be developed based on bulk materials, with significant energy density improvement over conventional electrodes. [4pt] [1] M.N. Obrovac and L.J. Krause, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A103. [0pt] [2] M.N. Obrovac, Leif Christensen, Dinh Ba Le, and J.R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A849

  19. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  20. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  1. Wet-chemical systems and methods for producing black silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Yost, Vernon; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Page, Matthew

    2015-05-19

    A wet-chemical method of producing a black silicon substrate. The method comprising soaking single crystalline silicon wafers in a predetermined volume of a diluted inorganic compound solution. The substrate is combined with an etchant solution that forms a uniform noble metal nanoparticle induced Black Etch of the silicon wafer, resulting in a nanoparticle that is kinetically stabilized. The method comprising combining with an etchant solution having equal volumes acetonitrile/acetic acid:hydrofluoric acid:hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Electromagnetic Levitation of Silicon and Silicon-Iron Alloy Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul; Yang, Yindong; Barati, Mansoor; McLean, Alex

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the design of an electromagnetic levitation system and a technique for non-conductive silicon heating and conductive silicon levitation is described. The aim of the work is to describe the various parameters including coil design, applied power and specimen weight that govern the temperature of levitated silicon and silicon-iron alloy droplets.

  3. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kovačević, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  4. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  5. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Performance and Materials Chemistry of a Sililcone-Based Replicating Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Kalan, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the performance and chemistry of a siliconebased replicating compound. Some silicone replicating compounds are useful for critical inspection of surface features. Common applications are for examining micro-cracks, surface pitting, scratching, and other surface defects. Materials characterization techniques were used: FTIR, XPS, ToF-SIMS, AFM, and Confocal Microscopy to evaluate the replicating compound. These techniques allowed for the characterization and verification of the resolution capabilities and surface contamination that may be a result of using the compound. FTIR showed the compound is entirely made from silicone constituents. The AFM and Confocal Microscopy results showed the compound does accurately replicate the surface features to the claimed resolution. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed there is a silicone contaminant layer left behind when a cured replica is peeled off a surface. Attempts to clean off the contamination could not completely remove all silicone residues.

  6. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  7. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  8. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Abrams, Billie L.

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  9. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  10. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  11. The bonded unipolar silicon-silicon junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Stefan; Andersson, Gert I.; Andersson, Mats O.; Engström, Olof

    1992-07-01

    The electrical and optical properties of wafer bonded unipolar silicon-silicon junctions were investigated. The interfaces, both n-n type and p-p type, were prepared using wafers with hydrophilic surfaces. The current versus voltage characteristics, the current transients following stepwise changes in the applied bias, and the capacitance versus voltage characteristics as well as the temperature dependence of the current and capacitance were experimentally obtained and theoretically modeled. The proposed model assumes two distributions of interface states, one of acceptors and one of donors, causing a potential barrier at the bonded interface. It is argued that the origins of the interface states are impurities and crystallographic defects in the interfacial region. The capacitance of the bonded structures includes contributions from the depletion regions as well as from minority carriers. When bonded n-n type samples were illuminated with light of photon energies larger than the silicon band gap the current across the junction increased. This is caused by the photogenerated increase in the minority carrier concentration in the interfacial region, which results in a lowering of the potential barrier. Illumination of n-n type structures with light of photon energies lower than the band gap caused a considerable photocurrent at low temperatures. In this case the observed behavior cannot be explained by interaction with the interface states. Instead, the mechanism is the change in the occupancy of deep electron traps caused by the illumination. These traps are located in the silicon in a small volume around the bonded interface with energies close to the center of the band gap and with a peak concentration of about 1013 cm-3. Impurities present on the silicon surfaces before bonding and impurities gettered to the bonded interface are possible reasons for the increased concentration of deep electron traps in the vicinity of the bonded interface.

  12. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  13. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively.

  14. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  15. Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their derivatives are important man-made chemicals that have wide consumer and industrial applications. They are relatively contemporary chemicals, being in use only since the 1950s, and until recently, have be...

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  17. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  18. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  19. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  20. Porous silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-10-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures-single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion batteries, gas sensors and drug delivery.

  1. Silicon-electroceramics integration

    SciTech Connect

    Tuller, H.L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroceramics provides unique functionality as sensors, transducers, and non-volatile storage media while silicon is nearly unique in its signal processing and micromechanical properties. We discuss how these two materials technologies, when integrated, provide unique devices and structures.

  2. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  3. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  4. SPS silicon reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design analysis of a silicon power conversion system for the solar power satellite (SPS) is summarized. The solar array, consisting of glass encapsulated 50 micrometer silicon solar cells, is described. The general scheme for power distribution to the array/antenna interface is described. Degradation by proton irradiation is considered. The interface between the solar array and the klystron equipped power transmitter is described.

  5. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, R. P.; Mason, G. S.; Miller, A. L.; Stipe, C. B.; Kearns, J. D.; Prier, M. W.; Rarick, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds.

  6. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R P; Mason, G S; Miller, A L; Stipe, C B; Kearns, J D; Prier, M W; Rarick, J D

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds. PMID:27250478

  7. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  8. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  9. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Çakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  10. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Cakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl(3), CH(2)Cl(2), acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  12. Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, Kenneth

    For many years, powder X-ray diffraction was used primarily as a fingerprinting method for phase identification in the context of molecular organic materials. In the early 1990s, with only a few notable exceptions, structures of even moderate complexity were not solvable from PXRD data alone. Global optimisation methods and highly-modified direct methods have transformed this situation by specifically exploiting some well-known properties of molecular compounds. This chapter will consider some of these properties.

  13. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  14. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  15. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  16. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  17. Turbulent flow model for vapor collection efficiency of a high-purity silicon reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model and a computer code based on this model was developed to allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors for converting gaseous silicon compounds to condensed-phase silicon. Specifically, the model formulated describes the silicon vapor separation/collection from the developing turbulent flow stream within reactors of the Westinghouse type. Migration of the silicon vapor to the reactor walls was described by the parametric solutions presented here, in order to reduce the experimentation necessary in the design of such reactors. Calculations relating to the collection efficiencies of such reactors are presented as a function of the reactor throughflow and distance along its length.

  18. Towards silicon speciation in light petroleum products using gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with a dynamic reaction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainet, Fabien; Lienemann, Charles-Philippe; Ponthus, Jeremie; Pécheyran, Christophe; Castro, Joaudimir; Tessier, Emmanuel; Donard, Olivier François Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Silicon speciation has recently gained interest in the oil and gas industry due to the significant poisoning problems caused by silicon on hydrotreatment catalysts. The poisoning effect clearly depends on the structure of the silicon species which must be determined and quantified. The hyphenation of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows a specific detection to determine the retention times of all silicon species. The aim of this work is to determine the retention indices of unknown silicon species to allow their characterization by a multi-technical approach in order to access to their chemical structure. The optimization of the dynamic reaction cell (DRC) of the ICP-MS using hydrogen as reactant gas successfully demonstrated the resolution of the interferences (14N14N+ and 12C16O+) initially present on 28Si. The linearity was excellent for silicon compounds and instrumental detection limits ranged from 20 to 140 μg of Si/kg depending on the response of the silicon compounds. A continuous release of silicon in the torch was observed most likely due to the use of a torch and an injector which was made of quartz. A non-universal response for silicon was observed and it was clearly necessary to use response coefficients to quantify silicon compounds. Known silicon compounds such as cyclic siloxanes (D3-D16) coming from PDMS degradation were confirmed. Furthermore, more than 10 new silicon species never characterized before in petroleum products were highlighted in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) degradation samples produced under thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. These silicon species mainly consisted of linear and cyclic structures containing reactive functions such as ethoxy, peroxide and hydroxy groups which can be able to react with the alumina surface and hence, poison the catalyst. This characterization will further allow the development of innovative solutions such as trapping silicon compounds or

  19. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  20. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2001-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  1. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors.

  2. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors. PMID:8441826

  3. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  4. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  7. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  8. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  10. Silicon-based cross-coupling reaction: an environmentally benign version.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshiaki; Hiyama, Tamejiro

    2011-10-01

    Much attention has been paid to the cross-coupling reaction of organosilicon compounds due to their stability, non-toxicity, and natural abundance of silicon. In addition, the silicon-based cross-coupling has many advantages over other cross-coupling protocols. Successful examples of the silicon-based cross-coupling reaction are reviewed, focusing especially on the advances made in the last decade. Having had a number of highly effective palladium catalysts developed mainly for other cross-coupling reactions, the development of the silicon-based protocol owes heavily to the design of organosilicon reagents which effectively undergo transmetalation, a key elemental step of the silicon-based cross-coupling reaction. This tutorial review thus classifies various organosilicon reagents depending on substituents on silicon and surveys their cross-coupling reactions with various electrophiles.

  11. Silicon, a Possible Link between Environmental Exposure and Autoimmune Diseases: The Case of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Speck-Hernandez, Cesar A.; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is one of the most common chemicals on earth. Several compounds such as silica, asbestos, silicone or, nanoparticles are built from tetrahedral units with silicon as the central atom. Despite these, structural similarities, they have rarely been analyzed as a group. These compounds generate significant biological alterations that include immune hyperactivation, production of the reactive species of oxygen and tissue injury. These pathological processes may trigger autoimmune responses and lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Populations at risk include those that constantly work in industrial process, mining, and agriculture as well as those that undergo silicone implants. Herein a review on the main features of these compounds and how they may induce autoimmune responses is presented. PMID:23119159

  12. Bondability of RTV silicon rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delollis, N. J.; Montoya, O.

    1972-01-01

    Glow discharge method for producing a bondable Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone is described. Mechanical and chemical properties of silicone specimens are described. Theory concerning the relationship between surface characteristics and bondability is examined with respect to the polymer specimen.

  13. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  14. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  15. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  16. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  17. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  18. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  19. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  20. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor.

    PubMed

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E; Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Johnson, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  1. Palladium contamination in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Ceresoli, M.; Codegoni, D.; Somaini, F.; Bianchi, I.; Volonghi, D.

    2015-04-01

    In this work palladium is characterized as a silicon contaminant by recombination lifetime, DLTS, C-V and C-t measurements of palladium-implanted wafers. Palladium introduced by ion implantation is found to remain in the solid solution in silicon after rapid thermal treatments, and to be a very effective recombination center. For this reason recombination lifetime measurements are the most sensitive method to detect palladium in silicon. Two palladium-related levels were found by DLTS in p-type material. One of these levels corresponds to a level reported in the literature as the single donor level of substitutional palladium. For what concerns MOS capacitors, palladium is responsible for negative oxide charge and for degradation of the generation lifetime. In addition, palladium is confirmed to be a very fast diffuser, which segregates at the wafer surface even with low temperature treatments (250 °C). Microscopy inspections showed that palladium precipitates and surface defects were formed upon segregation.

  2. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  3. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  4. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  5. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  6. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  7. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  8. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  10. LHCb Silicon Tracker infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermoline, Yuri

    2004-02-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is a vital part of the experiment. It consists of four planar stations: one trigger and three inner tracking stations. The operation of the Silicon Tracker detectors and electronics is provided by its infrastructure: cooling system, high- and low-voltage power supply systems, temperature and radiation monitoring systems. Several components of these systems are located in the experimental hall and subjected to radiation. This paper mainly concentrates on the recent development: requirements definition, evaluation of possible implementation scenarios, component choice and component radiation tests.

  11. Thermodynamics of paracrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, P. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.

    2000-05-09

    Fluctuation microscopy experiments have shown that the as-deposited structure of amorphous silicon thin films is paracrystalline. A paracrystal consists of small (< 3 nm in diameter) topologically crystalline grains separated by a disordered matrix. Here the authors consider the thermodynamics of paracrystalline silicon as a function of the grain size and the temperature. They offer a simple model that qualitatively explains the observed metastability of the ordered structure at low temperature (300 K), the relaxation towards a more disordered structure at intermediate temperatures (600 K), and the recrystallization at high temperatures (1,000 K).

  12. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  13. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  14. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  15. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  16. The interface between silicon and a high-k oxide.

    PubMed

    Först, Clemens J; Ashman, Christopher R; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Blöchl, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the semiconductor industry to continue scaling microelectronic devices to ever smaller dimensions (a trend known as Moore's Law) is limited by quantum mechanical effects: as the thickness of conventional silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) gate insulators is reduced to just a few atomic layers, electrons can tunnel directly through the films. Continued device scaling will therefore probably require the replacement of the insulator with high-dielectric-constant (high-k) oxides, to increase its thickness, thus preventing tunnelling currents while retaining the electronic properties of an ultrathin SiO(2) film. Ultimately, such insulators will require an atomically defined interface with silicon without an interfacial SiO(2) layer for optimal performance. Following the first reports of epitaxial growth of AO and ABO(3) compounds on silicon, the formation of an atomically abrupt crystalline interface between strontium titanate and silicon was demonstrated. However, the atomic structure proposed for this interface is questionable because it requires silicon atoms that have coordinations rarely found elsewhere in nature. Here we describe first-principles calculations of the formation of the interface between silicon and strontium titanate and its atomic structure. Our study shows that atomic control of the interfacial structure by altering the chemical environment can dramatically improve the electronic properties of the interface to meet technological requirements. The interface structure and its chemistry may provide guidance for the selection process of other high-k gate oxides and for controlling their growth.

  17. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  18. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  19. Improved mold release for filled-silicone compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accountius, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    Ceramic and filled-plastic materials used for fabrication of tiles are relatively brittle and easily break as they are being removed from molds. Dusting mold surfaces with commercially available glass microspheres provides mold release superior to existing spray releases. Glass-microsphere dusting also permits removal of uncured tile which has very little strength.

  20. Silicone-polyoxometalate (SiPOM) hybrid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Katsoulis, D.E.; Keryk, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Oligomeric and polymeric SiPOM materials have been prepared by reacting trichloro endblocked PDMS [degree of polymerization, {approximately} 14 (I) and 60 (II)] with {alpha}-K{sub 8}SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}. NMR and IR spectroscopy show that the POM units are bonded to the siloxane via Si-O-W bonds. The reaction of the short PDMS segment (I) with the POM produces powdery materials, (isolated as tetrabutylammonium salts) while the longer PDMS (II) forms elastomeric materials. For the latter the POM anions act as reinforcing fillers. Other important properties of the hybrid materials are their UV absorbency, their electrochromicity, their electrical properties (volume resistivity, {approximately} 10{sup 11} ohm{center_dot}cm; low loss tangent, memory capability) and their film formation.

  1. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  2. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  3. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  4. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  5. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  6. Fabrication of sinterable silicon nitride by injection molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, C. L.; French, K.; Neil, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Transformation of structural ceramics from the laboratory to production requires development of near net shape fabrication techniques which minimize finish grinding. One potential technique for producing large quantities of complex-shaped parts at a low cost, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material. Binder selection methodology, compounding of ceramic and binder components, injection molding techniques, and problems in binder removal are discussed. Strength, oxidation resistance, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material.

  7. Integration of InP-based optoelectronics with silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Kapulainen, Markku; Ylinen, Sami; Ollila, Jyrki; Vilokkinen, Ville; Mörl, Ludwig; Möhrle, Martin; Hamelin, Régis

    2009-02-01

    Compound semiconductors provide state-of-the-art performance in optoelectronics, while silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is an ideal platform for many passive functions in integrated optics. By combining them one can realise optical devices with high performance and low cost. This paper discusses the various applications and technologies for integrating InP chips with SOI waveguides. Bonding of lasers, SOA arrays and detectors for practical applications is described. Experimental results are given for visually aligned thermo-compression bonding and self-aligned flip-chip bonding with Indium bumps. Flip-chip bonding is reported directly on SOI chips, as well as on a separate silicon-optical-bench.

  8. Analysis of copper-rich precipitates in silicon: chemical state,gettering, and impact on multicrystalline silicon solar cellmaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, Tonio; Marcus, Matthew A.; Istratov, Andrei A.; Heuer, Matthias; Ciszek, Theodore F.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Weber,Eicke R.

    2004-11-08

    In this study, synchrotron-based x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (mu-XAS) is applied to identifying the chemical states of copper-rich clusters within a variety of silicon materials, including as-grown cast multicrystalline silicon solar cell material with high oxygen concentration and other silicon materials with varying degrees of oxygen concentration and copper contamination pathways. In all samples, copper silicide (Cu3Si) is the only phase of copper identified. It is noted from thermodynamic considerations that unlike certain metal species, copper tends to form a silicide and not an oxidized compound because of the strong silicon-oxygen bonding energy; consequently the likelihood of encountering an oxidized copper particle in silicon is small, in agreement with experimental data. In light of these results, the effectiveness of aluminum gettering for the removal of copper from bulk silicon is quantified via x-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF),and a segregation coefficient is determined from experimental data to beat least (1-2)'103. Additionally, mu-XAS data directly demonstrates that the segregation mechanism of Cu in Al is the higher solubility of Cu in the liquid phase. In light of these results, possible limitations for the complete removal of Cu from bulk mc-Si are discussed.

  9. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  10. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  11. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon, silicon dioxide, titanium and ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    Various silicon-based thin films (such as epitaxial, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon thin films, silicon dioxide thin films and silicon nitride thin films), titanium thin film and various ferroelectric thin films (such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films) play critical roles in the manufacture of microelectronics circuits. For the past few years, there have been tremendous interests to search for cheap, safe and easy-to-use methods to develop those thin films with high quality and good step coverage. Silane is a critical chemical reagent widely used to deposit silicon-based thin films. Despite its wide use, silane is a dangerous material. It is pyrophoric, extremely flammable and may explode from heat, shock and/or friction. Because of the nature of silane, serious safety issues have been raised concerning the use, transportation, and storage of compressed gas cylinders of silane. Therefore it is desired to develop safer ways to deposit silicon-based films. In chapter III, I present the results of our research in the following fields: (1) Silane generator, (2) Substitutes of silane for deposition of silicon and silicon dioxide thin films, (3) Substitutes of silane for silicon dioxide thin film deposition. In chapter IV, hydropyridine is introduced as a new ligand for use in constructing precursors for chemical vapor deposition. Detachement of hydropyridine occurs by a low-temperature reaction leaving hydrogen in place of the hydropyridine ligands. Hydropyridine ligands can be attached to a variety of elements, including main group metals, such as aluminum and antimony, transition metals, such as titanium and tantalum, semiconductors such as silicon, and non-metals such as phosphorus and arsenic. In this study, hydropyridine-containing titanium compounds were synthesized and used as chemical vapor deposition precursors for deposition of titanium containing thin films. Some other titanium compounds were also studied for comparison. In chapter V, Chemical Vapor

  13. High aspect ratio transmission line circuits micromachined in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Shane Truman

    The performance of complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) fabricated on silicon has improved dramatically. The scaling down of silicon transistors has increased the maximum frequency of transistors to the point where silicon MMICs have become a viable alternative to compound semiconductor MMICs in certain applications. A fundamental problem still exists in silicon MMICs however in that transmission lines fabricated on silicon can suffer from high loss due to the finite conductivity of the silicon substrate. A novel approach for creating low-loss transmission lines on silicon is presented in this work. Low-loss transmission lines are created on low resistivity silicon by using a micromachining method that combines silicon deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), thermal oxidation, electroplating, and planarization. Two types of high aspect ratio transmission lines are created with this method including high aspect ratio coplanar waveguide (hicoplanar) and semi-rectangular coaxial (semicoaxial). Transmission lines with impedances ranging from 20--80 O have been fabricated with minimum measured loss lower than 1 dB/cm at 67 GHz. Low-loss dielectrics are created for the high aspect ratio transmission lines using the mesa merging method. The mesa merging method works by creating silicon mesa arrays using DRIE and then converting and merging the mesa arrays into a solid oxide dielectric using thermal oxidation. The transmission lines are designed so that the fields penetrate the low-loss oxide dielectric and are isolated from the lossy silicon substrate. The mesa merging method has successfully created large volume oxide with depth up to 65 microm and width up to 240 microm in short oxidation times. Other advantages of the high aspect ratio transmission lines are demonstrated including low-loss over a wide impedance range, high isolation, and high coupling for coupled-line circuits. Transmission line models have been

  14. Pnictogen-Silicon Analogues of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Andreas E; Eckhardt, Maria; Erlebach, Andreas; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Sierka, Marek; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-08-24

    Since the discovery of the first "inorganic benzene" (borazine, B3N3H6), the synthesis of other noncarbon derivatives is an ongoing challenge in Inorganic Chemistry. Here we report on the synthesis of the first pnictogen-silicon congeners of benzene, the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene [(PhC(NtBu)2)3Si3E3] (E = P (1a), As (1b)) by a simple metathesis reaction. These compounds are formed by the reaction of [Cp″2Zr(η(1:1)-E4)] (E = P, As; Cp″ = C5H3tBu2) with [PhC(NtBu)2SiCl] in toluene at room temperature along with the silicon pnictogen congeners of the cyclobutadiene, [(PhC(NtBu)2)2Si2E2] (E = P (2a), As (2b)), which is unprecedented for the arsenic system 2b. All compounds were comprehensively characterized, and density functional theory calculations were performed to verify the stability and the aromatic character of the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene. PMID:27513314

  15. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  16. Decomposition procedure using methyl orthoformate to analyze silicone polymers.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuichiro; Sogabe, Keisuke; Ohtani, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    A new decomposition method for structural analysis of polysiloxanes (silicones) was developed using methyl orthoformate. The siloxane bonds in samples with vinyl and/or methyl side groups decomposed under relatively mild acidic conditions up to around 70°C and were followed by methoxylation at the cleaved linkages with few side reactions. The product yields with respect to the siloxane monomer units were 98-100% for low molecular weight model siloxane compounds. Additionally, this method decomposed the silicone polymer sample in a similar manner with decomposition yields of 98 and 103% for the dimethylsiloxane main chain and dimethylvinylsilyl end groups, respectively. These results demonstrate that the proposed decomposition method should be an effective pretreatment procedure for structural and compositional analyses of silicone polymers. PMID:25007937

  17. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  18. A silicon electromechanical photodetector.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Siddharth; Bhave, Sunil A

    2013-06-12

    Optomechanical systems have enabled wide-band optical frequency conversion and multichannel all-optical radio frequency amplification. Realization of an on-chip silicon communication platform is limited by photodetectors needed to convert optical information to electrical signals for further signal processing. In this paper we present a coupled silicon microresonator, which converts near-IR optical intensity modulation at 174.2 MHz and 1.198 GHz into motional electrical current. This device emulates a photodetector which detects intensity modulation of continuous wave laser light in the full-width-at-half-maximum bandwidth of the mechanical resonance. The resonant principle of operation eliminates dark current challenges associated with convetional photodetectors. While the results presented here constitute a purely classical demonstration, the device can also potentially be extended to the quantum regime to realize a photon-phonon translator. PMID:23706144

  19. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  20. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  1. Making silicon stronger.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad Lee

    2010-11-01

    Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

  2. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  3. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  4. More competitive silicon smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Over the past several years, foreign manufacturers of ferrosilicon and silicon alloys have been making inroads in American markets such as computer chips. To make domestic smelting of these materials more competitive, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded the development of a direct-current plasma-arc-furnace smelting process by the South Carolina Research Authority (SCRA) in North Charleston. This new technology can reduce the energy consumption of the smelting process, saving million of dollars in energy costs per year. Typically, silicon and ferrosilicon alloys are produced in open-top, submerged-arc, alternating-current furnaces. A mixture of quartz ore and reducing agents are fed into the furnace, multiple electrodes are inserted into the material, and the mixture is charged to produce the desired metal. The process consumes high amounts of electrical power relative to the amount of metal recovered.

  5. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  6. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  7. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  8. Bringing Silicon Valley inside.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Silicon Valley companies produced 41 IPOs, which by January 1999 had a combined market capitalization of $27 billion--that works out to $54,000 in new wealth creation per worker in a single year. Multiply the number of employees in your company by $54,000. Did your business create that much new wealth last year? Half that amount? It's not a group of geniuses generating such riches. It's a business model. In Silicon Valley, ideas, capital, and talent circulate freely, gathering into whatever combinations are most likely to generate innovation and wealth. Unlike most traditional companies, which spend their energy in resource allocation--a system designed to avoid failure--the Valley operates through resource attraction--a system that nurtures innovation. In a traditional company, people with innovative ideas must go hat in hand to the guardians of the old ideas for funding and for staff. But in Silicon Valley, a slew of venture capitalists vie to attract the best new ideas, infusing relatively small amounts of capital into a portfolio of ventures. And talent is free to go to the companies offering the most exhilarating work and the greatest potential rewards. It should actually be easier for large, traditional companies to set up similar markets for capital, ideas, and talent internally. After all, big companies often already have extensive capital, marketing, and distribution resources, and a first crack at the talent in their own ranks. And some of them are doing it. The choice is yours--you can do your best to make sure you never put a dollar of capital at risk, or you can tap into the kind of wealth that's being created every day in Silicon Valley.

  9. The PHOBOS silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Birger; Betts, Russell; Ganz, Rudolf; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan H.; Holzman, Burt; Kucewicz, Wojtek; Lin, Willis T.; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit J.; Nouicer, Rachid; Pernegger, Heinz; Reuter, Michael; Sarin, Pradeep; Tsay, Vincent; Vale, Carla M.; Wadsworth, Bernard; Wuosmaa, Alan; Wyslouch, Bolek

    1999-08-01

    PHOBOS is one of the four experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. PHOBOS almost exclusively utilizes silicon sensors to measure charged particle multiplicity distributions and to track particles in a 2-arm spectrometer. The detector consists of about 450 silicon pad sensors. Nine different pad geometries are used to match the different physics needs of the experiment. A relatively high granularity, of up to 1536 channels per sensor, is used in the spectrometer. The multiplicity detector uses 128 and 64 channel sensors and the charge deposition per pad is measured to determine the multiplicity of single events. All sensors are of the double-metal silicon pad type with pad sizes from 1 cm 2 up to 4 cm 2. They are produced in Taiwan by the ERSO foundry under supervision of Miracle Co. and National Central University. An extensive testing procedure makes it possible to select sensors suited for use in PHOBOS. Detector modules consisting of up to five sensors are read out with integrated chips of either 64 or 128 channels. The testing of the sensors and the performance of assembled detector modules is discussed.

  10. Silicon nanotubes: Why not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. Q.; Lee, S. T.; Law, Chi-Kin; Li, Wai-Kee; Teo, Boon K.

    2002-10-01

    A diamond nanowire (CNW), a silicon nanowire (SiNW), a carbon nanotube (CNT), and a silicon nanotube (SiNT) were studied using the semiempirical molecular orbital PM3 method, with confirmations by calculations at the HF/3-21G and HF/3-21G(d) levels. It was shown that the systems with a diamond structure generally possess larger band gaps than their tubular counterparts. Carbon nanotubular structure shows efficient sp 2 hybridization and π bonding, thus allowing a high stability of the carbon nanotube structure. In contrast, silicon prefers sp 3 hybridization and favors the tetrahedral diamond-like structures, thereby forming the commonly observed nanowires. This distinction can be traced to the differences in the energetics and overlaps of the valence s and p orbitals of C vs Si. Nevertheless, when the dangling bonds are properly terminated, SiNT can in principle be formed. The resulting energy minimized SiNT, however, adopts a severely puckered structure (with a corrugated surface) with SiSi distances ranging from 1.85 to 2.25 Å.

  11. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Park, Jinsung; Yoon, Gwonchan; Song, Jiseok; Jee, Sang-Won; Lee, Jung-Ho; Na, Sungsoo; Kwon, Taeyun; Eom, Kilho

    2009-10-27

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm.

  13. Special Issue: The Silicon Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of articles about different aspects of current silicon research and applications, ranging from basic investigations of mono- and polycrystalline silicon materials and nanostructures to technologies for device fabrication in silicon photovoltaics, micro- and optoelectronics. Guest Editors are Martin Kittler and Deren Yang, the organizers of a recent Sino-German symposium held in Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005.The cover picture shows four examples of The Silicon Age: the structure of a thin film solar cell on low-cost SSP (silicon sheet from powder) substrate (upper left image) [1], a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image and diffraction pattern of a single-crystalline Si nanowire (upper right) [2], a carrier lifetime map from an n-type multicrystalline silicon wafer after gettering by a grain boundary (lower left) [3], and a scanning acoustic microscopy image of a bonded 150 mm diameter wafer pair (upper right) [4].

  14. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm. PMID:20652130

  15. Lateral diffusion epitaxy (LDE) of single crystal silicon with downward facing substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Luke H. L.; Li, Bo; Shen, Huaxiang; Kitai, Adrian H.

    2012-10-01

    An increase in the aspect ratio of silicon platelets grown by Lateral Diffusion Epitaxy (LDE) is achieved. Epitaxial growth is achieved by a compound graphite slider boat in which an oxidized silicon plate is placed above the seed line on the substrate. The function of the plate is to i) favor side wall growth by limiting vertical nucleation on the platelets, and ii) to enhance the surface smoothness by restricting diffusion of silicon to a horizontal direction. We have studied layer growth from the In-Si liquid phase by reducing the gap between substrate and plate. By reducing the gap, it allows for a more uniform growth of silicon from the side wall of the strip. In addition, we investigate repositioning the silicon seed line to a downward orientation. In this case, the diffusion rate increases due to a gravity effect.

  16. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  17. Uniform silicon slow light waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.

    2011-01-01

    An uniform silicon waveguide is proposed featuring ultralow-dispersion slow light. The core of the waveguide consists of one silicon trip and two pairs of air/silicon strip and the cladding is composed of several alternative silicon and air strips, which form a transverse band gap to confine propagating light in the core. The waveguide has several nearly linear photonic bands in a large frequency range, which can support broadband slow modes with a group velocity of 0.03-0.08 c and tolerable group velocity dispersion.

  18. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  19. Direct Human Contact with Siloxanes (Silicones) – Safety or Risk Part 1. Characteristics of Siloxanes (Silicones)

    PubMed Central

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna; Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Szymkowska, Katarzyna; Krenczkowska, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Siloxanes are commonly known as silicones. They belong to the organosilicon compounds and are exclusively obtained by synthesis. Their chemical structure determines a range of physicochemical properties which were recognized as unique. Due to the susceptibility to chemical modifications, ability to create short, long or complex polymer particles, siloxanes found an application in many areas of human life. Siloxanes differ in particle size, molecular weight, shape and chemical groups. As a result, this determines the different physico-chemical properties, that directly affect the safety or the risk of their use. The areas that can be a source of danger to human health will be commented in this paper. PMID:27303296

  20. Soft chemical synthesis of silicon nanosheets and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hideyuki; Ikuno, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional silicon nanomaterials are expected to show different properties from those of bulk silicon materials by virtue of surface functionalization and quantum size effects. Since facile fabrication processes of large area silicon nanosheets (SiNSs) are required for practical applications, a development of soft chemical synthesis route without using conventional vacuum processes is a challenging issue. We have recently succeeded to prepare SiNSs with sub-nanometer thicknesses by exfoliating layered silicon compounds, and they are found to be composed of crystalline single-atom-thick silicon layers. In this review, we present the synthesis and modification methods of SiNSs. These SiNSs have atomically flat and smooth surfaces due to dense coverage of organic moieties, and they are easily self-assembled in a concentrated state to form a regularly stacked structure. We have also characterized the electron transport properties and the electronic structures of SiNSs. Finally, the potential applications of these SiNSs and organic modified SiNSs are also reviewed.

  1. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  2. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models were developed which allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H2 or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction.

  3. Fluidized bed for production of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Flagella, R.N.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for removing silicon powder particles from a reactor that produces polycrystalline silicon by the pyrolysis of a silane containing gas in a fluidized bed reaction zone of silicon seed particles. It comprises introducing the silane containing gas stream into the reaction zone of fluidized silicon seed particles; heterogeneously decomposing the silane containing gas under conditions; collecting the silicon product particles from the collection zone; and removing silicon powder particles from the reactor.

  4. Silicon Utilizing Microbial Bioactivities in the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, M. M.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms are unicellular eukaryotic algae and an important member of the silicon utilizing organisms, that generate ~20% of the ~100 billion metric tons of organic carbon produced through photosynthesis on Earth each year. Fragilariopsis is a dominating psychrophilic diatom genus in polar sea ice. The two species Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Fragilariopsis curta are able to grow and divide below freezing temperature. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), involved in cold adaptation in several psychrophilic organisms, are widespread in this two polar species. Achanthes minutissima isolated as dominant diatom has degradable effects involving petroleum hydocarbons. Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have antibacterial activity and the fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been identified as one compound responsible for this activity. Other antibacterial compounds are monounsaturated fatty acid (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid; C16:1 n-7) and the relatively unusual polyunsaturated fatty acid (6Z, 9Z, 12Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA; C16:3 n-4). Both are active against Gram-positive bacteria and many Gram-negative pathogen. Palmitoleic acid is active at micro-molar concentrations, kills bacteria rapidly, and is highly active against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Domoic acid -a neurotoxin produced by Pseudo-nitzschia accumulates in marine invertebrates. Evidences of sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and human poisoning following consumption of contaminated blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) is mainly due to this toxin. Among the most prominent features described in human beings was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Silicon utilizing organisms can act as a bioindicator of environmental contamination, thus a rapid change in phytochelatins to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress was found in Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii. Some of them also can produce biofuels particularly diatoms have significant

  5. InGaAlAsPN: A Materials System for Silicon Based Optoelectronics and Heterostructure Device Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekaert, T. P. E.; Tang, S.; Wallace, R. M.; Beam, E. A., III; Duncan, W. M.; Kao, Y. -C.; Liu, H. -Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new material system is proposed for silicon based opto-electronic and heterostructure devices; the silicon lattice matched compositions of the (In,Ga,Al)-(As,P)N 3-5 compounds. In this nitride alloy material system, the bandgap is expected to be direct at the silicon lattice matched compositions with a bandgap range most likely to be in the infrared to visible. At lattice constants ranging between those of silicon carbide and silicon, a wider bandgap range is expected to be available and the high quality material obtained through lattice matching could enable applications such as monolithic color displays, high efficiency multi-junction solar cells, opto-electronic integrated circuits for fiber communications, and the transfer of existing 3-5 technology to silicon.

  6. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  7. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  8. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  9. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  10. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  11. Micromachined Silicon Waveguide Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Rectangular waveguides are commonly used as circuit elements in remote-sensing heterodyne receivers at millimeter wavelengths. The advantages of waveguides are low loss and mechanical tunability. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguide components operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. Waveguides micromachined from silicon however would have several important advantages including low-cost; small size for very high frequency (submillimeter wave) operation; high dimensional accuracy (important for high-Q circuits); atomically smooth walls, thereby reducing rf losses; and the ability to integrate active and passive devices directly in the waveguide on thin membranes, thereby solving the traditional problem of mounting thin substrates.

  12. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  13. Silicon Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A dual stage process of depositing bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and coating Si using Radio frequency sputtering (RFS) technique. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron field emission studies (EFE). SEM results suggest a dense network of homogeneous silicon-coated BCNTs. From the comprehensive analysis of the results provided by these techniques emerges the picture of Si encapsulated BCNTs. PMID:20652067

  14. Silicon material task review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Silicon Material Task are to evaluate technologies, new and old; to develop the most promising technologies; to establish practicality of the processes to meet production, energy use, and economic criteria; and to develop an information base on impurities in polysilicon and to determine their effects on solar cell performance. The approach involves determining process feasibility, setting milestones for the forced selection of the processes, and establishing the technical readiness of the integrated process.

  15. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  16. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  17. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  18. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  19. Selective Response of Mesoporous Silicon to Adsorbants with Nitro Groups

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, John A.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Sushko, Petr V.; Boyko, Teak D.; Levitsky, Igor A.; Moewes, Alexander

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate that the electronic structure of mesoporous silicon is affected by adsorption of nitrobased explosive molecules in a compound-selective manner. This selective response is demonstrated by probing the adsorption of two nitro-based molecular explosives (trinitrotoluene and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) and a nonexplosive nitro-based aromatic molecule (nitrotoluene) on mesoporous silicon using soft X-ray spectroscopy. The Si atoms strongly interact with adsorbed molecules to form Si-O and Si-N bonds, as evident from the large shifts in emission energy present in the Si L2,3 X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements. Furthermore, we find that the energy gap (band gap) of mesoporous silicon changes depending on the adsorbant, as estimated from the Si L2,3 XES and 2p X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Our ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of model compounds suggest that these changes are due to spontaneous breaking of the nitro groups upon contacting surface Si atoms. This compound-selective change in electronic structure may provide a powerful tool for the detection and identification of trace quantities of airborne explosive molecules.

  20. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  1. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  2. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  3. Recent developments in silicon calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1990-11-01

    We present a survey of some of the recent calorimeter applications of silicon detectors. The numerous attractive features of silicon detectors are summarized, with an emphasis on those aspects important to calorimetry. Several of the uses of this technology are summarized and referenced. We consider applications for electromagnetic calorimetry, hadronic calorimetry, and proposals for the SSC.

  4. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  5. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  6. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  7. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  8. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. V.; Cleland, J. W.; Westbrook, R. D.; Davis, H. L.; Wood, R. F.; Lindmayer, J.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The economic production of silicon solar cell arrays circumvents p-n junction degradation by nuclear doping, in which the Si-30 transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron capture. Also considered are chemical purity specifications for improved silicon bulk states, surface induced states, and surface states.

  9. Silicon supply modifies C:N:P stoichiometry and growth of Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Schaller, J; Brackhage, C; Gessner, M O; Bäuker, E; Gert Dudel, E

    2012-03-01

    Silicon is a non-essential element for plant growth. Nevertheless, it affects plant stress resistance and in some plants, such as grasses, it may substitute carbon (C) compounds in cell walls, thereby influencing C allocation patterns and biomass production. How variation in silicon supply over a narrow range affects nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake by plants has also been investigated in some detail. However, little is known about effects on the stoichiometric relationships between C, N and P when silicon supply varies over a broader range. Here, we assessed the effect of silicon on aboveground biomass production and C:N:P stoichiometry of common reed, Phragmites australis, in a pot experiment in which three widely differing levels of silicon were supplied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that elevated silicon supply promoted silica deposition in the epidermis of Phragmites leaves. This resulted in altered N:P ratios, whereas C:N ratios changed only slightly. Plant growth was slightly (but not significantly) enhanced at intermediate silicon supply levels but significantly decreased at high levels. These findings point to the potential of silicon to impact plant growth and elemental stoichiometry and, by extension, to affect biogeochemical cycles in ecosystems dominated by Phragmites and other grasses and sedges.

  10. SILICON CARBIDE JOINING. FINAL TOPICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    Future energy systems will be required to fire lower-grade fuels and meet higher energy conversion efficiencies than today's systems. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum temperature of 550 C because above that, the stainless steel tubes deform and corrode excessively. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required. Although high-temperature alloys will suffice for the construction of these components in the near term, the greatest efficiency increases can be reached only with the use of advanced structural ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC). However, SiC does not melt, but instead sublimes at temperatures over 2000 C. Therefore, it is not possible to join pieces of it through welding, and most brazing compounds have much lower melting points, so the joints lose strength at temperatures much lower than the maximum use temperature of the SiC. Since larger objects such as heat exchangers cannot be easily created from smaller ceramic pieces, the size of the SiC structures that can presently be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha SiC). In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field-joining techniques. Some success has been had by causing silicon and carbon to react at 1400--1500 C to form SiC in a joint (Rabin, 1995), but these joints contain continuous channels of unreacted silicon, which cause the joints to corrode and creep excessively at temperatures below 1260 C (Breder and Parten, 1996). The objective of this work conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop a patentable technique for joining large SiC structures in the field. The key to developing a successful technique will be the use of reactive joining compounds to lower the joining temperature without leaving continuous channels of unreacted compounds that can weaken the joint at temperatures below 1260 C or serve as conduits for

  11. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  12. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Curreri, Alexis T.; Taylor, Gina A.; Burris, Katy

    2016-01-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled “practitioners” not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors’ medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  13. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Curreri, Alexis T; Taylor, Gina A; Burris, Katy

    2016-05-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled "practitioners" not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors' medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  14. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  15. Multimode Silicon Nanowire Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 104 is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 107 whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  16. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis was continued for the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) in which solar cell silicon is produced in a 1,000 MT/yr plant. Progress and status are reported for the primary engineering activities involved in the preliminary process engineering design of the plant base case conditions (96%), reaction chemistry (96%), process flow diagram (85%), material balance (85%), energy balance (60%), property data (60%), equipment design (40%), major equipment list (30%) and labor requirements (10%). Engineering design of the second distillation column (D-02, TCS column) in the process was completed. The design is based on a 97% recovery of the light key (TCS, trichlorosilane) in the distillate and a 97% recovery of the heavy key (TET, silicon tetrachloride) in the bottoms. At a reflux ratio of 2, the specified recovery of TCS and TET is achieved with 20 trays (equilibrium stages, N=20). Respective feed tray locations are 9, 12 and 15 (NF sub 1 = 9, NF sub 2 = 12,, and NF sub 3 = 15). A total condenser is used for the distillation which is conducted at a pressure of 90 psia.

  17. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  18. Multimode silicon nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Sebastian; Zeiner, Clemens; Periwal, Priyanka; Baron, Thierry; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-11-12

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(4) is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(7) whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  19. Silicon nanowire Esaki diodes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Heinz; Bessire, Cedric; Björk, Mikael T; Schenk, Andreas; Riel, Heike

    2012-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire tunnel diodes. The silicon nanowires were grown on p-type Si substrates using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth and in situ n-type doping. Electrical measurements reveal Esaki diode characteristics with peak current densities of 3.6 kA/cm(2), peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 4.3, and reverse current densities of up to 300 kA/cm(2) at 0.5 V reverse bias. Strain-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a decrease of the peak tunnel current with uniaxial tensile stress and an increase of 48% for 1.3 GPa compressive stress along the <111> growth direction, revealing the strain dependence of the Si band structure and thus the tunnel barrier. The contributions of phonons to the indirect tunneling process were probed by conductance measurements at 4.2 K. These measurements show phonon peaks at energies corresponding to the transverse acoustical and transverse optical phonons. In addition, the low-temperature conductance measurements were extended to higher biases to identify potential impurity states in the band gap. The results demonstrate that the most likely impurity, namely, Au from the catalyst particle, is not detectable, a finding that is also supported by the excellent device properties of the Esaki diodes reported here.

  20. Friction, wear, and thermal stability studies of some organotin and organosilicon compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal decomposition temperatures were determined for a number of organotin and organosilicon compounds. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used to determine the friction and wear characteristics of two representative compounds, (1) 3-tri-n-butylstannyl (diphenyl) and (2) 3-tri-n-butylsilyl (diphenyl). Friction and wear test conditions included a 1-kg load, 25 to 225 C disk temperatures, and a dry air atmosphere. The tin and silicon compounds yielded friction and wear results either lower than or similar to those obtained with a polyphenyl ether and a C-ether. The maximum thermal decomposition temperatures obtained in the silicon and tin series were 358 and 297 C, respectively. Increasing the steric hindrance around the silicon or tin atoms increased the thermal stability. Future work with these compounds will emphasize their use as antiwear additives rather than base fluids.

  1. Evaluation of a compound eye type tactile endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Sasaki, Nagisa; Takeda, Maki; Shimizu, Sachiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Ohno, Yuko

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for endoscope become widely used, for example, laparoscopic operation, NOTES (Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery), robotic surgery and so on. There are so many demand and needs for endoscopic diagnosis. Especially, palpation is most important diagnosis on any surgery. However, conventional endoscopic system has no tactile sensibility. There are many studies about tactile sensor for medical application. These sensors can measure object at a point. It is necessary to sense in areas for palpation. To overcome this problem, we propose compound eye type tactile endoscope. The proposed system consists of TOMBO (Thin Observation Module by Bound Optics) and clear silicon rubber. Our proposed system can estimate hardness of target object by measuring deformation of a projected pattern on the silicon rubber. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the proposed system. At first, we introduce approximated models of the silicone and the object. We formulate the stiffness of object, the deformation of silicone, and the whole object. We investigate the accuracy of measured silicone's lower surface for deformation of silicone by prototype system. Finally, we evaluate the calculated stiffness of the soft object.

  2. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  3. Compounding in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Gryzodub, Oleksandr I; Schnatz, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding in modern Ukraine has a rich history and goes back to ancient times. Today in the Ukraine, there is a revival of compounding practice, the opening of private compounding pharmacies, updating of legislative framework and requirements of the State Pharmacopeia of Ukraine for compounding preparations, and the introduction of Good Pharmaceutical Practice. PMID:23696172

  4. Retention Indices for Frequently Reported Compounds of Plant Essential Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushok, V. I.; Linstrom, P. J.; Zenkevich, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Gas chromatographic retention indices were evaluated for 505 frequently reported plant essential oil components using a large retention index database. Retention data are presented for three types of commonly used stationary phases: dimethyl silicone (nonpolar), dimethyl silicone with 5% phenyl groups (slightly polar), and polyethylene glycol (polar) stationary phases. The evaluations are based on the treatment of multiple measurements with the number of data records ranging from about 5 to 800 per compound. Data analysis was limited to temperature programmed conditions. The data reported include the average and median values of retention index with standard deviations and confidence intervals.

  5. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  6. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  7. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  8. Silicene: silicon conquers the 2D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    We live in the digital age based on the silicon chip and driven by Moore's law. Last July, IBM created a surprise by announcing the fabrication of a 7 nm test chip with functional transistors using, instead of just silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy. Will silicon be dethroned?

  9. Ceramic for Silicon-Shaping Dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekercioglu, I.; Wills, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon beryllium oxynitride (SiBON) is a promising candidate material for manufacture of shaping dies used in fabricating ribbons or sheets of silicon. It is extremely stable, resists thermal shock, and has excellent resistance to molten silicon. SiBON is a solid solution of beryllium silicate in beta-silicon nitride.

  10. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  11. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  12. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  13. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  14. Silicon: Child and Progenitor of Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, R. W.

    Antoine Lavoisier, the pioneering French chemist who (together with Joseph Priestley in England) identified oxygen as an element and gave it its name, in 1789 concluded that quartz was probably a compound with an as-yet undiscovered but presumably extremely common element. That was also the year in which the French Revolution broke out. Five years later, the Jacobins accused Lavoisier of offences against the people and cut off his head, thereby nearly cutting off the new chemistry. It was not until 1824 that Jöns Berzelius in Sweden succeeded in confirming Lavoisier's speculation by isolating silicon. Argument at once broke out among the scientific elite as to whether the newly found element was a metal or an insulator. It took more than a century to settle that disagreement decisively: As so often, when all-or-nothing alternatives are fiercely argued, the truth turned out to be neither all nor nothing.

  15. Pharmacy compounding urban legends.

    PubMed

    Kastango, Eric S

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews and clarifies a small sampling of the myths, or urban legends, about compounding. Included are comments on United sTates Pharmacopeia Chapter 797, environmental issues related to sterile compounding, and suggested resources for clarification of some of these myths. This article recommends a knowledge-based partnership between compounding pharmacists and pharmaceutical manufacturers to improve compounding activities and quality assurance methods to ensure that compounded medications are safe.

  16. Phytodegradation of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lee A; Reynolds, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    The phytodegradation of organic compounds can take place inside the plant or within the rhizosphere of the plant. Many different compounds and classes of compounds can be removed from the environment by this method, including solvents in groundwater, petroleum and aromatic compounds in soils, and volatile compounds in the air. Although still a relatively new area of research, there are many laboratories studying the underlying science necessary for a wide range of applications for plant-based remediation of organic contaminants.

  17. Reactions of Persistent Carbenes with Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Mavros, Michael G; Queeney, K T; Wu, Tony; Voorhis, Troy Van; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-07-13

    Surface passivation has enabled the development of silicon-based solar cells and microelectronics. However, a number of emerging applications require a paradigm shift from passivation to functionalization, wherein surface functionality is installed proximal to the silicon surface. To address this need, we report here the use of persistent aminocarbenes to functionalize hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces via Si-H insertion reactions. Through the use of model compounds (H-Si(TMS)3 and H-Si(OTMS)3), nanoparticles (H-SiNPs), and planar Si(111) wafers (H-Si(111)), we demonstrate that among different classes of persistent carbenes, the more electrophilic and nucleophilic ones, in particular, a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC) and an acyclic diaminocarbene (ADAC), are able to undergo insertion into Si-H bonds at the silicon surface, forming persistent C-Si linkages and simultaneously installing amine or aminal functionality in proximity to the surface. The CAAC (6) is particularly notable for its clean insertion reactivity under mild conditions that produces monolayers with 21 ± 3% coverage of Si(111) atop sites, commensurate with the expected maximum of ∼20%. Atomic force and transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron, and infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry provided evidence for the surface Si-H insertion process. Furthermore, computational studies shed light on the reaction energetics and indicated that CAAC 6 should be particularly effective at binding to silicon dihydride, trihydride, and coupled monohyride motifs, as well as oxidized surface sites. Our results pave the way for the further development of persistent carbenes as universal ligands for silicon and potentially other nonmetallic substrates. PMID:27366818

  18. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  19. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  20. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  1. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C. (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fluidized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of porous silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daeyoon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Moon, Taeho; Sohn, Honglae

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of porous silicon nanowires through the metalassisted chemical etching of porous silicon in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of porous silicon nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The etch rate of the porous silicon nanowires was faster than that of silicon nanowires, but slower than that of porous silicon. The porous silicon nanowires distributed uniformly on the entire porous silicon layer and the tips of the porous silicon nanowires congregated together. The single crystalline and sponge-like porous structure with the pore diameters of less than 5 nm was confirmed for the porous silicon nanowires. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  4. The ISOLDE Silicon Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Fraile, L.M.

    2003-09-16

    The investigation of weakly bound nuclei close to the particle driplines makes necessary the development of new spectroscopy devices with the capability of detecting charged particles and precisely determining their energy, angular distribution and nature. With this aim the ISOLDE Silicon Ball is under construction. It is a charged particle spectroscopy device with the requirements of high geometrical efficiency and broad energy range coverage, designed for the investigation of the exotic nuclei produced at ISOLDE and at other similar facilities. In order to allow for particle identification the simultaneous use of the Time of Flight (TOF) and Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques is intended. Recoil tagging capabilities, suitable for transfer reactions to be performed at REX-ISOLDE, should be foreseen for a future development. The design and realization of the first prototype, together with the first tests are reported.

  5. Silicon tracker data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Large particle physics experiments are making increasing technological demands on the design and implementation of real-time data acquisition systems. The LHC will have bunch crossing intervals of 25 nanoseconds and detectors, such as CMS, will contain over 10 million electronic channels. Readout systems will need to cope with 100 kHz rates of 1 MByte-sized events. Over 70% of this voluminous flow will stem from silicon tracker and MSGC devices. This paper describes the techniques currently being harnessed from ASIC devices through to modular microprocessor-based architectures around standards such as VMEbus and PCI. In particular, the experiences gained at the HERA H1 experiment are highlighted where many of the key technological concepts have already been im implemented.

  6. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) for producing silicon from dichlorosilane in a 1,000 MT/yr plant was continued. Progress and status for the chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process are reported for the primary process design engineering activities: base case conditions (85%), reaction chemistry (85%), process flow diagram (60%), material balance (60%), energy balance (30%), property data (30%), equipment design (20%) and major equipment list (10%). Engineering design of the initial distillation column (D-01, stripper column) in the process was initiated. The function of the distillation column is to remove volatile gases (such as hydrogen and nitrogen) which are dissolved in liquid chlorosilanes. Initial specifications and results for the distillation column design are reported including the variation of tray requirements (equilibrium stages) with reflux ratio for the distillation.

  7. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  8. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  9. Silicone plesiotherapy molds

    SciTech Connect

    Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

    1983-04-01

    Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

  10. Thick film silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Jewett, D. N.; Mlavsky, A. I.; White, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    One inch wide silicon ribbons up to 14 inches long have been produced from graphite dies. Several different techniques have been employed to improve the semiconductor purity of silicon. This has resulted in a general increase in quality although the techniques involved have not been optimized. The power factor of uncoated ribbon solar cells produced for material evaluation has increased to approximately 75% of those evaluation cells made from commercial silicon. The present limitation is believed due to low lifetime. Additional work has continued with new die materials; however, only composite dies of SiO2 and C show significant potential at this time.

  11. Three-dimensional silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, S.; Song, J.; Dang, Z. Y.; Liang, H. D.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2012-11-01

    A process for fabricating arbitrary-shaped, two- and three-dimensional silicon and porous silicon components has been developed, based on high-energy ion irradiation, such as 250 keV to 1 MeV protons and helium. Irradiation alters the hole current flow during subsequent electrochemical anodization, allowing the anodization rate to be slowed or stopped for low/high fluences. For moderate fluences the anodization rate is selectively stopped only at depths corresponding to the high defect density at the end of ion range, allowing true three-dimensional silicon machining. The use of this process in fields including optics, photonics, holography and nanoscale depth machining is reviewed.

  12. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  13. Investigations of silicon nitride films for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elmiger, J.R.; Kunst, M.

    1996-12-31

    Silicon nitride films on crystalline silicon were deposited in a low-temperature (<400 C) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition process. The deposition process is monitored with in situ Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity measurements leading to an on-line quality control of the deposited films. It is shown that at the start of the deposition there is a strong decrease of the lifetime of the measured transient signal due to plasma induced damage at the silicon surface. Afterwards an increase of the lifetime is observed due to passivation of the interface. For thin films (<30 nm), the lifetime and the film composition depend on the film thickness. Furthermore, the film composition has a strong impact on the passivation of thick (100 nm) silicon nitride films. The best passivation is obtained for almost stoichiometric films characterized by a refractive index of 1.95.

  14. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  15. Composition, process, and apparatus, for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.

    1991-10-15

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4"y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  16. Process for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.

    1992-03-10

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value of from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  17. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  18. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  19. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  20. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  1. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  2. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  3. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent.

  4. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  5. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  6. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  7. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5. PMID:27447839

  8. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5.

  9. Effect of organo-clay on actuation response of silicone rubber actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavi, N.; Razzaghi Kashani, M.; Moradi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are light weight, low-cost, and highly deformable smart materials widely in used as sensors and actuators. Compounding of silicone rubber with various fillers can enhance efficiency of smart materials. Effect of organically modified Montmorillonite (OMMT) nanoclay on improvement of dielectric properties and actuation stress was considered in this study. Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber was compound with 2% and 5% of OMMT by solution method and a composite film was cast. Dielectric measurements show enhancement of both dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss in these composites. Actuation stress for different composites was measured by using an in-house actuation set-up, which showed that actuation stress for a given electric field intensity is higher for composites than that for pristine silicone rubber. Furthermore, time dependent actuation response of the samples was evaluated. Dielectric properties of the composites were measured under AC electric fields, and results were compared with the reference silicone rubbers with no filler. Results shows increase in both storage and loss dielectric constants of base silicone rubber when it is compounded with OMMT.

  10. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  11. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  12. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  13. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  14. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  15. Single Crystal Silicon Instrument Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, Vince

    2007-01-01

    The goals for the fabrication of single crystal silicon instrument mirrors include the following: 1) Develop a process for fabricating lightweight mirrors from single crystal silicon (SCS); 2) Modest lightweighting: 3X to 4X less than equivalent solid mirror; 3) High surface quality, better than lambda/40 RMS @ 633nm; 4) Significantly less expensive than current technology; and 5) Negligible distortion when cooled to cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  17. Annealing of silicon optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; McMillen, C.; Singh, R.; Podila, R.; Rao, A. M.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Morris, S.; Rice, R.; Poole, K. F.; Zhu, L.; Ballato, J.

    2011-11-01

    The recent realization of silicon core optical fibers has the potential for novel low insertion loss rack-to-rack optical interconnects and a number of other uses in sensing and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photothermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination of the silicon core showed a considerable enhancement in the length and amount of single crystallinity post-annealing. Further, shifts in the Raman frequency of the silicon in the optical fiber core that were present in the as-drawn fibers were removed following the RPP treatment. Such results indicate that the RPP treatment increases the local crystallinity and therefore assists in the reduction of the local stresses in the core, leading to more homogenous fibers. The dark current-voltage characteristics of annealed silicon optical fiber diodes showed lower leakage current than the diodes based on as-drawn fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers.

  18. Synchrotron powder diffraction of silicon: high-quality structure factors and electron density.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse; Becker, Jacob; Dippel, Ann Christin; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is an ideal compound to test the current state of experimental structure factors and corresponding electron densities. High-quality structure factors have been measured on crystalline silicon with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. They are in excellent agreement with benchmark Pendellösung data having comparable accuracy and precision, but acquired in far less time and to a much higher resolution (sin θ/λ < 1.7 Å(-1)). The extended data range permits an experimental modelling of not only the valence electron density but also the core deformation in silicon, establishing an increase of the core density upon bond formation in crystalline silicon. Furthermore, a physically sound procedure for evaluating the standard deviation of powder-derived structure factors has been applied. Sampling statistics inherently account for contributions from photon counts as well as the limited number of diffracting particles, where especially the latter are particularly difficult to handle. PMID:26697864

  19. Distribution and Chemical State of Cu-rich Clusters in Silicon: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, T.; Marcus, M. A.; Istratov, A. A.; Heuer, M.; Ciszek, T. F.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Weber, E. R.

    2004-08-01

    the chemical state and distribution of Cu-rich clusters were determined in four different silicon-based materials with varying contamination pathways and degrees of oxygen concentration, including as-grown multicrystalline silicon. In all four samples, Cu3Si was the only chemical state observed. Cu3Si clusters were observed at structural defects within all four materials; XBIC measurements revealed that the presence of Cu3Si corresponds to increased recombination activity. Oxidized Cu compounds are not likely to form in silicon. The +1 eV edge shift in the -XAS absorption spectrum of Cu3Si relative to Cu metal is believed to be an indication of a degree of covalent bonding between Cu atoms and their silicon neighbors.

  20. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  1. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  2. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  3. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  4. Supercritical carbon dioxide assisted silicon based finishing of cellulosic fabric: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amina L; Er-Rafik, Meriem; Moller, Martin

    2013-10-15

    Usage of supercritical carbon dioxide as a medium for finishing cotton fabrics with modified dimethylsiloxane polymers terminated with silanol groups was investigated, different cross-linkers namely 3-isocyanatepropyltriethoxysilane (IPES) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) were used for covalently bonding between silicon and cellulose. The presence and the amount of PDMS compounds on the treated fabrics were characterized by FT-IR. Qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution of the silicon molecules across the fibre cross section was provided by SEM/EDX analysis and Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) respectively. The results confirm that all fibres treated with PDMS and IPES have larger silicon amounts than those treated with TEOS. SC-CO2 medium provides good coating of cotton surface with a 3D network of DMS compound and cross linker, and leads to forming highest DMS concentration in a layer between 1 and 2μ under the surface of cotton fabrics.

  5. Regulating compounding pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    (1) The Pew Charitable Trusts identified 27 compounding incidents that resulted in 89 deaths since 2001. (2) Unlike drug manufacturers, compounding pharmacies are generally not required to report adverse events associated with their products to the FDA. (3) Federal law on drug compounding was updated in 2013 to create a new group of compounders called "outsourcing facilities." Over 50 facilities in 23 states are now registered with the FDA.

  6. High resolution solid-state 29Si NMR spectroscopy of silicone gels used to fill breast prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dorne, L; Alikacem, N; Guidoin, R; Auger, M

    1995-10-01

    We have used 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the chemical structure of the silicone gels in virgin and explanted breast prostheses. Despite evidences of alteration in the morphological appearance of the silicone gel inside the breast prosthesis, our results do not reveal changes in the chemical nature and structure of the silicone gels after implantation. In addition to the main 29Si resonance peak at -22.26 ppm that corresponds to the resonance frequency of the D repeat unit of the polysiloxane chains, the high sensitivity of our NMR technique allows the detection of very low concentrations of silicone compounds. Within our experimental detection limit of 0.2%, no signal between -90 ppm and -150 ppm are observed. This indicates that no silica products are present inside the gel of the prostheses. Furthermore, our 29Si NMR spectra indicate differences in the chemical compositions of the silicone gels from different manufacturers.

  7. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  8. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  9. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  10. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  11. Transferring resist microlenses into silicon by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Martin; Schwider, Johannes

    1996-10-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is known as an effective technique for high precision anisotropic etching with a minimum loss of the critical dimensions provided by the photoresist or other masking materials. RIE can also be used to transfer continuous forms such as spherical resist microlenses into substrate materials (e.g., quartz glass or silicon). The form of the lenses can be considerably controlled by changing the etch rate ratio between resist and the substrate. This was achieved by varying the etch gas compound, especially the amount of oxygen, during the etching or by changing the applied power. Measured etch rates for silicon are given to demonstrate the possibilities of lens shaping. The surface roughness of the etched lenses was one of the main problems. The roughness could be minimized by adding helium to the etch gases for heat removal and by increasing the resist rinse time after the wet chemical development.

  12. Method of enhancing the electronic properties of an undoped and/or N-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    The dark conductivity and photoconductivity of an N-type and/or undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer fabricated by an AC or DC proximity glow discharge in silane can be increased through the incorporation of argon in an amount from 10 to about 90 percent by volume of the glow discharge atmosphere which contains a silicon-hydrogen containing compound in an amount of from about 90 to about 10 volume percent.

  13. Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Seals for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Miller, Sharon K. R.; Smith, Ian M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber seals are being considered for a number of interfaces on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Some of these joints include the docking system, hatches, and heat shield-to-back shell interface. A large diameter molded silicone seal is being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) that forms an effective seal between the CEV and International Space Station (ISS) and other future Constellation Program spacecraft. Seals between the heat shield and back shell prevent high temperature reentry gases from leaking into the interface. Silicone rubber seals being considered for these locations have inherent adhesive tendencies that would result in excessive forces required to separate the joints if left unchecked. This paper summarizes adhesion assessments for both as-received and adhesion-mitigated seals for the docking system and the heat shield interface location. Three silicone elastomers were examined: Parker Hannifin S0899-50 and S0383-70 compounds, and Esterline ELA-SA-401 compound. For the docking system application various levels of exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) were evaluated. Moderate AO treatments did not lower the adhesive properties of S0899-50 sufficiently. However, AO pretreatments of approximately 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm did lower the adhesion of S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 to acceptable levels. For the heat shield-to-back shell interface application, a fabric covering was also considered. Molding Nomex fabric into the heat shield pressure seal appreciably reduced seal adhesion for the heat shield-to-back shell interface application.

  14. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  15. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  16. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  17. Channelized Optical Waveguides On Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, F. S.; Seaton, C. T.

    1987-02-01

    Silicon provides a natural substrate base for the development of channel waveguides and their integration with optoelectronic components. Using epitaxial growth, selective doping, and plasma etching, channel waveguides can be fabricated using single crystal silicon alone. Oxide layers of low optical index are readily formed by thermal means on silicon to provide a base upon which low-loss film waveguides can be formed by ion exchange and implantation, chemical vapor deposition, and physical vapor deposition. Thermally oxidized and nitrided layers provide a simple means for developing waveguides. The channel shape for ridge waveguides can be delineated by chemical etching and ion milling techniques. The anisotropic etch characteristics of silicon provide a natural channel for imbedding waveguides using organic and inorganic materials. This paper will review common semiconductor processing techniques used for the formation of channel waveguides on silicon and the performance results obtained to date. The use of channel waveguides for specific device developments will be described and the most promising areas for future development will be addressed.

  18. Effect of reinforcing grade silicon dioxide on the properties of a silicone elastomer and its cellular silicone

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, W.E.; Jessop, E.S.; Buckner, A.T.

    1980-11-24

    The addition of reinforcing silicon dioxide to silicone gum has a significant effect on the properties of the elastomer and the cellular silicone cushion made from the elastomer. As the amount of silicon dioxide increases, the hardness, density, and tensile strength of the elastomer increase. Ultimate elongation is less sensitive to the filler content. In the cushion, the stiffness and compression set increase as the filler content increases, but the resiliency of the cushion decreases.

  19. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  20. The interaction of molten silicon with silicon aluminum oxynitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wills, R. R.; Sekercioglu, I.; Niesz, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon aluminum oxynitride solid solutions (sialons) based on beta-Si3N4 and Si2N2O behave differently in contact with molten silicon. The Si2N2O-based sialons convert to almost pure Si3N4, apparently through a two-step decomposition and solution-precipitation reaction, whereas the beta-Si3N4 sialons are preferentially attacked at the grain boundaries. The composition of the grain-boundary phase appears to control the rate of reaction.

  1. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  2. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  3. Silicone rubber selection for passive sampling of pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Margoum, C; Randon, J; Coquery, M

    2016-11-01

    Silicone rubber can extract organic compounds with a broad range of polarities (logKow>2-3) from aqueous samples. Such compounds include substances of major concern in the protection of aquatic ecosystems and human health, e.g. pesticides. Silicone rubbers (SRs) with various characteristics have been successfully used in sorptive methods for water sample extraction in the laboratory (SPME, SBSE), and for passive sampling in aquatic environments. However, only few studies have evaluated variability in organic compound sorption due to the origin of SRs, particularly for pesticides. The aim of this study was to select an SR for the extraction of pesticides from water samples by passive sampling. To this end we measured the impact of seven SR formulations on sorption capacity, defined by the partition coefficient (Ksw). Kinetic experiments and sorption isotherms were performed to determine extraction recovery as a selection criterion for SRs, and pesticide partition coefficients. Very large differences in affinity for pesticides were found between two kinds of SRs: "Polymerized SR kits" and "Manufactured SRs". One SR was chosen among the "Manufactured SRs", and the Ksw values of 21 pesticides were determined, filling a gap in the literature (1.50

  4. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  5. A New Process for Fabricating Random Silicon Nanotips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish

    2004-01-01

    An improved process for the fabrication of random arrays of silicon nanotips has been demonstrated to be feasible. Relative to other such processes, this process offers advantages of low cost and simplicity. Moreover, this process can readily be combined with other processes used to fabricate integrated circuits and other monolithic silicon structures. Arrays of silicon nanotips are subjects of research and development efforts directed toward utilizing them as field emitters in flat-panel displays, vacuum microelectronics, and microwave devices. Other silicon-nanotip-fabrication processes developed thus far predominantly include lithography, etching, and/or elaborate deposition steps followed by oxide sharpening steps and are both process intensive as well as expensive. In addition to being cheaper and simpler, the present process can efficiently produce silicon nanotips that range in height from a few microns to several tens of microns and are distributed over large areas. The process mentioned here can be summarized as consisting of (1) the growth of micro-etch masks on a silicon substrate, followed by (2) etching away of the masks, along with some of the substrate, to make an array of sharp tips. In the first step of the process, a cleaned silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching (RIE) in a certain mixture of oxygen and carbon tetrafluoride under radio-frequency excitation. This process step results in the growth of fluorine based compounds in the form of stumps randomly distributed on the substrate. These stumps are known in the art as polymer RIE grass. The dimensions of these stumps are of the order of hundreds of nanometers, the exact values depending on process time and gas composition. The areal density of the stumps decreases with increasing process time as they grow and merge with neighboring stumps. These stumps constitute the micro-etch masks for the next step of the process. In the second step of the process, the substrate covered with

  6. Analysis of silicon stress/strain relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, O.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for work on stress-strain relationships in silicon ribbon. Calculations of stress fields, dislocation desities, and buckling were made; uniaxial tensile tests were made on silicon at 1150 C; and dislocation motion studies were performed.

  7. 22. 8% efficient silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Blakers, A.W.; Wang, A.; Milne, A.M.; Zhao, J.; Green, M.A. )

    1989-09-25

    A new silicon solar cell structure, the passivated emitter and rear cell, is described. The cell structure has yielded independently confirmed efficiencies of up to 22.8%, the highest ever reported for a silicon cell.

  8. Solid structures with bioorganic films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutov, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    The electrophysical parameters of ovalbumin/silicon and propolis/silicon heterostructures are studied using impedance spectroscopy and high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics under water vapor sorption conditions.

  9. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  10. A continuous silicon-coating facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butter, C.; Heaps, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Automatic continuous silicon-coating facility is used to process 100 by 10 cm graphite-coated ceramic substrates for silicon solar cells. Process reduces contamination associated with conventional dip-coating processes, improving material service life.

  11. Features of compound multiplicity in heavy-ion interactions at 4. 5 A GeV/ c

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, T.; Irfan, M. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper mainly deals with some important features of compound multiplicity in the inelastic nuclear reactions induced by 4.5{ital A} GeV/{ital c} carbon and silicon ions in nuclear emulsion. The characteristics of this parameter observed in the present study are compared with the corresponding values obtained for proton-emulsion interactions at the same incident momentum per nucleon. The average compound multiplicity is found to vary linearly with black and heavy particle multiplicities. Finally, the compound multiplicity distributions for carbon- and silicon-emulsion interactions are observed to obey a Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) type of scaling law.

  12. Microdistribution of oxygen in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgai, A.; Chi, J. Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The microdistribution of oxygen in Czochralskii-grown, p-type silicon crystals was determined by using the SEM in the EBIC mode in conjunction with spreading resistance measurements. When the conductivity remained p-type, bands of contrast were observed in the EBIC image which corresponded to maxima in resistivity. When at the oxygen concentration maxima the oxygen donor concentration exceeded the p-type dopant concentration, an inversion of the conductivity occurred. It resulted in the formation of p-n junctions in a striated configuration and the local inversion of the EBIC image contrast. By heat-treating silicon at 1000 C prior to the activation of oxygen donors, some silicon-oxygen micro-precipitates were observed in the EBIC image within the striated oxygen concentration maxima.

  13. Interfacing porous silicon with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Martin J.; Graney, Sean D.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    The control of protein binding into nanostructured porous surfaces is highly relevant to the development of advanced biosensors and other biodevices. Here, an investigation of the covalent immobilisation of a model protein (albumin) onto porous silicon (pSi) films was conducted using a new alkene linker, the synthesis of which was developed. This alkene linker contained both hydrophobic and hydrophilic (oligoethylene glycol) sections and terminated in a protected thiol. The alkene was attached to freshly etched porous silicon via thermal hydrosilylation, where further surface reactions resulted in the attachment of a maleimido N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) heterobifunctional crosslinker. Albumin was then covalently immobilised on the porous silicon layer through reaction of the protein's amine groups and the NHS functional group of the crosslinker. Surface modification reactions were monitored by infrared spectroscopy and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Protein binding was monitored by infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy.

  14. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  15. Direct band gap silicon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Xu, Bo; Sun, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Zhao, Zhisheng; Yu, Dongli; Fan, Changzeng; He, Julong

    2014-07-16

    Elemental silicon has a large impact on the economy of the modern world and is of fundamental importance in the technological field, particularly in solar cell industry. The great demand of society for new clean energy and the shortcomings of the current silicon solar cells are calling for new materials that can make full use of the solar power. In this paper, six metastable allotropes of silicon with direct or quasidirect band gaps of 0.39-1.25 eV are predicted by ab initio calculations at ambient pressure. Five of them possess band gaps within the optimal range for high converting efficiency from solar energy to electric power and also have better optical properties than the Si-I phase. These Si structures with different band gaps could be applied to multiple p-n junction photovoltaic modules.

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-01

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  17. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  18. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    SciTech Connect

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2014-06-03

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  19. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  20. Do silicone breast implants affect breastfeeding?

    PubMed Central

    Koren, G.; Ito, S.

    1998-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my patients has silicone breast implants. She gave birth to a healthy baby boy but is afraid to breastfeed because she read in a magazine that the baby might be affected by silicone secreted in the milk. How should I advise her? ANSWER: Neither silicone nor its components could be measured in the breast milk of women with silicone implants. Your patient should be able to breastfeed safely. PMID:9870113

  1. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOEpatents

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2013-05-28

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  2. Acute toxicities to larval rainbow trout of representative compounds detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes has ranked the potential hazard to fish and invertebrates of various chemical compounds detected in two Great Lakes fishes-- lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, and walleye, Stizostedion vitreum vitreum (Hesselberg and Seelye 1982). This hazard assessment has included the identification of the potential sources of the compounds, determination of the occurrence and abundance of the compounds in Great Lakes fish, and the determination of acute toxicities of representative compounds of 19 chemical classes (Passino and Smith 1987a). In further studies Smith et al. (1988) focused on 6 of the 19 classes of compounds using the zooplankter Daphnia pulex as the test organism. They ranked the six classes as follows (in decreasing order of toxicity): polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and silicon-containing compounds.

  3. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  4. Vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into silicon-on-insulator platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Eftekhar, Ali A; Sodagar, Majid; Xia, Zhixuan; Atabaki, Amir H; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into the silicon-on-insulator platform for applications at the telecommunication wavelengths. Low-loss silicon nitride films with a thickness of 400 nm are successfully grown, enabling compact silicon nitride microresonators with ultra-high intrinsic Qs (~ 6 × 10(6) for 60 μm radius and ~ 2 × 10(7) for 240 μm radius). The coupling between the silicon nitride microresonator and the underneath silicon waveguide is based on evanescent coupling with silicon dioxide as buffer. Selective coupling to a desired radial mode of the silicon nitride microresonator is also achievable using a pulley coupling scheme. In this work, a 60-μm-radius silicon nitride microresonator has been successfully integrated into the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing a single-mode operation with an intrinsic Q of 2 × 10(6).

  5. Ecotoxicology of organofluorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret B; Loi, Eva I H; Kwok, Karen Y; Lam, Paul K S

    2012-01-01

    Organofluorous compounds have been developed for myriad purposes in a variety of fields, including manufacturing, industry, agriculture, and medicine. The widespread use and application of these compounds has led to increasing concern about their potential ecological toxicity, particularly because of the stability of the C-F bond, which can result in chemical persistence in the environment. This chapter reviews the chemical properties and ecotoxicology of four groups of organofluorous compounds: fluorinated refrigerants and propellants, per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), fluorinated pesticides, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. These groups vary in their environmental fate and partitioning, but each raises concern in terms of ecological risk on both the regional and global scale, particularly those compounds with long environmental half-lives. Further research on the occurrence and toxicities of many of these compounds is needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their ecological effects.

  6. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  7. Lithium counterdoped silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I. (Inventor); Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The resistance to radiation damage of an n(+)p boron doped silicon solar cell is improved by lithium counterdoping. Even though lithium is an n-dopant in silicon, the lithium is introduced in small enough quantities so that the cell base remains p-type. The lithium is introduced into the solar cell wafer by implantation of lithium ions whose energy is about 50 keV. After this lithium implantation, the wafer is annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere at 375 C for two hours.

  8. The CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Cerri et al.

    2000-10-10

    Real time pattern recognition is becoming a key issue in many position sensitive detector applications. The CDF collaboration is building SVT: a specialized electronic device designed to perform real time track reconstruction using the silicon vertex detector (SVX II). This will strongly improve the CDF capability of triggering on events containing b quarks, usually characterized by the presence of a secondary vertex. SVT is designed to reconstruct in real time charged particles trajectories using data coming from the Silicon Vertex detector and the Central Outer Tracker drift chamber. The SVT architecture and algorithm have been specially tuned to minimize processing time without degrading parameter resolution.

  9. Experimental imaging of silicon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, M.; Castrucci, P.; Scarselli, M.; Diociaiuti, M.; Chaudhari, Prajakta S.; Balasubramanian, C.; Bhave, Tejashree M.; Bhoraskar, S. V.

    2005-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss near edge structures (EELNES) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to distinguish silicon nanotubes (SiNT) among the reaction products of a gas phase condensation synthesis. TEM images exhibit the tubular nature with a well-defined wall. The EELNES spectra performed on each single nanotube show that they are constituted by nonoxidized silicon atoms. STM images show that they have diameter ranging from 2 to 35 nm, have an atomic arrangement compatible with a puckered structure and different chiralities. Moreover, the I-V curves showed that SiNT can be semiconducting as well as metallic in character.

  10. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  11. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S.

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  12. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  13. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  14. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  15. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Alexandre P; Carpentier, Gabriel A; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates.

  16. Analysis of silicon transporters in turfgrass species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silicon is an abundant element on earth and is also known to be beneficial as an amendment in some crops such as rice. Despite its abundance in many soils, accumulation of silicon in plants is species-specific and can be widely different. It has been shown that the genes responsible for silicon upta...

  17. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  18. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  19. Closed-Loop Process Yields Ultrapure Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, J. C.; Moore, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    Metallurgical-grade silicon transforms into tribromosilane by reacting it with process byproducts. Tribromosilane is separated from mixture, purified, and finally decomposed in presence of hydrogen in silicon-product reactor. Conversion efficiencies of 30 to greater than 60 percent of tribromosilane to ultrapure granular polycrystalline silicon are typical in produce reactor.

  20. Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D.; Katz, Joel D.; Hurley, George F.

    1988-01-01

    A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

  1. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  2. Preventing Freezeup in Silicon Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B.

    1983-01-01

    Carefully-shaped heat conductor helps control thermal gradients crucial to growth of single-crystal silicon sheets for solar cells. Ends of die through which silicon sheet is drawn as ribbon from molten silicon. Profiled heat extractor prevents ribbon ends from solidifying prematurely and breaking.

  3. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  4. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Garneau, Alexandre P.; Carpentier, Gabriel A.; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F.; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J.; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates. PMID:26313002

  5. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing

    1997-01-01

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  6. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Alexandre P; Carpentier, Gabriel A; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates. PMID:26313002

  7. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces. PMID:27396288

  8. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces.

  9. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  10. Silicon microcantilevers as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayal, Babita

    This work focuses on the general use of microcantilever arrays for parallel detection of multiple analytes and understanding the mechanics behind it. The system employs an array of eight silicon micro cantilevers and has the capability of measuring cantilever deflection due to differential surface stress generated as well as frequency change due to added mass in both gaseous and liquid environments. In this work, we move beyond antibody-antigen binding systems and demonstrate that short peptides ligands can be used to efficiently capture Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis spores in liquids, given that specific peptides corresponding to the particular bacteria are synthesized. These peptide functionalized cantilever array can be stored under ambient conditions for days without loss of functionality, making then suitable for in-field use. A detailed experimental protocol, optimizing every step is presented. Applications of this technology can serve as a platform for the detection of pathogenic organisms including biowarfare agents. The dominant physical phenomena producing surface-stress during molecular binding are difficult to specify a priori. Differential surface stress generated due to adsorption of small molecules on gold coated cantilevers is measured to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the self-assembly process and into the origin of associated the surface stress. Our experiments indicate that the contribution from inter-molecular Lennard-Jones interactions and binding energy between the end group and the functionalized surface play a minimal role in the development of surface stress. Electrostatic repulsion between adsorbed species stress and Changes in the electronic structure of the underlying gold substrate play an important role in surface stress generation. To achieve higher sensitivity in the performance of cantilever sensors, optimized cantilevers of different dimensions are required. By adjusting cantilever dimensions, it is

  11. Nanoporous silicon nitride membranes fabricated from porous nanocrystalline silicon templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desormeaux, J. P. S.; Winans, J. D.; Wayson, S. E.; Gaborski, T. R.; Khire, T. S.; Striemer, C. C.; McGrath, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    The extraordinary permeability and manufacturability of ultrathin silicon-based membranes are enabling devices with improved performance and smaller sizes in such important areas as molecular filtration and sensing, cell culture, electroosmotic pumping, and hemodialysis. Because of the robust chemical and mechanical properties of silicon nitride (SiN), several laboratories have developed techniques for patterning nanopores in SiN using reactive ion etching (RIE) through a template structure. These methods however, have failed to produce pores small enough for ultrafiltration (<100 nm) in SiN and involve templates that are prone to microporous defects. Here we present a facile, wafer-scale method to produce nanoporous silicon nitride (NPN) membranes using porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) as a self-assembling, defect free, RIE masking layer. By modifying the mask layer morphology and the RIE etch conditions, the pore sizes of NPN can be adjusted between 40 nm and 80 nm with porosities reaching 40%. The resulting NPN membranes exhibit higher burst pressures than pnc-Si membranes while having 5× greater permeability. NPN membranes also demonstrate the capacity for high resolution separations (<10 nm) seen previously with pnc-Si membranes. We further demonstrate that human endothelial cells can be grown on NPN membranes, verifying the biocompatibility of NPN and demonstrating the potential of this material for cell culture applications.

  12. Black Silicon Enhanced Thin Film Silicon Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin U. Pralle; James E. Carey

    2010-07-31

    SiOnyx has developed an enhanced thin film silicon photovoltaic device with improved efficiency. Thin film silicon solar cells suffer from low material absorption characteristics resulting in poor cell efficiencies. SiOnyx’s approach leverages Black Silicon, an advanced material fabricated using ultrafast lasers. The laser treated films show dramatic enhancement in optical absorption with measured values in excess of 90% in the visible spectrum and well over 50% in the near infrared spectrum. Thin film Black Silicon solar cells demonstrate 25% higher current generation with almost no impact on open circuit voltage as compared with representative control samples. The initial prototypes demonstrated an improvement of nearly 2 percentage points in the suns Voc efficiency measurement. In addition we validated the capability to scale this processing technology to the throughputs (< 5 min/m2) required for volume production using state of the art commercially available high power industrial lasers. With these results we clearly demonstrate feasibility for the enhancement of thin film solar cells with this laser processing technique.

  13. Nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds and processes

    DOEpatents

    Lerom, M.W.; Peters, H.M.

    1975-07-08

    This patent relates to the nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds: 3,3''-bis (difluoramino)-2,2'' 4,4', 4'',6,6',6''-octanitro-m-terphenyl (DDONT) and 3,3''-bis(difluoramino)-2,2',2''4,4',4'',6,6',6''-nonanitro-m-terphenyl (DDNONA). Procedures are described wherein diamino precursors of the indicated compounds are prepared and the final compounds are obtained by a fluorination operation. The compounds are highly energetic and suitable for use as explosives and particularly in exploding bridge wire (EBW) detonators. (auth)

  14. Properties of maxillofacial silicone elastomers reinforced with silica powder.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulos, A G; Evangelatou, M; Tarantili, P A

    1998-07-01

    Compounds of a silicone elastomer suitable for preparing maxillofacial prostheses, reinforced with various amounts of silica powder, have been studied for their mechanical response and wetting properties in terms of contact angle. Tensile strength and elongation at break showed an increase with increasing silica volume fraction up to 35%, whereas the Young modulus displayed small dependence on the silica content and the resistance to tear increased continuously with filler volume fraction (Vf). The wetting properties assessed via the contact angle, seemed to degrade with increasing silica Vf, but a dependence on the elastomer network density has also been recorded.

  15. The evaporation study of silicon-containing ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarov, Norbert S.; Medvedev, Artem A.; Deyko, Grigoriy S.; Kustov, Leonid M.; Chernikova, Elena A.; Glukhov, Lev M.; Polyakova, Marina V.; Ioutsi, Vitaliy A.; Markov, Vitaliy Yu.; Sidorov, Lev N.

    2016-07-01

    1,2-Dimethyl-3-(1‧,1‧,3‧,3‧-tetramethyl-3‧-phenyldisiloxanyl)methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([PhC5OSi2MMIm+][Tf2N-]) is the first silicon-containing ionic liquid which was characterized with the vaporization enthalpy, (138.5 ± 1.8) kJ mol-1, and saturated vapor pressure, ln(p/Pa) = -(16656 ± 219)/(T/K) + (30.69 ± 0.92). This compound is a unique ionic liquid giving ions, retaining both cationic and anionic portions, in the electron impact ionization (EI) mass spectrum.

  16. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  17. Bonding analysis of planar hypercoordinate atoms via the generalized BLW-LOL.

    PubMed

    Bomble, Laetitia; Steinmann, Stephan N; Perez-Peralta, Nancy; Merino, Gabriel; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2013-10-01

    The multicenter bonding pattern of the intriguing hexa-, hepta-, and octacoordinate boron wheel series (e.g., CB62-, CB7-, B82-, and SiB8 as well as the experimentally detected CB7- isomer) is revised using the block-localized wave function analyzed by the localized orbital locator (BLW-LOL). The more general implementation of BLW combined with the LOL scalar field is not restricted to the analysis of the out-of-plane π-system but can also provide an intuitive picture of the σ-radial delocalization and of the role of the central atom. The results confirm the presence of a π-ring current pattern similar to that of benzene. In addition, the LOLπ isosurfaces along with the maximum intensity in the ΔLOL profiles located above and below the ring suggest that the central atom plays a minor role in the π-delocalized bonding pattern. Finally, the analysis of the σ-framework in these boron wheels is in line with a moderated inner cyclic rather than disk-type delocalization. PMID:23897739

  18. Hypercoordinate β-carbon in Grubbs and Schrock olefin metathesis metallacycles.

    PubMed

    Remya, Premaja R; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2015-10-28

    Metallacyclobutane (MCB) intermediates of Grubbs and Schrock olefin metathesis catalysts are well-known for their unusually short single bond-like metal to Cβ distance and unusually long CαCβ distances. From the analysis of structural, bond order, electron density and (13)C NMR data of a large variety of MCB systems, we show that the Cβ of the metallacycle possesses pentacoordinate geometry due to the agostic type interaction of the metal with the CαCβ bonds. The pentacoordination of Cβ to the metal center is characterized by a catastrophe ring critical point (RCP) in the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecule (QTAIM) analysis. Fine tuning of the ligand environment changes the catastrophe point to a fifth bond critical point (BCP) which is clearly brought out in the case of two ruthenium olefin metathesis systems. Several Ru and W agostic MCB complexes exhibiting pentacoordinate Cβ as well as their non-agostic isomers have been reported at the BP86/def2-TZVPP level of DFT. The agostic systems showed a significant bond order between metal and Cβ (0.17-0.36), single bond-like electron density values at the catastrophe RCP/BCP and a significantly large difference in (13)C NMR chemical shift values between Cα and Cβ atoms. PMID:26394072

  19. Hypercoordinate β-carbon in Grubbs and Schrock olefin metathesis metallacycles.

    PubMed

    Remya, Premaja R; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2015-10-28

    Metallacyclobutane (MCB) intermediates of Grubbs and Schrock olefin metathesis catalysts are well-known for their unusually short single bond-like metal to Cβ distance and unusually long CαCβ distances. From the analysis of structural, bond order, electron density and (13)C NMR data of a large variety of MCB systems, we show that the Cβ of the metallacycle possesses pentacoordinate geometry due to the agostic type interaction of the metal with the CαCβ bonds. The pentacoordination of Cβ to the metal center is characterized by a catastrophe ring critical point (RCP) in the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecule (QTAIM) analysis. Fine tuning of the ligand environment changes the catastrophe point to a fifth bond critical point (BCP) which is clearly brought out in the case of two ruthenium olefin metathesis systems. Several Ru and W agostic MCB complexes exhibiting pentacoordinate Cβ as well as their non-agostic isomers have been reported at the BP86/def2-TZVPP level of DFT. The agostic systems showed a significant bond order between metal and Cβ (0.17-0.36), single bond-like electron density values at the catastrophe RCP/BCP and a significantly large difference in (13)C NMR chemical shift values between Cα and Cβ atoms.

  20. Bonding analysis of planar hypercoordinate atoms via the generalized BLW-LOL.

    PubMed

    Bomble, Laetitia; Steinmann, Stephan N; Perez-Peralta, Nancy; Merino, Gabriel; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2013-10-01

    The multicenter bonding pattern of the intriguing hexa-, hepta-, and octacoordinate boron wheel series (e.g., CB62-, CB7-, B82-, and SiB8 as well as the experimentally detected CB7- isomer) is revised using the block-localized wave function analyzed by the localized orbital locator (BLW-LOL). The more general implementation of BLW combined with the LOL scalar field is not restricted to the analysis of the out-of-plane π-system but can also provide an intuitive picture of the σ-radial delocalization and of the role of the central atom. The results confirm the presence of a π-ring current pattern similar to that of benzene. In addition, the LOLπ isosurfaces along with the maximum intensity in the ΔLOL profiles located above and below the ring suggest that the central atom plays a minor role in the π-delocalized bonding pattern. Finally, the analysis of the σ-framework in these boron wheels is in line with a moderated inner cyclic rather than disk-type delocalization.

  1. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  2. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance limiting mechanisms in polycrystalline silicon are investigated by fabricating a matrix of solar cells of various thicknesses from polycrystalline silicon wafers of several bulk resistivities. The analysis of the results for the entire matrix indicates that bulk recombination is the dominant factor limiting the short circuit current in large grain (greater than 1 to 2 mm diameter) polycrystalline silicon, the same mechanism that limits the short circuit current in single crystal silicon. An experiment to investigate the limiting mechanisms of open circuit voltage and fill factor for large grain polycrystalline silicon is designed. Two process sequences to fabricate small cells are investigated.

  3. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  4. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  5. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  6. Silicon Technologies Adjust to RF Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke Taub, Susan; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon (Si), although not traditionally the material of choice for RF and microwave applications, has become a serious challenger to other semiconductor technologies for high-frequency applications. Fine-line electron- beam and photolithographic techniques are now capable of fabricating silicon gate sizes as small as 0.1 micron while commonly-available high-resistivity silicon wafers support low-loss microwave transmission lines. These advances, coupled with the recent development of silicon-germanium (SiGe), arm silicon integrated circuits (ICs) with the speed required for increasingly higher-frequency applications.

  7. Solar silicon via the Dow Corning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technical feasibility for high volume production of solar cell-grade silicon is investigated. The process consists of producing silicon from pure raw materials via the carbothermic reduction of quartz. This silicon was then purified to solar grade by impurity segregation during Czochralski crystal growth. Commercially available raw materials were used to produce 100 kg quantities of silicon during 60 hour periods in a direct arc reactor. This silicon produced single crystalline ingot, during a second Czochralski pull, that was fabricated into solar cells having efficiencies ranging from 8.2 percent to greater than 14 percent. An energy analysis of the entire process indicated a 5 month payback time.

  8. Growth of silicon sheets for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Surek, T.

    1980-12-01

    The status of silicon sheet development for photovoltaic applications is critically reviewed. Silicon sheet growth processes are classified according to their linear growth rates. The fast growth processes, which include edge-defined film-fed growth, silicon on ceramic, dendritic-web growth, and ribbon-to-ribbon growth, are comparatively ranked subject to criteria involving growth stability, sheet productivity, impurity effects, crystallinity, and solar cell results. The status of more rapid silicon ribbon growth techniques, such as horizontal ribbon growth and melt quenching, is also reviewed. The emphasis of the discussions is on examining the viability of these sheet materials as solar cell substrates for low-cost silicon photovoltaic systems.

  9. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  10. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  11. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Landry, Marc D.; Pitts, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  12. Let’s talk silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While silicon (Si) has been a known plant nutrient for centuries, how plants use this element is still poorly understood. Researchers have identified how plants acquire Si from the environment and transport the element to all plant tissues, including roots, stems, petioles, leaves and flowers. We ...

  13. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-11

    A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

  14. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Basore, Paul A.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-08-11

    A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

  15. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  16. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Stalford, Harold L.

    2011-07-19

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  17. Mesoporous Silicon-Based Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peramunage, Dharmasena

    2015-01-01

    For high-capacity, high-performance lithium-ion batteries. A new high-capacity anode composite based on mesoporous silicon is being developed. With a structure that resembles a pseudo one-dimensional phase, the active anode material will accommodate significant volume changes expected upon alloying and dealloying with lithium (Li).

  18. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  19. Vacuum Refining of Molten Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-12-01

    Metallurgical fundamentals for vacuum refining of molten silicon and the behavior of different impurities in this process are studied. A novel mass transfer model for the removal of volatile impurities from silicon in vacuum induction refining is developed. The boundary conditions for vacuum refining system—the equilibrium partial pressures of the dissolved elements and their actual partial pressures under vacuum—are determined through thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. It is indicated that the vacuum removal kinetics of the impurities is different, and it is controlled by one, two, or all the three subsequent reaction mechanisms—mass transfer in a melt boundary layer, chemical evaporation on the melt surface, and mass transfer in the gas phase. Vacuum refining experimental results of this study and literature data are used to study the model validation. The model provides reliable results and shows correlation with the experimental data for many volatile elements. Kinetics of phosphorus removal, which is an important impurity in the production of solar grade silicon, is properly predicted by the model, and it is observed that phosphorus elimination from silicon is significantly increased with increasing process temperature.

  20. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  1. Behavior of dislocations in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Koji

    1995-08-01

    A review is given of dynamic behavior of dislocations in silicon on the basis of works of the author`s group. Topics taken up are generation, motion and multiplication of dislocations as affected by oxygen impurities and immobilization of dislocations due to impurity reaction.

  2. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  3. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  4. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  5. High purity silane and silicon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen and metallurgical silicon are reacted at about 400.degree.-600.degree. C. and at pressures in excess of 100 psi, and specifically from about 300 up to about 600 psi to form di- and trichlorosilane that is subjected to disproportionation in the presence of an anion exchange resin to form high purity silane. By-product and unreacted materials are recycled, with metallurgical silicon and hydrogen being essentially the only consumed feed materials. The silane product may be further purified, as by means of activated carbon or cryogenic distillation, and decomposed in a fluid bed or free space reactor to form high purity polycrystalline silicon and by-product hydrogen which can be recycled for further use. The process results in simplified waste disposal operations and enhances the overall conversion of metallurgical grade silicon to silane and high purity silicon for solar cell and semiconductor silicon applications.

  6. Photocatalytic Properties of Porous Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhong, Xing; Li, Yujing; Liao, Lei; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2010-01-01

    Porous silicon nanowires are synthesized through metal assisted wet-chemical etch of highly-doped silicon wafer. The resulted porous silicon nanowires exhibit a large surface area of 337 m(2)·g(-1) and a wide spectrum absorption across the entire ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regime. We further demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles can be loaded onto the surface of the porous silicon nanowires with controlled density. These combined advancements make the porous silicon nanowires an interesting material for photocatalytic applications. We show that the porous silicon nanowires and platinum nanoparticle loaded porous silicon nanowires can be used as effective photocatalysts for photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes and toxic pollutants under visible irradiation, and thus are of significant interest for organic waste treatment and environmental remediation.

  7. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  8. Aluminum gettering in single and multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R.

    1995-08-01

    Al gettering has been performed on integrated circuit (I.C.) quality silicon and a variety of single and multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials. The minority carrier diffusion length, Ln, has been used to quantify the gettering response. Vast differences in response to the Al gettering treatment are observed between the I.C. quality silicon and the solar cell materials. The I.C. silicon generally responds well while the solar cell silicon performance progressively degrades with increasing gettering temperature. Preliminary data shows that by performing a Rapid Thermal Annealing treatment prior to the Al gettering, an improved or further degraded Ln emerges in solar cell material depending on the material`s manufacturer. We explain these observed phenomena by suggesting that Al gettering in solar cell silicon is an impurity emission-limited process while for I.C. quality silicon it is diffusion limited.

  9. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  10. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  11. Control of silicon nanoparticle size embedded in silicon oxynitride dielectric matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhardt, F.; Ferblantier, G.; Muller, D.; Slaoui, A.; Ulhaq-Bouillet, C.; Rinnert, H.

    2013-07-21

    In this study, silicon rich silicon oxynitride layers containing more than 15% nitrogen were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance assisted plasma enhanced vapor deposition in order to form silicon nanoparticles after a high temperature thermal annealing. The effect of the flows of the precursor gases on the composition and the structural properties of the layers was assessed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The morphological and crystallinity properties were investigated by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We show that the excess of silicon in the silicon oxynitride layer controls the silicon nanoparticles size. On the other hand, the crystalline fraction of particles is found to be strongly correlated to the nanoparticle size. Finally, the photoluminescence measurements show that it is also possible to tune the photoluminescence peak position between 400 and 800 nm and its intensity by changing the silicon excess in the silicon rich silicon oxynitride matrix.

  12. National solar technology roadmap: Film-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Brian

    2007-06-01

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) technologies are addressed in two different technology roadmaps: Film-Silicon PV and Wafer-Silicon PV. This Film-Silicon PV roadmap applies to all silicon-film technologies that rely on a supporting substrate such as glass, polymer, aluminum, stainless steel, or metallurgical-grade silicon. Such devices typically use amorphous, nanocrystalline, fine-grained polycrystalline, or epitaxial silicon layers that are 1–20 μm thick.

  13. Application of silicon piezoresistive stress test chips in electronic packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yida

    In this work, both special (100) and (111) silicon test chips containing an array of optimized piezoresistive stress sensor rosettes have been successfully applied within several electronic packaging configurations. Unlike (100) silicon test chips, (111) silicon test chips are able to measure the complete stress state on the die surface. After calibration and characterization of the test chips, they were packaged into various assemblies. The post packaging resistances of the sensors were then recorded at room temperature, as a function of temperature excursion, and during long term packaging reliability qualification tests (thermal cycling and thermal aging). The stresses on the die surface were calculated using the measured resistance changes and the appropriate theoretical equations. For comparison purposes, three-dimensional nonlinear finite element simulations of the packaging processes were also performed, and the stress predictions were correlated with the experimental test chip data. AAA2 (100) silicon test chips containing optimized four element dual polarity rosettes have been applied within 44 pin Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier (PLCC) packages and 240 pin Quad Flat Packs (QFP's). In these plastic package experiments, comparison of the stress levels induced by various molding compounds was emphasized. Advanced (111) silicon test chips (BMW-1 or BMW-2) comprising an array of optimized eight-element dual polarity piezoresistive sensor rosettes were encapsulated in 240 pin QFP's, 160 pin QFP's, Chip on Board (COB) packages, and 281 pin ceramic Pin Grid Array (PGA) packages. In addition to molding compound evaluations, BMW-1 test chips encapsulated in 240 pin QFP's were used to detect the presence of delaminations between the die surface and the encapsulant. In the wire bonded COB package studies, die surface stress evaluations were conducted after die attachment, and throughout the cure cycle of the liquid encapsulant. The stresses were also studied as a

  14. Anisotropic etching of monocrystalline silicon under subcritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pereyra, Nestor Gabriel

    Sub- and supercritical fluids remain an underexploited resource for materials processing. Around its critical point a common compound such as water behaves like a different substance exhibiting changes in its properties that modify its behavior as a solvent and unlock reaction paths not viable in other conditions. In the subcritical region water's properties can be directed by controlling temperature and pressure. Water and silicon are two of the most abundant, versatile, environmentally non-harmful, and simplest substances on Earth. They are among the most researched and best-known substances. Both are ubiquitous and essential for present-day world. Silicon is fundamental in semiconductor fabrication, microelectromechanical systems, and photovoltaic cells. Wet etching of silicon is a fabrication strategy shared by these three applications. Processing of silicon requires large amounts of water, often involving dangerous and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Yet, minimal knowledge is available on the ways high temperature water interacts with crystalline silicon. The purpose of this project is to identify and implement a method for the modification of monocrystalline silicon surfaces with three important characteristics: 1) requires minimal amounts of added chemicals, 2) controllability of morphological features formed, 3) reduced processing time. This will be accomplished by subjecting crystalline silicon to diluted alkaline solutions working in the subcritical region of water. This approach allows for variations on surface morphologies and etching rates by adapting the reactions conditions, with focus on composition and temperature of the solutions used. The work reported discusses the techniques used for producing surfaces with a variety of morphologies that ultimately allowed to create patterns and textures on silicon wafers, using highly diluted alkaline solutions that can be used for photovoltaic applications. These morphologies were created with a

  15. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  16. D0 Silicon Upgrad: D0 Silicon Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.; /Fermilab

    1998-07-14

    The cooling system design is not complete. This paper lays out the general design and some of the design calculations that have been performed up to this date. Further refinement will be performed. This is especially true in the piping layout, piping insulation and detector manifold areas. The silicon detector is cooled by means of a coolant in the beryllium channels that also act as the primary supporting device for the silicon ladders and wedges. The coolant is water with ethylene glycol added as a freezing point depressant. The glycol concentration in the coolant is 30% by weight resulting in a freezing point of approximately -15 C. If the water/glycol is not sufficient for maintaining the desired detector temperature the concentration of the water/glycol may be changed or an alternative coolant may be used.

  17. Computational assessment of organic photovoltaic candidate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borunda, Mario; Dai, Shuo; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Amador-Bedolla, Carlos; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells are emerging as a possible renewable alternative to petroleum based resources and are needed to meet our growing demand for energy. Although not as efficient as silicon based cells, OPV cells have as an advantage that their manufacturing cost is potentially lower. The Harvard Clean Energy Project, using a cheminformatic approach of pattern recognition and machine learning strategies, has ranked a molecular library of more than 2.6 million candidate compounds based on their performance as possible OPV materials. Here, we present a ranking of the top 1000 molecules for use as photovoltaic materials based on their optical absorption properties obtained via time-dependent density functional theory. This computational search has revealed the molecular motifs shared by the set of most promising molecules.

  18. Clathrate compounds and method of manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Witanachchi, Sarath; Mukherjee, Pritish

    2009-05-19

    The present invention comprises new materials, material structures, and processes of fabrication of such that may be used in technologies involving the conversion of light to electricity and/or heat to electricity, and in optoelectronics technologies. The present invention provide for the fabrication of a clathrate compound comprising a type II clathrate lattice with atoms of silicon and germanium as a main framework forming lattice spacings within the framework, wherein the clathrate lattice follows the general formula Si.sub.136-yGe.sub.y, where y indicates the number of Ge atoms present in the main framework and 136-y indicates the number of Si atoms present in the main framework, and wherein y>0.

  19. Task 6.3/6.7.4 - Silicon Carbide Joining

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1998-02-01

    Future energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and meet higher energy conversion efficiencies than today's systems. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum temperature of 550 "C, because above that the stainless steel tubes deform and corrode excessively. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required. Although high-temperature alloys will suffice for the construction of these components in the near-term, the greatest efficiency increases can only be reached with the use of advanced structural ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC). However, SiC does not melt, but instead sublimes at temperatures over 2000 "C. Therefore, it is not possible to join pieces of it through welding, and most brazing compounds have much lower melting points so the joints lose strength at temperatures much lower than the maximum use temperature of the SiC. Since larger objects, such as heat exchangers, cannot be easily created from smaller ceramic pieces, the size of the SiC structures that can presently be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha silicon carbide). In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field joining techniques. Some success has been made by causing silicon and carbon to react at 1400 0-1 500 "C to form SiC in a joint (Rabin, 1995) but these joints contain continuous channels of unreacted silicon which cause the joints to corrode and creep excessively at temperatures below 1260 "C (Breder, 1996). At present, no joining techniques are available that allow sintered alpha SiC to be used to its full potential.

  20. Solar silicon via improved and expanded metallurgical silicon technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A completed preliminary survey of silica sources indicates that sufficient quantities of high-purity quartz are available in the U.S. and Canada to meet goals. Supply can easily meet demand for this little-sought commodity. Charcoal, as a reductant for silica, can be purified to a sufficient level by high-temperature fluorocarbon treatment and vacuum processing. High-temperature treatment causes partial graphitization which can lead to difficulty in smelting. Smelting of Arkansas quartz and purified charcoal produced kilogram quantities of silicon having impurity levels generally much lower than in MG-Si. Half of the goal was met of increasing the boron resistivity from 0.03 ohm-cm in metallurgical silicon to 0.3 ohm-cm in solar silicon. A cost analysis of the solidification process indicate $3.50-7.25/kg Si for the Czochralski-type process and $1.50-4.25/kg Si for the Bridgman-type technique.

  1. Optoelectronic properties of nanocrystalline silicon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada Marin, Yury

    The interest in silicon at the nano-scale level has gained great impetus since the discovery in the last decade of its photoluminescence properties at room temperature; this characteristic has opened up the possibility of creating microelectronics with optical integrated capabilities and has been the main motivation for new research in photonics and optoelectronics applications. To date, the most cost effective technique used to make silicon nanoparticles is the electroetching of silicon wafers in HF electrolytes solutions; this method generates hydrogen-passivated particles by the electrochemical dispersion of bulk silicon. The ultrasonic fracturing of porous silicon structures produces a colloidal suspension of particles in a large variety of organic solvents that can be readily used as photoluminescent tags and to create new optical materials. Silicon nanoparticles can be also produced by sputtering Si-SiO 2, a technique that can render films with distributions of silicon crystallite sizes. This thesis presents the results of an optoelectronic study of nanocrystalline silicon produced by chemical electroetching of silicon wafers and RF-co sputtering of Si-SiO2. Herein are presented the experimental contributions of this work: the development of two novel materials: silica gel monoliths and microfilms doped with porous silicon nanoclusters that have showed blue shifted photoluminescence emission with intensities over five times higher than the original intensity from the native material used for the sol-gel preparation; the enhancement of the photoluminescence of porous silicon substrates by silica gel spin coating. Finally, through a charge transport study of nanocrystalline silicon in Si-SiO2 a relationship between the photoluminescence with the silicon crystallites sizes and concentrations is demonstrated and analyzed along with the diffusion length.

  2. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  3. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Goodman, Mark M.

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  4. Anti-Fog Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tracer Chemical Corporation's TRX Anti-Fog Composition is an inexpensive product which prevents condensation on plastic and glass surfaces. It was the result from a Tech Briefs article detailing a Johnson Space Center compound.

  5. Compound composite odontoma

    PubMed Central

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas. PMID:27194882

  6. Compound composite odontoma.

    PubMed

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas.

  7. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  8. Compounding a Problem?

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Allergist-immunologists say a U.S. Pharmacopeia proposal will mess with an allergy treatment system that's worked for more than a century. The revised standards, if adopted, would remove a key exemption separating allergen extract preparations from the stricter requirements of other compounds. Immunologists say the exemption has allowed them to compound allergen extracts in their own offices, and they've done so safely and effectively millions of times a year.

  9. Curing rate and flowing properties of silicone rubber at injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, M.; Nakamura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    Generally, silicone rubbers are mold-cured after mixing the rubber and peroxide curing agent with a two-roll mill or a kneader. Typically this is done at pressures of 5 MPa to 10 MPa and at temperatures between 120 to 200 C. Compression molding, transfer molding and injection molding are common molding ways for silicone rubbers. Recently, injection molding techniques are developing rapidly that have the advantages of molding automatically with high cycle mechanisms. To reduce the molding time and to make a precision part, both the flowing and curing properties of a particular rubber compound will be important. In this article, correlations between the curing and the flowing properties of silicone rubber are investigated by using the Rheovulkameter device.

  10. Development of a Model and Computer Code to Describe Solar Grade Silicon Production Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models and computer codes based on these models, which allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors for converting gaseous silicon compounds to condensed-phase silicon were developed. The following tasks were accomplished: (1) formulation of a model for silicon vapor separation/collection from the developing turbulent flow stream within reactors of the Westinghouse (2) modification of an available general parabolic code to achieve solutions to the governing partial differential equations (boundary layer type) which describe migration of the vapor to the reactor walls, (3) a parametric study using the boundary layer code to optimize the performance characteristics of the Westinghouse reactor, (4) calculations relating to the collection efficiency of the new AeroChem reactor, and (5) final testing of the modified LAPP code for use as a method of predicting Si(1) droplet sizes in these reactors.

  11. Development of a Model and Computer Code to Describe Solar Grade Silicon Production Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The program aims at developing mathematical models and computer codes based on these models, which allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors for converting gaseous silicon compounds to condensed-phase silicon. The major interest is in collecting silicon as a liquid on the reactor walls and other collection surfaces. Two reactor systems are of major interest, a SiCl4/Na reactor in which Si(l) is collected on the flow tube reactor walls and a reactor in which Si(l) droplets formed by the SiCl4/Na reaction are collected by a jet impingement method. During this quarter the following tasks were accomplished: (1) particle deposition routines were added to the boundary layer code; and (2) Si droplet sizes in SiCl4/Na reactors at temperatures below the dew point of Si are being calculated.

  12. Thermal and mechanical joints to cryo-cooled silicon monochromatorcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A.; Fakra, S.; Morrison, G.

    2006-07-14

    We describe the performance of various materials used as thethermal interface between silicon to silicon and silicon to copper jointswhen operated at ~;120K and loaded with ~;20 watts of thermal power. Wefind that only the indium based silicon-to-silicon joint isreliable.

  13. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  14. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  15. Ambipolar acoustic transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. D.; Batista, P. D.; Tahraoui, A.; Diniz, J. A.; Santos, P. V.

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated the ambipolar transport of electrons and holes by electrically generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on silicon wafers coated with a piezoelectric ZnO film. The transport experiments were carried out by using a focused laser beam to optically excite carriers. The carriers are then captured by the moving SAW piezoelectric field and then transported towards a lateral p-i-n junction, where they are electrically detected. The piezoelectric modulation modifies the current vs. voltage characteristics of the lateral p-i-n junction. This behavior is accounted for by a simple model for the change of the junction potential by the SAW fields. We demonstrate that electrons and holes can be acoustically transported over distances approaching 100 μm, the transport efficiency being limited by the low mobility of holes in the material. These results open the way for silicon-based acousto-electric devices using ambipolar transport such as photo-detectors and solar cells.

  16. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  17. Silicon photomultipliers in calorimetric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Cauz, D.; Driutti, A.; Hasan, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Mascagna, Y.; Mattera, A.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Scarpino, F.; Vallazza, E.

    2010-04-01

    In recent years Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new type of readout system for scintillating detectors in many experiments. SiPMs consist of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micro-pixels, which are independent photon counters working in limited Geiger mode with very high gain (~106). This contribution presents the use of an array of SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a shashlik calorimeter composed by lead and scintillator tiles for a total of ~23 X0; the scintillator light is carried out by 64 WLS fibers (4 fibers per SiPM). The performances of the calorimeter in terms of linearity and energy resolution have been tested in a beam test with charged particles (e±, muons and pions) with a momentum up to 6 GeV/c at the CERN PS T10 line.

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Silicone Contamination on Various Bond Systems and the Feasibility of Removing the Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Stephanie D.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone is a contaminant that can cause catastrophic failure of a bond system depending on the materials and processes used to fabricate the bond system. Unfortunately, more and more materials are fabricated using silicone. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate which bond systems are sensitive to silicone contamination and whether or not a cleaning process could be utilized to remove the silicone to bring the bond system performance back to baseline. Due to the extensive nature of the testing, attempts will be made to generalize the understanding within classes of substrates, bond systems, and surface preparation and cleaning methods. This study was done by contaminating various metal (steel, Inconel, and aluminum), phenolic (carbon-cloth phenolic [CCP] and glass-cloth phenolic [GCP]), and rubber (natural rubber, asbestos-silicone dioxide filled natural butyldiene rubber [ASNBR]; silica-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer [SFEPDM], and carbon-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer [CFEPDM]) substrates which were then bonded using various adhesives and coatings (epoxy-based adhesives, paints, ablative compounds, and Chemlok adhesives) to determine the effect silicone contamination has on a given bond system's performance. The test configurations depended on the bond system being evaluated. The study also evaluated the feasibility of removing the silicone contamination by cleaning the contaminated substrate prior to bonding. The cleaning processes also varied depending on bond system.

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Silicone Contamination on Various Bond Systems and the Feasibility of Removing the Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Stephanie D.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone is a contaminant that can cause catastrophic failure of a bond system depending on the materials and processes used to fabricate the bond system, Unfortunately, more and more materials are fabricated using silicone. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate which bond systems are sensitive to silicone contamination and whether or not a cleaning process could be utilized to remove the silicone to bring the bond system performance back to baseline. Due to the extensive nature of the testing attempts will be made to generalize the understanding within classes of substrates, bond systems, and surface preparation and cleaning methods. This study was done by contaminating various meta! (steel, inconel, and aluminum), phenolic (carbon cloth phenolic and glass cloth phenolic), and rubber (natural rubber, asbestos-silicone dioxide filled natural butyldiene rubber, silica-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer, and carbon-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer) substrates which were then bonded using various adhesives and coatings (epoxy-based adhesives, paints, ablative compounds, and Chemlok adhesives) to determine the effect silicone contamination has on a given bond system's performance. The test configurations depended on the bond system being evaluated. The study also evaluated the feasibility of removing the silicone contamination by cleaning the contaminated substrate prior to bonding. The cleaning processes also varied depending on bond system.

  20. Understanding medication compounding issues.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W

    2014-04-01

    The potential for contamination of compounded products and the resulting infections are a serious threat to patient safety. Immediate use products are used frequently in the perioperative department, and perioperative nurses should be familiar with the guidelines and practices that aim to reduce the contamination that can occur during the sterile compounding process. Four common themes lead to successful compounding: quality (eg, product identification, purity, stability, compatibility, risk level assessment), the environment (eg, using a segregated compounding area with specialized airflow capabilities, reducing particulate matter, practicing proper hand hygiene, performing gloved fingertip sampling, properly cleaning equipment and work areas), personnel activities (eg, familiarity with types of containers used and how often they can be accessed, following expiration dates and the number of times containers can be accessed), and the control process (eg, process monitoring, quality improvement). If a third-party vendor is contracted to handle compounding for a facility, perioperative personnel should be aware of the responsibilities for the facility and the vendor to ensure a quality compounding program. PMID:24674793