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Sample records for hyperlipidemic rat model

  1. Neuroprotective effects of pretreatment with quercetin as assessed by acetylcholinesterase assay and behavioral testing in poloxamer-407 induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Josiane B S; Ruchel, Jader B; Adefegha, Stephen A; Coelho, Ana Paula V; Trelles, Kelly B; Signor, Cristiane; Rubin, Maribel A; Oliveira, Juliana S; Dornelles, Guilherme L; de Andrade, Cinthia M; Castilhos, Lívia G; Leal, Daniela B R

    2017-04-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a group of disorders characterized by excessive lipids in the bloodstream. It is associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and recognized as the most important factor underlying the occurrence of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to investigate whether pretreatment with quercetin can protect against possible memory impairment and deterioration of the cholinergic system in hyperlipidemic rats. Animals were divided into ten groups (n=7): saline/control, saline/quercetin 5mg/kg, saline/quercetin 25mg/kg, saline/quercetin 50mg/kg, saline/simvastatin (0.04mg/kg), hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 5mg/kg, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 25mg/kg, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 50mg/kg and hyperlipidemia/simvastatin. The animals were pretreated with quercetin by oral gavage for a period of 30days and hyperlipidemia was subsequently induced by intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of 500mg/kg of poloxamer-407. Simvastatin was administered after the induction of hyperlipidemia. The results demonstrated that hyperlipidemic rats had memory impairment compared with the saline control group (P<0.001). However, pretreatment with quercetin and simvastatin treatment attenuated the damage caused by hyperlipidemia compared with the hyperlipidemic group (P<0.05). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the cerebral hippocampus was significantly (P<0.001) reduced in the hyperlipidemic group compared with the control saline group. Pretreatment with quercetin and simvastatin treatment in the hyperlipidemic groups significantly (P<0.05) increased AChE activity compared with the hyperlipidemic group. Our results thus suggest that quercetin may prevent memory impairment, alter lipid metabolism, and modulate AChE activity in an experimental model of hyperlipidemia.

  2. Hypolipidemic effect of aqueous extract of Carum carvi (black Zeera) seeds in diet induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Muhammad Rashad; Sadiq, Soban; Nayak, Salma; Tahir, Muhammad Usman

    2012-04-01

    Medicinal plants play a key role in preventing various diseases. Hyperlipidemia is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of aqueous extract of Carum carvi seeds in diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats. 2% cholesterol diet were given to rats for six weeks and rats showed high lipid levels were included in the study. Then all rats were divided into, normal control group (A), hyperlipidemia positive control group (B), and the remaining two groups (C and D) served as experimental groups. Group C hyperlipidemic experimental rats received aqueous dried extract of Carum carvi seeds at 60 mg/kg of body weight for eight weeks on daily basis. On the other hand group D rats received simvastatin at 1.0 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Blood samples were collected after eight weeks. The hyperlipidemic positive control group rats showed variable increase in serum triglycerides, LDL and total cholesterol levels. Serum HDL levels decreased in hyperlipidemic positive control groups. Carum carvi and simvastatin significantly decreased the levels of these parameters in rats. On comparison Carum carvi reduced lipid levels more, effectively than the simvastatin. Carum carvi constituents, especially flavonoids and carvone have strong anti-oxidant activity which might be involved in hypolipidemia. In conclusion, Carum carvi aqueous seeds extract decrease lipid levels in diet induced hyperlipidemic rats.

  3. GCG-rich tea catechins are effective in lowering cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Chae Wook; Kim, Jung Kee; Shin, Hyun Jung; Baik, Joo Hyun

    2008-05-01

    The (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG) concentration in some tea beverages can account for as much as 50% of the total catechins, as a result of sterilization. The present study aims to examine the effects of GCG-rich tea catechins on hyperlipidemic rats and the mechanisms associated with regulating cholesterol metabolism in the liver. By performing heat epimerization of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), we manufactured a mixture of catechins that had a GCG content of approximately 50% (w/w). In sucrose-rich diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats, the GCG-rich tea catechins exhibited strong activity in reducing plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, the hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations that had increased as a result of the sucrose-rich diet were reduced due to GCG-rich tea catechins consumption. In order to investigate the hyperlipidemic mechanism of GCG-rich tea catechins, we examined the hepatic expressions of LDL receptor and HMG-CoA reductase in hyperlipidemic rats. We further evaluated the action of purified GCG on LDL receptor activity, which is a key contributor to the regulation of cholesterol concentrations. We found that purified GCG increased LDL receptor protein level and activity to a greater extent than EGCG. In conclusion, our study indicates that GCG-rich tea catechins in tea beverages may be effective in preventing hyperlipidemia by lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations.

  4. Hyperlipidemic chicken as a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Castillo, Antonia Martín; Adánez, Gracia; Fernández-Rufete, Ana; Pérez, Bartolomé García; Castells, Maria T

    2009-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is part of the spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), currently the most common cause of abnormal liver tests. Given the difficulty of studying all the factors involved in it in human populations, studies in animal models might provide crucial insights in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. Several physiological features predispose birds to fat deposition in the liver. The present study was conceived to explore the possibilities of the chicken fed a cholesterol and fat enriched diet as a model for steatohepatitis. We used two different diets: a standard growing mash (control group) and a standard growing mash enriched with 2% cholesterol and 20% palm oil (hyperlipidemic group). We investigated the effect of feeding a cholesterol and fat enriched diet, on plasma lipid levels, liver enzymes and hepatic histopathology. Semiquantitative and quantitative assessment by image analysis was performed to determine changes in lipid deposits and inflammatory infiltration. Statistically significant increases were observed in all plasma lipid parameters, liver macroscopic features, fat deposits and cell-ballooning of hepatocytes between control and hyperlipidemic animals. Significant differences were also observed in the inflammatory infiltration parameters (number of foci, density, area and maximal diameter). Results show that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia are associated with severe impairment of liver histology (fat accumulation, inflammation and cell-ballooning), reproducing histological features of human NAFLD. This model, which is easy and reproducible, offers economic and technical advantages. Furthermore, the reversibility of the pathologic changes makes it suitable for drug intervention studies of steatohepatitis.

  5. Effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Jyoti, Uma; Sharma, Samridhi; Kaura, Arun; Deshmukh, Rahul; Goyal, Sandeep

    2015-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is regarded as independent risk factor in the development of ischemic heart disease, and it can increase the myocardial susceptibility to ischemia-/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury. Hyperlipidemia attenuates the cardioprotective response of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). The present study investigated the effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat hearts. Hyperlipidemia was induced in rat by feeding high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks then the serum lipid profile was observed. In experiment, the isolated Langendorff rat heart preparation was subjected to 4 cycles of ischemic preconditioning (IPC), then 30 min of ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was elaborated morphologically by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and biochemically by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) release from coronary effluent and left ventricular collagen content. However, the effect of zinc supplement, i.e., zinc pyrithione (10 μM) perfused during reperfusion for 120 min, significantly abrogated the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart whereas administration of chelator of this zinc ionophore, i.e., N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylene diamine (TPEN; 10 μM), perfused during reperfusion 2 min before the perfusion of zinc pyrithione abrogated the cardioprotective effect of zinc supplement during experiment in hyperlipidemic rat heart. Thus, the administration of zinc supplements limits the infarct size, LDH, and CK-MB and enhanced the collagen level which suggests that the attenuated cardioprotective effect of IPC in hyperlipidemic rat is due to zinc loss during reperfusion caused by ischemia/reperfusion.

  6. Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Malus toringoides (Rehd.) Hughes Leaves in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Liu, Haifeng; Meng, Ning; Li, Bin; Wang, Jule

    2017-03-01

    Malus toringoides (Rehd.) Hughes (MT) leaves are traditionally used as a medicine for treating or preventing cardiovascular disease in Tibet. In addition to the effect of this medicinal plant on thrombosis, we tested its effect on dyslipidemia in a hypolipidemic rat model. A total of 60 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: normal control, model control, simvastatin groups, and MT low-, medium-, and high-dose groups. The normal controls were fed with a normal diet, whereas all other groups were fed with a high-fat diet. After 6 weeks, the high-fat diet had induced hyperlipidemia in the rats, which were then orally administered with different doses of MT leaf extract (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) for an additional 6 weeks. Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c and HDL-c, respectively), as well as the antioxidant capacity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHP-x), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured at the end of the study. MT significantly reduced serum TC, TG, and LDL-c and increased the HDL-c content in MT-treated rats compared with the model group. These changes were dose dependent. MT treatment also significantly elevated the activity of SOD and GSHP-x, and decreased the serum levels of MDA compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats, thereby increasing serum antioxidant capacity. In addition, MT reduced liver steatosis in hyperlipidemic rats. Overall, MT exerts considerable hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties.

  7. Probing the anti-hyperlipidemic efficacy of the allspice (Pimenta officinalis Lindl.) in rats fed with high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, M P; Paramundayil, Julie J; Venukumar, M R; Latha, M S

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of aqueous extract of Pimenta officinalis (APO) was investigated in experimental rats fed with high fat diet (HFD). Hyperlipidemia in experimental rats was evidenced by a significant enhancement in the level of glycerol, triglycerides and phopholipids in serum, and also in liver and kidney tissues. HFD caused oxidative stress in these animals as shown by marked increment in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and diene conjugates (CD), and a distinct diminution in reduced glutathione (GSH) content in liver and kidneys. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) showed reduced activity in hyperlipidemic rats. All these biochemical parameters showed reliable signs of retrieving towards near-normalcy in APO-administered HFD fed rats. This study unveiled the anti-hyperlipidemic as well as antioxidant activity of APO.

  8. Hypolipidemic effect of β-caryophyllene to treat hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Grando, Thirssa H; Doleski, Pedro H; Boligon, Aline A; Stefani, Lenita M; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of β-caryophyllene on hypercholesterolemia using a model of hyperlipidemia induced by Triton WR-1339 in rats, as well as its possible effect on hepatic antioxidant enzymes. Thus, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were measured in serum, while reactive oxygen species (ROS), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutayl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the hepatic tissue. In addition, seric concentrations of β-caryophyllene were measured to perform correlation studies. Serum samples from hypercholesterolemic rats show higher (p < 0.05) levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol, and lower (p < 0.05) levels of HDL cholesterol compared to non-hypercholesterolemic rats. β-Caryophyllene treatment reduced (p < 0.05) the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, similar to the reference drug simvastatin. However, HDL cholesterol levels did not increase with the treatment. β-Caryophyllene treatment was able to inhibit the HMG-CoA reductase activity, as well as to prevent the increase on ROS and TBARS levels, and ameliorate the antioxidant system. In summary, our findings demonstrated that β-caryophyllene has hypolipidemic effect via inhibition of the hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, like the standard drug simvastatin, and this inhibition suggests a possible mechanism of hypolipidemic action. Thus, our results indicate that β-caryophyllene can be used to treat dyslipidemic diseases because it exerts a similar effect as the reference drug, protecting the liver against lipid damage and improving the hepatic antioxidant defense system.

  9. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity of Cucumis melo fruit peel extracts in high cholesterol diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bidkar, Jayant S; Ghanwat, Dhanaji Dadaso; Bhujbal, Madhuri D; Dama, Ganesh Y

    2012-09-24

    Abstract Cucumis melo Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) fruits have been used, traditionally in Indian traditional system of medicine, for the treatment of various disorders such as liver tonic, cardioprotective, antidiabetic, antiobesity, etc. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-hyperlipidemic activity of Cucumis melo fruit peel (CMFP) methanolic and aqueous extract in high cholesterol diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Treatment with CMFP methanolic and aqueous extract showed significant (P<0.01) reduction in gain in body weight, serum lipid profile like total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, atherogenic index and increased the serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in 28 days treatment when compared to the hyperlipidemic control group. The fecal excretion of bile acids and sterols was further increased upon treatment with CMFP methanolic and aqueous extract and standard drug. Administration of methanolic extract of CMFP at a dose of 500 mg/kg showed higher antihyperlipidemic activity as compared to other extract treated groups. The results concluded that CMFP methanolic extract (500 mg/kg) have potent antihyperlipidemic activity in high cholesterol diet induced hyperlipidemia model and which is equipotent activity when compared with atorvastatin treated group.

  10. DIVERSITY OF VASCULAR REACTIVITY AND THE TREATMENT RESPONSE IN DIABETIC, HYPERTENSIVE, HYPERLIPIDEMIC, AND HEALTHY RATS SUBJECTED TO HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Liu, Liang-Ming; Li, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The current diagnosis and treatment guidelines for severe trauma and shock are all for healthy population. Few studies focused on the pathophysiological features and treatments in metabolic diseases after severe trauma and shock. Vascular reactivity is significantly decreased after severe trauma and shock. Improving the vascular reactivity with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and phorbol-12 myristate-13-acetate (PMA) is beneficial to trauma and shock. Whether the cardiovascular function and treatment responses have the own features in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic patients after traumatic hemorrhagic shock is not known. Using hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic and healthy rats, we compared the change patterns in cardiovascular function including vascular reactivity, tissue perfusion, and the hemodynamics after hemorrhagic shock and their responses to AVP, PMA, and common antishock agents including dopamine and norepinephrine. A same degree of hemorrhagic shock (40% hemorrhage or mean arterial pressure maintained at 40 mm Hg for 2 h) resulted in a more obvious decrease in vascular reactivity, hemodynamics, tissue perfusion, and mitochondrial function of liver and kidney in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats, and a more rapidly natural death than in healthy rats. The effectiveness of AVP and PMA in these diseased rats was lower than in healthy rats. The effective dosage of common antishock agents including norepinephrine, dopamine, and AVP in healthy rats was wider than that in these diseased rats. Among the antishock agents used in the current study, AVP had the best effect in improving animal survival and vascular reactivity both in healthy and in diseased rats. These findings suggest that hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats have a worse vascular reactivity and organ function than the healthy rats after traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which result in the worse treatment responses and effects to vasoactive agents. Lower dose

  11. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress.

  12. Hypolipidemic effects of chitosan and its derivatives in hyperlipidemic rats induced by a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haitao; Yang, Qingyun; Huang, Guidong; Ding, Chen; Cao, Peiqiu; Huang, Lanlan; Xiao, Tiancun; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zhengquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is the primary risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Various factors, including genetics, physical inactivity, and daily nutritional habits, affect the prevalence of HLP. Recently, it was revealed that dietary fibers, such as pectin, psyllium, and especially chitosan (CTS), may play important roles in hypolipidemic management. Thus, this study aims to determine the hypolipidemic effect and mechanism of CTS and its water-soluble derivatives, chitosan oligosaccharides (MN≤1,000 Da (COSI) and MN≤3,000 Da (COSIII)), in male hyperlipidemic rats induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). Design After the model creation, 120 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were equally assigned to 12 groups fed various diets as follows: the normal group with basic diet, an HFD group, an HFD group supplemented with three doses of CTS, COSI and COSIII groups, and an HFD group treated with simvastatin (7 mg/kg·d). After 6 weeks, body weight, fat/body ratio, and the relevant biomarkers of serum, liver, and feces were measured. Additionally, the histological analysis of liver and adipose tissue was performed, and the mRNA expressions of liver peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and hepatic lipase (HL) were examined. Results Compared with HFD group, rats fed CTS, COSI, and COSIII showed a better ability to regulate their body weight, liver and cardiac indices, fat/body ratio, as well as serum, liver, and fecal lipids, and simultaneously to maintain the appropriate activity of liver and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), as well as liver and fecal total bile acids (TBA). Simultaneously, there had been a higher mRNA expression of PPARα and HL in the treatment groups. Conclusion The obtained results suggested that these three function foods can effectively improve liver lipid metabolism by normalizing the expressions of PPARα and HL, and protect liver from the oxidized trauma by

  13. Beneficial effects of natural Jeju groundwaters on lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-chao; Lu, Jin-miao; Jin, Hui-zi; Ma, Ai-niu; Zhang, Jin-yang; Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Lv, Ying-fang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Groundwater is believed to possess many beneficial effects due to its natural source of various minerals. In this study, we examined the effects of natural Jeju groundwater S1 (Samdasoo™), S2 and S3 pumped up from different locations of Jeju Island, Korea, along with local tap water, on body weight gain, serum lipids and lipoproteins, and liver histopathology in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Rats were randomly and equally divided into 6 groups. Different water samples were supplied to the hyperlipidemic rats as their daily drinking water and the widely-used anti-hyperlipidemic drug simvastatin was used as a positive control. Body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins were measured weekly. Liver weight, liver index and liver histopathology were examined after the execution of the rats. RESULTS After drinking Jeju groundwaters for two months, S2 but not S3 significantly reduced weight growth and serum triglycerides levels and increased high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C) without affecting total cholesterol or LDL-C. S1 and particularly S2 significantly reduced the severity of liver hypertrophy and steatosis. All Groundwaters had much higher contents of vanadium (S3>S2>S1>>tap water) whereas S1 and S2 but not S3 markedly blocked autoxidation of ferrous ions. CONCLUSION Jeju Groundwater S1 and particularly S2 exhibit protective effects against hyperlipidemia and fatty liver and hypothesize that the beneficial effect of Jeju Groundwaters may be contributed from blockade of autoxidation of ferrous ions rather than their high contents of vanadium. PMID:24741400

  14. Effects of Tanshinone IIA on the modulation of miR-33a and the SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway in hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    JIA, LIANQUN; SONG, NAN; YANG, GUANLIN; MA, YIXIN; LI, XUETAO; LU, REN; CAO, HUIMIN; ZHANG, NI; ZHU, MEILIN; WANG, JUNYAN; LENG, XUE; CAO, YUAN; DU, YING; XU, YUE

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the active compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine known as Danshen. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of Tanshinone IIA on the regulation of lipid metabolism in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and the underlying molecular events. An in vivo model of hyperlipidemia was established in rats, with the animals receiving a daily dose of Tanshinone IIA. The serum lipid profiles were analyzed using an automatic biochemical analyzer, and the histopathological alterations and lipid deposition in liver tissue were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and oil red O staining, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of microRNA (miR)-33a, ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC)A1, ABCG1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) in liver tissues were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9, and LDL-R were analyzed using western blotting. Tanshinone IIA reduced lipid deposition and improved histopathology in the rat liver tissue, however, did not alter the lipid profile in rat serum. In addition, Tanshinone IIA treatment suppressed the expression of miR-33a, whereas the protein expression levels of ABCA1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9 in addition to LDL-R mRNA and protein were upregulated. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Tanshinone IIA attenuated lipid deposition in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and modulated the expression of miR-33a and SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway proteins. PMID:27082100

  15. Hypocholesterolemia of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids is related to the bile acid by up-regulated CYP7A1 in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Bei, Weijian; Hu, Yinming; Cao, Le; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Laiyou; Luo, Duosheng; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yao, Xi; He, Wei; Liu, Xiaobo; Guo, Jiao

    2012-06-15

    This study is to investigate the cholesterol-lowering effect and the new mode of action of coptis alkaloids on high lipid diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. Coptis alkaloids extract (CAE) was prepared by alcohol extraction from Rhizoma Coptidis that have been quality-controlled according to the protocol. The cholesterol-lowering effect of CAE was evaluated on SD rats fed with high-lipid diet. Serum level of lipid, Bile acid and cholesterol in the liver and feces of the rats were measured using colorimetric assay kit. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to analyze the mRNA and protein expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes including cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the livers of the rats. A HPLC analysis was used to assess the activity of CYP7A1. The results showed that CAE reduced the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). CYP7A1 gene expression and its activity was up-regulated dose-dependently accompanying with the increased level of bile acid and the reduced cholesterol level in the livers of the CAE treated hyperlipidemic rats. Meanwhile, the mRNA expression of PPARα was also up-regulated in dose-dependent way accompanying the down-modulation of the FXR mRNA expression in the livers of the CAE treated hyperlipidemic rats. The results indicate that the cholesterol-lowering effect of coptis alkaloid extract is at least partly attributed to its promoting the cholesterol conversion into bile acids by up-regulating the gene expression of CYP7A1 and thus increasing its activity in the liver of the hyperlipidemic rats, which might related to the positive regulation of PPARα and the negative modulation of FXR.

  16. Anti-hyperlipidemic and cardioprotective effects of Ocimum sanctum L. fixed oil in rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Suanarunsawat, Thamolwan; Boonnak, Theewara; Na Ayutthaya, Watcharaporn Devakul; Thirawarapan, Suwan

    2010-01-01

    Ocimum sanctum (OS) has a lipid-lowering action in both normal and diabetic animals. Because OS leaves are rich in oil, the present study was conducted to explain the anti-hyperlipidemic and organ-protective effect of OS fixed oil in rats fed with a high fat (HF) diet. OS fixed oil was extracted by hexane and the fatty acids composition identified by GC-MS. Four groups of male Wistar rats included a normal control group, a high fat fed-diet (HF) group, a HF group treated with OS fixed oil, and a HF group treated with a reference drug simvastatin. The results show that OS fixed oil contains five kinds of fatty acids, of which alpha-linolenic acid was the major fatty acid. OS fixed oil depressed high serum levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, and AI, whereas no significant effect on HDL-C was observed. OS fixed oil also suppressed high levels of liver cholesterol and triglyceride with no significant effect on both lipids in feces. In addition, OS fixed oil normalized the high serum levels of LDH and CK-MB but no significant effect on high serum levels of ALT, AST, and ALP was obtained. We conclude that treatment with OS fixed oil during the last three weeks of HF diet feeding decreased the high serum lipid profile and expressed antiartherogenic and cardioprotective actions against hyperlipidemia. The anti-hyperlipidemic action of OS fixed oil was mainly resulted from the suppression of liver lipid synthesis. Linolenic acid and linoleic acid contained in OS fixed oil were possibly responsible for both lipid-lowering and cardiac protective action against hyperlipidemia.

  17. Chronic effects of berberine on blood, liver glucolipid metabolism and liver PPARs expression in diabetic hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji Yin; Zhou, Shi Wen; Zhang, Ke Bin; Tang, Jian Lin; Guang, Li Xia; Ying, Yi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Le; Li, Dan Dan

    2008-06-01

    Berberine is one of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma coptidis which has been used as a folk medicine to treat diabetes mellitus for more than 1400 years in China. To investigate the chronic effect of berberine on diabetic hyperlipidemic rats, fasted rats were intraperitoneally injected 35 mg/kg streptozotocin. Diabetic rats were admitted after 2 weeks and given a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet to induce hyperlipidemia. The rats were divided into 7 groups at the end of week 16: normal and diabetic rats received no drug, 5 treatment groups were administered with either 75, 150, 300 mg/kg berberine, 100 mg/kg fenofibrate or 4 mg/kg rosiglitazone per day for 16 weeks, respectively. The blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid metabolic parameters and hepatic glycogen and triglyceride were measured, and histopathology and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alpha/delta/gamma expression of liver were determined by hematoxylin eosin and immunohistochemical staining. Berberine reduced diabetic rats' body weight, liver weight and liver to body weight ratio. Berberine restored the increased blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and the decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, apolipoprotein AI levels in diabetic rats to near the control ones. Berberine alleviated the pathological progression of liver and reverted the increased hepatic glycogen and triglyceride to near the control levels. Berberine increased PPARalpha/delta expression and reduced PPARgamma expression in liver of diabetic rat to near the control ones. Berberine improved glucolipid metabolism both in blood and liver in diabetic rats possibly through modulating the metabolic related PPARalpha/delta/gamma protein expression in liver.

  18. Comparative effects of piperine and simvastatin in fat accumulation and antioxidative status in high fat-induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Tunsophon, Sakara; Chootip, Krongkarn

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the comparative effects of piperine (PIP) - the active ingredient of black and long peppers - and simvastatin (SIM) on hepatic steatosis in hyperlipidemic rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a cholesterol mixture daily by intragastric gavage for 8 weeks. Piperine was given by oral gavage 8 h after cholesterol feeding. The animals were divided into 4 groups: control, high fat (HF), high fat plus 40 mg PIP/kg, and high fat plus 2 mg SIM/kg. At the end of the treatment, liver cholesterol, triglyceride, thiobaribituric reacting substances, superoxide dismutase (SOD), serum aminotransferase (AST), and alanine transferase (ALT) were measured. The result demonstrated that PIP and SIM significantly reduced the accumulation of cholesterol, triglyceride, and lipid peroxidation in the liver, while elevation of SOD was observed. The activities of AST and ALT significantly decreased in PIP when compared with the HF group. Our in vitro study of pancreatic lipase also showed the inhibitory effect of PIP higher than 30% at 5 mmol/L. These results demonstrate that PIP has beneficial effects in the treatment and (or) prevention of fat accumulation in the liver and that this mechanism is due to the inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the improvement of oxidative status.

  19. Rosiglitazone attenuates the severity of hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    NIYAZ, BATUR; ZHAO, KAI-LIANG; LIU, LI-MIN; CHEN, CHEN; DENG, WEN-HONG; ZUO, TENG; SHI, QIAO; WANG, WEI-XING

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) ligand regulates adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity, and exerts antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms by which PPAR-γ ligands affect hyperlipidemia with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ ligand, on hyperlipidemia with SAP in a rat model. The hyperlipidemia was induced with a high-fat diet and SAP was induced by the administration of sodium taurocholate (TCA). The hyperlipidemia was shown to aggravate the severity of the sodium taurocholate-induced SAP. However, rosiglitazone demonstrated significant antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects in the rats with high-lipid diet-induced hyperlipidemia and SAP. PMID:24137303

  20. Red yeast rice and coenzyme Q10 as safe alternatives to surmount atorvastatin-induced myopathy in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset, Marwan; Safar, Marwa M; Mahmoud, Sawsan S; Negm, Seham A; Agha, Azza M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are the first line treatment for the management of hyperlipidemia. However, the primary adverse effect limiting their use is myopathy. This study examines the efficacy and safety of red yeast rice (RYR), a source of natural statins, as compared with atorvastatin, which is the most widely used synthetic statin. Statin interference with the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prompted the hypothesis that its deficiency may be implicated in the pathogenesis of statin-associated myopathy. Hence, the effects of combination of CoQ10 with either statin have been evaluated. Rats were rendered hyperlipidemic through feeding them a high-fat diet for 90 days, during the last 30 days of the diet they were treated daily with either atorvastatin, RYR, CoQ10, or combined regimens. Lipid profile, liver function tests, and creatine kinase were monitored after 15 and 30 days of drug treatments. Heart contents of CoQ9 and CoQ10 were assessed and histopathological examination of the liver and aortic wall was performed. RYR and CoQ10 had the advantage over atorvastatin in that they lower cholesterol without elevating creatine kinase, a hallmark of myopathy. RYR maintained normal levels of heart ubiquinones, which are essential components for energy production in muscles. In conclusion, RYR and CoQ10 may offer alternatives to overcome atorvastatin-associated myopathy.

  1. Effects of Tribuli saponins on ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Shi, Da-Zhuo; Yin, Hui-Jun; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2007-01-01

    This experiment was designed to determine whether Tribuli saponins (TS) relieve left ventricular remodeling (VR) after myocardial infarction (MI) in a murine hyperlipemia (HL) model. MI and HL models were induced and high and low doses of TS and simvastatin were administrated to the rats. Four weeks later, echocardiographic observation was performed and the left and right ventricular weight index (LVWI, RVWI) was calculated. Echocardiographic results showed that both high dose of TS and simvastatin had a beneficial effect on increasing fractional shortening (FS) and ejection fraction (EF), reducing left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), systolic volume (LVESV), left ventricular dimension end diastole (LVDd) and systole (LVDs), and decreasing LVWI, as compared to those in the HL-MI model group (p < 0.05, 0.01). Both medicines had little impact on thickness of the anterior and posterior wall. No significant difference was observed between each treatment group (p > 0.05). In conclusion, TS not only lowered serum lipidemia, but also relieved left ventricular remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the early stage after MI.

  2. Activation of transsulfuration pathway by salvianolic acid a treatment: a homocysteine-lowering approach with beneficial effects on redox homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated homocysteine is a cardiovascular risk factor in hyperlipidemia. Transsulfuration pathway provides an endogenous pathway for homocysteine conversion to antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) contains two molecules of caffeic acid and one molecule of danshensu that is capable of enhancing homocysteine transsulfuration, which led to the hypothesis that Sal A has activatory effect on transsulfuration pathway and this effect may have beneficial effects on both homocysteine and redox status in hyperlipidemia. Methods and results To test this hypothesis, we developed a rat model of hyperlipidemia induced by high-fat diet for 16 weeks, during which rats were treated with 1 mg/kg salvianolic acid A (Sal A) for the final 4 weeks. Activities of key enzymes and metabolite profiling in the transsulfuration pathway revealed that hyperlipidemia led to elevated plasma homocysteine levels after 16-week dietary treatment, which was associated with reduced activities of homocysteine transsulfuration enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). The impaired transsulfuration pathway prevented homocysteine transsulfuration to cysteine, resulting in cysteine deficiency and subsequent reduction in GSH pool size. The redox status was altered in the setting of hyperlipidemia as indicated by GSH/GSSG ratio. Sal A treatment increased hepatic CBS and CSE activities, which was associated with reduced accumulation in circulating homocysteine levels and attenuated decline in hepatic cysteine content in hyperlipidemic rats. Sal A also led to an increase in GSH pool size, which subsequently caused a restored GSH/GSSG ratio. The activatory effect of Sal A on CBS was also observed in normal rats and in in vitro experiment. Conclusion Our results suggest that activation of transsulfuration pathway by Sal A is a promising homocysteine-lowering approach that has beneficial effects on redox homeostasis in hyperlipidemic settings

  3. Effect of ambrex (a herbal formulation) on oxidative stress in hyperlipidemic rats and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Devi, A. Jamuna; Ravindran, Rekha; Sankar, M.; Rajkumar, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ambrex is a polyherbal formulation which consists of Withania somnifera, Orchis mascula, Cycas circirnalis, Shorea robusta with amber. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the potential effects of ambrex on the antioxidant status in high fat diet fed rats and to investigate the possible mechanisms focusing on the gene expression involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in 3T3-L1 cell line. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 6); Group A received normal diet, Group B received high fat diet for 30 days, Group C and D received high fat diet for 30 days and treated with ambrex (40 mg/kg b.w) and atorvastatin (10 mg/kg b.w) for successive 15 days respectively. This study also assesses the effect of ambrex on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Results: The serum total cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly decreased in ambrex treated hyperlipidemic animals when compared to untreated animals. The activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione were significantly augmented in the serum, liver, and heart of hyperlipidemic rats treated with ambrex when compared to control. Ambrex treated rats had significant reductions in malondiadehyde levels in the serum, liver and heart compared to untreated rats. In addition, we observed that treatment with ambrex resulted in a major inhibition of pre-adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells in vitro by suppression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, sterol regulatory binding proteins, tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitricoxide synthase, leptin, and upregulation of thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and TRX2 mRNA expression. Conclusion: Therefore, ambrex may be a potential drug for treatment of hyperlipidemia and related disorders. PMID:24914283

  4. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  5. A mechanism-based pharmacological evaluation of efficacy of Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) seeds in regulation of dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Upma; Shrivastava, Atul; Bhadauria, Smriti; Saxena, Jitendra K; Bhatia, Gitika

    2013-06-01

    : Alcoholic extract of Trigonella foenum graecum seeds [fenugreek seed extract (FSE)] was studied in triton-induced and high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia to evaluate antidyslipidemic effect. Plasma cholesterol (26.19%) and triglycerides (36.6%) were found to be lowered by FSE maximum at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight in triton-treated hyperlipidemic rats. Chronic feeding of FSE (200 mg/kg body weight) caused lowering in plasma and hepatic lipid levels by activating lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (47%), postheparin lipolytic activity (35%), triglyceride lipase (34%), lipoprotein lipase (20.8%), and increased excretion of fecal bile acids (36%-45%). The FSE shows potent antioxidant activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. It inhibited generation of superoxide anion and hydroxyl free radicals in both enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems significantly at 200 µM concentration. Furthermore, FSE normalizes the activities of antioxidant enzymes, that is, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and reduces plasma lipid peroxidation (33.9%), hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal (27%), and isoprostanes (28%). Data of the present study demonstrated that the T. foenum graecum seed extract has both antidyslipidemic and antioxidant properties.

  6. Antihyperlipidemic potential of Albizia amara (Roxb) Boiv. bark against Triton X-100 induced hyperlipidemic condition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gundamaraju, Rohit; Hwi, Kim Kah; Singla, Rajeev K.; Vemuri, Ravi Chandra; Mulapalli, Sartaj Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The plant Albizia amara (Roxb.) Boiv. bark was used in traditional medical practices of India to treat cardiovascular diseases. Hyperlipidemia is the greatest risk factor of coronary heart disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to screen the potential of A. amara against the condition of hyperlipidemia in rats. Materials and Methods: The antihyperlipidemic activity of A. amara ethanolic extract (AAEE) was studied on Triton X-100 induced model of hyperlipidemia in rats. Hyperlipidemia in experimental rats was evidenced by an enhancement in the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very LDL (VLDL) and decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL). Results: AAEE showed significant antihyperlipidemic effect by lowering the serum levels of biochemical parameters such as a significant reduction in the level of serum cholesterol, TG (104.1 ± 3.39), LDL (48.2 ± 2.19), VLDL (20.81 ± 0.67) and increase in HDL (47.25 ± 2.05) level with an increase in a dose of AAEE (41.39 ± 1.24) < (47.25 ± 2.05), which was similar to the standard drug atorvastatin. The results of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase also revealed that the plant extract was found to be safe on liver. Histopathological evaluation also revealed the positive effect of the plant extract. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of phytoconstituents such as saponins, glycosides and tannins. The preliminary chemical constituents stood as a strong evidence for the study. Conclusion: Summing up the evidences of the pragmatic study, we can conclude that the extract of A. amara (Roxb.) Boiv. Bark aids in declining the condition of hyperlipidemia in rats. PMID:25276061

  7. Effect of Centella asiatica on Oxidative Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun; Shu, Ping; Zhang, Youzhi; Lin, Limin; Zhou, Haihong; Xu, Zhentian; Suo, Daqin; Xie, Anzhi; Jin, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and many other metabolic diseases are related to oxidative stress. Centella asiatica is a traditional Chinese medicine whose antioxidant effect in vitro has been reported. We are interested in whether it possesses this effect in vivo and hence modulates lipid metabolism. Therefore, experiments were carried out on mice and golden hamsters regarding its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect. We observed that a fraction (CAF3) of the ethanol extract (CAE) of Centella asiatica had a cholesterol decrease of 79% and a triglyceride decrease of 95% in acute mice model, so CAF3 was further investigated in high-fat-fed hamster model. It was shown that CAF3 increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased MDA level, and it also improved TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, AST, and ALT levels. L-CAT and SR-BI gene expression in hamsters were increased. Taken together, our data suggest that the CAF3 fraction of Centella asiatica has antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. PMID:24829618

  8. Anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activity of Hemidesmus indicus in rats fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshan, Suganya; Subramaniyan, Vetriselvan; Chinnasamy, Velmurugan; Chandiran, Sarath

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dietary changes play major risk roles in oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease and modulate normal metabolic function. The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of different extracts of Hemidesmus indicus to experimental high-fat diet in wistar rats, and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: Male wistar rats were divided into 6 groups (n=6/group) and fed with a standard diet (control), high-fat diet (HFD), high-fat diet supplemented with different extracts and positive control for 9 weeks. High-fat diet induced changes in average body weight and oxidative stress and elevated levels of plasma lipid profile in rats. Results: Oral administration of methanolic extract of H. indicus (200 mg/kg) offered a significant dose-dependent protection against HFD-induced oxidative stress, as reflected in the levels of catalase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver), superoxide dismutase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver), and glutathione peroxidase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver). Hyperlipidemia condition assessed in terms of body weight, total cholesterol, free cholesterol, ester cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides, and atherogenic index and the results showed significant differences between HFD and non-HFD fed rats (p<0.001). High-fat diet treated rats showed changes in hepatic tissue architecture such as micro and macrovascular steatosis, increased fatty infiltration, and inflammation. Conclusion: The present study revealed that the methanolic extract of H. indicus protects against oxidative stress, hyperlipidemia and liver damage. PMID:27761421

  9. Simultaneous determination of five free and total flavonoids in rat plasma by ultra HPLC-MS/MS and its application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study in normal and hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofan; Zhao, Xu; Gu, Liqiang; Lv, Chunxiao; He, Bosai; Liu, Zhenzhen; Hou, Pengyi; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2014-03-15

    A simple and rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of five free flavonoids (amentoflavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, kaempferol and quercetin) and their total (free and conjugated) forms, and to compare the pharmacokinetics of these active ingredients in normal and hyperlipidemic rats. The free and total forms of these flavonoids were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The conjugated flavonoids were deconjugated by the enzyme β-Glucuronidase and Sulfatase. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on a ZORBAX Eclipse XDB-C8 USP L7 column using gradient elution. Detection was performed on a 4000Q uHPLC-MS/MS system from AB Sciex using negative ion mode in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The lower limits of quantification were 2.0-5.0ng/mL for all the analytes. Intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 15% and accuracy ranged from -9.3% to 11.0%, and the mean extraction recoveries of analytes and internal standard (IS) from rat plasma were all more than 81.7%. The validated method was successfully applied to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of five free and total analytes in rat plasma. The results indicated that the absorption of five total flavonoids in hyperlipidemia group were significantly higher than those in normal group with similar concentration-time curves.

  10. Influence of Sorghum Kafirin on Serum Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Activity in Hyperlipidemic Rats (In Vitro and In Vivo Studies)

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz Cruz, Raquel A.; Cárdenas López, José L.; González Aguilar, Gustavo A.; Astiazarán García, Humberto; Gorinstein, Shela; Canett Romero, Rafael; Robles Sánchez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the antioxidant potential of sorghum kafirin and sorghum flour and their influence on lipids and antioxidant capacity in rats. The antioxidant activity in sorghum kafirin extract measured by the DPPH and TEAC methods was increased 30 and 65 times, respectively, compared to that of its counterpart, sorghum flour. According to electrophoresis assay, the kafirins tert-butanol extract showed a high proportion of α-kafirin monomers, and its amino acid composition revealed higher hydrophobic amino acid content such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine than sorghum flour extract. Diets supplemented with sorghum kafirin extract have improved lipid metabolism and increased the serum antioxidant potential (67%) especially in rats fed with added cholesterol. The bioactive peptides generated from kafirin in vivo hydrolysis appear to be associated with the positive effect on serum lipids and antioxidant activity. According to these results, sorghum kafirin extract at the levels used in this study apparently could be used for prevention of atherosclerosis and other chronic diseases. PMID:26634202

  11. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  12. Protective effects of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains in hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Xin; Liu, Kai; Gao, Da-Wei; Hao, Ji-Kui

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) CAI6 and L. plantarum SC4 on hyperlipidemic mice. METHODS: Male Kunming mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 28 d to construct hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic mice and normal mice were assigned to 3 groups which were separately treated with L. plantarum CAI6, L. plantarum SC4, and physiological saline through oral gavage for 28 d. Total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were measured by commercially available enzyme kits. FACS Calibur flow cytometry was used to examine hepatic and renal nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression. The morphology of livers was checked by hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscope observation. RESULTS: Compared with normal mice, hyperlipidemic mice possessed significantly higher TC (3.50 ± 0.43 vs 2.89 ± 0.36, P < 0.01), TG (1.76 ± 0.07 vs 1.10 ± 0.16, P < 0.01), and LDL-C (1.72 ± 0.20 vs 0.82 ± 0.10, P< 0.01) levels, resulting in an increase of atherogenic index (AI) (2.34 ± 1.60 vs 0.93 ± 0.55, P < 0.05) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (1.43 ± 0.12 vs 0.51 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). After treatment with L. plantarum CAI6/L. plantarum SC4, TG (1.43 ± 0.27/1.54 ± 0.10 vs 1.76 ± 0.07, P < 0.01/P < 0.05) and LDL-C (1.42 ± 0.07/1.47 ± 0.12 vs 1.72 ± 0.20, P < 0.01/P < 0.01) in hyperlipidemic mice significantly decreased. In addition, TC, HDL-C, AI, and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were all positively changed. Meanwhile, the treatment markedly alleviated hepatic steatosis and significantly stimulated Nrf2 expression (73.79 ± 0.80/72.96 ± 1.22 vs 54.94 ± 1.84, P < 0.01/P < 0.01) in hepatocytes of hyperlipidemic mice. CONCLUSION: L. plantarum CAI6 and L. plantarum SC4 may protect against cardiovascular disease by lipid metabolism regulation and Nrf2-induced antioxidative defense in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:23716997

  13. Effects of F-1394, an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, on ACAT activity in HepG2 cells and on hepatic secretion of lipids in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: possible role of hepatic ACAT in very low density lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Aragane, K; Kusunoki, J; Kitamine, T; Yamaura, T; Ohnishi, H

    1998-03-01

    We examined the inhibitory potency of F-1394 ((1S,2S)-2-[3-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)-3-nonylureido]cyclohexane -1-yl 3-[(4R)-N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3-dioxane-4-carbonyl)amino]propionate), an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, on ACAT activity and its hypolipidemic effect. F-1394 inhibited whole-cell ACAT activity in HepG2 cells with an IC50 value of 42 nM. The potency of F-1394 was greater than that of the five other ACAT inhibitors tested (YM-17E, CI-976, 57-118, CL-277,082 and DL-melinamide). In rats made hyperlipidemic by Triton WR-1339, F-1394 caused a reduction in the hepatic secretion rate of cholesterol. These data suggest that inhibition of hepatic ACAT activity helps to reduce very low density lipoprotein secretion from the liver into the circulation.

  14. Hyperlipidemic myeloma: review of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Goede, Jeroen S; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Schanz, Urs; Seebach, Jörg D

    2010-06-01

    Hyperlipidemic myeloma is a rare and poorly understood variant of multiple myeloma. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with hyperlipidemic myeloma, skin xanthomas and hyperviscosity syndrome who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. A comprehensive literature search identified 52 additional cases with plasma cell disease and hyperlipidemia. A detailed analysis revealed several characteristics of these patients as compared to multiple myeloma with normal lipid status: (1) IgA paraprotein was present in the majority (53% vs. 21% in classical multiple myeloma). (2) Skin xanthomas, especially in the palmar creases, elbows, and knees were common (70%). (3) Hyperviscosity syndrome occurred more often (26% vs. 2-6%). While conventional lipid-lowering therapy had only marginal effects, successful anti-myeloma therapy also reduced hyperlipidemia. Analyses of the mechanisms leading to hyperlipidemia documented complexes of paraprotein and lipoprotein in 75% of the 32 cases tested, suggesting an inhibitory role of the paraprotein on lipid degradation. In conclusion, the clinical characteristics, the therapeutic options, and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of hyperlipidemic myeloma are comprehensively reported using the available data from all 53 published cases in the literature.

  15. Increased hair selenium concentration in hyperlipidemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, Péter; Seres, Ildikó; Jenei, Zoltán; Juhász, Imre; Paragh, György

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element with potential anti-atherogenic and antioxidant effects. Experimental data suggest that selenium might be beneficial in the prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications, whereas human epidemiological studies have yielded conflicting results. Data on hair selenium status in hyperlipidemic patients are still lacking. Therefore, we analysed selenium concentrations by X-ray fluorescence in the hair of 81 statin-naïve patients with newly diagnosed Fredrickson-type IIa and IIb hyperlipoproteinemia and compared their data with 43 healthy volunteers. We also assessed the frequency of other classical risk factors of atherosclerosis. Hair selenium levels were found to be significantly higher in hyperlipidemic patients compared with volunteers with normal lipid levels. Also, a significantly increased number of traditional atherosclerosis risk factors were observed in hyperlipidemic patients with hair selenium concentrations above the median in contrast to those with below. Our results suggest that high hair selenium status might be associated with adverse blood lipid profile together with an increased number of traditional risk factors in a selenium-deplete population. These findings warrant further investigations to study the impact of selenium supplementation on the incidence of cardiovascular events. PMID:23402643

  16. In vitro and In vivo Antioxidant, Anti-hyperlipidemic Properties and Chemical Characterization of Centella asiatica (L.) Extract

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sima; Deori, Meetali; Elancheran, R.; Kotoky, Jibon; Devi, Rajlakshmi

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the phenolic compounds present in Centella asiatica (L.) (C. asiatica) extract and evaluate the respective antioxidant potential as well as its cholesterol-lowering effects in the experimental animal model. Herein, the antioxidant potential of extracts was assessed by its free radical scavenging activity such as 2, 2-diphenyl -1- picrylhydrazyl as well as reducing capability. The anti-hyperlipidemic effects of C. asiatica extract (CAE) were evaluated in high cholesterol-fed (HCF) rats for 4 weeks, where different concentrations of extracts (0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/kg/day) were orally administrated daily. Lipid and antioxidant profiles, including total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), together with the indices of hepatic functions were also examined. C. asiatica revealed excellent free radical scavenging activity as revealed by 2-2- diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay, with the IC50 values (9.62 ± 0.88 μg/mL). Furthermore, C. asiatica extracts and fenofibrate remarkably lowered the level of TC, TG, LDL-C, and showed elevated levels of HDL-C, SOD. The histopathological observations further demonstrated clear differentiation and structural changes in liver of HCF and CAE treated group. Furthermore, gulonic acid, ferulic acid, kaempferol, chlorogenic acid, and asiatic acid were identified to be the major components which might be responsible for the antioxidant activity of the C. asiatica extract as evidenced from an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometer. Taken together, these results signifies the excellent antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic properties of C. asiatica leaf extracts, which might be useful for the treatment of oxidative-stress related diseases such as hyperlipidemia. PMID:27840607

  17. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  18. Aloe barbadensis Mill. formulation restores lipid profile to normal in a letrozole-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bhavna N.; Maharjan, Radha H.; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), characterized by ovulatory infertility and hyperandrogenism, is associated with metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Almost 70% PCOS women have abnormal serum lipid levels (dyslipidemia) and 50% of these women are obese. Several classes of pharmacological agents have been used to manage dyslipidemia. However, studies have shown adverse effects associated with these drugs. In the light of alternate therapy, many medicinal herbs have been reported to show hypoglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic potential. Aloe barbadensis Mill. or Aloe vera is reported as one such herb. This study was to evaluate the lipid correcting effect of Aloe vera gel (AVG) in a PCOS rat model. Materials and Methods: PCOS was induced in Charles Foster female rats by oral administration of non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole (0.5 mg/kg body weight, 21 days). All rats were hyperglycemic and 90% rats also showed elevated plasma triglycerides, elevated LDL cholesterol levels, and lowered plasma HDL cholesterol levels indicative of a dyslipidemic profile. PCOS positive rats with an aberrant lipid profile were selected for treatment. An AVG formulation (1 ml (10 mg)/day, 30 days) was administered orally. Results and Conclusion: AVG treated PCOS rats exhibited significant reduction in plasma triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels, with an increase in HDL cholesterol. The gel treatment also caused reversion of abnormal estrous cyclicity, glucose intolerance, and lipid metabolizing enzyme activities, bringing them to normal. In conclusion, AVG has phyto components with anti-hyperlipidemic effects and it has shown efficacy in management of not only PCOS but also the associated metabolic complication : dyslipidemia. PMID:22518083

  19. Antihyperlipidemic activity of adenosine triphosphate in rabbits fed a high-fat diet and hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianshan; Liang, Libin; Tong, Tong; Qin, Yuguo; Xu, Yanping; Tong, Xinglong

    2016-10-01

    Context Recently, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was occasionally found to decrease the triglyceride (TG) levels in several hyperlipidemic patients in our clinical practice. Objective The study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic effects of ATP in a high-fat fed rabbit model and hyperlipidemic patients. Materials and methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into three groups of eight animals each as follows: normal diet, high-fat diet and high-fat diet + ATP group. ATP supplementation (40 mg/day) was started at the 20th day and lasted for 10 days. Serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), TG, LDL-C, HDL-C were measured on the 20th day and 30th day. Heart, liver and aorta were subjected histopathological examination. Twenty outpatients diagnosed primary hyperlipidemia took ATP at a dose of 60 mg twice a day for 1 week. Results Feeding rabbits with a high-fat diet resulted in a significant elevation of lipid parameters including TC, TG, LDL-C, VLDL-C compared to the normal diet group (p < 0.01). ATP treatment significantly decreased serum TG level (p < 0.01), whilst other parameters remained statistically unaltered. Meanwhile, ATP significantly reduced the thickness of fat layer in cardiac epicardium (p < 0.05) and pathological gradation of ballooning degeneration in hepatocytes (p < 0.05). After taking ATP for 1 week, hyperlipidemia patients exhibited a significant decrease of TG (p < 0.01), but other lipid parameters had no significant change. Discussion and conclusion The study indicates that ATP selectively decreases serum TG levels in high-fat diet rabbits and hyperlipidemic patients. Therefore, ATP supplementation may provide an effective approach to control TG level.

  20. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Lixia; Gao, Xiuzhi; Jia, Hui; Lian, Zhengxing; Tong, Nengsheng; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats, female Wistar rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) for 28 d to generate hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic rats were assigned to four groups, which were individually treated with three different dosages of K. marxianus M3+HCD or physiological saline+HCD via oral gavage for 28 d. The total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in the serum and liver of the rats were measured using commercially available enzyme kits. In addition, the liver morphology was also examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscopy. According to our results, the serum and liver TC, TG, LDL-C levels and atherogenic index (AI) were significantly decreased in rats orally administered K. marxianus M3 (p <0.01), and the HDL-C levels and anti atherogenic index (AAI) were significantly increased (p <0.01) compared to the control group. Moreover, K. marxianus M3 treatment also reduced the build-up of lipid droplets in the liver and exhibited normal hepatocytes, suggesting a protective effect of K. marxianus M3 in hyperlipidemic rats. PMID:26273253

  1. Cardiometabolic Risk in Hyperlipidemic Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Leutner, Michael; Wielandner, Alice; Howorka, Eleonora; Prünner, Marlies; Bozkurt, Latife; Harreiter, Jürgen; Prosch, Helmut; Schlager, Oliver; Charwat-Resl, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate sex specific differences of metabolic and clinical characteristics of treated hyperlipidemic men and women (HL-men and HL-women). Methods. In this study vascular and metabolic characteristics of 35 HL-women and 64 HL-men were assessed. In addition a sex specific analysis of metabolic and nutritional habits of HL-patients with prediabetes (HL-IGR) was done. Results. HL-women were older and had favourable concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol), triglycerides (TG), and triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-ratio) but were also shown to have higher concentrations of lipoprotein-a compared to HL-men. HL-men were characterized as having higher levels of liver-specific parameters and body weight as well as being more physically active compared to HL-women. Brain natriuretic peptide (pro-BNP) was higher in HL-women than HL-men, while no differences in metabolic syndrome and glycemic parameters were shown. HL-IGR-women were also older and still had a better profile of sex specific lipid parameters, as well as a lower body weight compared to HL-IGR-men. No differences were seen in vascular parameters such as the intima media thickness (IMT). Conclusion. HL-women were older and had overall more favourable concentrations of lipid parameters and liver enzymes but did not differ regarding vascular morphology and insulin sensitivity compared to HL-men of comparable body mass index (BMI). PMID:27895666

  2. Iron overload alters glucose homeostasis, causes liver steatosis, and increases serum triacylglycerols in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maísa; Silva, Marcelo E; de Paula, Heberth; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of iron overload with a hyperlipidemic diet on the histologic feature of hepatic tissue, the lipid and glycemic serum profiles, and the markers of oxidative damage and stress in a rat model. Twenty-four male Fischer rats, purchased from Experimental Nutrition Laboratory, Federal University of Ouro Preto, were assigned to 4 equal groups, 2 were fed a standard cholesterol-free diet (group C or control and CI or control with iron) containing 8.0% soybean oil and 2 were fed a hyperlipidemic diet (group H or hyperlipidemic and HI or hyperlipidemic with iron) containing 1.0% cholesterol and 25.0% soybean oil. A total of 50 mg of iron was administered to rats in groups CI and HI in 5 equal doses (1 every 3 weeks for a 16-week period) by intraperitoneal injections of 0.1 mL of iron dextran solution (100 g Fe(2+)/L; Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The other rats in groups C and H were treated in a similar manner but with sterile saline (0.1 mL). Irrespective of the diet, iron excess enhanced serum triacylglycerols (P < .05) and reduced serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels (P < .05) but did not affect serum cholesterol concentration. Histologic analysis showed steatosis in groups H and to a lesser extent in HI. No significant differences (P > .05) were observed in paraoxonase activities or in serum levels of free or total sulfhydryl radicals, malondialdehyde, or total antioxidants. The findings suggest that iron excess in the rat probably modifies lipid metabolism and, as a consequence, alters glucose homeostasis and increases the level of serum triacylglycerols but not of cholesterol.

  3. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations. PMID:27379252

  4. Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Colaço, Bruno; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-03-15

    Mammary cancer is one of the most common cancers, victimizing more than half a million of women worldwide every year. Despite all the studies in this field, the current therapeutic approaches are not effective and have several devastating effects for patients. In this way, the need to better understand the mammary cancer biopathology and find effective therapies led to the development of several rodent models over years. With this review, the authors intended to provide the readers with an overview of the rat models used to study mammary carcinogenesis, with a special emphasis on chemically-induced models.

  5. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  6. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  7. 16-Dehydropregnenolone lowers serum cholesterol by up-regulation of CYP7A1 in hyperlipidemic male hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Kumar, Durgesh; Bhateria, Manisha; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2017-04-01

    16-Dehydropregnenolone (DHP) has been developed and patented as a promising antihyperlipidemic agent by CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI), India. Although DHP is implicated in controlling cholesterol homeostasis, the mechanism underlying its pharmacological effect in hyperlipidemic disease models is poorly understood. In the present study, we postulated that DHP lowers serum lipids through regulating the key hepatic genes accountable for cholesterol metabolism. The hypothesis was tested on golden Syrian hamsters fed with high-fat diet (HFD) following oral administration of DHP at a dose of 72mg/kg body weight for a period of one week. The serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total bile acids (TBA) in feces were measured. Real time comparative gene expression studies were performed for CYP7A1, LXRα and PPARα level in liver tissue of hamsters. The results revealed that the DHP profoundly decreased the levels of serum TC, TG, LDL-C and atherogenic index (AI), whilst elevated the HDL-C/TC ratio. Besides, DHP exhibited an anti-hyperlipidemic effect in the HFD induced hyperlipidemic hamsters by means of: (1) up-regulating the gene expression of CYP7A1 encoded cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, that promotes the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid; (2) inducing the gene expression of transcription factors LXRα and PPARα; (3) increasing the TBA excretion through feces. Collectively, the findings presented confer the hypolipidemic activity of DHP via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 pathway that promotes cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and bile acid excretion.

  8. Fimasartan Ameliorates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease through PPARδ Regulation in Hyperlipidemic and Hypertensive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yoo-Na; Han, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Min; Jeong, Jong-Min

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of fimasartan on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperlipidemic and hypertensive conditions, the levels of biomarkers related to fatty acid metabolism were determined in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells treated by high fatty acid and liver and visceral fat tissue samples of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) given high-fat diet. In HepG2 cells and liver tissues, fimasartan was shown to increase the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), phosphorylated 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK), phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (p-ACC), malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD), medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and it led to a decrease in the protein levels of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSDH1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Fimasartan decreased lipid contents in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells and liver tissues. In addition, fimasartan increased the adiponectin level in visceral fat tissues. The antiadipogenic effects of fimasartan were offset by PPARδ antagonist (GSK0660). Consequently, fimasartan ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease mainly through the activation of oxidative metabolism represented by PPARδ-AMPK-PGC-1α pathway. PMID:28386270

  9. Rosiglitazone attenuates renal injury caused by hyperlipidemic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Yan, Zhaopeng; Wu, Xingmao; Ji, Kaiqiang; Wang, Haiyuan; Zang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemic pancreatitis (HP) is a serious inflammatory disease with very high mortality and multiple organ injuries including renal injury. Rosiglitazone (Ros), an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), was reported to show a protective role against pancreatitis. However, whether Ros has an effect on renal injury caused by HP is not yet clear. In the present study, the function of Ros was explored using ELISA, RT-PCR, western blot, PAS staining and immunohistochemistry. Results of this study showed that Ros could inhibit the activation of NF-κB and MAPK P38 signaling pathways, relieve inflammatory response and inhibit cell apoptosis, thus attenuating renal injury caused by HP. This study suggested that Ros might be a promising drug for the treatment of renal injury caused by HP and also laid theoretical foundation for the development of renal injury treatment. PMID:26191125

  10. PBPK MODELING OF DELTAMETHRIN IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin is cleared nearly twice as rapidly in human liver microsomes compared to rat liver microsomes. A species difference such as this could influence the toxic potency of deltamethrin between rats and humans. PBPK modeling is a tool that can be ut...

  11. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  12. Hyperglycemic and Hyperlipidemic Conditions Alter Cardiac Cell Biomechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Jarett; Hariharan, Venkatesh; Huang, Hayden

    2014-01-01

    Currently, many diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) studies focus on either in vitro molecular pathways or in vivo whole-heart properties such as ejection fraction. However, as DC is primarily a disease caused by changes in structural and functional properties, such studies may not precisely identify the influence of hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemia in producing specific cellular changes, such as increased myocardial stiffness or diastolic dysfunction. To address this need, we developed an in vitro approach to examine how structural and functional properties may change as a result of a diabetic environment. Particle-tracking microrheology was used to characterize the biomechanical properties of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts under hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemic conditions. We showed that myocytes, but not fibroblasts, exhibited increased stiffness under diabetic conditions. Hyperlipidemia, but not hyperglycemia, led to increased cFos expression. Although direct application of reactive oxygen species had only limited effects that altered myocyte properties, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine had broader effects in limiting glucose or fatty-acid alterations. Changes consistent with clinical DC alterations occur in cells cultured in elevated glucose or fatty acids. However, the individual roles of glucose, reactive oxygen species, and fatty acids are varied, suggesting multiple pathway involvement. PMID:24896111

  13. Hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic conditions alter cardiac cell biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Jarett; Hariharan, Venkatesh; Huang, Hayden

    2014-06-03

    Currently, many diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) studies focus on either in vitro molecular pathways or in vivo whole-heart properties such as ejection fraction. However, as DC is primarily a disease caused by changes in structural and functional properties, such studies may not precisely identify the influence of hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemia in producing specific cellular changes, such as increased myocardial stiffness or diastolic dysfunction. To address this need, we developed an in vitro approach to examine how structural and functional properties may change as a result of a diabetic environment. Particle-tracking microrheology was used to characterize the biomechanical properties of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts under hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemic conditions. We showed that myocytes, but not fibroblasts, exhibited increased stiffness under diabetic conditions. Hyperlipidemia, but not hyperglycemia, led to increased cFos expression. Although direct application of reactive oxygen species had only limited effects that altered myocyte properties, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine had broader effects in limiting glucose or fatty-acid alterations. Changes consistent with clinical DC alterations occur in cells cultured in elevated glucose or fatty acids. However, the individual roles of glucose, reactive oxygen species, and fatty acids are varied, suggesting multiple pathway involvement.

  14. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  15. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  16. The Helsinki Rat Microsurgical Sidewall Aneurysm Model

    PubMed Central

    Marbacher, Serge; Marjamaa, Johan; Abdelhameed, Essam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Frösen, Juhana

    2014-01-01

    Experimental saccular aneurysm models are necessary for testing novel surgical and endovascular treatment options and devices before they are introduced into clinical practice. Furthermore, experimental models are needed to elucidate the complex aneurysm biology leading to rupture of saccular aneurysms. Several different kinds of experimental models for saccular aneurysms have been established in different species. Many of them, however, require special skills, expensive equipment, or special environments, which limits their widespread use. A simple, robust, and inexpensive experimental model is needed as a standardized tool that can be used in a standardized manner in various institutions. The microsurgical rat abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm model combines the possibility to study both novel endovascular treatment strategies and the molecular basis of aneurysm biology in a standardized and inexpensive manner. Standardized grafts by means of shape, size, and geometry are harvested from a donor rat's descending thoracic aorta and then transplanted to a syngenic recipient rat. The aneurysms are sutured end-to-side with continuous or interrupted 9-0 nylon sutures to the infrarenal abdominal aorta. We present step-by-step procedural instructions, information on necessary equipment, and discuss important anatomical and surgical details for successful microsurgical creation of an abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm in the rat. PMID:25350840

  17. Effect of atorvastatin and diet on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score in hyperlipidemic chickens.

    PubMed

    Martín-Castillo, Antonia; Castells, Maria Teresa; Adánez, Gracia; Polo, Maria Teresa Sánchez; Pérez, Bartolomé García; Ayala, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is part of the spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes from simple steatosis and steatohepatitis, to the most severe cirrhosis and carcinoma, which develops in the absence of excessive alcohol intake. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in affluent societies. There is no proven treatment for NAFLD/NASH. One of the most frequent adverse effects of statins is an increase in hepatic aminotransferases. Studies that evaluate if the benefits of statins overcome the risks in NASH are lacking. The present study was conceived to explore the effect of both atorvastatin and diet on regression of steatohepatitis, using a chicken experimental model induced by a hyperlipidemic diet (HD). Plasma lipid levels, liver enzymes and hepatic histopathology, as well as image analysis were performed to determine changes in liver lipid deposits and inflammatory infiltration. Features of steatosis, cell-ballooning, and inflammation were scored to obtain the NAFLD activity score (NAS). A severe level of steatosis was found in animals fed on HD. Atorvastatin treated groups showed smaller size of lipid deposits and a lower level of inflammation than non-treated groups. Atorvastatin therapy induced a significant reduction of hepatocellular damage, even though in the animals which continuously received a hyperlipidemic diet. The combination of atorvastatin therapy and a standard diet produced the lowest decrease of NAS. Our results show that atorvastatin therapy not only decreased plasmatic levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, but also induced a reduction of liver steatosis, inflammation and hepatocellular damage, without increasing plasmatic aminotransferase levels.

  18. Digital replantation teaching model in rats.

    PubMed

    Ad-El, D D; Harper, A; Hoffman, L A

    2000-01-01

    Replant surgery is a complex procedure that requires advanced microsurgical skills and is usually performed as an emergency operation, lasting many hours. For these reasons, teaching replantation is difficult. Although teaching models exist, they are often too general or complicated for routine use and do not simulate the stages and the pitfalls of human replant surgery. We have designed a model that is simple and imitates human replant surgery. After reviewing the rat anatomy, students dissect and replant a rat hind limb that has been sharply amputated by the instructor. They follow the same principles of "real" surgery like debridement, minimizing ischemia time, and stable fixation before anatomosis of vessels. After marking the structures, bony fixation followed by vessel and nerve anastomosis are performed. Muscle is reattached to the skin and limb vascularity evaluated. After we designed this model, plastic surgery residents performed the technique on 10 rats. An 80% limb viability rate was achieved. This model is simple to perform, simulates all the relevant structures and pitfalls of human surgery, and the rats are relatively cheap and can be used for other parallel projects.

  19. Effects of Apple Consumption on Lipid Profile of Hyperlipidemic and Overweight Men

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Mohammad Reza; Haghighatjoo, Elham; Shidfar, Farzad; Afshari, Shirin; Gohari, Mahmood Reza; Ziaee, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Fruits and vegetables may be beneficial on lipid profile of hyperlipidemic subjects. The present study was aimed to verify the effect of golden delicious apple on Lipid Profile in hyperlipidemic and overweight men. Methods: Forty six hyperlipidemic and overweight men were randomly divided into two groups. Intervention group received 300g golden delicious apple per day for 8 weeks. Control group had the regular dietary regimen for the same period of time. Blood samples were analyzed for serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL), apolipoprotein B (Apo B), lipoprotein a (Lp a) and LDL/HDL ratio at baseline and after intervention. Results: Total polyphenols and fibers were 485 mg/kg and 4.03 g/100g in fresh apple respectively. After 8 weeks, significant statistical differences were observed considering the TG and VLDL levels between two groups, but no significant differences were observed regarding TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, Apo (B), Lp (a) and LDL/HDL ratio. Conclusions: Consumption of Golden delicious apple may be increased serum TG and VLDL in hyperlipidemic and overweight men. We need more studies to assay the effect of apple consumption on serum TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, Apo (B), Lp (a) and LDL/HDL ratio. PMID:21603015

  20. MODELING OPERANT BEHAVIOR IN THE PARKINSONIAN RAT

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Irene; Reilly, Mark P.; Sanabria, Federico; Posadas-Sánchez, Diana; Chavez, Claudia L.; Banerjee, Nikhil; Killeen, Peter; Castañeda, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical principles of reinforcement (MPR; Killeen, 1994) is a quantitative model of operant behavior that contains 3 parameters representing motor capacity (δ), motivation (a), and short term memory (λ). The present study applied MPR to characterize the effects of bilateral infusions of 6-OHDA into the substantia nigra pars compacta in the rat, a model of Parkinson’s disease. Rats were trained to lever press under a 5-component fixed ratio (5, 15, 30, 60, and 100) schedule of food reinforcement. Rats were tested for 15 days prior to dopamine lesions and again for 15 days post-lesion. To characterize functional loss relative to lesion size, rats were grouped according to the extent and the degree of lateralization of their dopamine loss. Response rates decreased as a function of dopamine depletion, primarily at intermediate ratios. MPR accounted for 98% of variance in pre- and post-lesion response rates. Consistent with reported disruptions in motor behavior induced by dopaminergic lesions, estimates of δ increased when dopamine was severely depleted. There was no support for different estimates of a based on pre- and post-lesion performance of any lesion group, suggesting that dopamine loss has negligible effects on incentive motivation. The present study demonstrates the usefulness of combining operant techniques with a theoretical model to better understand the effects of a neurochemical manipulation. PMID:19073222

  1. On the rat model of human osteopenias and osteoporoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Harold M.; Jee, Webster S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea that rats cannot model human osteopenias errs. The same mechanisms control gains in bone mass (longitudinal bone growth and modeling drifts) and losses (BMU-based remodeling), in young and aged rats and humans. Furthermore, they respond similarly in rats and man to mechanical influences, hormones, drugs and other agents.

  2. Oxytocin administration attenuates atherosclerosis and inflammation in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Angela; Rossetti, Maria A; Mendez, Armando J; Noller, Crystal M; Herderick, Edward E; Gonzales, Julie A; Schneiderman, Neil; McCabe, Philip M

    2013-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neurohypophyseal peptide traditionally associated with female reproductive functioning, and more recently with prosocial behavior. OT and its receptor are also expressed in the heart and vascular tissue and play a role in cardiovascular homeostasis. In vitro, it has been demonstrated that OT decreases NADPH-dependent superoxide production and pro-inflammatory cytokine release from vascular endothelial cells and macrophages, suggesting that OT may attenuate pathophysiological processes involved with atherosclerotic lesion formation. The present study sought to determine the effect of chronic exogenous OT administration on inflammation and atherosclerosis in an animal model of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis, the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit. Twenty-two, 3-month-old WHHLs were surgically implanted with osmotic mini-pumps containing OT (n=11) or vehicle (n=11), and then were individually housed for the entire study. Blood and 24-h urine samples were taken at baseline and after 8 (midpoint) and 16 (endpoint) weeks of treatment. At endpoint, the aortas and visceral fat samples were dissected and stored for analyses. There were no group differences in body weight, serum lipids, plasma/urinary measures of oxidative stress, plasma cortisol or urinary catecholamines over the 16-week treatment. OT-treated animals exhibited significantly lower plasma C-reactive protein levels at midpoint and endpoint and developed significantly less atherosclerosis in the thoracic aorta relative to vehicle control animals at endpoint (p<0.05). Cytokine gene expression from visceral adipose tissue samples suggested that there was a decrease in adipose tissue inflammation in the OT-treated group compared to the vehicle control group, however these differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic peripheral OT administration can inhibit inflammation and atherosclerotic lesion development.

  3. Age- and sex-related differences in nuclear lipid content and nucleoside triphosphatase activity in the JCR:LA-cp corpulent rat.

    PubMed

    Czubryt, M P; Russell, J C; Sarantopoulos, J; Gilchrist, J S; Pierce, G N

    1997-11-01

    The putative role of the nuclear nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) is to provide energy to the nuclear pore complex for poly A(+) mRNA export. Previous work has demonstrated that liver nuclear NTPase activity is greater in 6 month old corpulent (cp/cp) female JCR:LA rats, a hyperlipidemic rat model, compared to lean (+/?) animals. This increase appeared to be related to increases in nuclear membrane cholesterol content. The current study extended these initial data to compare NTPase activity as a function of age and sex in isolated JCR:LA-cp rat liver nuclei, to further test the hypothesis that nuclear membrane cholesterol may modulate NTPase activity. NTPase activity was increased in cp/cp female animals compared to +/? females at all ages studied, with Vmax values increased by 60-176%. Membrane integrity of cp/cp female nuclei was reduced compared to +/? female nuclei. Nuclear membrane cholesterol levels increased linearly with age by 50, 150 and 250% in 3, 6 and 9 month old cp/cp females over leans. In contrast, nuclei from cp/cp males exhibited only minor, isolated changes in NTPase activity. Furthermore, there were no significant changes in nuclear cholesterol content or membrane integrity in the less hyperlipidemic male animals at any age. These data suggest that altered lipid metabolism may lead to changes in nuclear membrane structure, which in turn may alter NTPase activity and functioning of the nuclear pore complex.

  4. Chronic Paraspinal Muscle Injury Model in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Tack Geun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to establish an animal model of chronic paraspinal muscle injury in rat. Methods Fifty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into experimental group (n=30), sham (n=15), and normal group (n=9). Incision was done from T7 to L2 and paraspinal muscles were detached from spine and tied at each level. The paraspinal muscles were exposed and untied at 2 weeks after surgery. Sham operation was done by paraspinal muscles dissection at the same levels and wound closure was done without tying. Kyphotic index and thoracolumbar Cobb's angle were measured at preoperative, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the first surgery for all groups. The rats were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the first surgery, and performed histological examinations. Results At 4 weeks after surgery, the kyphotic index decreased, but, Cobb's angle increased significantly in the experimental group (p<0.05), and then that were maintained until the end of the experiment. However, there were no significant differences of the kyphotic index and Cobb's angle between sham and normal groups. In histological examinations, necrosis and fibrosis were observed definitely and persisted until 12 weeks after surgery. There were also presences of regenerated muscle cells which nucleus is at the center of cytoplasm, centronucleated myofibers. Conclusion Our chronic injury model of paraspinal muscles in rats shows necrosis and fibrosis in the muscles for 12 weeks after surgery, which might be useful to study the pathophysiology of the degenerative thoracolumbar kyphosis or degeneration of paraspinal muscles. PMID:27651859

  5. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  6. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  7. MODELING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND PHARMACOKINETICS IN RAT PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK model predictions of internal dosimetry in young rats were compared to adult animals for benzene, chloroform (CHL), methylene chloride, methyl ethly ketone (MEK), perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene.

  8. The emerging role for rat models in gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dwinell, Melinda R.; Lazar, Jozef; Geurts, Aron M.

    2011-01-01

    Rat models have been used for many decades to study physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Prior to the release of the rat genome and new technologies for targeting gene manipulation, the rat had been the underdog in the genomics era, despite the abundance of physiological data compared to the mouse. The overarching goal of biomedical research is to improve health and advance medical science. Translating human disease gene discovery and validation in the rat, through the use of emerging technologies and integrated tools and databases, is providing power to understand the genetics, environmental influences, and biology of disease. In this review, we will briefly outline the rat models, bioinformatic tools, and technologies that are changing the landscape of translational research. The strategies used to translate disease traits to genes to function, and ultimately, to improve human health will be discussed. Finally, our perspectives on how rat models will continue to positively impact biomedical research will be provided. PMID:21732192

  9. Psychopharmacology of male rat sexual behavior: modeling human sexual dysfunctions?

    PubMed

    Olivier, B; Chan, J S W; Pattij, T; de Jong, T R; Oosting, R S; Veening, J G; Waldinger, M D

    2006-01-01

    Most of our current understanding of the neurobiology, neuroanatomy and psychopharmacology of sexual behavior and ejaculatory function has been derived from preclinical studies in the rat. When a large population of male rats is tested on sexual activity during a number of successive tests, over time individual rats display a very stable sexual behavior that is either slow, normal or fast as characterized by the number of ejaculations performed. These sexual endophenotypes are postulated as rat counterparts of premature (fast rats) or retarded ejaculation (slow rats). Psychopharmacology in these endophenotypes helps to delineate the underlying mechanisms and pathology. This is illustrated by the effects of serotonergic antidepressants and serotonergic compounds on sexual and ejaculatory behavior of rats. These preclinical studies and models contribute to a better understanding of the neurobiology of ejaculation and boost the development of novel drug targets to treat ejaculatory disorders such as premature and retarded ejaculation.

  10. Adipose Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Hyperlipidemia-associated Detrusor-overactivity in a Rat Model System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Shindel, Alan W.; Ning, Hongxiu; Lin, Guiting; Harraz, Ahmed M.; Wang, Guifang; Garcia, Maurice; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It has been previously demonstrated that adipose tissue-derived stem cell (ADSC) can differentiate into muscle and neuron-like cells in vitro. In this study, we investigate the utility of ADSC in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) in obese hyperlipidemic rats (OHR). Materials and Methods Hyperlipidemia was induced in healthy rats by administration of a high fat diet. The resulting OHR were then treated with bladder injection of saline or ADSC or tail vein injection of ADSC. Bladder function was assessed by 24-h voiding behavior study and conscious cystometry. Bladder histology was assessed using immunostaining and trichrome staining followed by image analysis. Results Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly higher in OHR than in normal rats (p < 0.01). Micturition intervals were shorter in the saline-treated OHR relative to normal rats, OHR that received ADSC via tail vein, and OHR that received ADSC by bladder injection (143 ± 28.7 vs 407 ± 77.9 vs 281 ± 43.9 vs 368 ± 66.7 seconds respectively, p = 0.0084). Smooth muscle content of the bladder wall was significantly lower in OHR than in normal animals (p = 0.0061) while there was no significant difference between OHR groups. Nerve content and blood vessel density were lower in control than in ADSC-treated OHR. Conclusions Hyperlipidemia is associated with increased urinary frequency and diminished bladder blood vessel and nerve density in rats. Treatment with ADSC ameliorates these adverse effects and holds promise as a potential new therapy for OAB. PMID:20096880

  11. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  12. Variation in rat sciatic nerve anatomy: implications for a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Asato, F; Butler, M; Blomberg, H; Gordh, T

    2000-03-01

    We discovered a variation of rat sciatic nerve anatomy as an incidental finding during the anatomical exploration of the nerve lesion site in a rat neuropathic pain model. To confirm the composition and distribution of rat sciatic nerve, macroscopic anatomical investigation was performed in both left and right sides in 24 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In all rats, the L4 and L5 spinal nerves were fused tightly to form the sciatic nerve. However, the L6 spinal nerve did not fuse with this nerve completely as a part of the sciatic nerve, but rather sent a thin branch to it in 13 rats (54%), whereas in the remaining 11 rats (46%), L6 ran separately along with the sciatic nerve. Also, the L3 spinal nerve sent a thin branch to the L4 spinal nerve or sciatic nerve in 6 rats (25%). We conclude that the components of sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats vary from L3 to L6; however, the major components are L4 and L5 macroscopically. This finding is in contrast to the standard textbooks of rat anatomy which describe the sciatic nerve as having major contributions from L4, L5, and L6.

  13. Distraction of skeletal muscle: evolution of a rat model.

    PubMed

    Green, Stuart A; Horton, Eric; Baker, Michael; Utkan, Ali; Caiozzo, Vincent

    2002-10-01

    To better study the effects of limb lengthening on skeletal muscle, the authors developed a rat model that uses a miniature external skeletal fixator applied to the tibia of an adult Sprague-Dawley rat. The mounting and lengthening protocols follow the principles developed by Ilizarov. With the initial version of the fixator, the rats had progressive equinus contractures develop because the calf muscles resisted elongation. By incorporating a footplate in the distraction apparatus, tibial lengthening can be achieved without concomitant equinus.

  14. Hypolipidemic Effects of Alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamsters.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Kou, Shuming; Zou, Zongyao; Hu, Yinran; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic activity of five major alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis using high-fat- and high-cholesterol-induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. Hyperlipidemic hamsters were treated with coptisine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids with a dose of 46.7 mg/kg × day for 140 days. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids were examined after alkaloid treatment. The results showed that all therapy agents prevented body weight gain, reduced the serum total cholesterol, and increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of hamsters. Berberine, jatrorrhizine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids decreased the triglyceride level in hyperlipidemic hamsters, while coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids significantly suppressed the elevation of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly elevated by berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids, and orlistat. Notably, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids possess a much stronger lipid-lowering effect than the pure Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids could retard the synthesis of cholesterol by downregulating the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and accelerate the clearance of lipids by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and uncoupling protein-2 expression. These findings highlight the critical role of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids in hyperlipidemia treatment. Thus, they need to be considered in future therapeutic approaches.

  15. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  16. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  17. Generation of TALEN-mediated FH knockout rat model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dandan; Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Cao, Jing; Fan, Zhirui; Fan, Huijie; Yuan, Long; Xu, Benling; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hongquan; Ji, Zhenyu; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-09-20

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are valuable tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. Here we utilized this technique for efficient site-specific gene modification to create a fumarate hydratase (FH) gene knockout rat model, in which there was an 11 base-pair deletion in the first exon of the FH gene in 111 rats. 18 live-born targeted mutation offsprings were produced from 80 injected zygotes with 22.5% efficiency, indicating high TALEN knockout success in rat zygots. Only heterozygous deletion was observed in the offsprings. Sixteen pairs of heterozygous FH knockout (FH+/-) rats were arranged for mating experiments for six months without any homozygous KO rat identified. Sequencing from the pregnant rats embryo samples showed no homozygous FH KO, indicating that homozygous FH KO is embryonically lethal. Comparatively, the litter size was decreased in both male and female FH+/- KO rats. There was no behaviour difference between the FH+/- KO and the control rats except that the FH+/- KO male rats showed significantly higher body weight in the 16-week observation period. Clinical haematology and biochemical examinations showed hematopoietic and kidney dysfunction in the FH+/- KO rats. Small foci of anaplastic lesions of tubular epithelial cells around glomeruli were identified in the FH+/- kidney, and these anaplastic cells were comparatively positive for Ki67, p53 and Sox9, and such findings are most probably related to the kidney dysfunction reflected by the biochemical examinations of the rats. In conclusion, we have successfully established an FH+/- KO rat model, which will be useful for further functional FH studies.

  18. Generation of TALEN-mediated FH knockout rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dandan; Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Cao, Jing; Fan, Zhirui; Fan, Huijie; Yuan, Long; Xu, Benling; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hongquan; Ji, Zhenyu; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are valuable tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. Here we utilized this technique for efficient site-specific gene modification to create a fumarate hydratase (FH) gene knockout rat model, in which there was an 11 base-pair deletion in the first exon of the FH gene in 111 rats. 18 live-born targeted mutation offsprings were produced from 80 injected zygotes with 22.5% efficiency, indicating high TALEN knockout success in rat zygots. Only heterozygous deletion was observed in the offsprings. Sixteen pairs of heterozygous FH knockout (FH+/−) rats were arranged for mating experiments for six months without any homozygous KO rat identified. Sequencing from the pregnant rats embryo samples showed no homozygous FH KO, indicating that homozygous FH KO is embryonically lethal. Comparatively, the litter size was decreased in both male and female FH+/− KO rats. There was no behaviour difference between the FH+/− KO and the control rats except that the FH+/− KO male rats showed significantly higher body weight in the 16-week observation period. Clinical haematology and biochemical examinations showed hematopoietic and kidney dysfunction in the FH+/− KO rats. Small foci of anaplastic lesions of tubular epithelial cells around glomeruli were identified in the FH+/− kidney, and these anaplastic cells were comparatively positive for Ki67, p53 and Sox9, and such findings are most probably related to the kidney dysfunction reflected by the biochemical examinations of the rats. In conclusion, we have successfully established an FH+/− KO rat model, which will be useful for further functional FH studies. PMID:27556703

  19. Hemodiafiltration combined with resin-mediated absorption as a therapy for hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao-qin; Shi, Zai-xiang; Xu, Ji-yuan; Lu, Bo; Li, Jia-qiong; Xu, Yan-jun; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Li, Song-mei; Mo, Xun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether hemodiafiltration combined with resin-mediated absorption is a better therapy for hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. Patients (n = 67) with acute pancreatitis treated in ICU from January 2009 to December 2012 were included in this study. Seven of these 67 cases were diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). All the 7 HLAP patients went through fast, gastrointestinal decompression, anti-shock treatment, inhibition of pancreatic secretion, antiseptic treatments, and hemoperfusion (HP) combined with continuous veno venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). After one round of treatment by resin adsorption, there was a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (TG) (29.78 %) and total cholesterol (TC) (24.02 %) levels (p < 0.01). TG and TC levels dropped by 49.02 and 37.66 %, respectively, after 1-day treatment of HP + CVVHDF; by 62.81 and 47.37 % on day 2 post-treatment; and by 69.57 and 49.47 % on day 3 post-treatment. All the 7 patients survived. The average time spent in the ICU was 7 ± 3.8 days, and the average duration of hospitalization was 19 ± 15.1 days. Our results show that hemoperfusion combined with hemodiafiltration is an efficient treatment as this approach can reduce plasma lipid levels effectively and reduce the risk of acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia.

  20. L-4F Alters Hyperlipidemic (but not Normal) Mouse Plasma to Reduce Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Buga, Georgette M.; Navab, Mohamad; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Yekta, Babak; Hough, Greg; Chanslor, Shawn; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hyperlipidemia is associated with platelet hyper-reactivity. We hypothesized that L-4F, an apoA-I mimetic peptide, would inhibit platelet aggregation in hyperlipidemic mice. Methods and Results Injecting L-4F into apoE null and LDL receptor null mice resulted in a significant reduction in platelet aggregation in response to agonists but there was no reduction in platelet aggregation after injection of L-4F into wild-type (WT) mice. Consistent with these results, injection of L-4F into apoE null mice prolonged bleeding time but not in WT mice. Incubating L-4F in vitro with apoE null platelet rich plasma also resulted in decreased platelet aggregation. However, incubating washed platelets from either apoE null or WT mice with L-4F did not alter aggregation. Compared to wild-type mice, unstimulated platelets from apoE null mice contained significantly more 12-HETE, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), prostaglandins D2 (PGD2) and E2 (PGE2). In response to agonists, platelets from L-4F treated apoE null mice formed significantly less TXA2, PGD2 PGE2, and 12-HETE. Conclusions By binding plasma oxidized lipids that cause platelet hyper-reactivity in hyperlipidemic mice, L-4F decreases platelet aggregation. PMID:19965777

  1. Leptin Influences Healing in the Sprague Dawley Rat Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengcheng; Cai, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background Leptin plays a crucial role in bone metabolism, and its level is related to bone callus formation in the fracture repair process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant leptin on the healing process of femoral fractures in rats. Material/Methods Forty-eight male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with an average body weight of 389 g (range: 376–398 g) and an average age of 10 weeks were included in this animal research, and all rats were randomly divided into two major groups. Then standardized femur fracture models were implemented in all SD rats. Rats in the control group were treated with only 0.5 mL of physiological saline, and rats in the experimental group were treated with recombinant leptin 5 μg/kg/d along with the same 0.5 mL of physiological saline for 42 days intraperitoneally. At the same time, each major group was evenly divided into three parallel subgroups for each parallel bone evaluation separately at the second, fourth, and sixth weeks. Each subgroup included eight rats. Results The total radiological evaluation results showed that the healing progress of femoral fracture in the experimental group was superior to that in the control group from the fourth week. At the sixth week, experimental group rats began to present significantly better femoral fracture healing progress than that of the control group rats. Results of biomechanics show the ultimate load (N) and deflection ultimate load (mm) of the experimental group rats was significantly increased compared with that of the control group rats from the fourth week. Conclusions Our results suggest that leptin may have a positive effect on SD rat femur fracture healing. PMID:28088810

  2. Transplant arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic model.

    PubMed Central

    Isik, F. F.; McDonald, T. O.; Ferguson, M.; Yamanaka, E.; Gordon, D.

    1992-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) has emerged as an obstacle to the long-term survival of transplanted organs, especially cardiac transplants. The animal models that have been used to study TA have not been fully characterized with regard to features such as the time course of cell proliferation and the sequence of cell types arriving in the developing intimal lesion. We present a model of TA based on a transplanted segment of abdominal aorta that helps address these questions. Two strains of rats (PVG x DA) underwent orthotopic aortic transplantation without immunosuppression and were killed at 14, 20, 40, and 60 days after transplantation. The within-strain control group displayed minimal evidence of cellular rejection with minimal to absent intimal lesions. In contrast, the allograft group showed a linearly increasing intimal lesion, up through 60 days after transplantation. The mechanism of intimal thickening was by an increase in cell number at the earlier time points with the later deposition of extracellular matrix. The early intimal lesion consisted mostly of mononuclear inflammatory cells (45%) with gradually increasing presence of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the intima between 20 and 60 days. Conversely, the media showed gradual infiltration by macrophage-type cells with virtual loss of all SMC from the media by 40 days. The proliferative index showed a peak of 6% and 8% at 20 days in both the intima and media, respectively, and was preceded by the presence of macrophages. In fact, most of the proliferating cells at the earlier time points were either monocytes/macrophages, or were immediately adjacent to monocyte-/macrophage-rich regions. This straight artery segment model of transplant arteriosclerosis provides an easily quantifiable system in which the effects of different interventions (e.g., immunosuppressive regimens) can be tested. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure

  3. Spontaneous trigeminal allodynia in rats: a model of primary headache.

    PubMed

    Oshinsky, Michael L; Sanghvi, Menka M; Maxwell, Christina R; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Scavenger receptor function of mouse Fcγ receptor III contributes to progression of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinmei; Ng, Hang Pong; Lai, Yen-Chun; Craigo, Jodi K; Nagilla, Pruthvi S; Raghani, Pooja; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies showed loss of CD36 or scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A) does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in a hyperlipidemic mouse model, suggesting receptors other than CD36 and SR-A may also contribute to atherosclerosis. In this report, we show that apolipoprotein E (apoE)-CD16 double knockout (DKO; apoE-CD16 DKO) mice have reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with apoE knockout mice. In vivo and in vitro foam cell analyses showed apoE-CD16 DKO macrophages accumulated less neutral lipids. Reduced foam cell formation in apoE-CD16 DKO mice is not due to change in expression of CD36, SR-A, and LOX-1. This led to a hypothesis that CD16 may have scavenger receptor activity. We presented evidence that a soluble form of recombinant mouse CD16 (sCD16) bound to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDALDL), and this binding is blocked by molar excess of MDA- modified BSA and anti-MDA mAbs, suggesting CD16 specifically recognizes MDA epitopes. Interestingly, sCD16 inhibited MDALDL binding to macrophage cell line, as well as soluble forms of recombinant mouse CD36, SR-A, and LOX-1, indicating CD16 can cross-block MDALDL binding to other scavenger receptors. Anti-CD16 mAb inhibited immune complex binding to sCD16, whereas it partially inhibited MDALDL binding to sCD16, suggesting MDALDL binding site may be in close proximity to the immune complex binding site in CD16. Loss of CD16 expression resulted in reduced levels of MDALDL-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression. Finally, CD16-deficient macrophages showed reduced MDALDL-induced Syk phosphorylation. Collectively, our findings suggest scavenger receptor activity of CD16 may, in part, contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  5. Novel rat model for neurocysticercosis using Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Manuela R; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis.

  6. Animal models of dystonia: Lessons from a mutant rat.

    PubMed

    LeDoux, Mark S

    2011-05-01

    Dystonia is a motor sign characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which produce abnormal postures. Genetic factors contribute significantly to primary dystonia. In comparison, secondary dystonia can be caused by a wide variety of metabolic, structural, infectious, toxic and inflammatory insults to the nervous system. Although classically ascribed to dysfunction of the basal ganglia, studies of diverse animal models have pointed out that dystonia is a network disorder with important contributions from abnormal olivocerebellar signaling. In particular, work with the dystonic (dt) rat has engendered dramatic paradigm shifts in dystonia research. The dt rat manifests generalized dystonia caused by deficiency of the neuronally restricted protein caytaxin. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies have shown that defects at the climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in the dt rat lead to abnormal bursting firing patterns in the cerebellar nuclei, which increases linearly with postnatal age. In a general sense, the dt rat has shown the scientific and clinical communities that dystonia can arise from dysfunctional cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, work with the dt rat has provided evidence that dystonia (1) is a neurodevelopmental network disorder and (2) can be driven by abnormal cerebellar output. In large part, work with other animal models has expanded upon studies in the dt rat and shown that primary dystonia is a multi-nodal network disorder associated with defective sensorimotor integration. In addition, experiments in genetically engineered models have been used to examine the underlying cellular pathologies that drive primary dystonia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Advances in dystonia".

  7. Chinese medicinal herbs in treating model rats with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun-Xiao; Chen, Jiu; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yan-Li; Jin, Xiao-Dong

    2009-12-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of Chinese medicine formula-Yu Zhang Dan (YZD, composed of Herba Lysimachiae, Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, Radix Curcumae) on the model rats with hepatic fibrosis. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in the present study, and they were separated randomly into 4 groups: a normal control group (Group A, n=5), a model control (Group B, n=15), a high dose of YZD (Group C, n=10), and a low dose of YZD (Group D, n=10). Hepatic fibrosis in rats was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)). The variation of the serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronate acid (HA), laminin (LN), type • • procollagen peptide (P• •NP), L-Glutathione (GSH) was respectively measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and detection of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and smooth muscle alpha actin (α-SMA) was conducted with immunohistochemistry. The ALT, AST HA, LN and PIII NP levels in the serum of the model control group were significantly higher than those of the normal control group (P<0.05), and both of the high dose of YZD and low dose of YZD significantly decreased the ALT, AST HA, LN and PIII NP levels of the model rats (P<0.05). The TGF-β1 and α-SMA levels of the model control group were significantly higher than those of the normal control group (P<0.05), and both of the high dose of YZD and low dose of YZD significantly decreased the TGF-β1 levels of the model rats (P<0.05) , and only the high dose of YZD significantly decreased the α-SMA levels of the model rats (P<0.05). The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA in the liver tissues of the rats were in the cytoplasm of the cells. It may be through decreasing the ALT, AST, HA, LN and PIII NP levels in the serum of the model rats and decreasing the expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA in the liver tissues of the model rats that YZD significantly relieved the hepatic fibrosis.

  8. Development of a Rat Model of Hypothermia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Fall and MAJ Len Murray and their animal care technicians, SGT Jeffrey Hunter, SPC Robert Powers and SPC Melissa Valliere vi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... Bastille . Tissue-specific extravasation of albumin-bound Evans blue in hypothermic and rewarmed rats. Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 80:233-243, 2002

  9. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Carusillo Theriault, Brianna; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Karimy, Jason K.; Keledjian, Kaspar; Stokum, Jesse A.; Sarkar, Amrita; Coksaygan, Turhan; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Background In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes) dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI) and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS) at embryonic day (E) 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks. Results mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2) and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9) for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls. Conclusions In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development. PMID:28158198

  10. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Selten, Martijn M.; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A.; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D.; van Vugt, Ruben W. M.; van Hulten, Josephus A.; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J.; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20–22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27687783

  11. A New Model of Severe Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Thomas; Lendemans, Sven; de Groot, Herbert; Petrat, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We here introduce a fixed-pressure model of hemorrhagic shock in rats that maximizes effects on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during shock and yet maintains high reproducibility and controllability. The MAP of rats was adjusted to 25 to 30 mm Hg by blood withdrawals during 30 min. After a shock period of 60 min, rats were resuscitated either with lactated Ringer solution (LR) only or with the collected blood 3-fold diluted with LR (LR + blood) and monitored for further 150 min. Throughout the experiment, vital parameters and plasma marker enzyme activities and creatinine concentration were assessed. Thereafter, liver, kidneys, small intestine, heart, and lung were harvested and evaluated histopathologically. Vital parameters, plasma marker enzyme activities, creatinine concentration, and histopathology indicated pronounced but reliable and reproducible systemic effects and marked organ damage due to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In contrast to rats that received LR + blood, which survived the postresuscitation period, rats receiving LR only invariably died shortly after resuscitation. The hemorrhagic shock model we present here maximally affects MAP and yet is highly reproducible in rats, allowing the study of various aspects of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation under clinically relevant conditions. PMID:22330349

  12. Mapping genetic determinants of kidney damage in rat models.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Angela; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2012-07-01

    During the last two decades, significant progress in our understanding of the development of kidney diseases has been achieved by unravelling the mechanisms underlying rare familial forms of human kidney diseases. Due to the genetic heterogeneity in human populations and the complex multifactorial pathogenesis of the disease phenotypes, the dissection of the genetic basis of common chronic kidney diseases (CKD) remains a difficult task. In this regard, several inbred rat models provide valuable complementary tools to uncover the genetic basis of complex renal disease phenotypes that are related to common forms of CKD. In this review, data obtained in nine experimental rat models, including the Buffalo (BUF), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS), Fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH), Goto-Kakizaki (GK), Lyon hypertensive (LH), Munich Wistar Frömter (MWF), Sabra hypertension-prone (SBH), spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) inbred strains, that contributed to the genetic dissection of renal disease phenotypes are presented. In this panel of inbred strains, a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) linked to albuminuria/proteinuria and other functional or structural kidney abnormalities could be identified by QTL mapping analysis and follow-up studies including consomic and congenic rat lines. The comprehensive exploitation of the genotype-renal phenotype associations that are inherited in this panel of rat strains is suitable for making a significant contribution to the development of an integrated approach to the systems genetics of common CKD.

  13. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Selten, Martijn M; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D; van Vugt, Ruben W M; van Hulten, Josephus A; van Bakel, Nick H M; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J M

    2016-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20-22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  14. Detection of visual signals by rats: A computational model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). The model describes the animals’ expectation of receiving fo...

  15. Terahertz reflectometry of burn wounds in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Arbab, M. Hassan; Dickey, Trevor C.; Winebrenner, Dale P.; Chen, Antao; Klein, Mathew B.; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2011-01-01

    We present sub-millimeter wave reflectometry of an experimental rat skin burn model obtained by the Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) technique. Full thickness burns, as confirmed by histology, were created on rats (n = 4) euthanized immediately prior to the experiments. Statistical analysis shows that the burned tissue exhibits higher reflectivity compared to normal skin over a frequency range between 0.5 and 0.7 THz (p < 0.05), likely due to post-burn formation of interstitial edema. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a double Debye dielectric relaxation model can be used to explain the terahertz response of both normal and less severely burned rat skin. Finally, our data suggest that the degree of conformation between the experimental burn measurements and the model for normal skin can potentially be used to infer the extent of burn severity. PMID:21833370

  16. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  17. Effect of young barley leaf extract and adlay on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Liu, Chu-Sun; Tsai, Ching-Min

    2004-06-01

    Forty hyperlipidemic patients, smokers and non-smokers, were studied. Subjects received 15 g young barley leaf extract (BL) or 60 g adlay daily for four weeks. Overnight fasting blood samples were drawn immediately prior to and after four weeks of supplementation. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipid profiles and their susceptibility to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. The plasma total and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were reduced following treatment with either BL or adlay; furthermore, the lag phase of LDL oxidation increased after either supplementation. However, it seemed that BL had stronger antioxidative effect on the prevention of LDL oxidation than adlay. Our results also indicated that the antioxidative effect was less pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers. Therefore, supplementation with BL or adlay can decrease plasma lipids and inhibit LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers and/or non-smokers.

  18. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    this treatment (Figure 2b). Aspermatogenesis Meiosis in Brca2/ rats proceeds normally through leptotene and early zygotene (Figure 3a) with 40...Zygotene Late Zygotene Scp3Scp3 Scp3 Scp3 Scp1 CREST CRESTCREST Merge a b Figure 3 (a) Meiosis in Brca2/ spermatocytes does not progress beyond late...control of noncrossover and crossover recombination during meiosis . Cell 106: 47–57. Barlow C, Liyanage M, Moens PB, Tarsounas M, Nagashima K, Brown K

  19. Transgenic Rat Models for Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Introduction 6 6. Body 9 7. Key Research Accomplishments 15 8. Reportable Outcomes 15 9. Conclusions 16 10. References 17 11. Bibliography 20 12. Personnel 20...seen in human breast cancer (2-4). Third, a high percentage of the resulting rat mammary cancers are hormonally responsiveness, closely mimicking that...13, 17), activated c-neu (18-20), wild type c-neu (21), deregulated growth hormone (22), and deregulated transforming growth factor a (23-25) has

  20. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  1. Fluvastatin reduced liver injury in rat model of extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Savaş; Tas, Erkan; Gurunluoglu, Kubilay; Akin, Melih; Aksoy, Rauf T; Emre, Memet H; Aydin, Nasuhi E; Ay, Selma; Ozatay, Nilufer

    2007-02-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3methylglutarly coenzyme A, reductase, namely statins, exert pleiotropic actions beyond lipid-lowering effects. In ex vivo and in vitro studies, statins have antioxidative and antiinflammatory effects. Herein, we sought to determine whether treatment with fluvastatin (FV) would be beneficial in a rat model of common bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced liver injury. Female rats were subjected to a sham (n=10) or BDL (n=20). Obstructive jaundice was induced in rats by the ligation and division of the common bile duct. Three days after operation, rats subjected to CBDL were randomized to receive treatment with either FV (10 mg/kg) or saline every day over a 10 days experimental period. High levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase decreased significantly (P<0.05) in animals treated with FV with compared to saline-administrated BDL animals. Compared with sham-operated rats, CBDL rats showed significantly higher levels of total nitrite and nitrate, malondihaldehyde, tumor necrosis factor alpha, myeloperoxidase, and lower concentrations of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in the liver tissue (P<0.001). All of these changes were significantly attenuated (P<0.05) by treatment with FV after CBDL. CBDL was associated with increased apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa beta expression in saline-treated rats. Treatment with FV also decreased these parameters. These data support the view that FV ameliorates hepatic inflammation, lipid peroxidation, and tissue injury in rats subjected to CDBL. FV warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment to ameliorate liver injury from extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

  2. Hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is upregulated in hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minhao; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Wei; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Liu, Jingwen

    2009-11-01

    Members of the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family are key enzymes for cellular fatty acid metabolism that catalyze the initial step in activation of long-chain fatty acids. However, the specificity of individual isoforms of ACSL to the lipid metabolic process is not well studied. In addition, the regulation of expression of individual ACSL isoforms under hyperlipidemic conditions is largely unknown. We cloned the hamster ACSL3 cDNA coding region and generated specific antibodies recognizing the ACSL3 protein. We next observed the changes in ACSL3 mRNA and protein expression in hamsters fed a standard chow diet or a high fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet. HFHC feeding significantly increased ACSL3 mRNA and protein expression in liver and to a lesser extent in muscle but not in adipose, brain, heart, or testis. Additionally, ACSL3 mRNA abundance was differentially regulated by the nutritional status in different tissues with liver, muscle, and adipose being the most sensitive tissues. Importantly, the hepatic ACSL3 mRNA expression pattern in response to fasting and refeeding in hyperlipidemic hamsters differed from that observed in normal chow-fed hamsters. Together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence of altered regulation of hepatic ACSL3 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions and suggest important regulatory roles for this enzyme in lipid metabolism.

  3. Rodent models in neuroscience research: is it a rat race?

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Bart; Youn, Jiun

    2016-10-01

    Rodents (especially Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) have been the most widely used models in biomedical research for many years. A notable shift has taken place over the last two decades, with mice taking a more and more prominent role in biomedical science compared to rats. This shift was primarily instigated by the availability of a much larger genetic toolbox for mice, particularly embryonic-stem-cell-based targeting technology for gene disruption. With the recent emergence of tools for altering the rat genome, notably genome-editing technologies, the technological gap between the two organisms is closing, and it is becoming more important to consider the physiological, anatomical, biochemical and pharmacological differences between rats and mice when choosing the right model system for a specific biological question. The aim of this short review and accompanying poster is to highlight some of the most important differences, and to discuss their impact on studies of human diseases, with a special focus on neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Spontaneous Trigeminal Allodynia in Rats: A Model of Primary Headache

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Sanghvi, Menka M.; Maxwell, Christina R.; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22963523

  5. Antihyperalgesic Activity of Rhodiola rosea in a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; González-Trujano, Maria Eva; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe Esther; Brindis, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) is used for enhancing physical and mental performance. Recent studies demonstrated that R. rosea had anti-inflammatory activity in animal models, for example, carrageenan- and nystatin-induced edema in rats, possibly by inhibiting phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenases-1 and -2. In addition, R. rosea had antinociceptive activity in thermal and chemical pain tests as well as mechanical hyperalgesia. The purpose of the present study was to assess the antihyperalgesic effect of an ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) in a diabetic rat model. Rats were administered a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and hyperalgesia was evaluated four weeks later. Formalin-evoked (0.5%) flinching was increased in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls Systemic (1-100 mg/kg, i.p.) and local (0.1-10 mg/paw into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw) administration of R. rosea ethanol extract dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of R. rosea was compared with gabapentin. These results suggest that R. rosea ethanol extract may have potential as a treatment for diabetic hyperalgesia.

  6. Reducing Fear of the Laboratory Rat: A Participant Modeling Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the use of participant modeling in a study of 56 college-level students to reduce fear of laboratory rats. Discovers that even mild exposure reduced fear significantly. Finds that women were more fearful initially but that their fear reduction was equal to that of men. (CFR)

  7. Analgesic Effect of Xenon in Rat Model of Inflammatory Pain.

    PubMed

    Kukushkin, M L; Igon'kina, S I; Potapov, S V; Potapov, A V

    2017-02-01

    The analgesic effects of inert gas xenon were examined on rats. The formalin model of inflammatory pain, tail-flick test, and hot-plate test revealed the antinociceptive effects of subanesthetizing doses of inhalation anesthetic xenon. Inhalation of 50/50 xenon/oxygen mixture moderated the nociceptive responses during acute and tonic phases of inflammatory pain.

  8. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  9. Calcium Balance in A Rat Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, M.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of calcium (Ca) metabolism during space flight and the human bed rest model for microgravity is negative Ca balance, attributed, to an increase in urinary Ca excretion and depressed intestinal Ca absorption. No differences or less positive Ca balances are reported after skeletal unloading in similar studies in weaning or juvenile rats. To determine Ca balances and evaluate the Ca endocrine system in mature rats exposed to a space flight model which unloaded the hind limbs by tail suspension, we modified the cage to quantify dietary, fecal and urinary Ca. Five 2-5 d balance periods in 8 loaded (C) and 8 unloaded (S) rats were compared during a 4 week study in 6 month old 490 g male rats. The first period revealed negative balances of -16+/-3 and -14+/-5 mg/d which reflected adaptation to the cages, the change in diet from Purina to AIN 76 and weight loss in both C and S. Average Ca balances in rats fed 0.1% Ca and 0.3% phosphorus (Pi) diets, remained negative in S and were less than C after 6 -10 d (-2.9 vs 0.12 mg/d, p<.05) but not thereafter. In spite of eating 10% more food than C, initial weight loss, restored in C, was never recovered in S. Fecal excretion exceeded dietary intake by -3.7% in S and reflected absorption and retention of 8.4% dietary Ca in C. Urinary Ca was the same fraction of dietary intake in S and C (9.0 vs 8.6%, NS). Serum Ca, Pi, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were the same in both groups after 28 days. In contrast to the human, a major determinant of negative Ca balance in the mature rat exposed to a space flight model appears to be losses from gastrointestinal Ca secretion, rather than urinary Ca excretion.

  10. Ameliorative effect of melatonin against increased intestinal permeability in diabetic rats: possible involvement of MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Zou, Duobing; Tang, Songtao; Fan, Tingting; Su, Huan; Hu, Ruolei; Zhou, Qing; Gui, Shuyu; Zuo, Li; Wang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The increased intestinal permeability and functional impairment play an important role in type 2 diabetes (T2D), and melatonin may possess enteroprotection properties. Therefore, we used streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to investigate the regulation of intestinal permeability by melatonin. Rats were randomly divided into three groups, including control, diabetes mellitus (DM), and DM rats treated with melatonin. Melatonin was administered (10 mg/kg/day) by gavage for 24 weeks. The DM rats significantly increased the serum fasting blood glucose and lipid levels, which were alleviated by melatonin treatment. Importantly, the intestinal epithelial permeability was significantly increased in DM rats but was ameliorated following treatment with melatonin. These findings also indicated the expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phosphorylation of MLC targeting subunit (MYPT) induced myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation level was markedly elevated in hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic status. They were partly associated with down-regulated membrane type 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2) expression, and up-regulated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) expression and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. However, the changes in target protein expression were reversed by melatonin. In conclusion, our results show melatonin beneficial effects on impaired intestinal epithelial permeability in T2D by suppressing ERK/MLCK- and ROCK/MCLP-dependent MLC phosphorylation.

  11. Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity in cardiac myofibrils from the insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rat.

    PubMed

    Misra, T; Russell, J C; Clark, T A; Pierce, G N

    2001-01-01

    There is a great deal of information presently available documenting a cardiomyopathic condition in insulin-deficient models of diabetes. Less information is available documenting a similar status in non insulin-dependent models of diabetes. We have studied the functional integrity of the myofibrils isolated from hearts of JCR:LA rats. The JCR:LA rat is hyperinsulinemic, hyperlipidemic, glucose intolerant and obese. As such, it carries many of the characteristics found in humans with non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These animals also have many indications of heart disease. However, it is not clear if the hearts suffer from vascular complications or are cardiomyopathic in nature. We examined Mg2+-dependent myofibrillar ATPase in hearts of JCR:LA-cp/cp rats and their corresponding control animals (+/?) and found no significant differences (P> 0.05). This is in striking contrast to the depression in this activity exhibited by cardiac myofibrils isolated from insulin-deficient models of diabetes. Our data demonstrate that myofibrillar functional integrity is normal in JCR:LA-cp rats and suggest that these hearts are not in a cardiomyopathic state. Insulin status may be critical in generating a cardiomyopathic condition in diabetes.

  12. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  13. The mathematical whisker: A review of numerical models of the rat׳s vibrissa biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lucianna, Facundo Adrián; Albarracín, Ana Lía; Vrech, Sonia Mariel; Farfán, Fernando Daniel; Felice, Carmelo José

    2016-07-05

    The vibrissal system of the rat refers to specialized hairs the animal uses for tactile sensory perception. Rats actively move their whiskers in a characteristic way called "whisking". Interaction with the environment produces elastic deformation of the whiskers, generating mechanical signals in the whisker-follicle complex. Advances in our understanding of the vibrissal complex biomechanics is of interest not only for the biological research field, but also for biomimetic approaches. The recent development of whisker numerical models has contributed to comprehending its sophisticated movements and its interactions with the follicle. The great diversity of behavioral patterns and complexities of the whisker-follicle ensemble encouraged the creation of many different biomechanical models. This review analyzes most of the whisker biomechanical models that have been developed so far. This review was written so as to render it accessible to readers coming from different research areas.

  14. A new rat model for studies of hypokinesia and antiorthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Deavers, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A new rat model (suspension and immobilization) is described for induction of hypokinesia and orthostatic manipulations. Hypokinetic responses were comparable to those in prolonged bed rest and weightlessness in humans, body or limb casted and small cage restrained animals. Responses to antiorthostasis (15 to 20 deg head down tilt) in rats were similar to those in neutral bouyancy tests in humans and animals and to those in prolonged bed rest in humans. During seven days of hypokinesia there was an atrophy of the gastrocnemius and increased excretion of urinary nitrogeneous end products. The antiorthostatic (AOH) 15 to 20 deg head down tilt resulted in diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis. No comparable responses were observed in orthostatic hypokinetic (OH) rats. Readaptation from AOH and OH occurred during one week recovery in metabolic cage conditions.

  15. Sonic hedgehog expression in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luo-Wei; Lin, Han; Lu, Yi; Xia, Wei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the activation of sonic hedgehog (SHh) signaling pathways in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: experimental group and control group (20 rats in each group). Dibutyltin dichloride was infused into the tail vein of the rats to induce chronic pancreatitis in the experimental group. The same volume of ethanol and glycerol mixture was infused in the control group. The expression of Ptch, Smo and Gli were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Compared with the control group, significant histological changes in terms of the areas of abnormal architecture, glandular atrophy, fibrosis, pseudo tubular complexes, and edema were observed at week 4 in the experimental group. The expression of Ptch1, Smo and Gli1 in the pancreatic tissue increased significantly in the experimental group. Using RT-PCR, mRNA levels of Ptch, Smo and Gli in the experimental group increased significantly compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: The SHh signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in rats with chronic pancreatitis. The SHh signaling pathway plays an important role in the development of chronic pancreatitis. These results may be helpful in studies focusing on the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782623

  16. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.; Moser, A.D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390 g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35 mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats. PMID:22473322

  17. Rat model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Shen, Yan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Huanmin

    2015-01-01

    In the human brain, the dominant hemisphere is more complex than the non-dominant hemisphere. Hence, cerebral ischemia of the dominant hemisphere often leads to serious consequences. This study aims to establish a rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere. The quadruped feeding test was used to screen 70 male Sprague Dawley rats. From this test, 48 rats with right paw preference were selected and randomly assigned numbers. Half were assigned to the dominant hemisphere ischemia (DHI) group, and the other half were assigned to the non-dominant hemisphere ischemia (NDHI) group. The middle cerebral artery was occluded 2 h before reperfusion. Neurological functions were tested. TTC and HE staining were performed. The volume of cerebral infarction was calculated. Rats in the DHI group had significantly worse neurological scores than rats in the NDHI group (P < 0.05). TTC staining indicated ischemia had more severe consequences in the dominant hemisphere than in the non-dominant hemisphere. The dominant hippocampus indicated severe neuronal loss and disorderly cellular arrangement. The volume of cerebral infarction was also greater in the DHI group compared to the NDHI group (P < 0.05). Compared to MCA occlusion in the non-dominant hemisphere, MCA occlusion in the dominant hemisphere caused greater impairment in neurological functions. The proposed rodent model is reliable and has high levels of reproducibility. Therefore, his model can be reliably for investigating the mechanism of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere of human brains. PMID:25785023

  18. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    PubMed

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  19. Comparison of starvation and elastase models of emphysema in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Mauderly, J.L.; Gregory, R.E.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Starvation and elastase-induced changes in rat lung structure, biochemistry, and function were compared as models of human pulmonary emphysema. Ten-week-old male rats were instilled intratracheally with either porcine pancreatic elastase in saline (E) or with saline alone. A group of the saline-instilled rats were fed one third of their normal food intake until a 45% loss of body weight occurred (S). The remaining saline-instilled rats served as control animals (C). Post-treatment evaluations included in vivo respiratory function, lung histopathologic and morphometric analyses, lung tissue proteinolytic activity, and lung collagen. The E rats had in vivo respiratory function changes more similar to human emphysema than those of S rats. All lung volume subdivisions were decreased in S rats and increased in E rats. The volume-pressure curve of S rats was shifted to the right of the C curve, whereas that of E rats was shifted to the left. Forced expiratory flow rates of E rats were decreased at all lung volumes, but those of S rats were not. Both E and S rats had larger terminal air spaces and less alveolar surface area than did C rats. The S rats had more collagen per gram lung and higher proteinolytic activity than did C or E rats. These results show that, although starvation induces some changes characteristic of human emphysema, elastase-treatment provides a model more similar to the human disease. 44 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Groove model of tibia-femoral osteoarthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Huub M; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C

    2017-03-01

    Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one-time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia-femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast-enhanced) micro-CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro-CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia-femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post-traumatic non-inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496-505, 2017.

  1. Groove model of tibia‐femoral osteoarthritis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, Huub M.; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H. P.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one‐time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia‐femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast‐enhanced) micro‐CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro‐CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia‐femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post‐traumatic non‐inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496–505, 2017. PMID:27183198

  2. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  3. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  5. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males

    PubMed Central

    DeNysschen, Carol A; Burton, Harold W; Horvath, Peter J; Leddy, John J; Browne, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Background Most individuals at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) can reduce risk factors through diet and exercise before resorting to drug treatment. The effect of a combination of resistance training with vegetable-based (soy) versus animal-based (whey) protein supplementation on CVD risk reduction has received little study. The study's purpose was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of resistance exercise training with soy versus whey protein supplementation on strength gains, body composition and serum lipid changes in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. Methods Twenty-eight overweight, male subjects (BMI 25–30) with serum cholesterol >200 mg/dl were randomly divided into 3 groups (placebo (n = 9), and soy (n = 9) or whey (n = 10) supplementation) and participated in supervised resistance training for 12 weeks. Supplements were provided in a double blind fashion. Results All 3 groups had significant gains in strength, averaging 47% in all major muscle groups and significant increases in fat free mass (2.6%), with no difference among groups. Percent body fat and waist-to-hip ratio decreased significantly in all 3 groups an average of 8% and 2%, respectively, with no difference among groups. Total serum cholesterol decreased significantly, again with no difference among groups. Conclusion Participation in a 12 week resistance exercise training program significantly increased strength and improved both body composition and serum cholesterol in overweight, hypercholesterolemic men with no added benefit from protein supplementation. PMID:19284589

  6. Antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic effects of mycelia zinc polysaccharides by Pleurotus eryngii var. tuoliensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nuo; Ren, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jianjun; Song, Xinling; Gao, Zheng; Jing, Huijuan; Li, Shangshang; Wang, Shouxian; Jia, Le

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this work were designed to investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of acidic- and alkali-extractable mycelia zinc polysaccharides (AcMZPS, AlMZPS) from Pleurotus eryngii var. tuoliensis on high-fat-high-cholesterol emulsion-induced hyperlipidemic mice. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that both AcMZPS and AlMZPS had potential hepatoprotective effects by significantly decreasing the levels of LDL-C, VLDL-C, TC, TG, ALT, AST, ALP, MDA and LPO, and remarkably increasing the HDL-C, SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in serum lipid/liver homogenate, respectively. In addition, four polysaccharide fractions of AcMZPS-1, AcMZPS-2, AlMZPS-1, and AlMZPS-2, purified from AcMZPS and AlMZPS using DEAE chromatography, respectively, were subjected to monosaccharide composition analysis and valuated for the in vitro antioxidant activity. The results obtained in present study suggested that AcMZPS, AlMZPS and their purified fractions could be used as functional foods and natural drugs in preventing the hyperlipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver.

  7. Acoustic noise improves motor learning in spontaneously hypertensive rats, a rat model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Göran B W; Eckernäs, Daniel; Holmblad, Olof; Bergquist, Filip

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat model of ADHD displays impaired motor learning. We used this characteristic to study if the recently described acoustic noise benefit in learning in children with ADHD is also observed in the SH rat model. SH rats and a Wistar control strain were trained in skilled reach and rotarod running under either ambient noise or in 75 dBA white noise. In other animals the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on motor learning was assessed with the same paradigms. To determine if acoustic noise influenced spontaneous motor activity, the effect of acoustic noise was also determined in the open field activity paradigm. We confirm impaired motor learning in the SH rat compared to Wistar SCA controls. Acoustic noise restored motor learning in SH rats learning the Montoya reach test and the rotarod test, but had no influence on learning in Wistar rats. Noise had no effect on open field activity in SH rats, but increased corner time in Wistar. MPH completely restored rotarod learning and performance but did not improve skilled reach in the SH rat. It is suggested that the acoustic noise benefit previously reported in children with ADHD is shared by the SH rat model of ADHD, and the effect is in the same range as that of stimulant treatment. Acoustic noise may be useful as a non-pharmacological alternative to stimulant medication in the treatment of ADHD.

  8. Osteoporotic rat models for evaluation of osseointegration of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration of dental and orthopedic bone implants is the important process that leads to mechanical fixation of implants and warrants implant functionality. In view of increasing numbers of osteoporotic patients, bone implant surface optimization strategies with instructive and drug-loading ability have been heavily explored. However, few animal models are available to study the effect of novel implant surface modifications in osteoporotic conditions. Since laboratory rats comply with a number of practical advantages, including the reliability of several methods for rapid induction of osteoporotic conditions, the present work aimed to define the use of the femoral condyle in osteoporotic female and male rats as a suitable implantation model to study osseointegration of bone implants. The method describes the procedures for induction (by hypogonadism) and assessment (by in vivo micro-computed tomography [CT]) of osteoporotic conditions in both female and male rats. The implantation site architecture (femoral condyle bone properties and dimensions) was comparatively evaluated for female and male rats, and the implant installation procedures are described. Finally, the possible analytical techniques to evaluate bone responses via mechanical tests, ex vivo micro-CT, and histological methods are provided.

  9. Emphysema model in rats treated intratracheally with elastase

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, E.; Nambu, Z.; Uchiyama, I.; Kyono, H.

    1987-04-01

    Pulmonary functions, morphology, and morphometry were examined in rats at 3, 7, and 10 weeks after a single intratracheal administration of 6.5 units of porcine pancreatic elastase in order to obtain a model of pulmonary emphysema which would be suitable for studying the responses of emphysematous lungs to atmospheric pollutants. Functional residual capacity and residual volume of the elastase-treated rats increased at all the times studied, but their total lung capacity increased only at 7 and 10 weeks compared with those of the saline-treated control rats. The increase in static lung compliance and the decrease in peak flow and maximum flow at 50% of total lung capacity during forced expiration were also observed in all except the 3-week elastase animals. The elastase-treated lungs showed morphological changes characteristic of emphysematous lesions. The increase in mean linear intercept length and the decrease in total alveolar surface area were demonstrated by these elastase-treated lungs. Based on these results, they conclude that an adequate and suitable model of pulmonary emphysemia could be obtained in rats 7-10 weeks after treatment with the present dose of elastase.

  10. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Talma; Younis, Firas; Alter, Ariela

    2010-01-01

    Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH) rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs), various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and calcium channel blockers (CCBs), to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment. PMID:27713282

  11. Particulate matter inhalation exacerbates cardiopulmonary injury in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is linked to cardiovascular events and death, especially among individuals with heart disease. A model of toxic cardiomyopathy was developed in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats to explore potential mechanisms. Rats were...

  12. Rat clonidine mydriasis model: imidazoline receptors are not involved.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongxin; Koss, Michael C

    2005-01-15

    The clonidine mydriasis model in rats has been widely applied in preclinical research to characterize alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonistic properties of drugs. The present study was undertaken to pharmacologically determine if imidazoline I(1) receptors are also involved in this model system. Sigmoid dose-response curves for pupillary dilation were produced in pentobarbital anesthetized rats by intravenous administration of increasing doses of agonists (guanabenz for alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, clonidine for both alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and imidazoline I(1) receptors, and rilmenidine for imidazoline I(1) receptors). Two antagonists (RS 79948 for alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and efaroxan for imidazoline I(1) receptors) were used to antagonize the mydriasis elicited by those three agonists, with antagonistic potencies calculated. In additional experiments, we examined the effect of the selective imidazoline I(1) receptor antagonist, AGN 192403, on clonidine-induced mydriasis. The results showed that pupillary response curves elicited by guanabenz, clonidine and rilmenidine were competitively antagonized by both RS 79948 (0.03-1 mg/kg) and efaroxan (0.03-1 mg/kg) in a dose-related fashion. The potencies of either antagonist against the three agonists were not significantly different. AGN 192403 (5 mg/kg) did not significantly shift the clonidine mydriasis curve. These results suggest that imidazoline I(1) receptors are not functionally involved in the rat clonidine mydriasis model and support this in vivo system as a useful model for studies of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors.

  13. Experimental model of arthritis induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Biazin, Samia Khalil; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia; de Franco, Marcello Fabiano; Puccia, Rosana; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira

    2012-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is highly prevalent in Brazil, where it is the principal cause of death by systemic mycoses. The disease primarily affects men aged 30-50 year old and usually starts as a pulmonary focus and then may spread to other organs and systems, including the joints. The present study aimed to develop an experimental model of paracoccidioidomycotic arthritis. Two-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 48) were used, divided in 6 groups: test groups EG/15 and EG/45 (received one dose of 100 μl of saline containing 10(5) Pb viable yeasts in the knee); heat killed Pb-group HK/15 and HK/45 (received a suspension of 10(5) Pb nonviable yeasts in the knee) and control groups CG/15 and CG/45 (received only sterile saline in the knee). The rats were killed 15 and 45 days postinoculation. In contrast with the control rats, the histopathology of the joints of rats of the test groups (EG/15 and EG/45) revealed a picture of well-established PCM arthritis characterized by extensive sclerosing granulomatous inflammation with numerous multiple budding fungal cells. The X-ray examination revealed joint alterations in these groups. Only metabolic active fungi evoked inflammation. The experimental model was able to induce fungal arthritis in the knees of the rats infected with metabolic active P. brasiliensis. The disease tended to be regressive and restrained by the immune system. No evidence of fungal dissemination to the lungs was observed.

  14. Creation of Consistent Burn Wounds: A Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Ang, Chuan Han; Raju, Ashvin; Tan, Kong Bing; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong Chiat; Lee, Hanjing; Lim, Jane; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte AE

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn infliction techniques are poorly described in rat models. An accurate study can only be achieved with wounds that are uniform in size and depth. We describe a simple reproducible method for creating consistent burn wounds in rats. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and dorsum shaved. A 100 g cylindrical stainless-steel rod (1 cm diameter) was heated to 100℃ in boiling water. Temperature was monitored using a thermocouple. We performed two consecutive toe-pinch tests on different limbs to assess the depth of sedation. Burn infliction was limited to the loin. The skin was pulled upwards, away from the underlying viscera, creating a flat surface. The rod rested on its own weight for 5, 10, and 20 seconds at three different sites on each rat. Wounds were evaluated for size, morphology and depth. Results Average wound size was 0.9957 cm2 (standard deviation [SD] 0.1845) (n=30). Wounds created with duration of 5 seconds were pale, with an indistinct margin of erythema. Wounds of 10 and 20 seconds were well-defined, uniformly brown with a rim of erythema. Average depths of tissue damage were 1.30 mm (SD 0.424), 2.35 mm (SD 0.071), and 2.60 mm (SD 0.283) for duration of 5, 10, 20 seconds respectively. Burn duration of 5 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage. Burn duration of 10 seconds and 20 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage, involving subjacent skeletal muscle. Conclusions This is a simple reproducible method for creating burn wounds consistent in size and depth in a rat burn model. PMID:25075351

  15. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, L M; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Aller, M A; Nava, M P; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2005-01-01

    The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g) were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20) and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20), and a control group (N = 20). A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001). In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001). These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  16. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat.

  17. Anti-hyperlipidemic sesquiterpenes and new sesquiterpene glycosides from the leaves of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.): structure requirement and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Nishida, Norihisa; Yoshino, Tomoe; Morikawa, Toshio; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2003-01-20

    The methanolic extract from the leaves of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) was found to suppress serum triglyceride elevation in olive oil-loaded mice. Through bioassay-guided separation, sesquiterpenes (cynaropicrin, aguerin B, and grosheimin) were isolated as the active components together with new sesquiterpene glycosides (cynarascolosides A, B, and C). The oxygen functional groups at the 3- and 8-positions and exo-methylene moiety in alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone ring were found to be essential for the anti-hyperlipidemic activity of guaiane-type sesquiterpene. In addition, inhibition of gastric emptying was shown to be partly involved in anti-hyperlipidemic activity.

  18. Culture Model of Rat Portal Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    El Mourabit, Haquima; Loeuillard, Emilien; Lemoinne, Sara; Cadoret, Axelle; Housset, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are matrix-producing cells with contractile properties, usually characterized by de novo expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, that arise in fibrotic diseases. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), known as perisinusoidal cells containing auto-fluorescent vitamin A, are the major although not exclusive source of myofibroblasts in the injured liver. Portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) have been defined as liver myofibroblasts derived from cells that are distinct from HSCs and located in the portal tract. Here, we describe the protocol we have established to obtain rat PMFs in culture. In this method, the biliary tree is (i) separated from the liver parenchyma by in situ enzymatic perfusion of the liver, (ii) minced and further digested in vitro, until bile duct segments are isolated by sequential filtration. Bile duct isolates free of HSC contaminants, form small cell clusters, which initially comprise a large majority of epithelial cells. In culture conditions (fetal bovine serum) that provide a growth advantage to mesenchymal cells over epithelial cells, the epithelial cells die and detach from the substrate, while spindle-shaped cells outgrow from the periphery of the cell clusters, as shown by video-microscopy. These cells are highly proliferative and after 4–5 days, the culture is composed exclusively of fully differentiated myofibroblasts, which express alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1, and secrete abundant collagen. We found no evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e., no co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin at any stage, while cytokeratin becomes undetectable in the confluent cells. PMFs obtained by this method express the genes that were previously reported to be overexpressed in non-HSC or portal fibroblast-derived liver myofibroblasts as compared to HSC-derived myofibroblasts, including the most discriminant, collagen 15, fibulin 2, and Thy-1. After one passage, PMFs retain the same phenotypic features as in

  19. Developing a rat model of dilated cardiomyopathy with improved survival* #

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-juan; Lu, Shu; Zhou, Yong-hua; Li, Lan; Xing, Qing-min; Xu, Yong-liang

    2016-01-01

    To compare the continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection administration protocols of doxorubicin (Dox) under the same cumulative dose (12 mg/kg), and establish a rat dilated cardiomyopathy model with improved survival, a total of 150 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups: a control group, administered with normal saline; a Dox 1 group, administration twice a week at 1 mg/kg; a Dox 2, administration once a week at 2 mg/kg. Mortality rates in the Dox 1 and Dox 2 groups were 22% and 48%, respectively (P<0.05). As shown by echocardiography, both Dox groups exhibited significant chamber dilatation and reduced cardiac function (all P<0.05 vs. control). Plasma brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein concentrations were significantly increased (P<0.05) with both Dox regimens. The concentrations of Caspase-3 in myocardial tissues of rats significantly increased in both doxorubicin regimens. Myocardial metabolism imaging by histology and 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) both revealed decreased myocardial viability and necrosis, and even interstitial fibrosis, in left ventricles (LVs) in both Dox groups. Serum creatinine and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations were significantly higher in the Dox 2 model than in the Dox 1 model. Doxorubicin given at both regimens induced dilated cardiomyopathy, while its administration at lower doses with more frequent infusions reduced the mortality rate. PMID:27921402

  20. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome through detailed knowledge of its specific traits or with certain techniques. The rat has been used in many experimental protocols leading to bone loss, including hormonal interventions (ovariectomy, orchidectomy, hypophysectomy, parathyroidectomy), immobilization, and dietary manipulations. The aim of the current review is not only to present the ovariectomized rat and its advantages as an appropriate model for the research of osteoporosis, but also to provide information about the most relevant age and bone site selection according to the goals of each experimental protocol. In addition, several methods of bone mass evaluation are assessed, such as biochemical markers, densitometry, histomorphometry, and bone mechanical testing, that are used for monitoring and evaluation of this animal model in preventive or therapeutic strategies for osteoporosis. PMID:19004367

  1. [Leveling the hyperlipidemic effect of beta-adrenoblockers by means of antiatherogenic vegetarian diet].

    PubMed

    Medkova, I L; Ieromuzo, A A; Ivanov, A N; Mosiakina, L I; Biriukova, L S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the capacities of correction of impaired lipid metabolism in patients with CHD receiving selective beta-adrenoblockers (beta-AB) by using an antiatherogenic milk-and-vegetable diet. According to the type of antiatherogenic diet, 67 patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) 42 patients were on an antiatherogenic vegetarian diet (a vegetarian group--VG) and 2) 25 patients received routine mixed diet No. 10c (a control group--CG). At the same time all the patients received similar antianginal drug therapy including the selective beta-AB atenolol in a dose of 50 mg/day. The vegetarian diet without special hypolipidemic therapy had a marked normalizing effect on the serum lipid spectrum in patients with CHD. Thus, in VG, by the end of treatment, the level of total cholesterol significantly decreased by 16% while in the controls it increased by 13%. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased in VG and decreased in CG, therefore the atherogenicity coefficient considerably rose. These were true for triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. These parameters significantly decreased in VG (by more than 30%) and increased in CG (by 16%). Among the clinical symptoms, a more pronounced decrease in blood pressure in the patients on vegetarian diet and a more significant increase in their exercise tolerance. Balanced antiatherogenic milk-and-vegetable diet in patients with coronary heart disease prevents the hyperlipidemic effect caused by the selective beta-AB atenolol and it is an agent for preventing its negative effect on lipid metabolism.

  2. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration.

  3. Achilles tendinosis: a morphometrical study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael Duarte; Glazebrook, Mark Anthony; Campos, Vinicius Castro; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the morphopathogenesis of Achilles tendinosis, using a rat model and presenting quantitative analysis of time-dependent histological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were used, randomly split in experimental and control groups. Animals of the experimental group were submitted to a treadmill running scheme. Five animals of each group were euthanized at four, eight and sixteen weeks. Achilles tendons were collected and processed routinely for histopath sections. Slides were stained by Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius Red, Alcian Blue, AgNOR, TUNEL and evaluated morphometrically. Cellular density decreased slightly along the time and was higher in the experimental group than in controls at fourth, eighth and sixteenth weeks. Fiber microtearing, percentual of reticular fibers and glycosaminoglycans content increased along the time and were higher in experimental group than in controls at all-time intervals. AgNOR labeling here interpreted as a marker of transcription activity was higher in the experimental groups than in controls at all-time intervals. Apoptotic cells were more frequent and diffusely distributed in tendinosis samples than in control groups. These results suggest that as mechanical overload is becoming chronic, cellular turnover and matrix deposition increases leading to tendinosis. The combination of staining techniques and morphometry used here to describe the evolution of lesions occurring in a rat model system has proved to be suited for the study of induced Achilles tendinosis.

  4. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  5. Rodent models in neuroscience research: is it a rat race?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rodents (especially Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) have been the most widely used models in biomedical research for many years. A notable shift has taken place over the last two decades, with mice taking a more and more prominent role in biomedical science compared to rats. This shift was primarily instigated by the availability of a much larger genetic toolbox for mice, particularly embryonic-stem-cell-based targeting technology for gene disruption. With the recent emergence of tools for altering the rat genome, notably genome-editing technologies, the technological gap between the two organisms is closing, and it is becoming more important to consider the physiological, anatomical, biochemical and pharmacological differences between rats and mice when choosing the right model system for a specific biological question. The aim of this short review and accompanying poster is to highlight some of the most important differences, and to discuss their impact on studies of human diseases, with a special focus on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27736744

  6. A rat model of spontaneous myopathy and malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, L. E.; Meléndez-Vásquez, C. V.; Gregson, N. A.; File, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a main cause of death during general anesthesia, particularly in children. However, research has been hampered by the lack of a convenient animal model, the only one available being a special strain of pig. In this study, we describe spontaneous myopathy and a fatal syndrome of generalized muscle rigidity triggered by halothane in an outbred strain of rat. Histological examination of skeletal muscle reveals severe abnormalities indicating chronic underlying myopathy. The association of histological abnormalities with an acute, fatal syndrome clinically resembling malignant hyperthermia provides a strong basis for a new and extremely useful animal model to study this fatal disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9546371

  7. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Models in Mice and Rats.

    PubMed

    Furman, Brian L

    2015-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is an antibiotic that produces pancreatic islet β-cell destruction and is widely used experimentally to produce a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Detailed in this unit are protocols for producing STZ-induced insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia in mice and rats. Also described are protocols for creating animal models for type 2 diabetes using STZ. These animals are employed for assessing the pathological consequences of diabetes and for screening potential therapies for the treatment of this condition.

  8. Resibufogenin corrects hypertension in a rat model of human preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hop; Ianosi-Irimie, Monica; Danchuk, Svitlana; Rabon, Edd; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Kamano, Yoshiaki; Pettit, G Robert; Wiese, Thomas; Puschett, Jules B

    2006-02-01

    The study of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia has been hampered by a relative dearth of animal models. We developed a rat model of preeclampsia in which the excretion of a circulating inhibitor of Na/K ATPase, marinobufagenin (MBG), is elevated. These animals develop hypertension, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. The administration of a congener of MBG, resibufogenin (RBG), reduces blood pressure to normal in these animals, as is the case when given to pregnant animals rendered hypertensive by the administration of MBG. Studies of Na/K ATPase inhibition by MBG and RBG reveal that these agents are equally effective as inhibitors of the enzyme.

  9. Retention modeling of diesel exhaust particles in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Yu, C P; Yoon, K J

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study was to predict the lung burden in rats and humans of diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions by means of a mathematical model. We previously developed a model to predict the deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs of these species. In this study, the clearance and retention of diesel exhaust particles deposited in the lung are examined. A diesel particle is composed of a carbonaceous core (soot) and adsorbed organics. These materials can be removed from the lung after deposition by two mechanisms: (1) mechanical clearance, provided by mucociliary transport in the ciliated airways as well as macrophage phagocytosis and migration in the nonciliated airways, and (2) clearance by dissolution. To study the clearance of diesel exhaust particles from the lung, we used a compartmental model consisting of four anatomical compartments: nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, alveolar, and the lung-associated lymph node compartments. We also assumed a particle model made up of material components according to the characteristics of clearance: (1) a carbonaceous core of about 80 percent of particle mass, (2) slowly cleared organics of about 10 percent of particle mass, and (3) fast-cleared organics accounting for the remaining 10 percent of particle mass. The kinetic equations of the retention model were first developed for Fischer-344 rats. The transport rates of each material component of diesel exhaust particles (soot, slowly cleared organics, and fast-cleared organics) were derived using available experimental data and several mathematical approximations. The lung burden results calculated from the model showed that although the organics were cleared at nearly constant rates, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot decreased with increasing lung burden. This is consistent with existing experimental observations. At low lung burdens, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot was a constant, equal to the normal clearance rate

  10. High-fat diet-induced obesity Rat model: a comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia; Meireles, Manuela; Norberto, Sónia; Leite, Joana; Freitas, Joana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decades, obesity and associated metabolic complications have reached epidemic proportions. For the study of these pathologies, a number of animal models have been developed. However, a direct comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) Rat as models of high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity has not been adequately evaluated so far. Wistar and SD rats were assigned for 2 experimental groups for 17 weeks: standard (St) and high-fat (HF) diet groups. To assess some of the features of the metabolic syndrome, oral glucose tolerance tests, systolic blood pressure measurements and blood biochemical analysis were performed throughout the study. The gut microbiota composition of the animals of each group was evaluated at the end of the study by real-time PCR. HF diet increased weight gain, body fat mass, mesenteric adipocyte's size, adiponectin and leptin plasma levels and decreased oral glucose tolerance in both Wistar and SD rats. However, the majority of these effects were more pronounced or earlier detected in Wistar rats. The gut microbiota of SD rats was less abundant in Bacteroides and Prevotella but richer in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus comparatively to the gut microbiota of Wistar rats. Nevertheless, the modulation of the gut microbiota by HF diet was similar in both strains, except for Clostridium leptum that was only reduced in Wistar rats fed with HF diet. In conclusion, both Wistar and SD Rat can be used as models of HF diet-induced obesity although the metabolic effects caused by HF diet seemed to be more pronounced in Wistar Rat. Differences in the gut microbial ecology may account for the worsened metabolic scenario observed in Wistar Rat. PMID:27144092

  11. A Rat Model for Muscle Regeneration in the Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Helmich, Maria P. A. C.; Ulrich, Dietmar J. O.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. Methods Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4) and 2 (n = 2) were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6) was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2) was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm) were evaluated by (immuno)histochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA) after 7 days. Results The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. Conclusions This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery. PMID:23554995

  12. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  13. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Irving, Amy A; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F; Amos-Landgraf, James M

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  14. Rat testis as a radiobiological in vivo model for radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Grafström, G; Jönsson, B-A; El Hassan, A M; Tennvall, J; Strand, S-E

    2006-01-01

    The radiobiological effect of intracellularly localised radionuclides emitting low energy electrons (Auger electrons) has received much attention. Most in vivo studies reported have been performed in the mouse testis. We have investigated the rat testis as an in vivo radiobiological model, with sperm-head survival, testis weight loss and also alteration in the blood plasma hormone levels of FSH and LH as radiobiological endpoints. Validation of the rat testis model was evaluated by using mean absorbed doses of up to 10 Gy from intratesticularly (i.t.) injected (111)In oxine or local X-ray irradiation. Biokinetics of the i.t. injected radionuclide was analysed by scintillation camera imaging and used in the absorbed dose estimation. By the analysis of the autoradiographs, the activity distribution was revealed. Cell fractionation showed (111)In to be mainly associated with the cell nuclei. External irradiations were monitored by thermoluminescence dosimeters. The sperm-head survival was the most sensitive radiobiological parameter correlated to the mean absorbed dose, with a D(37) of 2.3 Gy for (111)In oxine and 1.3 Gy for X rays. The levels of plasma pituitary gonadal hormones FSH and LH were elevated for absorbed doses >7.7 Gy. This investigation shows that the radiobiological model based on the rat testis has several advantages compared with the previously commonly used mouse testis model. The model is appropriate for further investigations of basic phenomena such as radiation geometry, intracellular kinetics and heterogeneity, crucial for an understanding of the biological effect of low-energy electrons.

  15. Comparison of BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II in Predicting Severity and Prognoses of Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Xing, Yun; Du, Lichuan; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, with the developing of living standard, hyperlipidemia becomes the second major reason of acute pancreatitis. It is important to predict the severity and prognosis at early stage of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). We compared the BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II scoring system in predicting MSAP and SAP, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. A total of 326 diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis patients from August 2006 to July 2015 were studied retrospectively. Our result showed that all four scoring systems can be used to predict the severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. Ranson did not have significant advantage in predicting severity and prognosis of HLAP compared to other three scoring systems. APACHE II was the best in predicting severity of HLAP, but it had shortcoming in predicting local complications. MCTSI had outstanding performance in predicting local complications, but it was poor in predicting severity and mortality. BISAP score had high accuracy in assessment of severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP, but the accuracy still needs to be improved in the future. PMID:27882045

  16. Comparison of BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II in Predicting Severity and Prognoses of Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Chinese Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Liu, Jing; Xing, Yun; Du, Lichuan; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, with the developing of living standard, hyperlipidemia becomes the second major reason of acute pancreatitis. It is important to predict the severity and prognosis at early stage of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). We compared the BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II scoring system in predicting MSAP and SAP, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. A total of 326 diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis patients from August 2006 to July 2015 were studied retrospectively. Our result showed that all four scoring systems can be used to predict the severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. Ranson did not have significant advantage in predicting severity and prognosis of HLAP compared to other three scoring systems. APACHE II was the best in predicting severity of HLAP, but it had shortcoming in predicting local complications. MCTSI had outstanding performance in predicting local complications, but it was poor in predicting severity and mortality. BISAP score had high accuracy in assessment of severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP, but the accuracy still needs to be improved in the future.

  17. Generation of a New Model Rat: Nrf2 Knockout Rats Are Sensitive to Aflatoxin B1 Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Keiko; Takaku, Misaki; Egner, Patricia A; Morita, Masanobu; Kaneko, Takehito; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    THE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR NRF2: (NF-E2-related-factor 2) REGULATES A BATTERY OF ANTIOXIDATIVE STRESS-RESPONSE GENES AND DETOXICATION GENES, AND NRF2 KNOCKOUT LINES OF MICE HAVE BEEN CONTRIBUTING CRITICALLY TO THE CLARIFICATION OF ROLES THAT NRF2 PLAYS FOR CELL PROTECTION HOWEVER, THERE ARE APPARENT LIMITATIONS IN USE OF THE MOUSE MODELS FOR INSTANCE, RATS EXHIBIT MORE SUITABLE FEATURES FOR TOXICOLOGICAL OR PHYSIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS THAN MICE IN THIS STUDY, WE GENERATED 2 LINES OF NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS BY USING A GENOME EDITING TECHNOLOGY; 1 LINE HARBORS A 7-BP DELETION Δ7 AND THE OTHER LINE HARBORS A 1-BP INSERTION +1 IN THE NRF2 GENE IN THE LIVERS OF RATS HOMOZYGOUSLY DELETING THE NRF2 GENE, AN ACTIVATOR OF NRF2 SIGNALING, CDDO-IM, COULD NOT INDUCE EXPRESSION OF REPRESENTATIVE NRF2 TARGET GENES TO EXAMINE ALTERED TOXICOLOGICAL RESPONSE, WE TREATED THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS WITH AFLATOXIN B1 AFB1, A CARCINOGENIC MYCOTOXIN THAT ELICITS GENE MUTATIONS THROUGH BINDING OF ITS METABOLITES TO DNA AND FOR WHICH THE RAT HAS BEEN PROPOSED AS A REASONABLE SURROGATE FOR HUMAN TOXICITY INDEED, IN THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RAT LIVERS THE ENZYMES OF THE AFB1 DETOXICATION PATHWAY WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DOWNREGULATED SINGLE DOSE ADMINISTRATION OF AFB1 INCREASED HEPATOTOXICITY AND BINDING OF AFB1-N7-GUANINE TO HEPATIC DNA IN NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS COMPARED WITH WILD-TYPE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS REPEATEDLY TREATED WITH AFB1 WERE PRONE TO LETHALITY AND CDDO-IM WAS NO LONGER PROTECTIVE THESE RESULTS DEMONSTRATE THAT NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS ARE QUITE SENSITIVE TO AFB1 TOXICITIES AND THIS RAT GENOTYPE EMERGES AS A NEW MODEL ANIMAL IN TOXICOLOGY.

  18. Ozone enema: a model of microscopic colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D; Cohen, P; Zimran, A

    2001-11-01

    Ozone is one of the most powerful oxidants available, with many applications in industry and medicine. Medically relevant features of ozone include bacterial and virucidal properties, disinfection, sterilization, circulatory stimulation, and disruption of malignant cells. Ozone therapy is administered in various ways, including intravenously, intramuscularly, and intrarectally. The latter modality is used for the treatment of colitis and hepatitis. Our aim was to examine the effect of ozone water enema on normal and inflamed rat colonic mucosa. Ozone water (20 microg/ml) was prepared via ozone generator and administered intrarectally (0.5 ml) daily. Rats were killed one, three, and seven days after rectal ozone water administration, and their colons resected, rinsed, and weighed (grams per 10 cm). Damage was assessed macro- and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase activity. Rats receiving saline served as controls. In an additional experiment colitis was induced by intrarectal iodoacetamide. Ozone therapy caused no macroscopic damage. Ozone therapy induced microscopic colitis, which lasted for at least a week and was accompanied by increase in segmental weight, myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide activity, and prostaglandin E2 generation. Ozone therapy had no protective effect on inflamed mucosa. In conclusion, ozone water therapy had a deleterious effect on normal colonic mucosa, suggesting intrarectal administration be reevaluated. Ozone water enema may serve as a model of microscopic colitis.

  19. Antifibrotic effect of heparin on liver fibrosis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Shah, Gaurang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chronic thrombin inhibition by heparin on experimentally induced chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) in rats. METHODS: Chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) was induced in Wistar rats by oral administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 7 wk, an animal model with persistent severe hepatic fibrosis. Intravenous administration of the thrombin antagonist (heparin) started 1 wk after the start of CCl4 intoxication for 6 wk. After completion of treatment (7 wk), markers of hepatic dysfunction were measured and changes evaluated histopathologically. RESULTS: Higher serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels, as well as lower fibrinogen levels, were found in CCl4 intoxicated rats. Heparin, silymarin and combination of drug (heparin and silymarin) treatment for 6 wk prevented a rise in SGOT, SGPT, ALP, total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels and improved fibrinogen levels. Deterioration in hepatic function determined by the fibrosis area was retarded, as evident from hepatic histopathology. Total protein levels were not changed in all groups. CONCLUSION: Heparin, a thrombin antagonist, preserved hepatic function and reduced severity of hepatic dysfunction/fibrogenesis. Combination of heparin and silymarin produced additional benefits on liver fibrosis. PMID:23494756

  20. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  1. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  2. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, P. H. R.; Vieira, J. W.; Yoriyaz, H.; Lima, F. R. A.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates—following the MIRD methodology—in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented.

  3. Anti‐diabetic and Anti‐hyperlipidemic Effects and Safety of Salacia reticulata and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sidhartha

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of Salacia reticulata Wight (Hypocrataceae) roots, stems, and leaves have been used in Asia for hundreds of years for the folkloric treatment of diabetes and other health problems. Constituents that have been identified as exhibiting anti‐diabetic effects include salacinol, kotalanol, ponkorinol, salaprinol, and their corresponding de‐0‐sulfonated compounds. Mangiferin, kotalagenin 16‐acetate and various proanthocyanidin oligomers have also been isolated. Studies indicate that Salacia extracts modulate multiple targets that influence carbohydrate and lipid metabolism including α‐glucosidase, aldose reductase, pancreatic lipase, peroxisomal proliferator‐activated receptor‐α, glucose transporter‐4 mediated glucose uptake, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Furthermore, Salacia extracts exhibit free radical scavenging, antioxidant and hepatoprotectant activities. In human studies, Salacia extracts have been shown to decrease plasma glucose and insulin levels, decrease HbA1c, and modulate serum lipid levels with no adverse effects being reported. Similar results have been demonstrated in rat and mouse models as well as in vitro systems. Safety of S. reticulata and other Salacia species as S. oblonga and S. chinensis in rats and mice indicate that extracts are exceedingly safe. No clinical studies have examined the effects of Salacia extracts on human weight loss, although weight loss and decreases in weight gain have been demonstrated in animal models. Because of the large number of pharmacologically active compounds, it is difficult to establish standards for extracts. © 2015 The Authors. Phytotheraphy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26031882

  4. Novel rat tail discitis model using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bostian, Phillip A; Karnes, Jonathan M; Cui, Shari; Robinson, Lisa J; Daffner, Scott D; Witt, Michelle R; Emery, Sanford E

    2016-12-05

    Management of spondylodiscitis is a challenging clinical problem requiring medical and surgical treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of spondylodiscitis that utilizes bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), thus permitting in vivo surveillance of infection intensity. Inocula of the bioluminescent S. aureus strain XEN36 were created in concentrations of 10(2) CFU/0.1 ml, 10(4)  CFU/0.1 ml, and 10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml. Three groups of rats were injected with the bacteria in the most proximal intervertebral tail segment. The third most proximal tail segment was injected with saline as a control. Bioluminescence was measured at baseline, 3 days, and weekly for a total of 6 weeks. Detected bioluminescence for each group peaked at day 3 and returned to baseline in 21 days. The average intensity was highest for the experimental group injected with the most concentrated bacterial solution (10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml). Radiographic analysis revealed loss of intervertebral disc space and evidence of osseous bridging. Saline-injected spaces exhibited no decrease in intervertebral spacing as compared to distal sites. Histologic analysis revealed neutrophilic infiltrates, destruction of the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, destruction of vertebral endplates, and osseous bridging. Saline-injected discs exhibited preserved annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus on histology. This study demonstrates that injection of bioluminescent S. aureus into the intervertebral disc of a rat tail is a viable animal model for spondylodiscitis research. This model allows for real-time, in vivo quantification of infection intensity, which may decrease the number of animals required for infection studies of the intervertebral disc. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  5. Differentiated analysis of orthodontic tooth movement in rats with an improved rat model and three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirschneck, Christian; Proff, Peter; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Behr, Michael; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Roemer, Piero

    2013-12-01

    Rat models currently available for analysis of orthodontic tooth movement often lack differentiated, reliable and precise measurement systems allowing researchers to separately investigate the individual contribution of tooth tipping, body translation and root torque to overall displacement. Many previously proposed models have serious limitations such as the rather inaccurate analysis of the effects of orthodontic forces on rat incisors. We therefore developed a differentiated measurement system that was used within a rat model with the aim of overcoming the limitations of previous studies. The first left upper molar and the upper incisors of 24 male Wistar rats were subjected to a constant orthodontic force of 0.25 N by means of a NiTi closed coil spring for up to four weeks. The extent of the various types of tooth movement was measured optometrically with a CCD microscope camera and cephalometrically by means of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both types of measurement proved to be reliable for consecutive measurements and the significant tooth movement induced had no harmful effects on the animals. Movement kinetics corresponded to known physiological processes and tipping and body movement equally contributed to the tooth displacement. The upper incisors of the rats were significantly deformed and their natural eruption was effectively halted. The results showed that our proposed measurement systems used within a rat model resolved most of the inadequacies of previous studies. They are reliable, precise and physiological tools for the differentiated analysis of orthodontic tooth movement while simultaneously preserving animal welfare.

  6. Keratoepithelioplasty in rat: development of a model and histological study.

    PubMed

    Amano, S; Sawa, M; Ishii, Y

    1992-01-01

    A model for keratoepithelioplasty (KEP) was developed using the Lewis rat, and histological studies were performed using this model. The entire corneal epithelium was removed mechanically and a 1.5-mm width of the conjunctiva including the limbus was excised. An oval corneal lamellar graft (3 x 1.5 mm) with an intact epithelium taken from another Lewis rat was transplanted on the denuded limbus. Biomicroscopic observations showed much less vascular invasion in the part of the cornea adjacent to the lenticule than in other parts of the cornea, and the cornea remained clear adjacent to the lenticule. Histologically, a few vessels were observed in the corneal stroma under the lenticule. Epithelial cells on the lenticule specimens showed histological characteristics of the corneal epithelium. These findings indicate that one of the functions of KEP is to block neovascularization in the newly developing corneal epithelium by transplanting the lenticule between the corneal epithelium and conjunctival vessels. The present study also confirmed that this model is useful in the research of the pathophysiological mechanism of KEP.

  7. [Histological study of a model of keratoepithelioplasty in the rat].

    PubMed

    Amano, S; Sawa, M; Ishii, Y

    1992-11-01

    A model for keratoepithelioplasty (KEP) was developed using the Lewis rat, and histological studies were performed using the model. The entire corneal epithelium was removed using a spatula and a 1.5-mm-width of the conjunctiva including the limbus was excised. An oval corneal lamellar graft (3 x 1.5 mm) with an intact epithelium taken from another Lewis rat was transplanted on the denuded limbus. Biomicroscopic observation showed significantly less vascular invasion in the part of the cornea adjacent to the lenticule than in other part of cornea, and clear cornea was maintained in the cornea adjacent to the lenticule. Histologically only few vessels were recognized in the lenticule, and the epithelial cells on the lenticule showed histological characteristics of corneal epithelium. These results indicate that surgical function of KEP can be obtained because the lenticules keep distance between corneal epithelium and conjunctival vessels. And it is also confirmed that this model is useful in research on the pathophysiological mechanism of KEP.

  8. Modeling postpartum depression in rats: theoretic and methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Ming, LI; Shinn-Yi, CHOU

    2016-01-01

    The postpartum period is when a host of changes occur at molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral levels to prepare female humans for the challenge of maternity. Alteration or prevention of these normal adaptions is thought to contribute to disruptions of emotion regulation, motivation and cognitive abilities that underlie postpartum mental disorders, such as postpartum depression. Despite the high incidence of this disorder, and the detrimental consequences for both mother and child, its etiology and related neurobiological mechanisms remain poorly understood, partially due to the lack of appropriate animal models. In recent decades, there have been a number of attempts to model postpartum depression disorder in rats. In the present review, we first describe clinical symptoms of postpartum depression and discuss known risk factors, including both genetic and environmental factors. Thereafter, we discuss various rat models that have been developed to capture various aspects of this disorder and knowledge gained from such attempts. In doing so, we focus on the theories behind each attempt and the methods used to achieve their goals. Finally, we point out several understudied areas in this field and make suggestions for future directions. PMID:27469254

  9. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p < 0.05). More myopathy cases were found in patients on simvastatin treatment (52% vs. 38%, ns.), while significantly less patients with myopathy were on fluvastatin treatment (13% vs. 33%, p < 0.05) compared to patients with other types of statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP

  10. Progesterone Treatment in Two Rat Models of Ocular Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rachael S.; Olsen, Timothy W.; Sayeed, Iqbal; Cale, Heather A.; Morrison, Katherine C.; Oumarbaeva, Yuliya; Lucaciu, Irina; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether the neurosteroid progesterone, shown to have protective effects in animal models of traumatic brain injury, stroke, and spinal cord injury, is also protective in ocular ischemia animal models. Methods. Progesterone treatment was tested in two ocular ischemia models in rats: a rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) model, which induces permanent monocular optic nerve stroke, and the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, which causes transient ischemia in both the retina and brain due to an intraluminal filament that blocks the ophthalmic and middle cerebral arteries. Visual function and retinal histology were assessed to determine whether progesterone attenuated retinal injury in these models. Additionally, behavioral testing and 2% 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining in brains were used to compare progesterone's neuroprotective effects in both retina and brain using the MCAO model. Results. Progesterone treatment showed no effect on visual evoked potential (VEP) reduction and retinal ganglion cell loss in the permanent rAION model. In the transient MCAO model, progesterone treatment reduced (1) electroretinogram (ERG) deficits, (2) MCAO-induced upregulation of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and (3) retinal ganglion cell loss. As expected, progesterone treatment also had significant protective effects in behavioral tests and a reduction in infarct size in the brain. Conclusions. Progesterone treatment showed protective effects in the retina following MCAO but not rAION injury, which may result from mechanistic differences with injury type and the therapeutic action of progesterone. PMID:26024074

  11. Metabolic Cages for a Space Flight Model in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Jennifer S.; Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Evans, Juli; Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of space flight models are available to mimic the physiologic changes seen in the rat during weightlessness. The model reported by Wronski and Morey-Holton has been widely used by many investigators, in musculoskeletal physiologic studies especially, resulting in accumulation of an extensive database that enables scientists to mimic space flight effects in the 1-g environment of Earth. However, information on nutrition or gastrointestinal and renal function in this space flight model is limited by the difficulty in acquiring uncontaminated metabolic specimens for analysis. In the Holton system, a traction tape harness is applied to the tail, and the rat's hindquarters are elevated by attaching the harness to a pulley system. Weight-bearing hind limbs are unloaded, and there is a headward fluid shift. The tail-suspended rats are able to move freely about their cages on their forelimbs and tolerate this procedure with minimal signs of stress. The cage used in Holton's model is basically a clear acrylic box set on a plastic grid floor with the pulley and tail harness system attached to the open top of the cage. Food is available from a square food cup recessed into a corner of the floor. In this system, urine, feces, and spilled food fall through the grid floor onto absorbent paper beneath the cage and cannot be separated and recovered quantitatively for analysis in metabolic balance studies. Commercially available metabolic cages are generally cylindrical and have been used with a centrally located suspension apparatus in other space flight models. The large living area, three times as large as most metabolic cages, and the free range of motion unique to Holton's model, essential for musculoskeletal investigations, were sacrificed. Holton's cages can accommodate animals ranging in weight from 70 to 600 g. Although an alternative construction of Holton's cage has been reported, it does not permit collection of separate urine and fecal samples. We describe

  12. Hypertension and vulnerability to hemorrhagic shock in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Penny S; Song, Kyle Seokhan; Tamariz, Francisco J; Wayne Barbee, R

    2015-02-01

    Trauma mortality may be increased in the presence of preexisting diseases such as chronic hypertension. We hypothesized that systemic and microvascular alterations accompanying chronic hypertension would increase the vulnerability to hemorrhage relative to normotensive controls in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. We present a novel comparative hemorrhage model of shock vulnerability, quantified by "vulnerability curves" expressing physiological response to hemorrhage as a function of three matched shock metrics: cumulative blood volume, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and oxygen delivery (Do2). Responses were central hemodynamics and respiratory and muscle oxygenation obtained for one hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive [SHR]) and two normotensive (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar-Kyoto) rat strains. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by incremental (0.5 mL) hemorrhage to cardiovascular collapse in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated animals. Shock vulnerability of SHR rats was primarily pressure-driven; in general, SHR exhibited the expected patterns of more rapid deterioration in MAP and Vo2 over smaller ranges of blood loss and Do2. Sternotomy-related depression of CO and thus Do2 in SHR meant that we could not test hypotheses related to the role of Do2 and contribution to perfusion differences between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Insensitivity of lactate to strain effects suggests that lactate may be a reliable biomarker of shock status. Unexpected similarities between Wistar-Kyoto and SHR suggest strain-related effects other than those related to hypertension per se contribute to hemorrhage response; body size effects and genetic relationships could not be ruled out. Future studies should incorporate phylogenetically based methods to examine the role of hypertension and physiological response to hemorrhage across multiple strains.

  13. A Model of Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Saccomanno, Stefania; Ferretti, Gianna; Bachetti, Tiziana; Marzioni, Marco; De Minicis, Samuele; Nobili, Liliana; Salzano, Renata; Omenetti, Alessia; Pacetti, Deborah; Sigmund, Soeren; Benedetti, Antonio; Casini, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance induces nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We used a high-fat, high-calorie solid diet (HFD) to create a model of insulin resistance and NASH in nongenetically modified rats and to study the relationship between visceral adipose tissue and liver. Obesity and insulin resistance occurred in HFD rats, accompanied by a progressive increase in visceral adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA and in circulating free fatty acids. HFD also decreased adiponectin mRNA and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α expression in the visceral adipose tissue and the liver, respectively, and induced hepatic insulin resistance through TNF-α-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent insulin receptor substrate-1Ser307 phosphorylation. These modifications lead to hepatic steatosis accompanied by oxidative stress phenomena, necroinflammation, and hepatocyte apoptosis at 4 weeks and by pericentral fibrosis at 6 months. Supplementation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, a PPARα ligand, to HFD-treated animals restored hepatic adiponectin and PPARα expression, reduced TNF-α hepatic levels, and ameliorated fatty liver and the degree of liver injury. Thus, our model mimics the most common features of NASH in humans and provides an ideal tool to study the role of individual pathogenetic events (as for PPARα down-regulation) and to define any future experimental therapy, such as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, which ameliorated the degree of liver injury. PMID:16936261

  14. A Rat Drinking in the Dark Model for Studying Ethanol and Sucrose Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Holgate, Joan Y.; Shariff, Masroor; Mu, Erica W. H.; Bartlett, Selena

    2017-01-01

    Background: The intermittent access 2-bottle choice (IA2BC) and drinking in the dark (DID) models were developed for studying rodent binge-like consumption. Traditionally, IA2BC was used with rats and DID with mice. Recently, IA2BC was adapted to study mouse ethanol consumption. However, it is unknown whether DID is suitable for rats or if one rat model is more advantageous than another for studying binge-like consumption. Methods: Male Wistar rats consumed 20% ethanol or 5% sucrose using IA2BC or DID for 12 weeks. IA2BC drinking sessions occurred on alternate days (Mondays–Fridays) and lasted 24 h, whereas DID sessions ran 4 h/day, 5 days/week (Monday–Friday). Average consumption/session, week and hour was measured. To explore DID model suitability for screening novel compounds for controlling ethanol and sucrose intake, varenicline (2 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered to DID rats. Results: IA2BC rats consume more ethanol/session and similar amounts of ethanol/week than DID rats. While, IA2BC rats consume more sucrose/session and week than DID rats. Although IA2BC rats had more ethanol and sucrose access time, DID rats had greater ethanol and sucrose intake/hour. Varenicline significantly reduced ethanol and sucrose consumption in DID rats, consistent with previously published IA2BC studies. Conclusions: Despite the shorter access time, the rat DID model induced higher initial intake and greater consumption/hour for both ethanol and sucrose. The shorter duration of DID sessions did not prevent detection of varenicline-induced reductions in ethanol or sucrose consumption, suggesting the DID model may be suitable for studying binge-like ethanol and sucrose consumption. PMID:28275340

  15. Relationship between Immunological Abnormalities in Rat Models of Diabetes Mellitus and the Amplification Circuits for Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuji; Shimomura, Tomoko; Asao, Hironobu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms is required in order to treat diseases. However, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications are extremely complex. Immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, while diabetes influences immune reactions. Furthermore, both diabetes and immune reactions are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To address these issues, animal models are useful tools. So far, various animal models of diabetes have been developed in rats, which have advantages over mice models in terms of the larger volume of tissue samples and the variety of type 2 diabetes models. In this review, we introduce rat models of diabetes and summarize the immune reactions in diabetic rat models. Finally, we speculate on the relationship between immune reactions and diabetic episodes. For example, diabetes-prone Biobreeding rats, type 1 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased autoreactive cellular and inflammatory immune reactions, while Goto-Kakizaki rats, type 2 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased Th2 reactions and attenuation of phagocytic activity. Investigation of immunological abnormalities in various diabetic rat models is useful for elucidating complicated mechanisms in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Studying immunological alterations, such as predominance of Th1/17 or Th2 cells, humoral immunity, and innate immune reactions, may improve understanding the structure of amplification circuits for diabetes in future studies.

  16. Relationship between Immunological Abnormalities in Rat Models of Diabetes Mellitus and the Amplification Circuits for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Tomoko; Asao, Hironobu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms is required in order to treat diseases. However, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications are extremely complex. Immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, while diabetes influences immune reactions. Furthermore, both diabetes and immune reactions are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To address these issues, animal models are useful tools. So far, various animal models of diabetes have been developed in rats, which have advantages over mice models in terms of the larger volume of tissue samples and the variety of type 2 diabetes models. In this review, we introduce rat models of diabetes and summarize the immune reactions in diabetic rat models. Finally, we speculate on the relationship between immune reactions and diabetic episodes. For example, diabetes-prone Biobreeding rats, type 1 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased autoreactive cellular and inflammatory immune reactions, while Goto-Kakizaki rats, type 2 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased Th2 reactions and attenuation of phagocytic activity. Investigation of immunological abnormalities in various diabetic rat models is useful for elucidating complicated mechanisms in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Studying immunological alterations, such as predominance of Th1/17 or Th2 cells, humoral immunity, and innate immune reactions, may improve understanding the structure of amplification circuits for diabetes in future studies. PMID:28299342

  17. Role of aldosterone in the remnant kidney model in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, E L; Kren, S; Hostetter, T H

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) participates in the injury sustained by the remnant kidney. Our studies assessed the importance of aldosterone in that model and the response of aldosterone to drugs interfering with the RAAS. Initially, four groups of rats were studied: SHAM-operated rats, untreated remnant rats (REM), REM rats treated with losartan and enalapril (REM AIIA), and REM AIIA rats infused with exogenous aldosterone (REM AIIA + ALDO). The last group was maintained with aldosterone levels comparable to those in untreated REM rats by constant infusion of exogenous aldosterone. REM rats had larger adrenal glands and a > 10-fold elevation in plasma aldosterone compared to SHAM. REM AIIA rats demonstrated significant suppression of the hyperaldosteronism as well as marked attenuation of proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis compared to REM. REM AIIA + ALDO rats manifested greater proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis than REM AIIA rats. Indeed, by 4 wk of observation all of these features of the experimental disease were similar in magnitude in REM AIIA + ALDO and untreated REM. In separate REM rats spironolactone administration did not reduce glomerular sclerosis but did transiently reduce proteinuria, lowered arterial pressure, and lessened cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, aldosterone contributes to hypertension and renal injury in the remnant kidney model. PMID:8770880

  18. Scavenger receptor function of mouse FcγRIII contributes to progression of atherosclerosis in apoE hyperlipidemic mice1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinmei; Ng, Hang Pong; Lai, Yen-Chun; Craigo, Jodi K.; Nagilla, Pruthvi S.; Raghani, Pooja; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed loss of CD36 or scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A) does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mouse model, suggesting receptors other than CD36 and SR-A may also contribute to atherosclerosis. In this report, we show that apoE-CD16 double knockout mice (apoE-CD16 DKO) have reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with apoE KO mice. In vivo and in vitro foam cells analyses showed apoE-CD16 DKO macrophages accumulated less neutral lipids. Reduced foam cell formation in apoE-CD16 DKO mice is not due to change in expression of CD36, SR-A and LOX-1. This led to a hypothesis that CD16 may have scavenger receptor activity. We presented evidence that a soluble form of recombinant mouse CD16 (sCD16) bound to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDALDL), and this binding is blocked by molar excess of MDA-BSA and anti-MDA mAbs, suggesting CD16 specifically recognizes MDA epitopes. Interestingly, sCD16 inhibited MDALDL binding to macrophage cell line as well as sCD36, sSR-A and sLOX-1, indicating CD16 can cross-block MDALDL binding to other scavenger receptors. Anti-CD16 mAb inhibited IC binding to sCD16, while partially inhibited MDALDL binding to sCD16, suggesting MDALDL binding site may be in close proximity to the IC binding site in CD16. Loss of CD16 expression resulted in reduced levels of MDALDL induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Finally, CD16 deficient macrophages showed reduced MDALDL-induced Syk phosphorylation. Collectively our findings suggest scavenger receptor activity of CD16 may in part contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25038257

  19. A BBDR-HPT Axis Model for the Pregnant Rat and Fetus: Evaluation of Iodide Deficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitarythyroid (HPT) axis for the pregnant rat and fetus is being developed to advance understanding of thyroid hormone disruptions and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). The model for the pregnant rat and fet...

  20. Laser thresholds in pulp exposure: a rat animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Goodis, Harold E.; Kudler, Joel J.

    1995-05-01

    Laser technology is now being clinically investigated for the removal of carious enamel and dentin. This study used an animal model to evaluate histological pulpal effects from laser exposure. The molars of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats (n equals 264) were exposed to either a pulsed 1.06 micrometers Nd:YAG laser (120 microseconds, 320 micrometer diameter fiber), air rotor drill preparation or left untreated as controls. The following treatment conditions were investigated: control group (n equals 54); high speed drill with carbide bur (n equals 39); laser exposure at 50 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 27), 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 66) and 100 mJ/p at 20 Hz (n equals 39). A sixth treatment condition was investigated: root surface hypersensitivity, which included incremental laser exposure from 30 to 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 39). The animals were euthanized either immediately after treatment, at one week, or at one month. The jaws were fixed and bioprepared. Remaining dentin thickness was measured, and ranged from 0.17 +/- 0.04 mm to 0.35 +/- 0.09 mm. The pulp tissue was examined for histologic inflammatory response. No evidence of pulpal involvement or adverse pulpal effects were found at any time period in teeth receiving 50 mJ/p. When histologic samples were compared with controls, all observations were similar. Of the 210 exposed teeth, 2 teeth receiving 100 mJ/p demonstrated abscess formation and were exfoliated. Further, in the rat molar when remaining dentin thickness was less than 0.5 mm, exposed to 100 mJ/p, threshold pulpal effects occurred. The response of rat pulp to laser exposure indicated no histologically measurable response to pulsed laser energy at 50 mJ/p.

  1. Metformin and atorvastatin reduce adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bulent; Aksakal, Orhan; Gungor, Tayfun; Sirvan, Levent; Sut, Necdet; Kelekci, Sefa; Soysal, Sunullah; Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether atorvastatin and metformin are effective in preventing adhesions in a rat uterine horn model. A total of 40 non-pregnant, female Wistar albino rats, weighing 180-210 g, were used as a model for post-operative adhesion formation. The rats were randomized into four groups after seven standard lesions were inflicted in each uterine horn and lower abdominal sidewall using bipolar cauterization. The rats were given atorvastatin 2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), metformin 50 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats) and no treatment was applied in the control group (10 rats). The animals were killed 2 weeks later and adhesions were scored both clinically and pathologically by authors blinded to groups. One rat in the control group died before the end of the 2 week period. Total clinical adhesion scores regarding extent, severity and degree of adhesions and histopathological findings including inflammation and fibrosis were significantly lower in the metformin (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) and atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) groups when compared with control group. Metformin and atorvastatin are both effective for prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

  2. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  3. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  4. Modeling the Nonlinear Motion of the Rat Central Airways.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G; Rona, A; Hainsworth, S V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in volumetric medical imaging techniques allowed the subject-specific modeling of the bronchial flow through the first few generations of the central airways using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a reliable CFD prediction of the bronchial flow requires modeling of the inhomogeneous deformation of the central airways during breathing. This paper addresses this issue by introducing two models of the central airways motion. The first model utilizes a node-to-node mapping between the discretized geometries of the central airways generated from a number of successive computed tomography (CT) images acquired dynamically (without breath hold) over the breathing cycle of two Sprague-Dawley rats. The second model uses a node-to-node mapping between only two discretized airway geometries generated from the CT images acquired at end-exhale and at end-inhale along with the ventilator measurement of the lung volume change. The advantage of this second model is that it uses just one pair of CT images, which more readily complies with the radiation dosage restrictions for humans. Three-dimensional computer aided design geometries of the central airways generated from the dynamic-CT images were used as benchmarks to validate the output from the two models at sampled time-points over the breathing cycle. The central airway geometries deformed by the first model showed good agreement to the benchmark geometries within a tolerance of 4%. The central airway geometry deformed by the second model better approximated the benchmark geometries than previous approaches that used a linear or harmonic motion model.

  5. Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Olof; Aspenberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods — Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results — The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation — The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model. PMID:26200395

  6. [Histostructural changes of rat cerebral cortex during hemorrhagic stroke modeling].

    PubMed

    Savos'ko, S I; Chaĭkovs'kyĭ, Iu B; Pogoriela, N Kh; Makarenko, O M

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes during modeling of primary and secondary acute hemorrhagic stroke were studied in rats. We revealed differences in the activity of pharmacological action of medications under condition of acute stroke. The action of medications increased viability of neurons in both hemispheres of rat cerebrum at a right-side primary and secondary hemorrhagic stroke. Following secondary stroke, the amount of degenerative neurons amounted 25.5 +/- 0.8 cells/mm2, following the action ofcerebrolysin this value was 17.6 +/- 1.7 cells/ mm2 and after the action of cortexine and cerebral this value amounted 18.0 +/- 0.9 cells/mm2 and 10.7 +/- 0.4 cells/ mm2, respectively. In control animals the number of degenerative neurons did not exceed 2% and averaged 1.5 +/- 0.1 cells/mm2. Analysis of the morphological and statistical data showed that the most effective remedies under the primary and secondary hemorrhagic insult are cortexine and cerebral. Cerebral was found to be more effective.

  7. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Marjory B; Turk, James R; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K; Nolan, John P; Besteman, Elizabeth G; Wilson, Dennis W; Thomas, Roberta A; Fishman, Cindy E; Thompson, Karol L; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y; Schultze, Albert E

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  9. Effects of benidipine in a rat model for experimental angina.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Matsubara, Masahiro; Yao, Kozo

    2006-12-01

    To compare the antianginal effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine-type calcium-channel blockers, we evaluated the effects of benidipine, amlodipine, nifedipine, and efonidipine on vasopressin-induced myocardial ischemia in rats, an experimental model of angina. Intravenous administration of benidipine (3 microg/kg), amlodipine (1000 microg/kg), and nifedipine (100 microg/kg) suppressed the vasopressin-induced S-wave depression, an index of myocardial ischemia. Efonidipine (100 microg/kg, i.v.) tended to inhibit the S-wave depression. At the antianginal dose of each drug, amlodipine, nifedipine, and efonidipine decreased blood pressure significantly, whereas benidipine had little effect on blood pressure at a dose of 3 microg/kg. These results indicate that benidipine, unlike the other 1,4-dihydropyridine-type calcium-channel blockers examined in this study, inhibits vasopressin-induced coronary vasospasm with fewer undesirable effects such as hypotension in rats, suggesting that benidipine may be useful in the treatment of angina pectoris.

  10. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Marjory B.; Turk, James R.; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K.; Nolan, John P.; Besteman, Elizabeth G.; Wilson, Dennis W.; Thomas, Roberta A.; Fishman, Cindy E.; Thompson, Karol L.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B.; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y.; Schultze, Albert E.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions. PMID:28081568

  11. Altered explorative strategies and reactive coping style in the FSL rat model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Magara, Salvatore; Holst, Sarah; Lundberg, Stina; Roman, Erika; Lindskog, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Modeling depression in animals is based on the observation of behaviors interpreted as analog to human symptoms. Typical tests used in experimental depression research are designed to evoke an either-or outcome. It is known that explorative and coping strategies are relevant for depression, however these aspects are generally not considered in animal behavioral testing. Here we investigate the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), a rat model of depression, compared to the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat in three independent tests where the animals are allowed to express a more extensive behavioral repertoire. The multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) and the novel cage tests evoke exploratory behaviors in a novel environment and the home cage change test evokes social behaviors in the re-establishment of a social hierarchy. In the MCSF test, FSL rats exhibited less exploratory drive and more risk-assessment behavior compared to SD rats. When re-exposed to the arena, FSL, but not SD rats, increased their exploratory behavior compared to the first trial and displayed risk-assessment behavior to the same extent as SD rats. Thus, the behavior of FSL rats was more similar to that of SDs when the rats were familiar with the arena. In the novel cage test FSL rats exhibited a reactive coping style, consistent with the reduced exploration observed in the MCSF. Reactive coping is associated with less aggressive behavior. Accordingly, FSL rats displayed less aggressive behavior in the home cage change test. Taken together, our data show that FSL rats express altered exploratory behavior and reactive coping style. Reduced interest is a core symptom of depression, and individuals with a reactive coping style are more vulnerable to the disease. Our results support the use of FSL rats as an animal model of depression and increase our understanding of the FSL rat beyond the behavioral dimensions targeted by the traditional depression-related tests. PMID:25954168

  12. Novel PPAR Pan Agonist, ZBH Ameliorates Hyperlipidemia and Insulin Resistance in High Fat Diet Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xinni; Xue, Nina; Jin, Xueyuan; Wang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Effective and safe pharmacological interventions for hyperlipidemia remains badly needed. By incorporating the key pharmacophore of fibrates into the natural scaffold of resveratrol, a novel structural compound ZBH was constructed. In present study, we found ZBH reserved approximately one third of the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activation produced by resveratrol at in-vitro enzyme activity assay, directly bound to and activated all three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes respectively in PPAR binding and transactivation assays. Moreover, ZBH (EC50, 1.75 µM) activate PPARα 21 fold more efficiently than the well-known PPAR pan agonist bezafibrate (EC50, 37.37 µM) in the cellular transactivation assays. In the high fat diet induced hyperlipidemic hamsters, 5-week treatment with ZBH significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C, FFA, hyperinsulinemia, and improved insulin sensitivity more potently than bezafibrate. Meanwhile, serum transaminases, creatine phosphokinase and CREA levels were found not altered by ZBH intervention. Mechanism study indicated ZBH promoted the expression of PPARα target genes and SIRT1 mRNA. Hepatic lipogenesis was markedly decreased via down-regulation of lipogenic genes, and fatty acid uptake and oxidation was simultaneously increased in the liver and skeletal muscle via up-regulation of lipolysis genes. Glucose uptake and utilization was also significantly promoted in skeletal muscle. These results suggested that ZBH significantly lowered hyperlipidemia and ameliorated insulin resistance more efficiently than bezafibrate in the hyperlipidemic hamsters primarily by activating of PPARα, and SIRT1 promotion and activation. ZBH thus presents a potential new agent to combat hyperlipidemia. PMID:24759758

  13. Noninvasive fatigue fracture model of the rat ulna.

    PubMed

    Tami, A E; Nasser, P; Schaffler, M B; Knothe Tate, M L

    2003-11-01

    Fatigue damage occurs in response to repeated cyclic loading and has been observed in situ in cortical bone of humans and other animals. When microcracks accumulate and coalesce, failure ensues and is referred to as fatigue fracture. Experimental study of fatigue fracture healing is inherently difficult due to the lack of noninvasive models. In this study, we hypothesized that repeated cyclic loading of the rat ulna results in a fatigue fracture. The aim of the study was to develop a noninvasive long bone fatigue fracture model that induces failure through accumulation and coalescence of microdamage and replicates the morphology of a clinical fracture. Using modified end-load bending, right ulnae of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cyclically loaded in vivo to fatigue failure based on increased bone compliance, which reflects changes in bone stiffness due to microdamage. Preterminal tracer studies with 0.8% Procion Red solution were conducted according to protocols described previously to evaluate perfusion of the vasculature as well as the lacunocanalicular system at different time points during healing. Eighteen of the 20 animals loaded sustained a fatigue fracture of the medial ulna, i.e. through the compressive cortex. In all cases, the fracture was closed and non-displaced. No disruption to the periosteum or intramedullary vasculature was observed. The loading regime did not produce soft tissue trauma; in addition, no haematoma was observed in association with application of load. Healing proceeded via proliferative woven bone formation, followed by consolidation within 42 days postfracture. In sum, a noninvasive long bone fatigue fracture model was developed that lends itself for the study of internal remodeling of periosteal woven bone during fracture healing and has obvious applications for the study of fatigue fracture etiology.

  14. A new model of implant-related osteomyelitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lucke, M; Schmidmaier, G; Sadoni, S; Wildemann, B; Schiller, R; Stemberger, A; Haas, N P; Raschke, M

    2003-10-15

    Infection related to osteosynthesis often has dramatic consequences for the patient. Prolonged hospitalization with systemic antibiotic therapy, several revision procedures, possible amputation, and even death may occur. To investigate the pathology of infection in orthopedic surgery, a new rat model of implant related osteomyelitis was developed. Three different concentrations (10(6), 10(3), and 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU)/10 microl) of Staphylococcus aureus were inoculated into the tibial medullary cavity with simultaneous insertion of a titanium Kirschner wire. Controls received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Each group consisted of 10 animals. Animals were followed for 4 weeks until sacrifice. X-rays of the tibiae were taken weekly, blood counts were analyzed, and body temperature and weight were determined. After sacrifice, infection was evaluated by histological and microbiological investigations. All animals inoculated with Staph. aureus in either concentration developed microbiological, histological, and radiological signs of osteomyelitis in correlation to the amount of inoculated bacteria. X-rays clearly revealed osseous destruction after 14 days with progression of osteomyelitis during the following weeks. CFU/g bone and bone weight after sacrifice showed dependence on the amount of inoculated CFU. The histological results confirmed the radiological findings. No significant changes in blood counts, body weight, and body temperature between the groups could be observed. The results demonstrate that it is possible to develop a model of implant-related osteomyelitis in rats with dependence on the amount of inoculated bacteria. No other promoters of infection besides intramedullary insertion of titanium Kirschner wires were used in this model.

  15. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  16. Development of a non-infectious rat model of acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Hui; Wei, Ya-Ru; Du, Shan-Shan; Jin, Yue-Ping; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Wu, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease with severe pulmonary fibrosis. The main cause of IPF-associated death is acute exacerbation of IPF (AE-IPF). This study aims to develop a rat model of AE-IPF by two intratracheal perfusions with bleomycin (BLM). Methods Ninety male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomized into three groups: an AE-IPF model group (BLM + BLM group), an IPF model group (BLM group), and a normal control group. Rats in the BLM + BLM group underwent a second perfusion with BLM on day 28 after the first perfusion with BLM. Rats in the other two groups received saline as the second perfusion. Six rats in each group were sacrificed on day 31, day 35, and day 42 after the first perfusion, respectively. Additional 18 rats in each group were observed for survival. Results Rats in the BLM + BLM group had significantly worse pulmonary alveolar inflammation and fibrosis than rats in the BLM group. Rats in the BLM + BLM group also developed large amounts of hyaline membrane, showed high levels of albumin (ALB) and various inflammatory factors in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and had markedly increased lung water content. Furthermore, rat survival was reduced in the BLM + BLM group. The pathophysiological characteristics of rats in the BLM + BLM group resemble those of patients with AE-IPF. Conclusions A second perfusion with BLM appears to induce acute exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis and may be used to model AE-IPF in rats. PMID:28203411

  17. Modeling interpopulation dispersal by banner-tailed kangaroo rats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skvarla, J.L.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Waser, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many metapopulation models assume rules of population connectivity that are implicitly based on what we know about within-population dispersal, but especially for vertebrates, few data exist to assess whether interpopulation dispersal is just within-population dispersal "scaled up." We extended existing multi-stratum mark-release-recapture models to incorporate the robust design, allowing us to compare patterns of within- and between-population movement in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Movement was rare among eight populations separated by only a few hundred meters: seven years of twice-annual sampling captured >1200 individuals but only 26 interpopulation dispersers. We developed a program that implemented models with parameters for capture, survival, and interpopulation movement probability and that evaluated competing hypotheses in a model selection framework. We evaluated variants of the island, stepping-stone, and isolation-by-distance models of interpopulation movement, incorporating effects of age, season, and habitat (short or tall grass). For both sexes, QAICc values clearly favored isolation-by-distance models, or models combining the effects of isolation by distance and habitat. Models with probability of dispersal expressed as linear-logistic functions of distance and as negative exponentials of distance fit the data equally well. Interpopulation movement probabilities were similar among sexes (perhaps slightly biased toward females), greater for juveniles than adults (especially for females), and greater before than during the breeding season (especially for females). These patterns resemble those previously described for within-population dispersal in this species, which we interpret as indicating that the same processes initiate both within- and between-population dispersal.

  18. [Efficacy of cerebrolysin in cerebral hemorrhage model in rats].

    PubMed

    Kositsyn, N S; Svinov, M M; Goloborod'ko, E V; Bozhevalova, S V; Iablonskaia, A M

    2006-01-01

    The pharmacological efficacy of cerebrolysin (a brain-derived peptidergic drug) was studied in rats with a unilateral hemorrhagic stroke model. Cerebrolysin produces a neuroprotective effect, which is manifested by a decrease in the number of degenerated neurons in the vicinity of hematoma region in acute period and by a reduction of the neuronal loss in the early recovery phase. Besides, the administration of cerebrolysin improves the functional state as judged from the results of neurological and behavioral tests (open field, paw licking, and passive avoidance). A decrease in the hyperactivity in the open field test and the conservation of latent avoidance in the passive avoidance test demonstrate the drug influence on the maintenance of inhibitory processes deteriorated in stroke.

  19. Sepsis leads to thyroid impairment and dysfunction in rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingsheng; Shi, Songjing; Shi, Songchang

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis was a systemic response to a local infection. Apoptosis was observed in the experimental sepsis. In this study, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established in rats. We found that sepsis decreased thyroid hormone levels, including triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), free T3 (fT3), and free T4 (fT4). Besides, we detected the increasing expression level of Caspase-3 and increasing ratio of TUNEL positive cells in the thyroid after sepsis. Furthermore, a series of pathological ultrastructural changes were observed in thyroid follicular epithelial cells by CLP-induced sepsis. This study established a sepsis animal model and provided the cellular and molecular basis for decoding the pathological mechanism in thyroid with the occurrence of sepsis.

  20. Podocyte Injury and Albuminuria in Experimental Hyperuricemic Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Shinichiro; Morimoto, Chikayuki; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Kumagai, Takanori; Hosoyamada, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Although hyperuricemia is shown to accelerate chronic kidney disease, the mechanisms remain unclear. Accumulating studies also indicate that uric acid has both pro- and antioxidant properties. We postulated that hyperuricemia impairs the function of glomerular podocytes, resulting in albuminuria. Hyperuricemic model was induced by oral administration of 2% oxonic acid, a uricase inhibitor. Oxonic acid caused a twofold increase in serum uric acid levels at 8 weeks when compared to control animals. Hyperuricemia in this model was associated with the increase in blood pressure and the wall-thickening of afferent arterioles as well as arcuate arteries. Notably, hyperuricemic rats showed significant albuminuria, and the podocyte injury marker, desmin, was upregulated in the glomeruli. Conversely, podocin, the key component of podocyte slit diaphragm, was downregulated. Structural analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed podocyte injury in this model. We found that urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine levels were significantly increased and correlated with albuminuria and podocytopathy. Interestingly, although the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the vascular changes and the hypertension, it failed to reduce albuminuria, suggesting that vascular remodeling and podocyte injury in this model are mediated through different mechanisms. In conclusion, vasculopathy and podocytopathy may distinctly contribute to the kidney injury in a hyperuricemic state. PMID:28337250

  1. The rat saphenous flap: a fasciocutaneous free flap model without panniculus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Mutaf, M; Tasaki, Y; Tanaka, K; Fujii, T

    1995-10-01

    The rat saphenous flap is described as a new experimental model for free flap studies. This is a fasciocutaneous free flap based on the saphenofemoral vascular pedicle. The flap may include the entire medial aspect of the lower leg between the knee and ankle. Thirty flaps were harvested from 15 inbred rats. Each flap was transferred to the anterior neck of a recipient rat of the same inbred strain so that 15 flaps were vascularized free flaps using the standard end-to-end microvascular technique and the other 15 flaps were nonvascularized free grafts. All but two (technical failure) of the vascularized flaps showed complete survival, whereas all nonvascularized flaps completely necrosed 2 weeks after transfer. It was concluded that the rat saphenous flap has several advantages such as a long and consistent vascular pedicle, ease of harvest, and an all-or-none survival pattern. Furthermore, as a unique feature of this flap, histological analysis revealed that the rat saphenous flap is composed of the skin and underlying fascia without panniculus carnosus. We therefore suggest that the rat saphenous flap is the first true fasciocutaneous free flap model in the rat. In this paper, in addition to illustrating the anatomy of the saphenous vessels and describing a new fasciocutaneous free flap model based on these vessels, we have documented some anatomical details of the rat leg that have never been described in the literature related to the rat anatomy.

  2. HIV-1 Nef breaches placental barrier in rat model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Agnihotri, Saurabh Kumar; Tewari, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Sadan; Sachdev, Monika; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2012-01-01

    The vertical transmission of HIV-1 from the mother to fetus is known, but the molecular mechanism regulating this transmission is not fully characterized. The fetus is highly protected by the placenta, which does not permit microbial pathogens to cross the placental barrier. In the present study, a rat model was established to observe the effect of HIV-1 protein Nef on placental barrier. Evans blue dye was used to assay permeability of placental barrier and fourteen day pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were injected intravenously with 2% Evans blue dye along with various concentrations of recombinant Nef. After an hour, animals were sacrificed and dye migration was observed through the assimilation of peripheral blood into fetus. Interestingly, traces of recombinant Nef protein were detected in the embryo as well as amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane along with placenta and uterus. Our study indicates that recombinant HIV-1-Nef protein breaches the placental barrier and allows the migration of Evans blue dye to the growing fetus. Further the concentration of Nef protein in blood is directly proportional to the intensity of dye migration and to the amount of Nef protein detected in uterus, placenta, amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid and embryo. Based on this study, it can be concluded that the HIV-1 Nef protein has a direct effect on breaching of the placental barrier in the model we have established in this study. Our observations will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanisms related to this breach of placental barrier by Nef in humans and may be helpful to identify specific Nef inhibitors.

  3. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19)F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  4. Fischer-344 rats are unsuitable for the MCAO filament model due to their cerebrovascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Michael S; Vatankhah, Bijan; Fehm, Nando P; Schuierer, Gerhard; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Horn, Markus; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2006-09-30

    Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in Fischer-344 rats results in a small variance of infarct size. However, complications are frequent especially in aged Fisher-344 rats undergoing endovascular suture occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Analyzing our experiences with 165 Wistar, 13 Sprague-Dawley and 10 F-344 rats, we compared the incidence of impossible thread advancement and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was applied to study the course of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in Fischer and Wistar rats. Finally, we performed a structured review of the literature from 1991 to 2005 evaluating reports on Fischer rats subjected to intraluminal filament MCAO. Complications like fruitless filament advancement or subarachnoid hemorrhage were found to be significantly more frequent in Fischer rats than in other strains. MRA revealed significantly more pronounced kinking of the ICA in F-344 than in Wistar rats. In seven publications available on filament MCAO in F-344 rats, complication rates of 50-100% were reported, corroborating our data. Surgical difficulties accompanied by high complication rates due to their cerebrovascular anatomy make Fischer rats unsuitable for filament MCAO. If the use of Fischer rats for studies on focal cerebral ischemia is indicated, other ischemia models than intraluminal suture occlusion should be chosen.

  5. Protective Effect of Dihydromyricetin Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Tao; Jiao, Peng; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Qian

    2016-02-11

    BACKGROUND The present study investigated the effect of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in a rat model. MATERIAL AND METHODS Kidney injury was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of LPS through the tail vein. The rats were treated with 5 µg/kg body weight DHM within 12 h of the LPS administration. The urine of the rats was collected over a period of 48 h for determination of calcium and creatinine concentrations. Blood urea nitrogen in the serum was analyzed using a BC-2800 Vet Animal Auto Biochemistry Analyzer. On day 3 after treatment, the rats were sacrificed to extract the kidneys. RESULTS Treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM caused a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the level of kidney injury molecule‑1 and blood urea nitrogen. DHM treatment significantly (P<0.05) decreased the level of calcium in the kidney tissues compared to those of the untreated endotoxemia rats. The level of malonaldehyde (MDA) in the kidney tissues was significantly reduced in the endotoxemia rats by DHM treatment. The results from immunohistochemistry reveled a significant decrease in the expression of osteopontin (OPN) and CD44 levels. The endotoxemia rats showed significantly higher levels of TUNEL-positive stained nuclei compared to the normal controls. However, treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM resulted in a significant decrease in the population of TUNEL-positive cells. CONCLUSIONS DHM may be a promising candidate for the treatment of acute kidney injury.

  6. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  7. Rat Indwelling Urinary Catheter Model of Candida albicans Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Brooks, Erin G.; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract. PMID:25183731

  8. An ameliorated skin flap model in rats for experimental research.

    PubMed

    Hosnuter, Mübin; Kargi, Eksal; Peksoy, Irfan; Babucçu, Orhan; Payasli, Cem

    2006-01-01

    There is a disagreement in the experimental design of random skin flaps owing to their vascular inconsistency. The definition of a reliable axial-pattern skin flap model is needed. The purpose of this study was to describe a new skin flap model to deal with entire drawbacks of existing random and axial pattern skin flap designs. This was accomplished by creating paired skin flaps including both skin and vascular pedicle on the dorsum of the same rat. This design was suitably termed as rando-axial flap. The present study offers a simple and reliable skin flap model with following advantages: (1) it has a predictable necrosis area, (2) it reveals a larger survival area (75 +/- 5%) when compared to other flaps in this study (Mann-Whitney U-test, p<0.001), (3) the vascular pedicle is consistent, (4) control and study flaps are placed on the same animal (5) it can be converted to a random, an axial or a free flap.

  9. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  10. Cerebral salt wasting in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats: model, mechanism, and tool.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Jun; Katayama, Yoichi; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Yoneko, Maki; Mori, Tatsuro

    2005-04-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) frequently occurs concomitantly with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). CSW induces excessive natriuresis and osmotic diuresis, and reduces total blood volume. As a result, the risk of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm may be elevated. Therefore, it is important to determine the mechanism of CSW. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the rat SAH model exhibits CSW and to investigate the relationship between CSW and natriuretic peptides. A SAH model was produced in 24 rats by perforating a cerebral artery with a nylon thread up through the common carotid artery. To evaluate CSW, urine was cumulatively collected from SAH onset to 12 hours and sodium (Na) excretion was analyzed. Body weight and hematocrit were analyzed before and after SAH onset. Concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in plasma were also analyzed. Urine volume and total Na excretion of SAH rats were significantly higher than those of sham rats (p<0.05). Body weight of SAH rats significantly decreased and hematocrit significantly increased (p < 0.05). ANP concentration was significantly decreased in SAH rats (p<0.05). However, BNP concentrations did not change. This study demonstrated for the first time that a rat SAH model exhibited CSW. It was suggested that the cause of CSW was neither ANP nor BNP. In addition, this rat SAH model will be useful for study of CSW after SAH.

  11. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment.

  12. The Characterization of Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rat Model Suitable for Exercise Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuwei; Jiang, Zhongli

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a new polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) rat model suitable for exercise intervention. Method Thirty six rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: PCOS rats with high-fat diet (PF, n = 24), PCOS rats with ordinary diet (PO, n = 6), and control rats with ordinary diet (CO, n = 6). Two kinds of PCOS rat model were made by adjustment diet structure and testosterone injection for 28 days. After a successful animal model, PF model rats were randomly assigned to three groups: exercise with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-EF, n = 6), sedentary with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-SF, n = 6), exercise with an ordinary diet (PF-EO, n = 6). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (FINS), estrogen (E2), progesterone (P), and testosterone (T) in serum were determined by RIA, and ovarian morphology was evaluated by Image-Pro plus 6.0. Results Body weight, Lee index, FINS increased significantly in PF rat model. Serum levels of E2 and T were significantly higher in PF and PO than in CO. Ovary organ index and ovarian areas were significant lower in PF than in CO. After intervention for 2 weeks, the levels of 1 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG1), 2 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG2), FINS and the serum levels of T decreased significantly in PF-EF rats and PF-EO rats. The ratio of FBG/FINS was significant higher in PF-EO rats than in PF-SF rats. Ovarian morphology showed that the numbers of preantral follicles and atretic follicles decreased significantly, and the numbers of antral follicles and corpora lutea increased significantly in the rats of PF-EF and PF-EO. Conclusion By combination of high-fat diet and testosterone injection, the obese PCOS rat model is conformable with the lifestyle habits of fatty foods and insufficient exercise, and has metabolic and reproductive characteristics of human PCOS. This model can be applied to study exercise intervention. PMID:24905232

  13. Simulating certain aspects of hypogravity: Effects on the mandibular incisors of suspended rats (PULEH model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Winter, F.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a hypogravity simulating model on the rate of mandibular incisor formation, dentinogenesis and, amelogenesis in laboratory rats was studied. The model is the partial unloading by elevating the hindquarters. In this system, rat hindquarters are elevated 30 to 40 deg from the cage floors to completely unload the hindlimbs, but the animals are free to move about using their forelimbs. This model replicates the fluid sift changes which occur during the weightlessness of spaceflight and produces an osteopenia in the weight bearing skeletons. The histogenesis and/or mineralization rates of the mandibular incisor during the first 19d of PULEH in young growing rats are recorded.

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Uveitis Models in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Rotkis, Lauren; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation generates changes in the protein constituents of the aqueous humor. Proteins that change in multiple models of uveitis may be good biomarkers of disease or targets for therapeutic intervention. The present study was conducted to identify differentially-expressed proteins in the inflamed aqueous humor. Methods Two models of uveitis were induced in Lewis rats: experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU). Differential gel electrophoresis was used to compare naïve and inflamed aqueous humor. Differentially-expressed proteins were separated by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and excised for identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF). Expression of select proteins was verified by Western blot analysis in both the aqueous and vitreous. Results The inflamed aqueous from both models demonstrated an increase in total protein concentration when compared to naïve aqueous. Calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9, was increased in the aqueous in both PMU and EAU. In the vitreous, S100A8 and S100A9 were preferentially elevated in PMU. Apolipoprotein E was elevated in the aqueous of both uveitis models but was preferentially elevated in EAU. Beta-B2–crystallin levels decreased in the aqueous and vitreous of EAU but not PMU. Conclusions The proinflammatory molecules S100A8 and S100A9 were elevated in both models of uveitis but may play a more significant role in PMU than EAU. The neuroprotective protein β-B2–crystallin was found to decline in EAU. Therapies to modulate these proteins in vivo may be good targets in the treatment of ocular inflammation. PMID:26747776

  15. Lipid mapping of the rat brain for models of disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gardeazabal, J; González de San Román, E; Moreno-Rodríguez, M; Llorente-Ovejero, A; Manuel, I; Rodríguez-Puertas, R

    2017-02-21

    Lipids not only constitute the primary component of cellular membranes and contribute to metabolism but also serve as intracellular signaling molecules and bind to specific membrane receptors to control cell proliferation, growth and convey neuroprotection. Over the last several decades, the development of new analytical techniques, such as imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), has contributed to our understanding of their involvement in physiological and pathological conditions. IMS allows researchers to obtain a wide range of information about the spatial distribution and abundance of the different lipid molecules that is crucial to understand brain functions. The primary aim of this study was to map the spatial distribution of different lipid species in the rat central nervous system (CNS) using IMS to find a possible relationship between anatomical localization and physiology. The data obtained were subsequently applied to a model of neurological disease, the 192IgG-saporin lesion model of memory impairment. The results were obtained using a LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer in positive and negative ionization modes and analyzed by ImageQuest and MSIReader software. A total of 176 different molecules were recorded based on the specific localization of their intensities. However, only 34 lipid species in negative mode and 51 in positive were assigned to known molecules with an error of 5ppm. These molecules were grouped by different lipid families, resulting in: Phosphatidylcholines (PC): PC (34: 1)+K(+) and PC (32: 0)+K(+) distributed primarily in gray matter, and PC (36: 1)+K(+) and PC (38: 1)+Na(+) distributed in white matter. Phosphatidic acid (PA): PA (38: 3)+K(+) in white matter, and PA (38: 5)+K(+) in gray matter and brain ventricles. Phosphoinositol (PI): PI (18: 0/20: 4)-H(+) in gray matter, and PI (O-30: 1) or PI (P-30: 0)-H(+) in white matter. Phosphatidylserines (PS): PS (34: 1)-H(+) in gray matter, and PS (38: 1)-H(+) in white matter. Sphingomyelin (SM

  16. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  17. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared to those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared to naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  18. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla.

    PubMed

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and [Formula: see text], and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts.

  19. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  20. Establishment and identification of a hypoxia-ischemia brain damage model in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; ZHANG, WEIRAN; HE, XUE; WANG, JINHU; JIANG, KEWEN; ZHAO, ZHENGYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to set up a reliable model of severe hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and several methods were used to identify whether the model was successful. A total of 40 healthy 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: The sham-surgery group (n=18) and the HIBD model group (n=22). The HIBD model was produced according to the traditional Rice method. The rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether. The left common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed, ligated and cut. Following this, the rats were exposed to hypoxia in a normobaric chamber filled with 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 2 h. In the sham-surgery group, the left CCA was exposed but was not ligated, cut or exposed to hypoxia. The neurobehavioral changes of the rats were observed in the 24 h after HIBD. The brains were collected after 72 h to observe the pathological morphological changes of the brain tissue. The behavioral ability and neurobehavioral changes were studied in each group. The water maze test was used for evaluating the learning-memory ability when the rats were 28 days old. Compared with the sham-surgery group, all the HIBD model rats had a lag of motor development. The rats had evident changes in anatomy and Nissl staining, and cognitive impairment was shown through the result of the water maze. Therefore, the model of HIBD in neonatal rats is feasible and provides a reliable model for subsequent studies. PMID:27073628

  1. Virgin Coconut Oil Supplementation Prevents Bone Loss in Osteoporosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model. PMID:23024690

  2. Virgin coconut oil supplementation prevents bone loss in osteoporosis rat model.

    PubMed

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model.

  3. Cellular Biochemistry and Cytogenetics in a Rat Lung Tumor Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Clara cells and alveolar type II cells from control and beta- naphthoflavone-pretreated rats. Cancer Res. 42:4658-4663. Kaighn, M.E., (1973), Human ...alkylation of nucleic acids of the rat by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, dimethylnitrosamine , dimethylsulfate, and methylmethanesulfonate. Biochem. J. 110:39-47

  4. Structure-activity relationship models for rat carcinogenesis and assessing the role mutagens play in model predictivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasquer, C A; Batey, K; Qamar, S; Cunningham, A R; Cunningham, S L

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that fragment based cat-SAR carcinogenesis models consisting solely of mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens varied greatly in terms of their predictive accuracy. This led us to investigate how well the rat cancer cat-SAR model predicted mutagens and non-mutagens in their learning set. Four rat cancer cat-SAR models were developed: Complete Rat, Transgender Rat, Male Rat and Female Rat, with leave-one-out (LOO) validation concordance values of 69%, 74%, 67% and 73%, respectively. The mutagenic carcinogens produced concordance values in the range 69-76% compared with only 47-53% for non-mutagenic carcinogens. As a surrogate for mutagenicity, comparisons between single site and multiple site carcinogen SAR models were analysed. The LOO concordance values for models consisting of 1-site, 2-site and 4+-site carcinogens were 66%, 71% and 79%, respectively. As expected, the proportion of mutagens to non-mutagens also increased, rising from 54% for 1-site to 80% for 4+-site carcinogens. This study demonstrates that mutagenic chemicals, in both SAR learning sets and test sets, are influential in assessing model accuracy. This suggests that SAR models for carcinogens may require a two-step process in which mutagenicity is first determined before carcinogenicity can be accurately predicted.

  5. Modeling corticosteroid effects in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis I: mechanistic disease progression model for the time course of collagen-induced arthritis in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Earp, Justin C; Dubois, Debra C; Molano, Diana S; Pyszczynski, Nancy A; Keller, Craig E; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2008-08-01

    A mechanism-based model was developed to describe the time course of arthritis progression in the rat. Arthritis was induced in male Lewis rats with type II porcine collagen into the base of the tail. Disease progression was monitored by paw swelling, bone mineral density (BMD), body weights, plasma corticosterone (CST) concentrations, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in paw tissue. Bone mineral density was determined by PIXImus II dual energy X-ray densitometry. Plasma CST was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Cytokine and GR mRNA were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Disease progression models were constructed from transduction and indirect response models and applied using S-ADAPT software. A delay in the onset of increased paw TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA concentrations was successfully characterized by simple transduction. This rise was closely followed by an up-regulation of GR mRNA and CST concentrations. Paw swelling and body weight responses peaked approximately 21 days after induction, whereas bone mineral density changes were greatest at 23 days after induction. After peak response, the time course in IL-1beta, IL-6 mRNA, and paw edema slowly declined toward a disease steady state. Model parameters indicate TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA most significantly induce paw edema, whereas IL-6 mRNA exerted the most influence on BMD. The model for bone mineral density captures rates of turnover of cancellous and cortical bone and the fraction of each in the different regions analyzed. This small systems model integrates and quantitates multiple factors contributing to arthritis in rats.

  6. Lemon juice has protective activity in a rat urolithiasis model

    PubMed Central

    Touhami, Mohammed; Laroubi, Amine; Elhabazi, Khadija; Loubna, Farouk; Zrara, Ibtissam; Eljahiri, Younes; Oussama, Abdelkhalek; Grases, Félix; Chait, Abderrahman

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of herbal medicines (medicinal plants or phytotherapy) has recently gained popularity in Europe and the United States. Nevertheless the exact mechanism of the preventive effects of these products is still far to be clearly established, being its knowledge necessary to successfully apply these therapies to avoid stone formation. Methods The effect of oral lemon juice administration on calcium oxalate urolithiasis was studied in male Wistar rats. Rats were rendered nephrolithic by providing drinking water containing 0.75% ethylene glycol [v/v] (EG) and 2% ammonium chloride [w/v] (AC) for 10 days. In addition to EG/AC treatment, three groups of rats were also gavage-administered solutions containing 100%, 75% or 50% lemon juice [v/v] (6 μl solution/g body weight). Positive control rats were treated with EG/AC but not lemon juice. Negative control rats were provided with normal drinking water, and were administered normal water by gavage. Each group contained 6 rats. After 10 days, serum samples were collected for analysis, the left kidney was removed and assessed for calcium levels using flame spectroscopy, and the right kidney was sectioned for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. Results Analysis showed that the rats treated with EG/AC alone had higher amounts of calcium in the kidneys compared to negative control rats. This EG/AC-induced increase in kidney calcium levels was inhibited by the administration of lemon juice. Histology showed that rats treated with EG/AC alone had large deposits of calcium oxalate crystals in all parts of the kidney, and that such deposits were not present in rats also treated with either 100% or 75% lemon juice. Conclusion These data suggest that lemon juice has a protective activity against urolithiasis. PMID:17919315

  7. Absence of "Warm-Up" during Active Avoidance Learning in a Rat Model of Anxiety Vulnerability: Insights from Computational Modeling.

    PubMed

    Myers, Catherine E; Smith, Ian M; Servatius, Richard J; Beck, Kevin D

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance behaviors, in which a learned response causes omission of an upcoming punisher, are a core feature of many psychiatric disorders. While reinforcement learning (RL) models have been widely used to study the development of appetitive behaviors, less attention has been paid to avoidance. Here, we present a RL model of lever-press avoidance learning in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and in the inbred Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat, which has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability. We focus on "warm-up," transiently decreased avoidance responding at the start of a testing session, which is shown by SD but not WKY rats. We first show that a RL model can correctly simulate key aspects of acquisition, extinction, and warm-up in SD rats; we then show that WKY behavior can be simulated by altering three model parameters, which respectively govern the tendency to explore new behaviors vs. exploit previously reinforced ones, the tendency to repeat previous behaviors regardless of reinforcement, and the learning rate for predicting future outcomes. This suggests that several, dissociable mechanisms may contribute independently to strain differences in behavior. The model predicts that, if the "standard" inter-session interval is shortened from 48 to 24 h, SD rats (but not WKY) will continue to show warm-up; we confirm this prediction in an empirical study with SD and WKY rats. The model further predicts that SD rats will continue to show warm-up with inter-session intervals as short as a few minutes, while WKY rats will not show warm-up, even with inter-session intervals as long as a month. Together, the modeling and empirical data indicate that strain differences in warm-up are qualitative rather than just the result of differential sensitivity to task variables. Understanding the mechanisms that govern expression of warm-up behavior in avoidance may lead to better understanding of pathological avoidance, and potential pathways to modify these processes.

  8. Pulmonary Transcriptional Response to Ozone in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genetic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated metabolic impairments can influence the lung injury from inhaled pollutants. We hypothesized that comparative assessment of global pulmonary expression profile of healthy and CVD-prone rat models will provide mechanistic ins...

  9. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  10. A new agent for flap survival – Hippophae rhamnoides L. (sea buckthorn): An experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Emsen, Ilteris Murat

    2005-01-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides L. (sea buckthorn) is a member of the Elaeagnaceae family, and is a temperate bush native to Europe and Asia. The antioxidant activity of H rhamnoides L. has been shown in vitro cell culture and animal studies. Different fractions of H rhamnoides L. fruits inhibit 2,2-azobis-(2,4 dimethylvaleronitrile) and ascorbate iron-induced lipid peroxidations in vitro. H rhamnoides L., as well as vitamin E, decrease the malondialdehyde content in hyperlipidemic rabbit serum-cultured smooth muscle cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in a rat model, the potential effect of H rhamnoides L. on survival of random pattern skin flaps. For this purpose, 30 Wistar Albino rats were used, and a McFarlane-type caudally based skin flap was created on the dorsum of the rat (2.5 cm × 8 cm). Rats were divided into three groups: one control (group A) and two treatment groups (groups B and C). H rhamnoides L. was administered orally to the experimental groups: group B received a single 15 mg/kg dose per day and group C received 15 mg/kg twice per day. The areas and lengths of flap necrosis were measured in each group. The extent of necrotic flap areas were evaluated as length and area of total flap area, and differences were studied by Student’s t tests. The areas and lengths of necrosis of skin flaps decreased depending on H rhamnoides L., but viability of the flaps treated with 15 mg/kg/day was not significantly different from the control group. The rats receiving H rhamnoides L. 15 mg/kg twice per day had the highest flap survival rate (P<0.001). In conclusion, H rhamnoides L. may have a dose-dependent effect to increase flap survival in random skin flaps. PMID:24227931

  11. The JCR:LA-cp rat: a novel rodent model of cystic medial necrosis.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Chilian, William M; Bennett, Martin R; Figg, Nichola; Kamarulzaman, Mohd Hamzah

    2017-03-01

    Although there are multiple rodent models of the metabolic syndrome, very few develop vascular complications. In contrast, the JCR:LA-cp rat develops both metabolic syndrome and early atherosclerosis in predisposed areas. However, the pathology of the normal vessel wall has not been described. We examined JCR:LA control (+/+) or cp/cp rats fed normal chow diet for 6 or 18 mo. JCR:LA-cp rats developed multiple features of advanced cystic medial necrosis including "cysts," increased collagen formation and proteoglycan deposition around cysts, apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells, and spotty medial calcification. These appearances began within 6 mo and were extensive by 18 mo. JCR:LA-cp rats had reduced medial cellularity, increased medial thickness, and vessel hypoxia that was most marked in the adventitia. In conclusion, the normal chow-fed JCR:LA-cp rat represents a novel rodent model of cystic medial necrosis, associated with multiple metabolic abnormalities, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and vessel hypoxia.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Triggers for cystic medial necrosis (CMN) have been difficult to study due to lack of animal models to recapitulate the pathologies seen in humans. Our study is the first description of CMN in the rat. Thus the JCR:LA-cp rat represents a useful model to investigate the underlying molecular changes leading to the development of CMN.

  12. Increases in body mass of rats during spaceflight: models and measurements.

    PubMed

    Wade, C E; Ortiz, R M; Baer, L A

    2000-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the body mass of rats is increased during spaceflight, we developed two models from the literature and obtained mass measurements during spaceflight. From studies of centrifugation (hypergravity), there is a reduction in body mass of rats dependent on the exposure gravity level. From data in 18 publications on rats subjected to hypergravity by centrifugation, we developed a model that predicted a 27% increase in body mass during the microgravity of spaceflight. Following spaceflight, with an increase in gravity on return to Earth, there is a reduction in body mass of rats for over 3 d. We related the reduction in body mass after spaceflight to the time after landing that mass measurements were made. From data in 23 publications on rats returning from spaceflight, we developed a model that predicted a 19% increase in body mass during spaceflight. Measurement of body mass of rats on days 6 and 10 of spaceflight found a 7 and 9% increase compared with ground control animals. The increase in body mass during spaceflight suggests that the rat may provide a viable model for metabolic studies in which changes during spaceflight may be predicted in part by ground-based hypergravity studies.

  13. Arthritic disease is more severe in older rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Yeom, Mijung; Choi, Hyun Mi; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    This study examined in an arthritis animal model whether elderly onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) is a more severe disease than younger onset rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by injecting 5% kaolin/carrageenan into the left tibiotarsal ankles of 18-month-old and 4-week-old rats. Various parameters were measured to evaluate the arthritic progression of kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis in the rats. Immunohistochemical staining of arthritic joints was performed to determine the degree of inflammation in old and young rats. Measurements of ankle volume and thickness, arthritic index, number of squeaks, and the paw pressure test showed the 18-month-old rats had more severe disease than the young rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model. The degree of inflammation and MMP-1 expression of arthritic joints in old rats was significantly higher than that of young rats based on histological evaluation with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunochemistry. More severe disease symptoms were found in old rats with EORA, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the molecular mechanisms will be helpful to develop clinical protocols to efficiently treat patients with EORA, which is difficult to control with current protocols.

  14. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial.

  15. Assessment of pharmacokinetic interaction of spirulina with glitazone in a type 2 diabetes rat model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Annu; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna; Al-Dhubiab, Bandar-E; Chattopadhyaya, Ipshita; Gupta, Sumeet

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to assess the possible pharmacokinetic interactions of spirulina with glitazones in an insulin resistance rat model. Wistar male albino rats were equally divided into five groups: insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg)+pioglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+pioglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg)+rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), and insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg). Described doses of pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, or spirulina were per orally administered and the plasma drug concentrations were determined. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Tmax, Cmax, AUC(0-α), t1/2, and Kel were determined by plotting the drug concentration as a function of time. The data observed in this acute study indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters (Tmax, Cmax, AUC(0-α), t1/2, and Kel) of glitazones (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone) or spirulina, when they were coadministered. Given the promising results, this study concludes that the coadministration of spirulina does not influence the pharmacokinetics of glitazones in a type 2 diabetes rat model. Further chronic in vivo studies are recommended to assess the real time effect.

  16. Determination of oxidative stress and effect of erdosteine on rhinitis medicamentosa in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Dokuyucu, Recep; Cevik, Cengiz; Ozler, Gul Soylu; Ozgur, Tumay; Arli, Cengiz; Sefil, Fatih; Yonden, Zafer

    2014-11-05

    We aimed to determine the presence of oxidative stress in rhinitis medicamentosa (RM) and to evaluate the effect of erdosteine (ED) on mucosal changes in a rat model. Twenty-four male rats were used in this experimental study. Three groups were created. Group 1 (n=8) was the control group. Two puffs of 0.05% oxymetazolin were sprayed into the nasal cavities of the remaining rats (n=16) three times daily for eight weeks. One of these 16 rats was scarified at the end of the eight weeks and examined to confirm the presence of RM. Seven of the remaining 16 rats were killed, and venous blood samples were taken (Group 2). Group 3 (n=8) received 10mg/kg of an ED suspension orally for seven days. All rats were put on formalin for light microscopy. The total antioxidant status (TAS) was similar in all groups (p=0.073). The total oxidative status (TOS) of the RM group was significantly higher than that of the control group and RM+ED group (Group 3) (p=0.003 and p=0.011, respectively). The pathological recovery of the nasal mucosa of the rats was similar in the RM+ED and control groups. The TOS was high in this RM rat model, and oxidative stress was associated with RM. ED significantly ameliorated nasal mucosal changes induced by RM, suggesting that oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of this condition.

  17. Impulsivity trait in the early symptomatic BACHD transgenic rat model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Manfré, Giuseppe; Doyère, Valérie; Bossi, Simon; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; El Massioui, Nicole

    2016-02-15

    Impulsivity trait was characterized in 3-5 months old BACHD rats, a transgenic model of Huntington disease, using (1) the delay discounting task to assess cognitive/choice impulsivity, and (2) the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rate of Responding task to evaluate motor/action impulsivity. Transgenic animals showed a high level of choice impulsivity and, to a lesser extent, action impulsivity. Our results provide the first evidence that the transgenic BACHD rat (TG5 line) displays impulsivity disorder as early as 3 months old, as described in early symptomatic HD patients, thus adding to the face validity of the rat model.

  18. Probucol inhibits LPS-induced microglia activation and ameliorates brain ischemic injury in normal and hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yeon Suk; Park, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hyunha; Kim, So Young; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Bae, Sun Sik; Choi, Byung Tae; Lee, Sae-Won; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Increasing evidence suggests that probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-oxidant activities, may be useful for the treatment of ischemic stroke with hyperlipidemia via reduction in cholesterol and neuroinflammation. In this study we examined whether probucol could protect against brain ischemic injury via anti-neuroinflammatory action in normal and hyperlipidemic mice. Methods: Primary mouse microglia and murine BV2 microglia were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3 h, and the release NO, PGE2, IL-1β and IL-6, as well as the changes in NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways were assessed. ApoE KO mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 0.004%, 0.02%, 0.1% (wt/wt) probucol for 10 weeks, whereas normal C57BL/6J mice received probucol (3, 10, 30 mg·kg-1·d-1, po) for 4 d. Then all the mice were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia through middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The neurological deficits were scored 24 h after the surgery, and then brains were removed for measuring the cerebral infarct size and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Results: In LPS-treated BV2 cells and primary microglial cells, pretreatment with probucol (1, 5, 10 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the release of NO, PGE2, IL-1β and IL-6, which occurred at the transcription levels. Furthermore, the inhibitory actions of probucol were associated with the downregulation of the NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways. In the normal mice with MCAO, pre-administration of probucol dose-dependently decreased the infarct volume and improved neurological function. These effects were accompanied by the decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2, IL-1, IL-6). In ApoE KO mice fed a high-fat diet, pre-administration of 0.1% probucol significantly reduced the infarct volume, improved the neurological deficits following MCAO, and decreased the total- and LDL-cholesterol levels. Conclusion: Probucol inhibits LPS-induced microglia activation and

  19. Deferoxamine and eflornithine (DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine) in a rat model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, A B; Sarić, M; Grady, R W

    1990-01-01

    The iron chelator deferoxamine and the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor eflornithine (DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine) were examined for anti-Pneumocystis carinii activity in the rat model of P. carinii pneumonia. The activity of deferoxamine at 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg given intraperitoneally provides evidence that iron chelation is a promising novel approach to P. carinii chemotherapy. Results with eflornithine at 2, 3, and 4% in drinking water confirm and extend previously reported activity in the rat model. PMID:2285303

  20. Therapeutic effect of sunitinib on diabetes mellitus related ovarian injury: an experimental rat model study.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Oytun; Pala, Halil Gursoy; Pala, Emel Ebru; Artunc Ulkumen, Burcu; Akman, Levent; Akman, Tulay; Oltulu, Fatih; Aktug, Huseyin; Yavasoglu, Altug

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of sunitinib on diabetes mellitus related-ovarian injury and fibrosis in rat models. An experimental diabetes mellitus model was created in 16 rats, and eight rats with normal blood glucose levels were included in control group (Group-1). The diabetic rats were divided into two groups:diabetic control group (water given) - Group-2 and sunitinib treatment group - Group-3. After four weeks, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and ovaries were examined histologically. The groups were compared by Student's t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney's U-test. There was a significant increase in no-medication (water given) diabetic rat's ovary (Group-2) in terms of follicular degeneration, stromal degeneration, stromal fibrosis and NF-kappaB immune-expression compared with control group normal rats' ovary (Group-1) (p < 0.0001). Stromal degeneration (p = 0.04), stromal fibrosis (p = 0.01), follicular degeneration (p = 0.02), NF-kappaB immune-expression (p = 0.001) significantly decreased in sunitinib-treated diabetic rat's ovary (Group-3) when compared with no-medication (water given) diabetic rat's ovary (Group-2) (p < 0.05). When we used sunitinib in the treatment of diabetic rats, ovarian injury, fibrosis and NF-kappaB immunoexpression decreased significantly. The effects of sunitinib in rat models give hope to the improved treatment of premature ovarian failure due to diabetes mellitus in humans.

  1. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis.

  2. Modeling CICR in rat ventricular myocytes: voltage clamp studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The past thirty-five years have seen an intense search for the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcium-release (CICR) in cardiac myocytes, with voltage clamp (VC) studies being the leading tool employed. Several VC protocols including lowering of extracellular calcium to affect Ca2+ loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and administration of blockers caffeine and thapsigargin have been utilized to probe the phenomena surrounding SR Ca2+ release. Here, we develop a deterministic mathematical model of a rat ventricular myocyte under VC conditions, to better understand mechanisms underlying the response of an isolated cell to calcium perturbation. Motivation for the study was to pinpoint key control variables influencing CICR and examine the role of CICR in the context of a physiological control system regulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]myo). Methods The cell model consists of an electrical-equivalent model for the cell membrane and a fluid-compartment model describing the flux of ionic species between the extracellular and several intracellular compartments (cell cytosol, SR and the dyadic coupling unit (DCU), in which resides the mechanistic basis of CICR). The DCU is described as a controller-actuator mechanism, internally stabilized by negative feedback control of the unit's two diametrically-opposed Ca2+ channels (trigger-channel and release-channel). It releases Ca2+ flux into the cyto-plasm and is in turn enclosed within a negative feedback loop involving the SERCA pump, regulating[Ca2+]myo. Results Our model reproduces measured VC data published by several laboratories, and generates graded Ca2+ release at high Ca2+ gain in a homeostatically-controlled environment where [Ca2+]myo is precisely regulated. We elucidate the importance of the DCU elements in this process, particularly the role of the ryanodine receptor in controlling SR Ca2+ release, its activation by trigger Ca2+, and its refractory characteristics

  3. Extended duration local anesthetic agent in a rat paw model.

    PubMed

    Ickowicz, D E; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Weiniger, C F

    2014-07-01

    Encapsulated local anesthetics extend postoperative analgesic effect following site-directed nerve injection; potentially reducing postoperative complications. Our study aim was to investigate efficacy of our improved extended duration formulation - 15% bupivacaine in poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 synthesized by ring opening polymerization. In vitro, around 70% of bupivacaine was released from the p(DLLA-CO) 3:7 after 10 days. A single injection of the optimal formulation of 15% bupivacaine-polymer or plain (0.5%) bupivacaine (control), was injected via a 22G needle beside the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under anesthesia; followed (in some animals) by a 1cm longitudinal incision through the skin and fascia of the paw area. Behavioral tests for sensory and motor block assessment were done using Hargreave's hot plate score, von Frey filaments and rearing count. The 15% bupivacaine formulation significantly prolonged sensory block duration up to at least 48 h. Following surgery, motor block was observed for 48 h following administration of bupivacaine-polymer formulation and rearing was reduced (returning to baseline after 48 h). No significant differences in mechanical nociceptive response were observed. The optimized bupivacaine-polymer formulation prolonged duration of local anesthesia effect in our animal model up to at least 48 h.

  4. Interictal EEG discoordination in a rat seizure model.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Samuel A; Lee, Heekyung; Fenton, André A; Lytton, William W

    2010-12-01

    Cognitive and psychiatric comorbidities are common and clinically important in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and are likely caused by ongoing abnormalities in brain activity. In addition, it is unclear how the dynamics of interictal brain activity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy contributes to the generation of seizures. To investigate these issues, the authors evaluated multisite interictal EEG from a perinatal excitotoxic, hippocampal lesion rat model of medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Sample entropy, an information theoretical measure, demonstrated decreased complexity at different time scales and across all channels in epileptic animals. However, higher-order multiarea measures showed evidence of increased variability in population correlation measures. This apparent paradox was resolved by noting that although the EEG from epileptic animals was overall more stereotyped, there were frequent periods where two or more brain areas "broke off" from ongoing brain activity in epileptic animals, producing decorrelations between areas. These decorrelations were particularly apparent across the midline, suggesting impairments of interhemispheric coordination, a form of interhemispheric diaschisis. Both the observed alterations could contribute to a reduction in brain functionality: an overall reduction in complexity and a failure of interhemispheric brain coordination, suggesting a breakdown in communication between hemispheres. The authors speculate that any tendency of areas to lose communication or break away from coordinated brain activity might predispose to seizures in these areas.

  5. Effect of ethanol on fluoroquinolone efficacy in a rat model of pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Keith M; Gentry-Nielsen, Martha; Yue, Mei; Snitily, Mary U; Preheim, Laurel C

    2006-01-01

    This investigation compared the effect of ethanol on fluoroquinolone antibiotic efficacy and pharmacodynamics in an ethanol-fed rat model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a liquid diet containing 36% of total calories as ethanol. Paired controls (pair-fed controls) were fed a liquid diet without ethanol or received rat chow. Diets began 7 days before and continued for 10 days after transtracheal infections with 10 times the 50% lethal dose of type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae. Beginning 18 h after infection, the rats received once daily subcutaneous phosphate-buffered saline, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, or trovafloxacin at 50 or 100 mg/kg of body weight. White blood cell counts were determined, blood samples were collected for culture, and mortality was recorded. Additional rats were killed on day 5 for pharmacodynamic studies and quantitative cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bacteremia occurred by day 3 in 20 of 22 untreated rats. All 22 untreated rats died by day 9. Moxifloxacin treatment was effective in all diet groups at both the 50- and 100-mg/kg doses. In contrast, 50-mg/kg doses of levofloxacin and trovafloxacin improved survival in ethanol-fed rats but were ineffective in chow-fed rats. High-dose trovafloxacin at 100 mg/kg was associated with increased mortality in pair-fed rats. The free-fraction area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratio exceeded 50 with all antibiotics in the ethanol group but dropped below 30 with levofloxacin and trovafloxacin in the pair- and chow-fed rats, with higher mortality. Achievement of adequate antibiotic-free fraction area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratios helps overcome ethanol-induced immune defects induced in experimental pneumococcal pneumonia.

  6. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  7. Reversal learning and associative memory impairments in a BACHD rat model for Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Abada, Yah-Se K; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Ellenbroek, Bart; Schreiber, Rudy

    2013-01-01

    Chorea and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder, genetically characterized by the presence of expanded CAG repeats (>35) in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. HD patients present psychiatric symptoms prior to the onset of motor symptoms and we recently found a similar emergence of non motor and motor deficits in BACHD rats carrying the human full length mutated HTT (97 CAG-CAA repeats). We evaluated cognitive performance in reversal learning and associative memory tests in different age cohorts of BACHD rats. Male wild type (WT) and transgenic (TG) rats between 2 and 12 months of age were tested. Learning and strategy shifting were assessed in a cross-maze test. Associative memory was evaluated in different fear conditioning paradigms (context, delay and trace). The possible confound of a fear conditioning phenotype by altered sensitivity to a 'painful' stimulus was assessed in a flinch-jump test. In the cross maze, 6 months old TG rats showed a mild impairment in reversal learning. In the fear conditioning tasks, 4, 6 and 12 months old TG rats showed a marked reduction in contextual fear conditioning. In addition, TG rats showed impaired delay conditioning (9 months) and trace fear conditioning (3 months). This phenotype was unlikely to be affected by a change in 'pain' sensitivity as WT and TG rats showed no difference in their threshold response in the flinch-jump test. Our results suggest that BACHD rats have a profound associative memory deficit and, possibly, a deficit in reversal learning as assessed in a cross maze task. The time course for the emergence of these symptoms (i.e., before the occurrence of motor symptoms) in this rat model for HD appears similar to the time course in patients. These data suggest that BACHD rats may be a useful model for preclinical drug discovery.

  8. Reversal Learning and Associative Memory Impairments in a BACHD Rat Model for Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abada, Yah-se K.; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Ellenbroek, Bart; Schreiber, Rudy

    2013-01-01

    Chorea and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder, genetically characterized by the presence of expanded CAG repeats (>35) in the HUNTINGTIN (HTT) gene. HD patients present psychiatric symptoms prior to the onset of motor symptoms and we recently found a similar emergence of non motor and motor deficits in BACHD rats carrying the human full length mutated HTT (97 CAG-CAA repeats). We evaluated cognitive performance in reversal learning and associative memory tests in different age cohorts of BACHD rats. Male wild type (WT) and transgenic (TG) rats between 2 and 12 months of age were tested. Learning and strategy shifting were assessed in a cross-maze test. Associative memory was evaluated in different fear conditioning paradigms (context, delay and trace). The possible confound of a fear conditioning phenotype by altered sensitivity to a ‘painful’ stimulus was assessed in a flinch-jump test. In the cross maze, 6 months old TG rats showed a mild impairment in reversal learning. In the fear conditioning tasks, 4, 6 and 12 months old TG rats showed a marked reduction in contextual fear conditioning. In addition, TG rats showed impaired delay conditioning (9 months) and trace fear conditioning (3 months). This phenotype was unlikely to be affected by a change in ‘pain’ sensitivity as WT and TG rats showed no difference in their threshold response in the flinch-jump test. Our results suggest that BACHD rats have a profound associative memory deficit and, possibly, a deficit in reversal learning as assessed in a cross maze task. The time course for the emergence of these symptoms (i.e., before the occurrence of motor symptoms) in this rat model for HD appears similar to the time course in patients. These data suggest that BACHD rats may be a useful model for preclinical drug discovery. PMID:24223692

  9. Bone Micro-CT Assessments in an Orchidectomised Rat Model Supplemented with Eurycoma longifolia

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Rosmaliza; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that Eurycoma longifolia, a herbal plant, may have the potential to treat osteoporosis in elderly male. This study aimed to determine the effects of Eurycoma longifolia supplementation on the trabecular bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats (androgen-deficient osteoporosis model). Forty-eight-aged (10–12 months old) Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups of sham-operated (SHAM), orchidectomised control (ORX), orchidectomised + 7 mg/rat testosterone enanthate (TEN) and orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 30 mg/kg (EL30), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 60 mg/kg (EL60), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 90 mg/kg (EL90). Rats were euthanized following six weeks of treatment. The left femora were used to measure the trabecular bone microarchitecture using micro-CT. Orchidectomy significantly decreased connectivity density, trabecular bone volume, and trabecular number compared to the SHAM group. Testosterone replacement reversed all the orchidectomy-induced changes in the micro-CT parameters. EL at 30 and 60 mg/kg rat worsened the trabecular bone connectivity density and trabecular separation parameters of orchidectomised rats. EL at 90 mg/kg rat preserved the bone volume. High dose of EL (90 mg/kg) may have potential in preserving the bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats, but lower doses may further worsen the osteoporotic changes. PMID:22952556

  10. Bone Micro-CT Assessments in an Orchidectomised Rat Model Supplemented with Eurycoma longifolia.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Rosmaliza; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that Eurycoma longifolia, a herbal plant, may have the potential to treat osteoporosis in elderly male. This study aimed to determine the effects of Eurycoma longifolia supplementation on the trabecular bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats (androgen-deficient osteoporosis model). Forty-eight-aged (10-12 months old) Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups of sham-operated (SHAM), orchidectomised control (ORX), orchidectomised + 7 mg/rat testosterone enanthate (TEN) and orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 30 mg/kg (EL30), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 60 mg/kg (EL60), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 90 mg/kg (EL90). Rats were euthanized following six weeks of treatment. The left femora were used to measure the trabecular bone microarchitecture using micro-CT. Orchidectomy significantly decreased connectivity density, trabecular bone volume, and trabecular number compared to the SHAM group. Testosterone replacement reversed all the orchidectomy-induced changes in the micro-CT parameters. EL at 30 and 60 mg/kg rat worsened the trabecular bone connectivity density and trabecular separation parameters of orchidectomised rats. EL at 90 mg/kg rat preserved the bone volume. High dose of EL (90 mg/kg) may have potential in preserving the bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats, but lower doses may further worsen the osteoporotic changes.

  11. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling.

  12. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice and activate platelets via TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  13. ICC density predicts bacterial overgrowth in a rat model of post-infectious IBS

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sam-Ryong; Morales, Walter; Low, Kimberly; Chang, Christopher; Zhu, Amy; Pokkunuri, Venkata; Chatterjee, Soumya; Soffer, Edy; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Pimentel, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) number using a new rat model. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups. The first group received gavage with Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) 81-176. The second group was gavaged with placebo. Three months after clearance of Campylobacter from the stool, precise segments of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were ligated in self-contained loops of bowel that were preserved in anaerobic bags. Deep muscular plexus ICC (DMP-ICC) were quantified by two blinded readers assessing the tissue in a random, coded order. The number of ICC per villus was compared among controls, Campylobacter recovered rats without small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and Campylobacter recovered rats with SIBO. RESULTS: Three months after recovery, 27% of rats gavaged with C. jejuni had SIBO. The rats with SIBO had a lower number of DMP-ICC than controls in the jejunum and ileum. Additionally there appeared to be a density threshold of 0.12 DMP-ICC/villus that was associated with SIBO. If ileal density of DMP-ICC was < 0.12 ICC/villus, 54% of rats had SIBO compared to 9% among ileal sections with > 0.12 (P < 0.05). If the density of ICC was < 0.12 DMP-ICC/villus in more than one location of the bowel, 88% of these had SIBO compared to 6% in those who did not (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In this post-infectious rat model, the development of SIBO appears to be associated with a reduction in DMP-ICC. Further study of this rat model might help understand the pathophysiology of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20677340

  14. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P; Shah, Alok S; Budde, Matthew D; Stemper, Brian D; Olsen, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure.

  15. The response of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant female rats to a space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Cephas, Stacy; Cleek, Tammy; Sayavongsa, Phouyong; Arnaud, Sara B.

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have tested the hypothesis that differences in vitamin D metabolism would render the Dahl S rat more susceptible than the Dahl R rat to the effects of a space flight model. Dahl female rats were tail suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a low salt (3 g/kg sodium chloride) diet. Plasma 25-OHD concentrations of S rats were significantly lower than that of R rats. Plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration was 50% lower in unloaded than in loaded S rats, but was unaffected in unloaded R rats. The left soleus muscle weight and breaking strength of the left femur (torsion test) were 50% and 25% lower in unloaded than in loaded S and R rats. The mineral content of the left femur, however, was significantly lower (by 11%) only in unloaded S rats. We conclude that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration and femur mineral content during hind limb unloading, but equally vulnerable to muscle atrophy and reduced breaking strength of the femur.

  16. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in a triphasic rat model of adenine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amnon; Brod, Vera; Awad, Hoda; Heyman, Samuel N; Abassi, Zaid; Frajewicki, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether NGAL, given its advantages over traditional biomarkers, can be used to describe the dynamic characteristics of the renal tubulointerstitial insult caused by adenine. Subsequently, it will be possible to assess NGAL as a biomarker of any acute kidney injury, on top of chronic interstitial disease, if NGAL levels are stable through the chronic phase of our adenine model. Study group rats were fed an adenine diet, and control group rats were fed a regular diet only. Blood and urine samples for urea, creatinine and NGAL were drawn from each rat at the beginning of the study and after 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 weeks. Kidney slices from these rats were stained with Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and β-actin stainings. Serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio in the study group were higher than baseline and than in the control group; these differences were statistically significant in some of the intervals. Tubulointerstitial changes and adenine crystals were evident in the study group rats. In the rats fed adenine, serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio followed a triphasic pattern of kidney injury: an acute phase while on the adenine diet, a partial recovery phase after switching to the regular diet and a chronic kidney disease phase after stabilization of renal function. NGAL can serve a biomarker for acute kidney injury and possibly for chronic kidney disease in the tubulointerstitial rat model.

  17. Establishment of a syngeneic orthotopic model of prostate cancer in immunocompetent rats

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shugo; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Kuno, Toshiya; Punfa, Wanisa; Long, Ne; Kato, Hiroyuki; Inaguma, Shingo; Komiya, Masami; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We previously established 3 cell lines (PLS10, PLS20 and PLS30) from a chemically-induced prostate carcinoma in F344 rats, and demonstrated high potential for metastasis in nude mice. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of establishing an orthotopic model using the 3 rat prostate cancer cell lines in immunocompetent rats with the aim of resolving species-mismatch problems and defects of immune systems. The PLS10, PLS20 and PLS30 cell lines were injected into the ventral prostates of 6-week-old rats, which were then sacrificed at experimental weeks 4 and 8. Tumor mass formation was found in rats with PLS10, but not in those with PLS20 or PLS30. Additionally, metastatic carcinomas could be detected in lymph nodes and lungs of PLS10-inoculated rats. Genetic analysis demonstrated K-ras gene mutations in PLS10 and PLS20, but not in PLS30 cells. There were no mutations in p53 and KLF6. In conclusion, we established a syngeneic orthotopic model for prostate cancer in immunocompetent rats simulating human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which should prove useful for development and validation of therapeutic agents, especially with immunotherapy. PMID:26023257

  18. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 ± 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  19. Cardiovascular disease-related parameters and oxidative stress in SHROB rats, a model for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Molinar-Toribio, Eunice; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Lluís, Laura; Sánchez-Martos, Vanessa; Taltavull, Núria; Romeu, Marta; Pazos, Manuel; Méndez, Lucía; Miranda, Aníbal; Cascante, Marta; Medina, Isabel; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2014-01-01

    SHROB rats have been suggested as a model for metabolic syndrome (MetS) as a situation prior to the onset of CVD or type-2 diabetes, but information on descriptive biochemical parameters for this model is limited. Here, we extensively evaluate parameters related to CVD and oxidative stress (OS) in SHROB rats. SHROB rats were monitored for 15 weeks and compared to a control group of Wistar rats. Body weight was recorded weekly. At the end of the study, parameters related to CVD and OS were evaluated in plasma, urine and different organs. SHROB rats presented statistically significant differences from Wistar rats in CVD risk factors: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, apoA1, apoB100, abdominal fat, insulin, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, ICAM-1 and PAI-1. In adipose tissue, liver and brain, the endogenous antioxidant systems were activated, yet there was no significant oxidative damage to lipids (MDA) or proteins (carbonylation). We conclude that SHROB rats present significant alterations in parameters related to inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, thrombotic activity, insulin resistance and OS measured in plasma as well as enhanced redox defence systems in vital organs that will be useful as markers of MetS and CVD for nutrition interventions.

  20. A rat model of the cognitive impairment from Pfiesteria piscicida exposure.

    PubMed

    Levin, E D

    2001-10-01

    Pfiesteria piscicida Steidinger & Burkholder, an estuarine dinoflagellate known to kill fish, has also been associated with neurocognitive deficits in humans. We have developed a rat model to determine the cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to Pfiesteria-containing water and cognitive impairment and to determine the neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying the Pfiesteria effect. The rat model of Pfiesteria toxicity can also provide important information concerning the toxin or toxins responsible for neurocognitive deficits resulting from Pfiesteria exposure. With the rat model we have repeatedly documented a Pfiesteria-induced choice accuracy impairment during radial-arm maze learning. The Pfiesteria-induced impairment was relatively specific to the acquisition phase of training. When rats were pretrained, Pfiesteria treatment did not affect performance. However, when these same rats were retrained on another task, the Pfiesteria-induced impairment became evident. Pfiesteria-induced effects were also seen in a locomotor activity test in the figure-8 apparatus and selected components of the functional observational battery. Pfiesteria effects on choice accuracy in the radial-arm maze in rats constitute a critical component of the model of Pfiesteria toxicity, as the hallmark of Pfiesteria toxicity in humans is cognitive dysfunction. Our finding that analysis of the first six sessions of radial-arm maze testing is sufficient for determining the effect means that this test will be useful as a rapid screen for identifying the critical neurotoxin(s) of Pfiesteria in future studies.

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ► Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ► MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ► MP and EP decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ► MP and EP reduced NF-κB expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ► MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  2. Mitochondrial polymorphisms in rat genetic models of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kumarasamy, Sivarajan; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Shafton, Asher; Nixon, Jeremy; Thangavel, Jayakumar; Farms, Phyllis; Joe, Bina

    2010-06-01

    Hypertension is a complex trait that has been studied extensively for genetic contributions of the nuclear genome. We examined mitochondrial genomes of the hypertensive strains: the Dahl Salt-Sensitive (S) rat, the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), and the Albino Surgery (AS) rat, and the relatively normotensive strains: the Dahl Salt-Resistant (R) rat, the Milan Normotensive Strain (MNS), and the Lewis rat (LEW). These strains were used previously for linkage analysis for blood pressure (BP) in our laboratory. The results provide evidence to suggest that variations in the mitochondrial genome do not account for observed differences in blood pressure between the S and R rats. However, variants were detected among the mitochondrial genomes of the various hypertensive strains, S, SHR, and AS, and also among the normotensive strains R, MNS, and LEW. A total of 115, 114, 106, 106, and 16 variations in mtDNA were observed between the comparisons S versus LEW, S versus MNS, S versus SHR, S versus AS, and SHR versus AS, respectively. Among the 13 genes coding for proteins of the electron transport chain, 8 genes had nonsynonymous variations between S, LEW, MNS, SHR, and AS. The lack of any sequence variants between the mitochondrial genomes of S and R rats provides conclusive evidence that divergence in blood pressure between these two inbred strains is exclusively programmed through their nuclear genomes. The variations detected among the various hypertensive strains provides the basis to construct conplastic strains and further evaluate the effects of these variants on hypertension and associated phenotypes.

  3. Blood Pressure Responses and Mineral Ocorticoid Levels in the Suspended Rat Model for Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses and fluid/electrolyte shifts seen during space flight are attributed to cephalad redistribution of vascular fluid. The antiorthostatic (AO) rat (suspended head down tilted, 15-20 deg) is used to model these responses. Current studies show that elevated blood pressures in A0 rats are sustained for periods up to seven days. Comparisons are made with presuspension rats. Increased blood pressure in head down tilted subjects suggests a specific response to A0 positioning, potentially relatable to cephalad fluid shift. To assess a role for hormonal regulation of sodium excretion, serum aldosterone levels were measured.

  4. Rat models of spinal cord injury: from pathology to potential therapies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A long-standing goal of spinal cord injury research is to develop effective spinal cord repair strategies for the clinic. Rat models of spinal cord injury provide an important mammalian model in which to evaluate treatment strategies and to understand the pathological basis of spinal cord injuries. These models have facilitated the development of robust tests for assessing the recovery of locomotor and sensory functions. Rat models have also allowed us to understand how neuronal circuitry changes following spinal cord injury and how recovery could be promoted by enhancing spontaneous regenerative mechanisms and by counteracting intrinsic inhibitory factors. Rat studies have also revealed possible routes to rescuing circuitry and cells in the acute stage of injury. Spatiotemporal and functional studies in these models highlight the therapeutic potential of manipulating inflammation, scarring and myelination. In addition, potential replacement therapies for spinal cord injury, including grafts and bridges, stem primarily from rat studies. Here, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of rat experimental spinal cord injury models and summarize knowledge gained from these models. We also discuss how an emerging understanding of different forms of injury, their pathology and degree of recovery has inspired numerous treatment strategies, some of which have led to clinical trials. PMID:27736748

  5. Rat models of spinal cord injury: from pathology to potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Kjell, Jacob; Olson, Lars

    2016-10-01

    A long-standing goal of spinal cord injury research is to develop effective spinal cord repair strategies for the clinic. Rat models of spinal cord injury provide an important mammalian model in which to evaluate treatment strategies and to understand the pathological basis of spinal cord injuries. These models have facilitated the development of robust tests for assessing the recovery of locomotor and sensory functions. Rat models have also allowed us to understand how neuronal circuitry changes following spinal cord injury and how recovery could be promoted by enhancing spontaneous regenerative mechanisms and by counteracting intrinsic inhibitory factors. Rat studies have also revealed possible routes to rescuing circuitry and cells in the acute stage of injury. Spatiotemporal and functional studies in these models highlight the therapeutic potential of manipulating inflammation, scarring and myelination. In addition, potential replacement therapies for spinal cord injury, including grafts and bridges, stem primarily from rat studies. Here, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of rat experimental spinal cord injury models and summarize knowledge gained from these models. We also discuss how an emerging understanding of different forms of injury, their pathology and degree of recovery has inspired numerous treatment strategies, some of which have led to clinical trials.

  6. Efficacy of Intrathecal Morphine in a Model of Surgical Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amy; Roughan, Johnny; Malik, Aneesa; Haylor, Katherine; Sandersen, Charlotte; Flecknell, Paul; Leach, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Concerns over interactions between analgesics and experimental outcomes are a major reason for withholding opioids from rats undergoing surgical procedures. Only a fraction of morphine injected intravenously reaches receptors responsible for analgesia in the central nervous system. Intrathecal administration of morphine may represent a way to provide rats with analgesia while minimizing the amount of morphine injected. This study aimed to assess whether morphine injected intrathecally via direct lumbar puncture provides sufficient analgesia to rats exposed to acute surgical pain (caudal laparotomy).In an initial blinded, randomised study, pain-free rats received morphine subcutaneously (MSC, 3mg.kg-1, N = 6), intrathecally (MIT, 0.2mg.kg-1, N = 6); NaCl subcutaneously (NSC, N = 6) or intrathecally (NIT, N = 6). Previously validated pain behaviours, activity and Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) scores were recorded at baseline, 1, 2, 4 and 8h post-injection. Morphine-treated rats had similar behaviours to NaCl rats, but their RGS scores were significantly different over time and between treatments. In a second blinded study, rats (N = 28) were randomly allocated to one of the following four treatments (N = 7): MSC, 3mg.kg-1, surgery; MIT, 0.2mg.kg-1, surgery; NIT, surgery; NSC, sham surgery. Composite Pain Behaviours (CPB) and RGS were recorded as previously. CPB in MIT and MSC groups were not significantly different to NSC group. MSC and MIT rats displayed significantly lower RGS scores than NIT rats at 1 and 8h postoperatively. RGS scores for MIT and MSC rats were not significantly different at 1, 2, and 8h postoperatively. Intraclass correlation value amongst operators involved in RGS scoring (N = 9) was 0.913 for total RGS score. Intrathecal morphine was mostly indistinguishable from its subcutaneous counterpart, providing pain relief lasting up to 8 hours in a rat model of surgical pain. Further studies are warranted to clarify the relevance of the rat grimace scale for

  7. Development and characterization of a novel rat model of estrogen-induced mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Kirsten L; Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Hickman, Maureen Peters; Seiler, Nicole L; Ding, Lina; Shull, James D

    2015-04-01

    The ACI rat model of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer is highly relevant for use in establishing the endocrine, genetic, and environmental bases of breast cancer etiology and identifying novel agents and strategies for preventing breast cancer. E2 treatment rapidly induces mammary cancer in female ACI rats and simultaneously induces pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia and adenoma. The pituitary tumors can result in undesired morbidity, which compromises long-term studies focused on mammary cancer etiology and prevention. We have defined the genetic bases of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancers and pituitary tumors and have utilized the knowledge gained in these studies to develop a novel inbred rat strain, designated ACWi, that retains the high degree of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer exhibited by ACI rats, but lacks the treatment-related morbidity associated with pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia/adenoma. When treated with E2, female ACWi rats developed palpable mammary cancer at a median latency of 116 days, an incidence of 100% by 161 days and exhibited an average of 15.6 mammary tumors per rat following 196 days of treatment. These parameters did not differ from those observed for contemporaneously treated ACI rats. None of the E2-treated ACWi rats were killed before the intended experimental end point due to any treatment-related morbidity other than mammary cancer burden, whereas 20% of contemporaneously treated ACI rats exhibited treatment-related morbidity that necessitated premature killing. The ACWi rat strain is well suited for use by those in the research community, focusing on breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  8. Work performance evaluation using the exercising rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Stavert, D.M.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    A treadmill-metabolic chamber system and a stress testing protocol have been developed to evaluate aerobic work performance on exercising rats that have inhaled toxic substances. The chamber with an enclosed treadmill provides the means to measure the physiologic status of rats during maximal work intensities in terms of O/sub 2/ consumption (V/sub 02/) and CO/sub 2/ production (V/sub c02/). The metabolic chamber can also accommodate instrumented rats for more detailed analyses of their cardiopulmonary status, e.g., ECG, cardiac output, arterial blood gases and pH, and arterial and venous blood pressures. For such studies, an arterial/venous catheter preparation is required. Because of the severe metabolic alterations after such surgery, a post surgical recovery strategy using hyperalimentation was developed to ensure maximal performance of instrumented animals during stress testing. Actual work performance studies are conducted using an eight minute stress test protocol in which the rat is subjected to increasing external work. The metabolic state of the animal is measured from resting levels to maximum oxygen consumption (V/sub 02max/). V/sub 02max/ has been shown to be reproducible in individual rats and is a sensitive indicator of oxidant gas-induced pulmonary damage. 3 tabs.

  9. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model

    PubMed Central

    FENG, SISI; LIU, WEIDONG; ZUO, SHENGNAN; XIE, TINGYAN; DENG, HUI; ZHANG, QIUHUAN; ZHONG, BAIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub-health model, the rats were subjected to a high-fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D-lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub-health rat model was successfully established, and sub-health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub-health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub-health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub-health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  10. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life.

  11. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sukhotnik, Igor; Starikov, Alona; Coran, Arnold G.; Pollak, Yulia; Sohotnik, Rima; Shaoul, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1) Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP) for 5 days; 2) O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3) O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration. PMID:25717388

  12. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, Jorge V.; Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Martinez-Galan, Juan R.; Caminos, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1) rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR) recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following the response to natural stimuli (hand clapping and kissing sounds). Of all the analyzed animals, 25.9% presented auditory loss before 50 days of age (P50) and 45% were totally deaf by P200. ABR recordings showed that all the rats had a higher hearing threshold than the control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which was also higher than any other rat strains. The integrity of the central and peripheral auditory pathway was analyzed by histology and immunocytochemistry. In the cochlear nucleus (CN), statistical differences were found between SD and P23H-1 rats in VGluT1 distribution, but none were found when labeling all the CN synapses with anti-Syntaxin. This finding suggests anatomical and/or molecular abnormalities in the auditory downstream pathway. The inner ear of the hypoacusic P23H-1 rats showed several anatomical defects, including loss and disruption of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. All these results can explain, at least in part, how hearing impairment can occur in a high percentage of P23H-1 rats. P23H-1 rats may be considered an experimental model with visual and auditory dysfunctions in future research. PMID:25278831

  13. Phenotypic characterization of recessive gene knockout rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kuldip D; De Silva, Shehan; Sheth, Niketa P; Ramboz, Sylvie; Beck, Melissa J; Quang, Changyu; Switzer, Robert C; Ahmad, Syed O; Sunkin, Susan M; Walker, Dan; Cui, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Daniel A; McCoy, Aaron M; Gamber, Kevin; Ding, Xiaodong; Goldberg, Matthew S; Benkovic, Stanley A; Haupt, Meredith; Baptista, Marco A S; Fiske, Brian K; Sherer, Todd B; Frasier, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1(Pink1), DJ-1 (Park7) and Parkin (Park2) genes are linked to familial cases of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). As part of its strategy to provide more tools for the research community, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) funded the generation of novel rat models with targeted disruption ofPink1, DJ-1 or Parkin genes and determined if the loss of these proteins would result in a progressive PD-like phenotype. Pathological, neurochemical and behavioral outcome measures were collected at 4, 6 and 8months of age in homozygous KO rats and compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Both Pink1 and DJ-1 KO rats showed progressive nigral neurodegeneration with about 50% dopaminergic cell loss observed at 8 months of age. ThePink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats also showed a two to three fold increase in striatal dopamine and serotonin content at 8 months of age. Both Pink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats exhibited significant motor deficits starting at 4months of age. However, Parkin KO rats displayed normal behaviors with no neurochemical or pathological changes. These results demonstrate that inactivation of the Pink1 or DJ-1 genes in the rat produces progressive neurodegeneration and early behavioral deficits, suggesting that these recessive genes may be essential for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). These MJFF-generated novel rat models will assist the research community to elucidate the mechanisms by which these recessive genes produce PD pathology and potentially aid in therapeutic development.

  14. Calcium Balance in Mature Rats Exposed to a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolinsky, Ira

    1996-01-01

    Negative calcium balances are seen in humans during spaceflight and bed rest, an analog of space flight. Due to the infrequency and costliness of space flight and the difficulties, cost, and restraints in using invasive procedures in bed rest studies, several ground based animal models of space flight have been employed. The most useful and well developed of these models is hind limb unloading in the rat. In this model the hind limbs are non-weight bearing (unloaded) but still mobile; there is a cephalad fluid shift similar to that seen in astronauts in flight; the animals are able to feed, groom and locomote using their front limbs; the procedure is reversible; and, importantly, the model has been validated by comparison to space flight. Several laboratories have studied calcium balance using rats in hind limb unweighting. Roer and Dillaman used young male rats to study calcium balance in this model for 25 days. They found no differences in dietary calcium intake, percent calcium absorption, urinary and fecal excretion, hence indicating no differences in calcium balance between control and unloaded rats. In another study, employing 120 day old females, rats' hind limbs were unloaded for 28 days. While negative calcium balances were observed during a 25 day recovery period no balance measurements were possible during unweighting since the researchers did not employ appropriate metabolic cages. In a recent study from this laboratory, using 200 g rats in the space flight model for two weeks, we found depressed intestinal calcium absorption and increased fecal calcium excretion (indicating less positive calcium balances) and lower circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The above studies indicate that there remains a dearth of information on calcium balance during the hind limb unloading rat space flight model, especially in mature rats, whose use is a better model for planned manned space flight than juvenile or growing animals. With the aid of a newly designed

  15. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Thibaut; Lafoux, Aude; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  16. Metabolic Cage for a Space Flight Model in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Jennifer S.; Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Evans, Juli; Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1994-01-01

    The new cage facilitates the collection of 24-h specimens of separated urine and feces apparently uncontaminated by food, as required for precise nutritional and metabolic studies, while maintaining the large floor area and suspension method of Holton's design (3). Although the cage was evaluated, using 6-month-old rats weighing 408 to 488 g, it can be easily adjusted for smaller rats. It also was successfully used to collect post-flight urine after the recent Spacelab Life Sciences-2 space shuttle flight. With its flexibility and ease of use, this new cage design adds a new tool to study the physiologic effects of simulated space flight and other disuse conditions.

  17. Restoring Spinal Noradrenergic Inhibitory Tone Attenuates Pain Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Chen, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether restoring descending noradrenergic inhibitory tone can attenuate pain in a PD rat model, which was established by stereotaxic infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral striatum (CPu). PD rats developed thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity at the 4th week after surgery. HPLC analysis showed that NE content, but not dopamine or 5-HT, significantly decreased in lumbar spinal cord in PD rats. Additional noradrenergic depletion by injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) aggravated pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. At the 5th week after injection of 6-OHDA, systemic treatment with pharmacological norepinephrine (NE) precursor droxidopa (L-DOPS) or α2 adrenoceptor agonist clonidine significantly attenuated thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Furthermore, application of norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors duloxetine, but not 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitors sertraline, significantly inhibited thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Systemic administration of Madopar (L-DOPA) or the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole slightly inhibited the thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity in PD rats. Thus, our study revealed that impairment of descending noradrenergic system may play a key role in PD-associated pain and restoring spinal noradrenergic inhibitory tone may serve as a novel strategy to manage PD-associated pain. PMID:27747105

  18. Effects of Aqueous Extracts of Cynanchum wilfordii in Rat Models for Postmenopausal Hot Flush

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyuok; Choi, Chul-yung; Jun, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Menopausal hot flushes (HFs), which manifest as a transient increase in skin temperature, occur most frequently in postmenopausal women, and sometimes negatively influence daily life. We investigated the effect of an aqueous extract of Cynanchum wilfordii (CWW) in a rat model of menopausal HFs, where tail skin temperature (TST) is increased after the rapid estrogen decline induced by ovariectomy. Ten-week-old female rats were ovariectomized and treated with CWW for 1 week. We measured TST and rectal temperatures (RT) and investigated serum estradiol. The TST in ovariectomized (OVX) rats was significantly elevated after ovariectomy compared with control rats, whereas the RT in OVX rats was not elevated. Administration of CWW (200 mg/kg/d for 7 days, p.o.) significantly improved the skin temperature increase in OVX rats. The lower level of serum estradiol in OVX rats was significantly increased by supplying E2, but it was not affected by CWW. The present study indicates a need for future research involving treatment with high concentrations of C. wilfordii and measurement over 24 h. PMID:28078261

  19. Ocular Changes in TgF344-AD Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Svendsen, Clive N.; Cohen, Robert M.; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in learning, memory, and executive functions. In addition to cognitive and behavioral deficits, vision disturbances have been reported in early stage of AD, well before the diagnosis is clearly established. To further investigate ocular abnormalities, a novel AD transgenic rat model was analyzed. Methods. Transgenic (Tg) rats (TgF344-AD) heterozygous for human mutant APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and age-matched wild type (WT) rats, as well as 20 human postmortem retinal samples from both AD and healthy donors were used. Visual function in the rodent was analyzed using the optokinetic response. Immunohistochemistry on retinal and brain sections was used to detect various markers including amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. Results. As expected, Aβ plaques were detected in the hippocampus, cortex, and retina of Tg rats. Plaque-like structures were also found in two AD human whole-mount retinas. The choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in both Tg rat and in AD human eyes when compared with age-matched controls. Tg rat eyes also showed hypertrophic retinal pigment epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and upregulation of complement factor C3. Although visual acuity was lower in Tg than in WT rats, there was no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell number and retinal vasculature. Conclusions. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance and mechanisms of this pathological change and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus. PMID:24398104

  20. Protective effects of leflunomide on renal lesions in a rat model if diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Ji, Yongqiang; Lv, Wei; He, Tianwei; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common chronic complications of diabetes with poor efficacy of clinical treatment. This study investigated the protective effects of leflunomide, a new immunosuppressant, on tubulointerstitial lesions in a rat model of diabetic nephropathy. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection in male Wistar rats. Two weeks after STZ injection, diabetic rats were treated daily for 8 weeks with low (5 mg/kg) and high dose (10 mg/kg) of leflunomide, and benazepril hydrochloride (4 mg/kg) as a positive control. In diabetic rats, the 24-h urine volume, urine protein and microalbumin, blood creatinine and urea nitrogen significantly increased, which were attenuated by leflunomide treatment in a dose-dependent manner (all p < 0.05). The increase of kidney weight/body weight and the histopathological findings of tubulointerstitial lesion in diabetic rats were mitigated by leflunomide treatment. Immunohistochemistry study and real-time polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that osteopontin (OPN), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), α-smooth muscle actin and CD68 expression in the renal tubulointerstitial region were significantly increased in the diabetic rats, while these increases were inhibited by leflunomide treatment. These findings suggest that leflunomide protects the kidney injury of diabetic rats might through its inhibition of OPN/TGF-β1 mediated extracellular matrix deposition and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as its inhibition on tubular epithelial-myofibroblast transdifferentiation.

  1. Intravenous self-administration of amphetamine is increased in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Masini, Cher V; Primeaux, Stefany D; Garrett, Joshua L; Zellner, Andrew; Stogner, Kimberly S; Duncan, Alicia A; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2002-10-01

    Affective disorders and substance abuse frequently coexist, yet few previous studies have examined drug self-administration using animal models of depression. The olfactory-bulbectomized rat is a well-established model that exhibits a high degree of neurochemical similarity to depression. Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) increases dopamine receptor densities in the ventral striatum, which may increase the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Experiments were designed to test the hypotheses that acquisition and stable self-administration of amphetamine would be increased in bulbectomized rats. In the first experiment, rats underwent bilateral OBX or sham surgery and intravenous jugular catheters were implanted 12-14 days later. Acquisition was examined using a standard operant paradigm involving a nose-poke response for a very low dose of D-amphetamine sulfate (12 microg/infusion, IV). A separate group of rats received coinfusions of sulpiride. In a second experiment designed to minimize differences in acquisition and examine stable self-administration, lever pressing for a low (0.10 mg/kg, IV) or high (0.25 mg/kg, IV) dose of D-amphetamine sulfate was measured in rats pretrained to lever press for food. Bulbectomized rats acquired the self-administration of very low dose amphetamine faster than sham-operated rats and this effect was reversed by sulpiride coinfusion. Stable self-administration of the low dose of amphetamine was also markedly increased in bulbectomized rats. The findings reveal the utility of the OBX model for studying the neurobiological basis of depression and drug abuse comorbidity and support the hypothesis that neurochemical abnormalities associated with depression may enhance the addictive properties of some drugs of abuse.

  2. Endoscopic evaluation of esophago-gastro-jejunostomy in rat model of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Lowe, A W; Triadafilopoulos, G; Hsiung, P-L; Hao, Y; Crawford, J M; Wang, T D

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopy can be used to monitor the onset of metaplastic transformation and to observe the progression of neoplasia in small animal models of Barrett's esophagus. By avoiding animal sacrifice, the natural history of this disease can be studied in a longitudinal fashion. We aim to characterize the endoscopic features of esophageal mucosa at various stages of the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in a rat reflux model of Barrett's for comparison with histology. Acid and bile reflux was produced by introducing a side-to-side esophago-gastro-jejunostomy in Sprague-Dawley rats. Endoscopic examination of the distal esophagus was performed in 24 surgically altered and 4 control rats, between weeks 24 and 36 after the operation in 4-week intervals, and all rats were biopsied and sacrificed at 36 weeks. Endoscopic images were classified based on the surface mucosal patterns of the distal esophagus and then compared with histology. The endoscopic appearance was classified as: (i) normal, characterized by a smooth surface; (ii) intestinal metaplasia, defined as elevated plaques/ridges, deep grooves, and thin linear folds; (iii) dysplasia, indicated by coarse folds/grooves, meshlike villi, and foveolar appearance; and (iv) carcinoma, suggested by irregular-shaped mass lesions with ulcerations. The endoscopic criteria for intestinal metaplasia yielded a sensitivity of 100% in comparison with histology. Intestinal metaplasia with high-grade dysplasia was found in two rats and with low-grade dysplasia in three rats. Both focally invasive squamous cell carcinoma and invasive adenocarcinoma were found in one rat. Small animal endoscopy in a rat model of Barrett's esophagus can be used to perform surveillance, classify mucosal patterns, observe the onset of intestinal metaplasia, and monitor the progression of neoplastic transformation, representing a useful tool for studying the natural history of this disease.

  3. The Methylazoxymethanol Acetate (MAM-E17) Rat Model: Molecular and Functional Effects in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hradetzky, Eva; Sanderson, Thomas M; Tsang, Tsz M; Sherwood, John L; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Lakics, Viktor; Malik, Nadia; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; O'Neill, Michael J; Cheng, Tammy MK; Harris, Laura W; Rahmoune, Hassan; Guest, Paul C; Sher, Emanuele; Collingridge, Graham L; Holmes, Elaine; Tricklebank, Mark D; Bahn, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the DNA-alkylating agent methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) on embryonic day 17 (E17) produces behavioral and anatomical brain abnormalities, which model some aspects of schizophrenia. This has lead to the premise that MAM rats are a neurodevelopmental model for schizophrenia. However, the underlying molecular pathways affected in this model have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular phenotype of adult MAM rats by focusing on the frontal cortex and hippocampal areas, as these are known to be affected in schizophrenia. Proteomic and metabonomic analyses showed that the MAM treatment on E17 resulted primarily in deficits in hippocampal glutamatergic neurotransmission, as seen in some schizophrenia patients. Most importantly, these results were consistent with our finding of functional deficits in glutamatergic neurotransmission, as identified using electrophysiological recordings. Thus, this study provides the first molecular evidence, combined with functional validation, that the MAM-E17 rat model reproduces hippocampal deficits relevant to the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:21956444

  4. The Rat Model in Microsurgery Education: Classical Exercises and New Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Shurey, Sandra; Akelina, Yelena; Legagneux, Josette; Malzone, Gerardo; Jiga, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Microsurgery is a precise surgical skill that requires an extensive training period and the supervision of expert instructors. The classical training schemes in microsurgery have started with multiday experimental courses on the rat model. These courses have offered a low threat supervised high fidelity laboratory setting in which students can steadily and rapidly progress. This simulated environment allows students to make and recognise mistakes in microsurgery techniques and thus shifts any related risks of the early training period from the operating room to the lab. To achieve a high level of skill acquisition before beginning clinical practice, students are trained on a comprehensive set of exercises the rat model can uniquely provide, with progressive complexity as competency improves. This paper presents the utility of the classical rat model in three of the earliest microsurgery training centres and the new prospects that this versatile and expansive training model offers. PMID:24883268

  5. Spaceflight and bone turnover - Correlation with a new rat model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Earlier manned spaceflight studies have revealed that the near-weightless environment of orbital flight produce certain biological effects in humans, including abnormalities in mineral metabolism. The data collected were compatible with bone mineral loss. Cosmos 782 and 936 experiments have shown a decrease in rat bone formation rate. In this paper, a rat model of weightlessness is described, which is unique in that the animal is free to move about a 360-deg arc. The model meets the requirements for an acceptable system. Data from the model and spaceflight are presented. Many of the responses noted in suspended animals indicate that the model closely mimics results from rats and man exposed to near-weightlessness during orbital spaceflight.

  6. The Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Puerarin to Treat Endometriosis Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Zhang, Danying; Zhai, Dongxia; Shen, Wei; Bai, Lingling; Liu, Yiqun; Cai, Zailong; Li, Ji; Yu, Chaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effects of puerarin to treat endometriosis (EMT) model rats and the possible regulatory mechanisms. Methods. EMT model rats were surgically induced by autotransplantion of endometrial tissues. The appropriate dosage of puerarin to treat EMT model rats was determined by observing the pathologic morphology of ectopic endometrial tissues and by detecting the levels of estradiol (E2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) of both serum and ectopic endometrial tissues. The related genes and proteins of ectopic endometrial tissues were analyzed by Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to explore the possible mechanisms. Results. Puerarin could reduce the levels of E2 and PGE2 and prevent the growth of ectopic endometrium tissues by inhibiting the expression of aromatase cytochrome P450 (p450arom) and cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2); puerarin could adjust the anabolism of E2 by upregulating the expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid-2 (17β-hsd-2) and downregulating the expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid-1 (17β-hsd-1) of the ectopic endometrium tissues; puerarin could increase the expression of ERβ and improve the inflammatory microenvironment of EMT model rats. Conclusions. Our data suggest that puerarin has a therapeutic effect on EMT model rats and could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of EMT in clinic. PMID:25815028

  7. A computational model of rat cerebral blood flow using non-uniform rational B-splines.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Sergey V; Podoprigora, Guennady I; Comas, Laurent; Boulahdour, Hatem; Cardot, Jean-Claude; Baud, Michel; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R; Blagosklonov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) surfaces can be used for a computer simulation of shapes. Some anatomical models of human or animal structures have been recently developed on that basis. We used positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) data for NURBS modeling of anatomical structures and isotope uptake in the rat brain. Our simplified model of the rat cerebral blood flow is the first step in a larger project aiming a simulation of PET scans in small animals followed by its validation in vivo.

  8. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  9. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using positron emission tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats was scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents.

  10. The effect of adropin on lipid and glucose metabolism in rats with hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Akcılar, Raziye; Emel Koçak, Fatma; Şimşek, Hasan; Akcılar, Aydın; Bayat, Zeynep; Ece, Ezgi; Kökdaşgil, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, whether the effects of low-dose adropin administration is effective in rats with hyperlipidemia. Materials and Methods: Twenty one Wistar albino female rats were randomly divided into 3 groups and fed with high-fat diet for 4 weeks to establish the hyperlipidemia model. Meanwhile, adropin was administrated intraperitonealy (2.1 μg/kg/day), once a day for continuous 10 days. Then, body weights and serum biochemical parameters, adropin, insulin and blood glucose levels were determined. Additionally, in liver tissue, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results: The results showed that intraperitoneal administration of adropin to hyperlipidemic rats for 10 days were extremely effective in decreasing the levels of serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and gamma glutamil transferase (GGT) and increasing the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). It could decrease mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 via regulating the expressions of iNOS. In addition, treatment with adropin showed a significant reduction in blood glucose, serum insulin levels, HbA1c (%), and HOMA-IR, and increase in serum adropin levels. Conclusion: Adropin may ameliorate lipid metabolism, reduce insulin resistance, and inhibit hepatocytes inflammation. Thus, adropin had significant therapeutic benefits and could be suggested as a potential candidate agent against hyperlipidemia. PMID:27114793

  11. The legacy of Adolf Meyer's comparative approach: Worcester rats and the strange birth of the animal model.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A

    2005-01-01

    The breeding of albino rats had an enormous impact on experimental psychology in the twentieth century. Rats were, and for many questions still remain, the "standard animal" for laboratory research in neurology, psychology, and physiology. Albert Meyer was one of the figures most responsible for developing the albino rat as an experimental model. Despite Meyer's pioneering work with albino rats, his rat research has received only sparse attention. Little is known about the way in which the animal served Meyer's more famous psychiatric program. In this article, the author discusses the role that albino rats played in Meyer's animal research. He then turn to the contrast between the way in which Meyer viewed the animal's role in research and the way rats were later used as a laboratory "standard" to assure scientific generality. This comparison highlights the changes that occurred in comparative psychology in the twentieth century, and it further clarifies some of the concerns associated with the use of animal models today.

  12. Effect of Angiotensin(1-7) on Heart Function in an Experimental Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Katja; Schlegel, Franziska; Raasch, Walter; Bader, Michael; Dähnert, Ingo; Dhein, Stefan; Salameh, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was shown that overexpression of the Mas-receptor antagonist angiotensin(1-7) could prevent from diet-induced obesity. However, it remained unclear whether diet-induced obesity and angiotensin(1-7) overexpression might also have effects on the cardiovascular system in these rats. Methods:Twenty three male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with standard chow (SD+chow, n = 5) or a cafeteria diet (SD+CD, n = 6) for 5 months. To investigate the effect of angiotensin(1-7) transgenic rats, expressing an angiotensin(1-7)-producing fusion protein in testis were used. These transgenic rats also received a 5 month's feeding period with either chow (TGR+chow, n = 6) or cafeteria diet (TGR+CD, n = 6), respectively. Hemodynamic measurements (pressure-volume loops) were carried out to assess cardiac function and blood pressure. Subsequently, hearts were explanted and investigated according to the Langendorff technique. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling in these animals was investigated histologically. Results:After 5 months cafeteria diet feeding rats showed a significantly increased body weight, which could be prevented in transgenic rats. However, there was no effect on cardiac performance after cafeteria diet in non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Moreover, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) deteriorated cardiac contractility as indicated by impaired dp/dt. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that cafeteria diet led to myocardial fibrosis in both, control and transgenic rats and this was not inhibited by an overproduction of angiotensin(1-7). Conclusion:These results indicate that an overexpression of circulating angiotensin(1-7) prevents a cafeteria diet-induced increase in body weight, but does not affect cardiac performance in this experimental rat model of obesity. Furthermore, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) alone resulted in an impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26733884

  13. A Novel Rat Model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Due to a Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikas, Thomas B; Wildt, Sheryl J; Wineinger, Amy E; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Markianos, Kyriacos; Cooper, Dale M; Fleming, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic iron overload in rats has been reported, but whether it is due to genetic or environmental causes is unknown. In the current study, phenotypic analysis of Hsd:HHCL Wistar rats revealed a low incidence of histologically detected liver iron overload. Here we characterized the pathophysiology of the iron overload and showed that the phenotype is heritable and due to a mutation in a single gene. We identified a single male rat among the 132 screened animals that exhibited predominantly periportal, hepatocellular iron accumulation. This rat expressed low RNA levels of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin and low protein levels of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2), a membrane protein essential for hepcidin expression in humans and mice and mutated in forms of hereditary hemochromatosis. Sequencing of Tfr2 in the iron-overloaded rat revealed a novel Ala679Gly polymorphism in a highly conserved residue. Quantitative trait locus mapping indicated that this polymorphism correlated strongly with serum iron and transferrin saturations in male rats. Expression of the Gly679 variant in tissue culture cell lines revealed decreased steady-state levels of Tfr2. Characterization of iron metabolism in the progeny of polymorphic rats suggested that homozygosity for the Ala679Gly allele leads to a hemochromatosis phenotype. However, we currently cannot exclude the possibility that a polymorphism or mutation in the noncoding region of Tfr2 contributes to the iron-overload phenotype. Hsd:HHCL rats are the first genetic rat model of hereditary hemochromatosis and may prove useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of iron metabolism. PMID:23582421

  14. Carcinogenically relevant split dose repair increased with age in rat skin model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Fredric; Tang, Moon-Shong Eric; Wu, Feng; Uddin, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    These experiments utilize cancer induction to evaluate cancer-relevant repair during the interval between dose fractions. Low LET electron radiation(LET ~ 0.34 keV/u) were utilized in experiments that involved exposing rat dorsal skin to 2 equal 8 Gy dose fractions separated at various intervals from 0.25 h to 24 h. Cancer onset was established for 80 weeks after the exposures and only histologically verified cancers were included in the analysis. This experiment involved a total of 540 rats and 880 induced cancers. In the youngest rats (irradiated at 28 days of age) the cancer yield declined with a halftime of approximately 3.5 hrs. In 113 day old rats the cancer yield halftime was shortened to 1.3 hrs. In the oldest rats (182 days of age), the halftime could not be established quantitatively, because it was less than the shortest interval (15 min) utilized in the protocol (best estimate ~5 min). In the oldest rats the cancer yields for all fractionated exposures dropped essentially to the expected level of 2 single fractions, below which theoretically no further reduction is possible. The follow-up times for obtaining cancer yields were the same for all exposure groups in spite of the differing ages at exposure. These results indicate that repair of carcinogenically-relevant damage accelerates with age of the rat. No information is available on the possible mechanistic basis for this finding, although the model might be useful for delineating which of the many postulated split dose repair pathways is the correct one. The finding indicates that older rats should be less susceptible to the carcinogenic action of single doses of low LET radiation in comparison to younger rats, which has been verified in separate studies.

  15. A CONTROLLED SAFETY STUDY OF DIINDOLYLMETHANE IN THE IMMATURE RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Elackattu, Alphi P.; Feng, Lining; Wang, Zhi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diindolylmethane, a natural product from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be a dietary component that has inhibitory effects on some tumors (e.g., laryngeal papilloma). However, current evidence to support its safety is based on adult humans or mature animals. There is little to show its safety in children. This study is designed to asses safety in the young rat model STUDY DESIGN Prospective Controlled Animal Study. METHODS 40 rats were separated into 4 treatment groups of 10 rats each, based on the amount of study drug they received in their daily food: 1. Immature rats fed low dose DIM, which is our proposed treatment dose (2.0mg/kg/day). 2. Immature rats fed high dose DIM (20.0mg/kg/day). 3. Immature rats fed no DIM (control). 4. Adult rats fed high dose DIM (20.0mg/kg/day). At the conclusion of the study we collected blood to compare serum chemistries and vitamin D levels, and harvest organs to observe for any gross or histological changes between the groups. Statistical methods involved one-way ANOVA and pairwise comparisons with Tukey’s multiple comparison adjustment. RESULTS Although our numbers do not allow for statistical significance, there was no appreciable difference in rat weights between the immature groups, nor was there appreciable difference between serum chemistries, or gross or histological examination of liver, kidney, or bone. CONCLUSIONS Diindolylmethane seems to have no adverse affects on the rat even when given in doses 10x what we propose to be therapeutic. This adds evidence to the safety of this drug in the pediatric population as a treatment option for recurrent respiratory papilloma. PMID:19544380

  16. White matter atrophy and myelinated fiber disruption in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jing; Tang, Jing; Liang, Xin; Huang, Chun-Xia; Wang, San-Rong; Chen, Lin-Mu; Wang, Fei-Fei; Tan, Chuan-Xue; Chao, Feng-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Luo, Yan-Min; Xiao, Qian; Du, Lian; Xiao, Qian; Tang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Brain imaging and postmortem studies have indicated that white matter abnormalities may contribute to the pathology and pathogenesis of depression. However, until now, no study has quantitatively investigated white matter changes in depression in rats. The current study used the chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model of depression. Body weight and sucrose preference test (SPT) scores were assessed weekly. Upon successfully establishing the CUS animal model, all animals were tested using the SPT and the open field test (OFT). Then, transmission electron microscopy and unbiased stereological methods were used to investigate white matter changes in the rats. Compared with the control group, the body weight and sucrose preference of the CUS rats were significantly decreased (p < .001, p < .001, respectively). In the OFT, the total time spent and the total distance traveled in the inner area by the CUS rats were significantly lower than those of the control group (p = .002, p = .001, respectively). The stereological results revealed that white matter volume, the total volume, and the total length and mean diameter of myelinated fibers in the white matter of the CUS rats were significantly decreased compared to the control rats (p = .042, p = .038, p = .035, p = .019, respectively). The results of this study suggested that white matter atrophy and disruption of myelinated fibers in the white matter may contribute to the pathophysiology underlying depression, which might provide new targets for the development of novel therapeutic interventions for depression.

  17. Chronic behavioral and cognitive deficits in a rat survival model of paraoxon toxicity.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Phillips, Kristin; Huang, Beverly; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds, including paraoxon (POX), are similar to nerve agents such as sarin. There is a growing concern that OP agents could be weaponized to cause mass civilian causalities. We have developed a rodent survival model of POX toxicity that is being used to evaluate chronic morbidity and to screen for medical countermeasures against severe OP exposure. It is well known that the survivors of nerve gas and chronic OP exposure exhibit neurobehavioral deficits such as mood changes, depression, and memory impairments. In this study we investigated whether animals surviving severe POX exposure exhibited long-term neurological impairments. POX exposure produced overt signs of cholinergic toxicity. Rats were rescued using an optimized atropine, 2-PAM and diazepam therapy. Surviving rats were studied using established behavioral assays for identifying symptoms of depression and memory impairment 3-months after POX exposure. In the forced swim test, POX rats exhibited increased immobility time indicative of a despair-like state. In the sucrose preference test, POX rats consumed significantly less sucrose water indicating anhedonia-like condition. POX rats also displayed increased anxiety as characterized by significantly lower performance in the open arm of the elevated plus maze. Further, when tested with a novel object recognition paradigm, POX rats exhibited a negative discrimination ratio indicative of impaired recognition memory. The results indicate that this model of survival from severe POX exposure can be employed to study some of the molecular bases for OP-induced chronic behavioral and cognitive comorbidities and develop therapies for their treatment.

  18. Optimization and pharmacological characterization of a refined cisplatin-induced rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Han, Felicity Yaqin; Wyse, Bruce D; Smith, Maree T

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is the major dose-limiting side-effect of many front-line anticancer drugs. This study was designed to establish and pharmacologically characterize a refined rat model of cisplatin-induced CIPN. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received four (n=18) or five (n=18) single intraperitoneal bolus doses of cisplatin at 3 mg/kg, or saline (control group), once-weekly. Body weight and general health were assessed over a 49-day study period. von Frey filaments and the Hargreaves test were used to define the time course for the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia in the hindpaws and for efficacy assessment of analgesic/adjuvant agents. The general health of rats administered four cisplatin doses was superior to that of rats administered five doses. Mechanical allodynia was fully developed (paw withdrawal thresholds≤6 g) in the bilateral hindpaws from day 32 to 49 for both cisplatin dosing regimens. They also showed significant thermal hypoalgesia in the bilateral hindpaws. In cisplatin-treated rats with paw withdrawal thresholds of up to 6 g, single bolus doses of gabapentin and morphine produced dose-dependent analgesia, whereas meloxicam and amitriptyline lacked efficacy. We have established and pharmacologically characterized a refined rat model of CIPN that is suitable for efficacy profiling of compounds from analgesic discovery programmes.

  19. BCG Induces Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in the Wistar Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Amit; Mathys, Vanessa; Kiass, Mehdi; Creusy, Colette; Delaire, Baptiste; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Dartois, Véronique; Kaplan, Gilla; Bifani, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the correlation of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-mediated immune responses and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still limited. We have recently characterized a Wistar rat model of experimental tuberculosis (TB). In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of BCG vaccination in this model. Upon Mtb challenge, BCG vaccinated rats controlled growth of the bacilli earlier than unvaccinated rats. Histopathology analysis of infected lungs demonstrated a reduced number of granulomatous lesions and lower parenchymal inflammation in vaccinated animals. Vaccine-mediated protection correlated with the rapid accumulation of antigen specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the infected lungs. Immunohistochemistry further revealed higher number of CD8+ cells in the pulmonary granulomas of vaccinated animals. Evaluation of pulmonary immune responses in vaccinated and Mtb infected rats by real time PCR at day 15 post-challenge showed reduced expression of genes responsible for negative regulation of Th1 immune responses. Thus, early protection observed in BCG vaccinated rats correlated with a similarly timed shift of immunity towards the Th1 type response. Our data support the importance of (i) the Th1-Th2 balance in the control of mycobacterial infection and (ii) the value of the Wistar rats in understanding the biology of TB. PMID:22162757

  20. Generation of muscular dystrophy model rats with a CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Fujii, Wataru; Tsuboi, Masaya; Tanihata, Jun; Teramoto, Naomi; Takeuchi, Shiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-07-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene encoding Dystrophin. DMD model animals, such as mdx mice and canine X-linked muscular dystrophy dogs, have been widely utilized in the development of a treatment for DMD. Here, we demonstrate the generation of Dmd-mutated rats using a clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system, an RNA-based genome engineering technique that is also adaptive to rats. We simultaneously targeted two exons in the rat Dmd gene, which resulted in the absence of Dystrophin expression in the F0 generation. Dmd-mutated rats exhibited a decline in muscle strength, and the emergence of degenerative/regenerative phenotypes in the skeletal muscle, heart, and diaphragm. These mutations were heritable by the next generation, and F1 male rats exhibited similar phenotypes in their skeletal muscles. These model rats should prove to be useful for developing therapeutic methods to treat DMD.

  1. Effect of adipose tissue-derived stem cell injection in a rat model of urethral fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sangkum, Premsant; Yafi, Faysal A.; Kim, Hogyoung; Bouljihad, Mostafa; Ranjan, Manish; Datta, Amrita; Mandava, Sree Harsha; Sikka, Suresh C; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the therapeutic effect of adi-pose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in a rat model of urethral fibrosis. Methods: Eighteen (18) male Sprague-Dawley rats (300‒350 g) were divided into three groups: (1) sham (saline injection); (2) urethral fibrosis group (10 μg transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) injection); and (3) ADSCs group (10 μg TGF-β1 injection plus 2 × 105 ADSCs). Rat ADSCs were harvested from rat inguinal fat pads. All study animals were euthanized at two weeks after urethral injection. Following euthanasia, rat urethral tissue was harvested for histologic evaluation. Type I and III collagen levels were quantitated by Western blot analysis. Results: TGF-β1 injection induced significant urethral fibrosis and increased collagen type I and III expression (p<0.05). Significant decrease in submucosal fibrosis and collagen type I and III expression were noted in the ADSCs group compared with the urethral fibrosis group (p<0.05). TGF-β1 induced fibrotic changes were ameliorated by injection of ADSCs. Conclusions: Local injection of ADSCs in a rat model of urethral fibrosis significantly decreased collagen type I and III. These findings suggest that ADSC injection may prevent scar formation and potentially serve as an adjunct treatment to increase the success rate of primary treatment for urethral stricture disease. Further animal and clinical studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27790299

  2. Daily sesame oil supplement attenuates joint pain by inhibiting muscular oxidative stress in osteoarthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sesame oil in controlling OA pain in rats. Rat joint pain was induced by medial meniscal transection in Sprague-Dawley rats and assessed by using hindlimb weight distribution method. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species and circulating antioxidants. Sesame oil significantly decreased joint pain compared with positive control group in a dose-dependent manner. Sesame oil decreased lipid peroxidation in muscle but not in serum. Further, sesame oil significantly decreased muscular superoxide anion and peroxynitrite generations but increased muscular glutathione and glutathione peroxidase levels. Further, sesame oil significantly increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor (Nrf2) expression compared with positive control group. We concluded that daily sesame oil supplement may attenuate early joint pain by inhibiting Nrf2-associated muscular oxidative stress in OA rat model.

  3. The alarm pheromone in male rats as a unique anxiety model: psychopharmacological evidence using anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2010-02-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that an alarm pheromone released from male donor Wistar rats evoked anxiety-related physiological and behavioral responses in recipient rats. Thus, we believe that this pheromone may increase anxiety levels in rats. In the current study, we evaluated the predictive validity of this alarm pheromone-induced anxiogenic effect in detail by investigating whether six types of human anxiolytics, each of which has a different mechanism of action, were efficacious in reducing anxiety, using changes in the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) as an index. The alarm pheromone-enhanced ASR was not affected by vehicle pretreatment but was dose-dependently attenuated by pretreatment with midazolam, phenelzine, propranolol, clonidine, and CP-154,526-although not buspirone. These results may reflect some aspects of the predictive validity of the alarm pheromone-induced anxiety in rats as an animal model of human anxiety.

  4. SYSTEMIC BIOMARKERS AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES OF RAT DISEASE MODELS EMPLOYED IN AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) models are used for identification of mechanisms of susceptibility to air pollution. We hypothesized that baseline systemic biomarkers and cardiac gene expression in CVD rat models will have influence on their ozone-induced lung inflammation. Male 12-...

  5. A Comparison of Neuroinflammation to Implanted Microelectrodes in Rat and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A.; Meador, William D.; Householder, Kyle T.; Buck, Amy C.; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G.; Anna, Jake P.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation following microelectrode implantation s between the rat and the mouse model. Our study suggests that subtle differences in the classic neuroinflammatory markers exist between the animal models at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Most notably, neuronal densities surrounding microelectrodes were significantly lower in the rat model at two weeks, while similar densities were observed between the animal models at sixteen weeks. Physiological differences between the species and slight alterations in surgical methods are likely key contributors to the observed differences. Moving forward, we propose that differences in the time course of neuroinflammation between the animal models should be considered when trying to understand and prevent intracortical microelectrode failure. PMID:24755527

  6. Comparison of Existing Clinical Scoring Systems in Predicting Severity and Prognoses of Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Sun, Rui Qing; Jia, Rong Rong; Ma, Xiu Ying; Cheng, Li; Tang, Mao Chun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is important to identify the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) in the early course of the disease. Clinical scoring systems may be helpful to predict the prognosis of patients with early AP; however, few analysts have forecast the accuracy of scoring systems for the prognosis in hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). The purpose of this study was to summarize the clinical characteristics of HLAP and compare the accuracy of conventional scoring systems in predicting the prognosis of HLAP. This study retrospectively analyzed all consecutively diagnosed AP patients between September 2008 and March 2014. We compared the clinical characteristics between HLAP and nonhyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. The bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (BISAP), Ranson, computed tomography severity index (CTSI), and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores were applied within 48 hours following admission. Of 909 AP patients, 129 (14.2%) had HLAP, 20 were classified as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), 8 had pseudocysts, 9 had pancreatic necrosis, 30 had pleural effusions, 33 had SIRS, 14 had persistent organ failure, and there was 1 death. Among the HLAP patients, the area under curves for BISAP, Ranson, SIRS, and CTSI in predicting SAP were 0.905, 0.938, 0.812, and 0.834, 0.874, 0.726, 0.668, and 0.848 for local complications, and 0.904, 0.917, 0.758, and 0.849 for organ failure, respectively. HLAP patients were characterized by younger age at onset, higher recurrence rate, and being more prone to pancreatic necrosis, organ failure, and SAP. BISAP, Ranson, SIRS, and CTSI all have accuracy in predicting the prognosis of HLAP patients, but each has different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:26061329

  7. A novel BET bromodomain inhibitor, RVX-208, shows reduction of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jahagirdar, Ravi; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Tobin, Jennifer; Attwell, Sarah; Yu, Raymond; Wu, Jin; McLure, Kevin G; Hansen, Henrik C; Wagner, Gregory S; Young, Peter R; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Wong, Norman C W; Johansson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Despite the benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular risk, a sizable proportion of patients still remain at risk. Since HDL reduces CVD risk through a process that involves formation of pre-beta particles that facilitates the removal of cholesterol from the lipid-laden macrophages in the arteries, inducing pre-beta particles, may reduce the risk of CVD. A novel BET bromodomain antagonist, RVX-208, was reported to raise apoA-I and increase preβ-HDL particles in non-human primates and humans. In the present study, we investigated the effect of RVX-208 on aortic lesion formation in hyperlipidemic apoE(-/-) mice. Oral treatments of apoE(-/-) mice with 150 mg/kg b.i.d RVX-208 for 12 weeks significantly reduced aortic lesion formation, accompanied by 2-fold increases in the levels of circulating HDL-C, and ∼50% decreases in LDL-C, although no significant changes in plasma apoA-I were observed. Circulating adhesion molecules as well as cytokines also showed significant reduction. Haptoglobin, a proinflammatory protein, known to bind with HDL/apoA-I, decreased >2.5-fold in the RVX-208 treated group. With a therapeutic dosing regimen in which mice were fed Western diet for 10 weeks to develop lesions followed by switching to a low fat diet and concurrent treatment with RVX-208 for 14 weeks, RVX-208 similarly reduced lesion formation by 39% in the whole aorta without significant changes in the plasma lipid parameters. RVX-208 significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines IP-10, MIP1(®) and MDC. These results show that the antiatherogenic activity of BET inhibitor, RVX-208, occurs via a combination of lipid changes and anti-inflammatory activities.

  8. Unexpected inhibition of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase by cholesterol in New Zealand white and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G; Salen, G; Shefer, S; Ness, G C; Nguyen, L B; Parker, T S; Chen, T S; Zhao, Z; Donnelly, T M; Tint, G S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cholesterol feeding on plasma cholesterol concentrations, hepatic activities and mRNA levels of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase and hepatic LDL receptor function and mRNA levels in 23 New Zealand White (NZW) and 17 Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. Plasma cholesterol concentrations were 9.9 times greater in WHHL than NZW rabbits and rose significantly in both groups when cholesterol was fed. Baseline liver cholesterol levels were 50% higher but rose only 26% in WHHL as compared with 3.6-fold increase with the cholesterol diet in NZW rabbits. In both rabbit groups, hepatic total HMG-CoA reductase activity was similar and declined > 60% without changing enzyme mRNA levels after cholesterol was fed. In NZW rabbits, cholesterol feeding inhibited LDL receptor function but not mRNA levels. As expected, receptor-mediated LDL binding was reduced in WHHL rabbits. Hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA levels were 2.8 and 10.4 times greater in NZW than WHHL rabbits. Unexpectedly, cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity was reduced 53% and mRNA levels were reduced 79% in NZW rabbits with 2% cholesterol feeding. These results demonstrate that WHHL as compared with NZW rabbits have markedly elevated plasma and higher liver cholesterol concentrations, less hepatic LDL receptor function, and very low hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA levels. Feeding cholesterol to NZW rabbits increased plasma and hepatic concentrations greatly, inhibited LDL receptor-mediated binding, and unexpectedly suppressed cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA to minimum levels similar to WHHL rabbits. Dietary cholesterol accumulates in the plasma of NZW rabbits, and WHHL rabbits are hypercholesterolemic because reduced LDL receptor function is combined with decreased catabolism of cholesterol to bile acids. Images PMID:7706454

  9. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Kissling, Grace E; Ledbetter, Allen D; Nyska, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. However, cross-model organ pathologies and clinical manifestations are often not compared. We hypothesized that genetic CVD rat models will exhibit baseline pathologies and will thus express varied lung response to acute ozone exposure. Male 12-14-week-old healthy Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WIS), and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone SH (SHSP), obese SH heart-failure (SHHF), obese diabetic JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h and clinical biomarkers, and lung, heart and kidney pathologies were compared immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Strain differences were observed between air-exposed CVD-prone and WKY rats in clinical biomarkers and in kidney and heart pathology. Serum cholesterol was higher in air-exposed obese SHHF and JCR compared to other air-exposed strains. Ozone did not produce lesions in the heart or kidney. CVD-prone and SD rats demonstrated glomerulopathy and kidney inflammation (WKY = WIS = SH < SD = SHSP < SHHF < JCR = FHH) regardless of ozone. Cardiac myofiber degeneration was evident in SH, SHHF, and JCR, while only JCR tends to have inflammation in coronaries. Lung pathology in air-exposed rats was minimal in all strains except JCR. Ozone induced variable alveolar histiocytosis and bronchiolar inflammation; JCR and SHHF were less affected. This study provides a comparative account of the clinical manifestations of disease and early-life organ pathologies in several rat models of CVD and their differential susceptibility to lung injury from air pollutant exposure.

  10. Rat model of cholelithiasis with human gallstones implanted in cholestasis-induced virtual gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Mulier, Stefaan; Li, Yue; Zhang, Jian; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate translational research on cholelithiasis, we have developed a rat model of human gallstones by exploiting the unique biliopancreatic features of this species. METHODS: Under anesthesia, 16 adult rats of equal genders underwent two times of abdominal surgery. First, their common bile duct (CBD) was ligated to cause cholestasis by total biliary obstruction (TBO). On day 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after TBO, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted to monitor the dilatation of the CBD, and blood was sampled to analyze total serum bilirubin (TSB). Secondly, on day 30, the abdomen was re-opened and gallstone(s) collected from human patients were implanted in the dilated CBD as a virtual gallbladder (VGB), which was closed by suture ligation. This rat cholelithiasis model was examined by MRI, clinical observation, microcholangiography and histology. RESULTS: All rats survived two laparotomies. After ligation, the CBD was dilated to a stable size of 4 to 30 mm in diameter on day 21-28, which became a VGB. The rats initially showed signs of jaundice that diminished over time, which paralleled with the evolving TSB levels from 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/dL before ligation, through a peak of 10.9 ± 1.9 mg/dL on day 14, until a nearly normalized value after day 28. The dilated CBD with thickened wall allowed an incision for implantation of human gallstones of 1-10 mm in diameter. The rat cholelithiasis was proven by in vivo MRI and postmortem microcholangiography and histomorphology. CONCLUSION: A rat model cholelithiasis with human gallstones has been established, which proves feasible, safe, reliable, nontoxic and cost-effective. Given the gallstones of human origin, applications of this model may be of help in translational research such as optical detection and lysis of gallstones by systemic drug administration. PMID:27376020

  11. Efficacy of Polaprezinc for Acute Radiation Proctitis in a Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Takada, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Tsuboi, Keita; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tanooka, Masao; Nakamura, Takeshi; Shikata, Toshiyuki; Tsujimura, Tohru; Hirota, Shozo

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to standardize the experimental rat model of radiation proctitis and to examine the efficacy of polaprezinc on radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 54 female Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were used. The rats were divided into three groups: those treated with polaprezinc (PZ+), those treated with base alone, exclusive of polaprezinc (PZ-), and those treated without any medication (control). All the rats were irradiated to the rectum. Polaprezinc was prepared as an ointment. The ointment was administered rectally each day after irradiation. All rats were killed on the 10th day after irradiation. The mucosal changes were evaluated endoscopically and pathologically. The results were graded from 0 to 4 and compared according to milder or more severe status, as applicable. Results: According to the endoscopic findings, the proportion of mild changes in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 71.4%, 25.0%, and 14.3% respectively. On pathologic examination, the proportion of low-grade findings in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 80.0%, 58.3%, and 42.9% for mucosal damage, 85.0%, 41.7%, and 42.9% for a mild degree of inflammation, and 50.0%, 33.3%, and 4.8% for a shallow depth of inflammation, respectively. The PZ+ group tended to have milder mucosal damage than the other groups, according to all criteria used. In addition, significant differences were observed between the PZ+ and control groups regarding the endoscopic findings, degree of inflammation, and depth of inflammation. Conclusions: This model was confirmed to be a useful experimental rat model for radiation proctitis. The results of the present study have demonstrated the efficacy of polaprezinc against acute radiation-induced rectal disorders using the rat model.

  12. Prophylactic neuroprotection by blueberry-enriched diet in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, François; Waterhouse, Jenna; Nason, Janette; Kalt, Wilhelmina

    2013-04-01

    The role of anthocyanins is controversial in vision health. This study investigates the impact of a blueberry-enriched diet as neuroprotectant in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy. Thirty-eight albino Wistar rats and 25 pigmented Brown-Norway rats were fed by gavage with long (7 weeks) and short (2 weeks) intervention with fortified blueberry juice (1 ml; 2.8 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents) or with a placebo solution (7 weeks) that contained the abundant nonanthocyanin blueberry phenolic, namely, chlorogenic acid, before being submitted to 2 hours of intense light regimen (1.8×10(4) lux). Retinal health was measured by fitting electroretinogram responses with the Naka-Rushton equation. The light-induced retinal damage was severe in the placebo groups, with the maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram being significantly reduced in both Wistar and Brown-Norway rats. The maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram was significantly protected from the light insult in the Wistar rats supplemented with blueberry juice for 7 or 2 weeks, and there was no significant difference between these two groups. The same dietary intervention in the Brown-Norway groups failed to protect the retina. Histological examination of retinal section confirmed the electroretinography results, showing protection of the outer nuclear layer of the retina in the Wistar rats fed with blueberries, while all placebo-fed rats and blueberry-fed Brown-Norway rats showed evidence of retinal damage concentrated in the superior hemiretina. The neuroprotective potential of anthocyanins in this particular model is discussed in terms of interaction with rhodopsin/phototransduction and in terms of antioxidative capacity.

  13. Repeated Moderate Noise Exposure in the Rat--an Early Adulthood Noise Exposure Model.

    PubMed

    Mannström, Paula; Kirkegaard, Mette; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of varying intensity levels of repeated moderate noise exposures on hearing. The aim was to define an appropriate intensity level that could be repeated several times without giving rise to a permanent hearing loss, and thus establish a model for early adulthood moderate noise exposure in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to broadband noise for 90 min, with a 50 % duty cycle at levels of 101, 104, 107, or 110 dB sound pressure level (SPL), and compared to a control group of non-exposed animals. Exposure was repeated every 6 weeks for a maximum of six repetitions or until a permanent hearing loss was observed. Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response (ABR). Rats exposed to the higher intensities of 107 and 110 dB SPL showed permanent threshold shifts following the first exposure, while rats exposed to 101 and 104 dB SPL could be exposed at least six times without a sustained change in hearing thresholds. ABR amplitudes decreased over time for all groups, including the non-exposed control group, while the latencies were unaffected. A possible change in noise susceptibility following the repeated moderate noise exposures was tested by subjecting the animals to high-intensity noise exposure of 110 dB for 4 h. Rats previously exposed repeatedly to 104 dB SPL were slightly more resistant to high-intensity noise exposure than non-exposed rats or rats exposed to 101 dB SPL. Repeated moderate exposure to 104 dB SPL broadband noise is a viable model for early adulthood noise exposure in rats and may be useful for the study of noise exposure on age-related hearing loss.

  14. Segmental Transarterial Embolization in a Translational Rat Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.F.; Hunt, Stephen J.; Harrison, Neil; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Weber, Charles; Pickup, Stephen; Furth, Emma E.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Soulen, Michael C.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant, minimally invasive technique for transarterial embolization in a translational rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Oral diethylnitrosamine was administered to 53 male Wistar rats ad libitum for 12 weeks. Tumor induction was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging. Minimally invasive lobar or segmental transarterial embolization was performed through a left common carotid artery approach. Necropsy was performed to evaluate periprocedural mortality. Histologic analysis of tumors that received embolization was performed to assess percent tumor necrosis. Results Severe cirrhosis and autochthonous HCCs were characterized in a cohort of rats composed of two groups of rats identically treated with diethylnitrosamine with median survival times of 101 days and 105 days (n = 10/group). A second cohort was used to develop minimally invasive transarterial embolization of HCCs (n = 10). In a third cohort, lobar embolization was successfully performed in 9 of 10 rats and demonstrated a high rate of periprocedural mortality (n = 5). Necropsy performed for periprocedural mortality after lobar embolization demonstrated extensive tissue necrosis within the liver (n = 3) and lungs (n = 2), indicating nontarget embolization as the likely cause of mortality. In a fourth cohort of rats, a segmental embolization technique was successfully applied in 10 of 13 rats. Segmental embolization resulted in a reduction in periprocedural mortality (P = .06) relative to selective embolization and a 19% increase in average tumor necrosis (P = .04). Conclusions Minimally invasive, segmental embolization mimicking the currently applied clinical approach is feasible in a translational rat model of HCC and offers the critical advantage of reduced nontarget embolization relative to lobar embolization. PMID:25863596

  15. Acute hyperglycemia induced by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia in rats: mechanisms and implications for preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Saha, Joy K; Xia, Jinqi; Grondin, Janet M; Engle, Steven K; Jakubowski, Joseph A

    2005-11-01

    The effects of anesthetic agents, commonly used in animal models, on blood glucose levels in fed and fasted rats were investigated. In fed Sprague-Dawley rats, ketamine (100 mg/kg)/xylazine (10 mg/kg) (KX) produced acute hyperglycemia (blood glucose 178.4 +/- 8.0 mg/dl) within 20 min. The baseline blood glucose levels (104.8 +/- 5.7 mg/dl) reached maximum levels (291.7 +/- 23.8 mg/dl) at 120 min. Ketamine alone did not elevate glucose levels in fed rats. Isoflurane also produced acute hyperglycemia similar to KX. Administration of pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in fed rats. In contrast, none of these anesthetic agents produced hyperglycemia in fasted rats. The acute hyperglycemic effect of KX in fed rats was associated with decreased plasma levels of insulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and corticosterone and increased levels of glucagon and growth hormone (GH). The acute hyperglycemic response to KX was dose-dependently inhibited by the specific alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine (1-4 mg/kg). KX-induced changes of glucoregulatory hormone levels such as insulin, GH, ACTH, and corticosterone were significantly altered by yohimbine, whereas the glucagon levels remained unaffected. In conclusion, the present study indicates that both KX and isoflurane produce acute hyperglycemia in fed rats. The effect of KX is mediated by modulation of the glucoregulatory hormones through stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in either fed or fasted rats. Based on these findings, it is suggested that caution needs to be taken when selecting anesthetic agents, and fed or fasted state of animals in studies of diabetic disease or other models where glucose and/or glucoregulatory hormone levels may influence outcome and thus interpretation. However, fed animals are of value when exploring the hyperglycemic response to anesthetic agents.

  16. Establishment and evaluation of an experimental rat model for high-altitude intestinal barrier injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Han; Zhou, Dai-Jun; Chen, Zhang; Zhou, Qi-Quan; Wu, Kui; Tian, Kun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Zhen-Liang

    2017-01-01

    In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model. To evaluate the model, bacterial translocation, serum lipopolysaccharide level, pathomorphology, ultrastructure and protein expression in rats were assessed. The results indicate that, compared with group C, the rate of bacterial translocation and the apoptotic index of intestinal epithelial cells were significantly higher in group H (P<0.01). Using a light microscope it was determined that the intestinal mucosa was thinner in group H, there were fewer epithelial cells present and the morphology was irregular. Observations with an electron microscope indicated that the intestinal epithelial cells in group H were injured, the spaces among intestinal villi were wider, the tight junctions among cells were open and lanthanum nitrate granules (from the fixing solution) had diffused into the intestinal mesenchyme. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin was also decreased in group H. Therefore, the methods applied in the present study enabled the establishment of a stable, high-altitude intestinal barrier injury model in rats. PMID:28352318

  17. Fused pulmonary lobes is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Nakano, Itsuko; Takahashi, Ken L.; Hojo, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) mutant rats exhibit similar phenotypes to Fraser syndrome. {yields} The fpl gene harbors a nonsense mutation in Fraser syndrome-associated gene Frem2. {yields} Fpl mutant is defined as a first model of human Fraser syndrome in rats. -- Abstract: Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) is a mutant gene that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and causes various developmental defects, including fusion of pulmonary lobes, and eyelid and digit anomalies in rats. Since these developmental defects closely resemble those observed in patients with Fraser syndrome, a recessive multiorgan disorder, and its model animals, we investigated whether the abnormal phenotypes observed in fpl/fpl mutant rats are attributable to a genetic disorder similar to Fraser syndrome. At the epidermal basement membrane in fpl/fpl mutant neonates, the expression of QBRICK, a basement membrane protein whose expression is attenuated in Fraser syndrome model mice, was greatly diminished compared with control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Fraser syndrome-related genes revealed that Frem2 transcripts were markedly diminished in QBRICK-negative embryos. Genomic DNA sequencing of the fpl/fpl mutant identified a nonsense mutation that introduced a stop codon at serine 2005 in Frem2. These findings indicate that the fpl mutant is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

  18. Screening for Cerebroprotective Agents Using an In Vivo Model of Cerebral Reversible Depolarization in Awake Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    19-12-2005 Article 1 1983-1993; 2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER SCREENING FOR CEREBROPROTECTIVE AGENTS USING AN IN VIVO MODEL OF... model . United States copyright, TXul 260-867. 2005 July 11. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Work was performed M. Bodo’s former work place. Article published...development of a model using hypoxic rats. In this model two outcome measures were used: 1) the time to reach isoelectric EEG, caused by nitrogen gas

  19. Efficacy of moclobemide in a rat model of neurotoxicant-induced edema.

    PubMed

    Girard, Philippe; Verniers, Danielle; Pansart, Yannick; Gillardin, Jean-Marie

    2007-05-01

    The potent antidepressant effect of moclobemide, a selective and reversible type A monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, is clinically established. In view of the ongoing debate on the neuroprotective properties of MAO inhibitors, the present study was undertaken to further define the protective effect of moclobemide in a rat model of neurotoxicant-induced edema. In this model, daily oral triethyltin (TET) administration for 5 consecutive days strongly perturbed the rat behaviour and induced a cerebral edema at the 5th day. Oral coadministration of moclobemide (2 x 100 mg.kg-1.day-1) with TET blocked the development of brain edema and the increase in the cerebral chloride content induced by TET. Moreover, moclobemide reduced the increase in the cerebral sodium content and attenuated the neurological deficit. In conclusion, moclobemide possesses potent protective properties in this rat model of cerebral edema, suggesting potential clinical utility as a neuroprotectant.

  20. Rethinking food anticipatory activity in the activity-based anorexia rat model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; van Kuyck, Kris; Tambuyzer, Tim; Luyten, Laura; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2014-01-29

    When a rat is on a limited fixed-time food schedule with full access to a running wheel (activity-based anorexia model, ABA), its activity level will increase hours prior to the feeding period. This activity, called food-anticipatory activity (FAA), is a hypothesized parallel to the hyperactivity symptom in human anorexia nervosa. To investigate in depth the characteristics of FAA, we retrospectively analyzed the level of FAA and activities during other periods in ABA rats. To our surprise, rats with the most body weight loss have the lowest level of FAA, which contradicts the previously established link between FAA and the severity of ABA symptoms. On the contrary, our study shows that postprandial activities are more directly related to weight loss. We conclude that FAA alone may not be sufficient to reflect model severity, and activities during other periods may be of potential value in studies using ABA model.

  1. An improved model to investigate the efficacy of antidyskinetic agents in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Spinnewyn, Brigitte; Charnet, Christelle; Cornet, Sylvie; Roubert, Véronique; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Auguet, Michel

    2011-10-01

    A number of experimental models of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia have been proposed, but these models result in a low to medium rate of dyskinetic animals with mild to severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to combine a model of 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonism and of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats to establish a reliable preclinical model. Two stereotaxic injections of 6-OHDA were administered in the left striatum. This model led to 90-100% of rats with a marked contralateral circling behaviour, significant limb use asymmetry (20%), a decrease in ipsilateral striatal dopamine content (70%) and degeneration of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (70%). Chronic treatment with L-DOPA was administered for 35 days and consisted of three phases with incremental daily doses. The third phase resulted in 83-90% of rats developing severe abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) which included limb and locomotive dyskinesia, axial dystonia and orolingual dyskinesia. Reproducibility of the model, criteria of strict blinding, placebo-controlled design, randomization of study subjects and pretrial determination of sample size were used to measure efficacy of amantadine and istradefylline and to validate the protocol design. Acute or subchronic post-treatment with amantadine reduced the severity of dyskinesia while istradefylline punctually attenuated AIMs. Our experimental conditions using gradual development of dyskinesia induced by increasing doses of L-DOPA resulted in a reliable model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia with a high rate of dyskinetic rats.

  2. Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Kim, Hyo J.; Haines, Wendy T.; Bruckner, James V.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-04-15

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC{sub 0-24h}) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

  3. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  4. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  5. Identifying Molecular Targets for Chemoprevention in a Rat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    parametric t-test was applied to each data set for each of the quantitated characteristics. The resulting p values are recorded above each pair of...and the development of PIN was difficult to estimate. The prostate samples did not show the two populations in continuity, nor was there a continuous... lycopene and curcumin on experimental rat prostate carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 2001;22:467-72. [19] Nelson CP, Kidd LC, Sauvageot J, Isaacs WB, De

  6. [Effect of semax and mexidol on brain ischemia models in rats].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, V V; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    It was established that semax and mexidol significantly reduced neurological deficiency and increased the survival in rats with model brain ischemia induced by the bilateral ligation of common carotid arteries. Mexidol exhibited a linear dose-effect relationship (in a range of doses from 30 to 120 mg/kg per day), while the effect of semax decreased with increasing dose (in a dose range from 0.3 to 1.2 mg/kg per day). Preventive course administration of semax and mexidol considerably reduced neurologic deficiency and amnesia in a step-down passive avoidance situation in rats with model brain ischemia caused by gravitation overload.

  7. AGN-2979, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase activation, does not affect serotonin synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a rat model of depression, but produces a significant effect in Flinders Resistant Line rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Nishi, Kyoko; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, is involved in several brain functions, including both normal, physiological functions, and pathophysiological functions. Alterations in any of the normal parameters of serotonergic neurotransmission can produce several different psychiatric disorders, including major depression. In many instances, brain neurochemical variables are not able to be studied properly in humans, thus making the use of good animal models extremely valuable. One of these animal models is the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) of rats, which has face, predictive and constructive validities in relation to human depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, on the FSL rats (rats with depression-like behaviour), and compare it to the effect on the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) of rats used as the control rats. The effect was evaluated by measuring changes in regional serotonin synthesis in the vehicle treated rats (FSL-VEH and FRL-VEH) relative to those measured in the AGN-2979 treated rats (FSL-AGN and FRL-AGN). Regional serotonin synthesis was measured autoradiographically in more than thirty brain regions. The measurements were performed using α-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan as the tracer. The results indicate that AGN-2979 did not produce a significant reduction of TPH activity in the AGN-2979 group relative to the vehicle group (a reduction would have been observed if there had been an activation of TPH by the experimental set up) in the FSL rats. On the other hand, there was a highly significant reduction of synthesis in the FRL rats treated by AGN-2979, relative to the vehicle group. Together, the results demonstrate that in the FSL rats, AGN-2979 does not affect serotonin synthesis. This suggests that there was no activation of TPH in the FSL rats during the experimental procedure, but such activation did occur in the FRL rats. Because of this finding, it could be

  8. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  9. Angiopoietin-1 Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis in a Rat Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Machein, Marcia Regina; Knedla, Anette; Knoth, Rolf; Wagner, Shawn; Neuschl, Elvira; Plate, Karl H.

    2004-01-01

    Angiopoietins have been implicated in playing an important role in blood vessel formation, remodeling, maturation, and maintenance. However, the role of angiopoietins in tumor angiogenesis remains uncertain. In this study, expression of human angiopoietin-1 (hAng-1) and angiopoietin (hAng-2) was amplified in the rat glioma cell line GS9L by stable transfection using an inducible tet-off system. Transfected cells were implanted intracerebrally into syngenic Fischer 344 rats. We demonstrated by means of magnetic resonance imaging that increased hAng-1 expression promoted a significant in vivo growth of intracerebral gliomas in rats. Overexpression of hAng-1 resulted in more numerous, more highly branched vessels, which were covered by pericytes. On the other hand, tumors derived from hAng-2-overexpressing cells were smaller than empty-plasmid control tumors. The tumor vasculature in these tumors was composed of aberrant small vascular cords, which were associated with few mural cells. Our results indicate that in the presence of hAng-1, tumors induce a more functional vascular network, which led to better tumor perfusion and growth. On the other hand, overexpression of hAng-2 led to less intact tumor vessels, inhibited capillary sprouting, and impaired tumor growth. PMID:15509526

  10. Novel Rat Model of Repetitive Portal Venous Embolization Mimicking Human Non-Cirrhotic Idiopathic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sabine; Hinüber, Christian; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Schierwagen, Robert; Uschner, Frank Erhard; Strassburg, Christian P.; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Spengler, Ulrich; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-cirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension (NCIPH) is characterized by splenomegaly, anemia and portal hypertension, while liver function is preserved. However, no animal models have been established yet. This study assessed a rat model of NCIPH and characterized the hemodynamics, and compared it to human NCIPH. Methods Portal pressure (PP) was measured invasively and coloured microspheres were injected in the ileocecal vein in rats. This procedure was performed weekly for 3 weeks (weekly embolization). Rats without and with single embolization served as controls. After four weeks (one week after last embolization), hemodynamics were investigated, hepatic fibrosis and accumulation of myofibroblasts were analysed. General characteristics, laboratory analyses and liver histology were collected in patients with NCIPH. Results Weekly embolization induced a hyperdynamic circulation, with increased PP. The mesenteric flow and hepatic hydroxyproline content was significantly higher in weekly embolized compared to single embolized rats (mesenteric flow +54.1%, hydroxyproline +41.7%). Mesenteric blood flow and shunt volumes increased, whereas splanchnic vascular resistance was decreased in the weekly embolization group. Fibrotic markers αSMA and Desmin were upregulated in weekly embolized rats. Discussion This study establishes a model using repetitive embolization via portal veins, comparable with human NCIPH and may serve to test new therapies. PMID:27589391

  11. Usefulness of a new gelatin glue sealant system for dural closure in a rat durotomy model.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shuko; Ikada, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Watertight dural closure is imperative after neurosurgical procedures, because inadequately treated leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can have serious consequences. We used a rat durotomy model to test the usefulness of a new gelatin glue as a dural sealant in a rat model of transdural CSF leakage. All rats were randomly divided into one of the following three treatment groups: no application (control group: N = 18), application of fibrin glue (fibrin glue group: N = 18), and application of the new gelatin glue (new gelatin glue group: N = 18). The craniotomy side was re-opened, and CSF leakage was checked and recorded at 1, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. The new gelatin glue was adequate for stopping CSF leakage; no leakage was observed at postoperative days 1 or 7, and leakage was observed in only one rat at postoperative day 28. This result was statistically significant when compared to the control group (P = 0.002, P = 0.015, P = 0.015, respectively). The pathologic score of the new gelatin group was not different from that of the control or fibrin glue groups. We conclude that our new gelatin glue provides effective watertight closure 1, 7, and 28 days after operation in the rat durotomy model.

  12. The development of a novel model of direct fracture healing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Savaridas, T.; Wallace, R. J.; Muir, A. Y.; Salter, D. M.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Small animal models of fracture repair primarily investigate indirect fracture healing via external callus formation. We present the first described rat model of direct fracture healing. Methods A rat tibial osteotomy was created and fixed with compression plating similar to that used in patients. The procedure was evaluated in 15 cadaver rats and then in vivo in ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Controls had osteotomies stabilised with a uniaxial external fixator that used the same surgical approach and relied on the same number and diameter of screw holes in bone. Results Fracture healing occurred without evidence of external callus on plain radiographs. At six weeks after fracture fixation, the mean stress at failure in a four-point bending test was 24.65 N/mm2 (sd 6.15). Histology revealed ‘cutting-cones’ traversing the fracture site. In controls where a uniaxial external fixator was used, bone healing occurred via external callus formation. Conclusions A simple, reproducible model of direct fracture healing in rat tibia that mimics clinical practice has been developed for use in future studies of direct fracture healing. PMID:23610660

  13. Prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaw by mucoperiosteal coverage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, J; Agholme, F; Aspenberg, P

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence for a link between the use of systemic bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). This condition has the appearance of chronic osteomyelitis, and antibiotics prevent the development of ONJ in animal models. Clinically, ONJ can sometimes be treated successfully by mucoperiosteal coverage. If ONJ is indeed primarily caused by bacterial infection, immediate coverage of the extraction alveolus might reduce the risk of ONJ developing in risk patients. Therefore, we studied whether immediate mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction could prevent the development of ONJ in a rat model. Thirty rats were randomly allocated to three groups (10 in each): (1) group I (controls): extraction, no drug treatment; (2) group II (non-coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate; (3) group III (coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate, plus coverage with a mucoperiosteal flap. Rats were examined for macroscopic ONJ-like wounds after 2 weeks. All animals in the non-coverage group developed large ONJ-like changes. The coverage and control groups showed an intact overlying mucosa in all rats. Findings were confirmed with histology. Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction in a rat model. This was prevented by immediate mucoperiosteal coverage. The risk of ONJ in patients using bisphosphonates might be reduced by mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction.

  14. A modified chronic ocular hypertension rat model for retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lichun

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to modify a chronic ocular hypertension (OHT) rat model to screen for potential compounds to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from responding to increased intraocular pressure (IOP). A total of 266 rats were prepared and randomly grouped according to different time-points, namely, weeks 3, 8, 16, and 24. Rats were sedated and eye examination was performed to score as the corneal damage on a scale of 1 to 4. The OHT rat model was created via the injection of a hypertonic saline solution into the episcleral veins once weekly for two weeks. OHT was identified when the IOP at week 0 was [Symbol: see text] 6 mmHg than that at week -2 for the same eye. Viable RGCs were labeled by injecting 4% FluoroGold. Rats were sacrificed, and the eyes were enucleated and fixed. The fixed retinas were dissected to prepare flat whole-mounts. The viable RGCs were visualized and imaged. The IOP (mean ± SD) was calculated, and data were analyzed by the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. The OHT model was created in 234 of 266 rats (87.97%), whereas 32 rats (12.03%) were removed from the study because of the absence of IOP elevation (11.28%) and/or corneal damage scores over 4 (0.75%). IOP was elevated by as much as 81.35% for 24 weeks. The average IOP was (16.68 ± 0.98) mmHg in non-OHT eyes (n = 234), but was (27.95 ± 0.97) mmHg in OHTeyes (n = 234). Viable RGCs in the OHT eyes were significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner by 29.41%, 38.24%, 55.32%, and 59.30% at weeks 3, 8, 16, and 24, respectively, as compared to viable RGCs in the non-OHT eyes (P < 0.05). The OHT model was successfully created in 88% of the rats. The IOP in the OHT eyes was elevated by approximately 81% for 24 weeks. The number of viable RGCs was decreased by 59% of the rats in a time-dependent manner. The modified OHT model may provide an effective and reliable method for screening drugs to protect RGCs from glaucoma.

  15. Serological validation of an alveolar echinococcosis rat model with a single hepatic lesion

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, Masamichi; IMAGAWA, Tomohiro; SAKO, Yasuhito; OKAMOTO, Munehiro; YANAGIDA, Tetsuya; OKAMOTO, Yoshiharu; TSUKA, Takeshi; OSAKI, Tomohiro; ITO, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Serology is important for the diagnosis and follow-up of human alveolar echinococcosis (AE). However, patient conditions are highly variable among those with AE, and antibody responses in serological follow-up have not been well-defined. We recently described a new AE rat model established by implantation of small AE tissue into a single arbitrary location in the liver; no metastasis and dissemination were observed. In the present study, we examined the serological characteristics in our rat model before and after surgical treatment. The results showed that antibody responses against crude antigens were increased at one month after transplantation and similar to those of other model animals. For the antigen Em18, antibody responses were slower in our rat model than in other animal models. After surgical resection, changes in antibody responses against Em18 were similar to those observed in human patients with AE. Because of the slow growth of lesions, establishment of a single hepatic lesion and patterns of antibody responses, our rat model may be useful for clarifying follow-up serodiagnoses in human AE and determining the mechanisms of multi-organ involvement by primary infection with oncospheres rather than metastasis. PMID:27890868

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation.

  17. Strong interactions between learned helplessness and risky decision-making in a rat gambling model

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, José N.; Hedayatmofidi, Parisa S.; Lobo, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Risky decision-making is characteristic of depression and of addictive disorders, including pathological gambling. However it is not clear whether a propensity to risky choices predisposes to depressive symptoms or whether the converse is the case. Here we tested the hypothesis that rats showing risky decision-making in a rat gambling task (rGT) would be more prone to depressive-like behaviour in the learned helplessness (LH) model. Results showed that baseline rGT choice behaviour did not predict escape deficits in the LH protocol. In contrast, exposure to the LH protocol resulted in a significant increase in risky rGT choices on retest. Unexpectedly, control rats subjected only to escapable stress in the LH protocol showed a subsequent decrease in riskier rGT choices. Further analyses indicated that the LH protocol affected primarily rats with high baseline levels of risky choices and that among these it had opposite effects in rats exposed to LH-inducing stress compared to rats exposed only to the escape trials. Together these findings suggest that while baseline risky decision making may not predict LH behaviour it interacts strongly with LH conditions in modulating subsequent decision-making behaviour. The suggested possibility that stress controllability may be a key factor should be further investigated. PMID:27857171

  18. Sensory and motor characterization in the postnatal valproate rat model of autism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stacey; Millette, Alexandre; Devine, Darragh P

    2012-01-01

    Although autism is diagnosed according to three core features of social deficits, communication impairments, and repetitive or stereotyped behaviors, other behavioral features such as sensory and motor impairments are present in more than 70% of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Exposure of rat pups to the teratogen valproate during sensitive periods of brain development has been shown to elicit behavioral features associated with autism diagnosis and has been proposed as a valid animal model of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to characterize sensory and motor performance in rats postnatally treated with valproate. Thirty-four rat pups were injected with either valproate (150 mg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 6-12. Auditory and tactile startle as well as auditory sensory gating was assessed during both the juvenile and adolescent stages of development; motor testing was conducted during late adolescence and included a sunflower seed eating task and a vermicelli handling task. Valproate-treated rats were underresponsive to auditory stimuli, showed deficits in auditory sensory gating, and demonstrated impairments in motor speed and performance. These findings suggest that postnatal valproate treatment elicits sensory and motor features often seen in individuals with ASD. Further, the hyposensitivity seen in postnatally valproate-treated rats contrasted with hypersensitivity previously reported in prenatally valproate-exposed rats. This suggests that timing of teratogenic exposure during early brain development may be important to consider when investigating the neurobiological basis of sensorimotor impairments in ASD.

  19. A truncated conical beam model for analysis of the vibration of rat whiskers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenyi; Kan, Qianhua; Kergrene, Kenan; Kang, Guozheng; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-08-09

    A truncated conical beam model is developed to study the vibration behaviour of a rat whisker. Translational and rotational springs are introduced to better represent the constraint conditions at the base of the whiskers in a living rat. Dimensional analysis shows that the natural frequency of a truncated conical beam with generic spring constraints at its ends is inversely proportional to the square root of the mass density. Under all the combinations of the classical free, pinned, sliding or fixed boundary conditions of a truncated conical beam, it is proved that the natural frequency can be expressed as f = α(rb/L(2))E/ρ and the frequency coefficient α only depends on the ratio of the radii at the two ends of the beam. The natural frequencies of a representative rat whisker are predicted for two typical situations: freely whisking in air and the tip touching an object. Our numerical results show that there exists a window where the natural frequencies of a rat whisker are very sensitive to the change of the rotational constraint at the base. This finding is also confirmed by the numerical results of 18 whiskers with their data available from literature. It can be concluded that the natural frequencies of a rat whisker can be adjusted within a wide range through manipulating the constraints of the follicle on the rat base by a behaving animal.

  20. Metabolic acetate therapy improves phenotype in the tremor rat model of Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Moffett, John R; Hamilton, Kristen; Grunberg, Neil E; Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Gahl, William A; Anikster, Yair; Mog, Steven; Hallows, William C; Denu, John M; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2010-06-01

    Genetic mutations that severely diminish the activity of aspartoacylase (ASPA) result in the fatal brain dysmyelinating disorder, Canavan disease. There is no effective treatment. ASPA produces free acetate from the concentrated brain metabolite, N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Because acetyl coenzyme A is a key building block for lipid synthesis, we postulated that the inability to catabolize NAA leads to a brain acetate deficiency during a critical period of CNS development, impairing myelination and possibly other aspects of brain development. We tested the hypothesis that acetate supplementation during postnatal myelination would ameliorate the severe phenotype associated with ASPA deficiency using the tremor rat model of Canavan disease. Glyceryltriacetate (GTA) was administered orally to tremor rats starting 7 days after birth, and was continued in food and water after weaning. Motor function, myelin lipids, and brain vacuolation were analyzed in GTA-treated and untreated tremor rats. Significant improvements were observed in motor performance and myelin galactocerebroside content in tremor rats treated with GTA. Further, brain vacuolation was modestly reduced, and these reductions were positively correlated with improved motor performance. We also examined the expression of the acetyl coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthase 1 and found upregulation of expression in tremor rats, with a return to near normal expression levels in GTA-treated tremor rats. These results confirm the critical role played by NAA-derived acetate in brain myelination and development, and demonstrate the potential usefulness of acetate therapy for the treatment of Canavan disease.

  1. A BBDR-HPT Axis Model for the Lactating Rat and Nursing Pup: Evaluation of Iodide Deficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for the lactating rat and pup hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is being developed to advance understanding of thyroid hormone disruptions and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). The model for the lactating rat and pup quanti...

  2. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of P23H line 1 rat model.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Elise; Dalkara, Deniz; Neuillé, Marion; Lechauve, Christophe; Michiels, Christelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Naash, Muna I; Lavail, Matthew M; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho) transgene in the wild-type (WT) Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1) and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3' UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing.

  3. The flinders sensitive line rat model of depression--25 years and still producing.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, David H; Wegener, Gregers

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 25 years have passed since the first publication suggesting the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rat as an animal model of depression. At least 6 years of research on these rats was completed before that seminal paper, and there has been a steady stream of publications (130+) over the years. The present review will focus on several issues not previously covered in earlier reviews, summarize the several lines of ongoing investigations, and propose a novel mechanism that accounts for a number of previously unexplained observations. A key observation in the FSL rat relates to the antidepressant (AD)-like effects of known and putative antidepressants. The FSL rat typically exhibits an AD-like effect in behavioral tests for AD-like activity following chronic (14 days) treatment, although some studies have found AD-like effects after fewer days of treatment. In other observations, exaggerated swim test immobility in the FSL rat has been found to have a maternal influence, as shown by cross-fostering studies and observations of maternal behavior; the implications of this finding are still to be determined. Ongoing or recently completed studies have been performed in the laboratories of Marko Diksic of Canada, Aleksander Mathé of Sweden, Gregers Wegener of Denmark, Brian Harvey of South Africa, Paul Pilowsky and Rod Irvine of Australia, and Gal Yadid of Israel. Jennifer Loftis of Portland, Oregon, and Lynette Daws of San Antonio, Texas, have been working with the FSL rats in the United States. A puzzling feature of the FSL rat is its sensitivity to multiple chemicals, and its greater sensitivity to a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action. It has been recently shown that each of these drugs feeds through G protein-coupled receptors to potassium-gated channels. Thus, an abnormality in the potassium channel could underlie the depressed-like behavior of the FSL rats.

  4. Liraglutide Improves Hypertension and Metabolic Perturbation in a Rat Model of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Vanessa; Bi, Jiangjiang; Mohankumar, Sheba M.; Vyas, Arpita K.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, with a prevalence of 5–8%. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are its long-term complications. Targeted therapies addressing both these complications together are lacking. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists that are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Hence we hypothesized that a GLP-1 agonist would improve both cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes in PCOS. To test this hypothesis, we used an established rat model of PCOS. Prepubertal female Sprague Dawley rats were sham-implanted or implanted s.c. with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) pellets (90 day release; 83μg/day). At 12 wks of age, sham implanted rats received saline injections and the DHT treated animals were administered either saline or liraglutide (0.2mg/kg s.c twice daily) for 4 weeks. Subgroups of rats were implanted with telemeters between 12-13 weeks of age to monitor blood pressure. DHT implanted rats had irregular estrus cycles and were significantly heavier than the control females at 12 weeks (mean± SEM 251.9±3.4 vs 216.8±3.4 respectively; p<0.05) and 4 weeks of treatment with liraglutide in DHT treated rats significantly decreased body weight (mean± SEM 294.75 ±3.2 in DHT+ saline vs 276.25±2.7 in DHT+ liraglutide group respectively; p<0.01). Liraglutide treatment in the DHT implanted rats significantly improved glucose excursion during oral glucose tolerance test (area under the curve: DHT+ saline 28674±310 vs 24990± 420 in DHT +liraglutide p <0.01). DHT rats were hypertensive and liraglutide treatment significantly improved mean arterial pressure. These results suggest that GLP-1 treatment could improve DHT–induced metabolic and blood pressure deficits associated with PCOS. PMID:26010091

  5. Experimental Testicular Torsion in a Rat Model: Effects of Treatment with Pausinystalia macroceras on Testis Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ikebuaso, Afamefuna Donatus; Yama, Oshiozokhai Eboetse; Duru, F.I.O.; Oyebadejo, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Testicular torsion is a medical emergency with catastrophic sequelae that deserves the same treatment considerations and concerted efforts in research as any other complicated medical condition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Pausinystalia macroceras (PM) bark extract on sperm quality and serum testosterone levels in testicular torsion in a rat model. Methods Sixty–five (65) mature male Wistar rats apportioned randomly into four experimental groups of A to C; were further divided into four subgroups according to duration of torsion. Group D were the normal regular rats. Each group/subgroup comprised five rats. Testis maintained in the torted position (T) for 1, 2, 3 and 4 hr in Group A (subgroups: AT1+PM, AT2+PM, AT3+PM, and AT4+PM). Group B (sub- groups: B1+PM, B2+PM, B3+PM, B4+PM) were sham–operated animals, which did not undergo torsion and served as the sham control group. Group C subgroups: CT1, CT2, CT3 and CT4 were torted as in A. All animals (except groups C and D) were treated by PM extract (0.1 g/kg b.w. per day) for 56 days. Group D rats were fed distilled water. Serum testosterone concentrations and sperm quality (motility and count) were measured. Analyses of variance with Scheffe's post-hoc test were carried out on the data. Results PM extract had a positive effect (significant; p < 0.5) on the sperm count and motility in rats with testicular torsion compared to those not receiving the extract. There was also an increase in serum testosterone levels in the former groups. Conclusion Treatment of rats following testicular torsion result to the enhancement of sperm production in comparison with untreated rats. PMID:23926549

  6. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide as a Novel Therapy to Control Chronic Visceral Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Lixia; Dai, Hengfen; Huang, Yang; Chen, Qianqian; Lin, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of multiple chronic visceral pain syndromes, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is not well known, and as a result current therapies are ineffective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of spinal protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ) on visceral pain sensitivity in rats with IBS to better understand the pathogenesis and investigate the effect of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) as a therapy for chronic visceral pain. Methods Visceral hypersensitivity rats were produced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). Visceral pain sensitivity was assessed by electromyographic (EMG) responses of abdominal muscles to colorectal distention (CRD). Spinal PKMζ and phosphorylated PKMζ (p-PKMζ) were detected by western blot. Varying doses of ZIP were intrathecally administered to investigate the role of spinal PKMζ in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. The open field test was used to determine if ZIP therapy causes spontaneous motor activity side effects. Results Graded CRD pressure significantly increased EMG responses in NMS rats compared to control rats (p < 0.05). p-PKMζ expression increased in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral spinal cord in the IBS-like rats with notable concomitant chronic visceral pain compared to control rats (p < 0.05). EMG data revealed that intrathecal ZIP injection (1, 5, and 10 μg) dose-dependently attenuated visceral pain hypersensitivity in IBS-like rats. Conclusions Phosphorylated PKMζ may be involved in the spinal central sensitization of chronic visceral hypersensitivity in IBS, and administration of ZIP could effectively treat chronic visceral pain with good outcomes in rat models. PMID:27776136

  7. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity.

  8. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of P23H Line 1 Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Elise; Dalkara, Deniz; Neuillé, Marion; Lechauve, Christophe; Michiels, Christelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Naash, Muna I.; Lavail, Matthew M.; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho) transgene in the wild-type (WT) Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1) and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3’ UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing. PMID:26009893

  9. Protective role of adiponectin in a rat model of intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu-Hui; Yang, Yue-Wu; Dai, Hai-Tao; Cai, Song-Wang; Chen, Rui-Han; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the potential protective role of adiponectin in intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. METHODS: A rat model of intestinal I/R injury was established. The serum level of adiponectin in rats with intestinal I/R injury was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also measured by ELISA. Apoptosis of intestinal cells was detected using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and villous injury scores were also measured. RESULTS: Adiponectin was downregulated in the serum of rats with intestinal I/R injury compared with sham rats. No significant changes in the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 and adiponectin receptor 2 were found between sham and I/R rats. Pre-treatment with recombinant adiponectin attenuated intestinal I/R injury. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in rats with intestinal I/R injury was reduced by adiponectin pre-treatment. The production of MDA was inhibited, and the release of SOD was restored by adiponectin pre-treatment in rats with intestinal I/R injury. Adiponectin pre-treatment also inhibited cell apoptosis in these rats. Treatment with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway inhibitor, compound C, or the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inhibitor, Snpp, attenuated the protective effects of adiponectin against intestinal I/R injury. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin exhibits protective effects against intestinal I/R injury, which may involve the AMPK/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26715807

  10. Evaluation of the Effects of Cucumis sativus Seed Extract on Serum Lipids in Adult Hyperlipidemic Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Rasool; Hashemi, Mohammad; Farazmand, Alimohammad; Asghari, Gholamreza; Heshmat-Ghahdarijani, Kiyan; Kharazmkia, Ali; Ghanadian, Syed Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis; therefore, control of this risk factor is very important in preventing atherosclerosis. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seed is used traditionally as a lipid-lowering nutritional supplement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cucumber seed extract on serum lipid profile in adult patients with mild hyperlipidemia. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, hyperlipidemic patients with inclusion criteria were randomly and equally assigned to either Cucumis or placebo groups and used one medicinal or placebo capsule, respectively, once daily with food for 6 wk. Body mass index (BMI) as well as fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) were measured for all patients pre- and post-intervention and finally the changes were compared between the groups. Twenty-four patients in Cucumis group and 23 patients in placebo group completed the study. Cucumis seed extract resulted in significant reduction of total cholesterol (P = 0.016), LDL-C (P < 0.001), TG (P < 0.001), and BMI (P < 0.001) as well as significant increase of HDL-C (P = 0.012) compared to placebo. In conclusion, the consumption of C. sativus seed extract with daily dose of 500 mg results in desirable effects on serum lipid profile in adult hyperlipidemic patients. Therefore, cucumber seed could be considered as a food supplement for treatment of dyslipidemia.

  11. The rationality of the hypolipidemic effect of alismatis rhizoma decoction, a classical chinese medicine formula in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengwu; Huang, Xiaofei; Lu, Kungang; Peng, Min; Yu, Shanggong; Fang, Nianbai

    2014-01-01

    Alismatis Rhizoma Decoction (ARD) is a classical Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula for treatment of vertigo with its long history of successful clinical effect. Since vertigo is a symptom of hyperlipidemia, this study aimed at evaluating the hypolipidemic effect of ARD in hyperlipidemic mice induced by high fat diet (HFD) and investigated the rationality of formula combination of Alismatis Rhizoma (AR) and Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR). Compared with control group, hyperlipidemic mice in AR and ARD groups displayed a reduction of the following parameters: body weight, liver and serum total cholesterol, triglyceride concentration, liver and spleen coefficients, activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT); whereas the serum HDL-cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in both AR and ARD groups. AR and ARD treatments significantly down regulated the expressions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) and sterol regulatory element binding factor-2 (SREBF-2). These findings clearly provided evidences that the suppression on biosynthesis of cholesterol in liver may in part contribute to the hypolipidemic effects of ARD and AR. Since no significantly hypolipidemic effect of AMR was observed, the more prominent effect of ARD than that of AR indicated synergistic effects of AR and AMR, and confirmed the rationality of ARD formula.

  12. Virgin Olive Oil Enriched with Its Own Phenols or Complemented with Thyme Phenols Improves DNA Protection against Oxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in Hyperlipidemic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Marta; Rubió, Laura; Sánchez-Martos, Vanessa; Castañer, Olga; de la Torre, Rafael; Valls, Rosa M; Ras, Rosa; Pedret, Anna; Catalán, Úrsula; López de las Hazas, María del Carmen; Motilva, María J; Fitó, Montserrat; Solà, Rosa; Giralt, Montserrat

    2016-03-09

    The effects of virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with its own phenolic compounds (PC) and/or thyme PC on the protection against oxidative DNA damage and antioxidant endogenous enzymatic system (AEES) were estimated in 33 hyperlipidemic subjects after the consumption of VOO, VOO enriched with its own PC (FVOO), or VOO complemented with thyme PC (FVOOT). Compared to pre-intervention, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker for DNA damage) decreased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in olive and thyme phenolic metabolites. Superoxide dismutase (AEES enzyme) significantly increased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in thyme phenolic metabolites. When all three oils were compared, FVOOT appeared to have the greatest effect in protecting against oxidative DNA damage and improving AEES. The sustained intake of a FVOOT improves DNA protection against oxidation and AEES probably due to a greater bioavailability of thyme PC in hyperlipidemic subjects.

  13. Royal jelly prevents osteoporosis in rats: beneficial effects in ovariectomy model and in bone tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Saburo; Okamoto, Yoshizo; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Nakatsuma, Akira; Hashimoto, Ken; Ohnishi, S Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2006-09-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) has been used worldwide for many years as medical products, health foods and cosmetics. Since RJ contains testosterone and has steroid hormone-type activities, we hypothesized that it may have beneficial effects on osteoporosis. We used both an ovariectomized rat model and a tissue culture model. Rats were divided into eight groups as follows: sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomized (OVX), OVX given 0.5% (w/w) raw RJ, OVX given 2.0% (w/w) RJ, OVX given 0.5% (w/w) protease-treated RJ (pRJ), OVX given 2.0% (w/w) pRJ, OVX given 17beta-estradiol and OVX given its vehicle, respectively. The Ovariectomy decreased tibial bone mineral density (BMD) by 24%. Administration of 17beta-estradiol to OVX rats recovered the tibial BMD decrease by 100%. Administration of 2.0% (w/w) RJ and 0.5-2.0% (w/w) pRJ to OVX rats recovered it by 85% or more. These results indicate that both RJ and pRJ are almost as effective as 17beta-estradiol in preventing the development of bone loss induced by ovariectomy in rats. In tissue culture models, both RJ and pRJ increased calcium contents in femoral-diaphyseal and femoral-metaphyseal tissue cultures obtained from normal male rats. However, in a mouse marrow culture model, they neither inhibited the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-induced calcium loss nor affected the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by PTH in mouse marrow culture system. Therefore, our results suggest that both RJ and pRJ may prevent osteoporosis by enhancing intestinal calcium absorption, but not by directly antagonizing the action of PTH.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of hemorheological and hemodynamic properties using a rat extracorporeal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon; CenterBiofluid; Biomimetics Research Team

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are closely related with the variations of hemorheological and hemodynamic properties. Accurate measurement of these properties is essential for early diagnosis of CVDs. However, in vitro measurements have technical limitation for the accurate measurement because in vitro exposure can change hemorheological properties. To resolve this problem, a rat extracorporeal model which connects the artery and vein in a rat was employed in this study. Blood flows in the rat extracorporeal model were visualized by an ultrasound imaging system and microfluidic devices for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties. As a result, the system can be effectively used to measure blood viscosity, red blood cell aggregation and flow rate under ex vivo conditions. The present results would be helpful to develop a diagnostic modality for monitoring the variations in hemorheological and hemodynamic parameters. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea Government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  15. Protective effects and mechanism of TPX2 on neurocyte apoptosis of rats in Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Keshan; Zhang, Jingling; Yin, Chengbin; Zhou, Xueying; Zhou, Shengnian

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the protective effects and mechanism of TPX2 on apoptosis of rat neurocytes. A total of 90 SD rats were randomly divided into the drug group, the control group and the blank group, with 30 rats in each group. The rats in the drug group and in the blank group were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate (at the dose of 0.5 ml/100 g) and Aβ1-42, with the concentration of 5 µl (1 µg/µl), was injected in the exact position of bilateral hippocampal areas of rats to establish the model. The configured TPX2 inhibitors and edible benne oil were mixed and made into a suspension. After model establishment, the rats were given different treatment methods; the rats in the drug group were given gavage administration in the proportion of 75 mg/kg once a day. The rats in the control group were given intragastric administration with the same proportion of physiological saline once a day. The blank group was the normal healthy group and the rats in this group did not undergo any surgery or drug treatment. Brain tissue in rats were divided into two parts, one part was fixed, dehydrated, paraffin-embedded and made into slices of approximately 5 µm. TUNEL staining was used to examine the apoptosis of brain tissue, H&E staining was used to observe the brain tissue cells of each group, and western blotting for detecting the MAPK, Erk and expression levels of p38 and RT-polymerase chain reaction method was employed to examine mRNA expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p21. After one week, TUNEL staining showed that apoptosis of brain tissue in the drug group was significantly greater than those of the control and blank groups. The protein expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p38 were significantly higher than those of the control group and the normal healthy group; the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Western blotting showed that the protein expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p38 of the drug group were significantly lower than those of the control group

  16. Protective effects and mechanism of TPX2 on neurocyte apoptosis of rats in Alzheimer's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Keshan; Zhang, Jingling; Yin, Chengbin; Zhou, Xueying; Zhou, Shengnian

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects and mechanism of TPX2 on apoptosis of rat neurocytes. A total of 90 SD rats were randomly divided into the drug group, the control group and the blank group, with 30 rats in each group. The rats in the drug group and in the blank group were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate (at the dose of 0.5 ml/100 g) and Aβ1–42, with the concentration of 5 µl (1 µg/µl), was injected in the exact position of bilateral hippocampal areas of rats to establish the model. The configured TPX2 inhibitors and edible benne oil were mixed and made into a suspension. After model establishment, the rats were given different treatment methods; the rats in the drug group were given gavage administration in the proportion of 75 mg/kg once a day. The rats in the control group were given intragastric administration with the same proportion of physiological saline once a day. The blank group was the normal healthy group and the rats in this group did not undergo any surgery or drug treatment. Brain tissue in rats were divided into two parts, one part was fixed, dehydrated, paraffin-embedded and made into slices of approximately 5 µm. TUNEL staining was used to examine the apoptosis of brain tissue, H&E staining was used to observe the brain tissue cells of each group, and western blotting for detecting the MAPK, Erk and expression levels of p38 and RT-polymerase chain reaction method was employed to examine mRNA expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p21. After one week, TUNEL staining showed that apoptosis of brain tissue in the drug group was significantly greater than those of the control and blank groups. The protein expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p38 were significantly higher than those of the control group and the normal healthy group; the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Western blotting showed that the protein expression levels of MAPK, Erk and p38 of the drug group were significantly lower than those of the control

  17. Evidence for TRPA1 involvement in central neural mechanisms in a rat model of dry eye.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, A; Thompson, R; Rahman, M; Okamoto, K; Bereiter, D A

    2015-04-02

    Dry eye (DE) disease is commonly associated with ocular surface inflammation, an unstable tear film and symptoms of irritation. However, little is known about the role of central neural mechanisms in DE. This study used a model for persistent aqueous tear deficiency, exorbital gland removal, to assess the effects of mustard oil (MO), a transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA1) agonist, on eyeblink and eyewipe behavior and Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) in the trigeminal brainstem of male rats. Spontaneous tear secretion was reduced by about 50% and spontaneous eyeblinks were increased more than 100% in DE rats compared to sham rats. MO (0.02-0.2%) caused dose-related increases in eyeblink and forelimb eyewipe behavior in DE and sham rats. Exorbital gland removal alone was sufficient to increase Fos-LI at the ventrolateral pole of trigeminal interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition region, but not at more caudal regions of the trigeminal brainstem. Under barbiturate anesthesia ocular surface application of MO (2-20%) produced Fos-LI in the Vi/Vc transition, in the mid-portions of Vc and in the trigeminal caudalis/upper cervical spinal cord (Vc/C1) region that was significantly greater in DE rats than in sham controls. MO caused an increase in Fos-LI ipsilaterally in superficial laminae at the mid-Vc and Vc/C1 regions in a dose-dependent manner. Smaller, but significant, increases in Fos-LI also were seen in the contralateral Vc/C1 region in DE rats. TRPA1 protein levels in trigeminal ganglia from DE rats ipsilateral and contralateral to gland removal were similar. Persistent tear reduction enhanced the behavioral and trigeminal brainstem neural responses to ocular surface stimulation by MO. These results suggested that TRPA1 mechanisms play a significant role in the sensitization of ocular-responsive trigeminal brainstem neurons in this model for tear deficient DE.

  18. Cyclosporin A significantly improves preeclampsia signs and suppresses inflammation in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bihui; Yang, Jinying; Huang, Qian; Bao, Junjie; Brennecke, Shaun Patrick; Liu, Huishu

    2016-05-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with an increased inflammatory response. Immune suppression might be an effective treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, improves clinical characteristics of preeclampsia and suppresses inflammation in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced preeclampsia rat model. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group 1 (PE) rats each received LPS via tail vein on gestational day (GD) 14; group 2 (PE+CsA5) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (5mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 3 (PE+CsA10) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (10mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 4 (pregnant control, PC) rats were treated with the vehicle (saline) used for groups 1, 2 and 3. Systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin, biometric parameters and the levels of serum cytokines were measured on day 20. CsA treatment significantly reduced LPS-induced systolic blood pressure and the mean 24-h urinary albumin excretion. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the LPS treatment group but were reduced in (LPS+CsA) group (P<0.05). Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 was decreased in the LPS group but was increased in (LPS+CsA) group (P<0.05). Cyclosporine A improved preeclampsia signs and attenuated inflammatory responses in the LPS induced preeclampsia rat model which suggests that immunosuppressant might be an alternative management option for preeclampsia.

  19. Effect of Zofenopril on regeneration of sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Zofenopril is an antioxidant agent which has been shown to have beneficial effects in hypertension and heart failure. The aim of this study was to test the effects of Zofenopril on nerve regeneration and scarring in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Methods Twenty-one adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a surgical procedure involving right sciatic nerve crush injury. 15 mg/kg Zofenopril was administered orally to seven rats in group Z for seven days. Seven rats in group S received saline orally for seven days. Seven rats in the control group C received no drug after crush injury. Fourteenth and 42nd days after injury, functional and electromyography assessments of nerves were performed. Functional recovery was analyzed using a walking track assessment, and quantified using the sciatic functional index (SFI). After these evaluations, all rats were sacrificed and microscopic evaluations were performed. Results The Sciatic functional Index (SFI) in group Z on 14th day is different significantly from group S and group C (p = 0.037). But on 42nd day there was no difference between groups (p = 0.278). The statistical analyses of electromyelographic (EMG) studies showed that the latency in group Z is significantly different from group S (p = 0.006) and group C (p = 0.045). But on 42nd day there was no difference between groups like SFI (p = 0.147). The amplitude was evaluated better in group Z than others (p < 0.05). In microscopic evaluation, we observed the highest number of nerve regeneration in the group Z and the lowest in the group C. But it was not significant statistically. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Zofenopril promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve injuries in rat models. PMID:19508704

  20. Impaired Decision Making and Loss of Inhibitory-Control in a Rat Model of Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    El Massioui, Nicole; Lamirault, Charlotte; Yagüe, Sara; Adjeroud, Najia; Garces, Daniel; Maillard, Alexis; Tallot, Lucille; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Riess, Olaf; Allain, Philippe; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; von Hörsten, Stephan; Doyère, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with Huntington disease (HD) are generally dominated by executive function disorders often associated with disinhibition and impulsivity/compulsivity. Few studies have directly examined symptoms and consequences of behavioral disinhibition in HD and its relation with decision-making. To assess the different forms of impulsivity in a transgenic model of HD (tgHD rats), two tasks assessing cognitive/choice impulsivity were used: risky decision-making with a rat gambling task (RGT) and intertemporal choices with a delay discounting task (DD). To assess waiting or action impulsivity the differential reinforcement of low rate of responding task (DRL) was used. In parallel, the volume as well as cellular activity of the amygdala was analyzed. In contrast to WT rats, 15 months old tgHD rats exhibited a poor efficiency in the RGT task with difficulties to choose advantageous options, a steep DD curve as delays increased in the DD task and a high rate of premature and bursts responses in the DRL task. tgHD rats also demonstrated a concomitant and correlated presence of both action and cognitive/choice impulsivity in contrast to wild type (WT) animals. Moreover, a reduced volume associated with an increased basal cellular activity of the central nucleus of amygdala indicated a dysfunctional amygdala in tgHD rats, which could underlie inhibitory dyscontrol. In conclusion, tgHD rats are a good model for impulsivity disorder that could be used more widely to identify potential pharmacotherapies to treat these invasive symptoms in HD. PMID:27833538

  1. Antihyperalgesic effects of imidazoline I2 receptor ligands in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Thorn, David A; Qiu, Yanyan; Peng, Bi-Wen; Zhang, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A new imidazoline I2 receptor ligand, CR4056, is effective for chronic inflammatory pain and diabetic neuropathy. However, it is unclear whether other I2 receptor ligands have similar effects and whether antinociceptive tolerance develops with repeated treatment. Experimental Approach The Von Frey filament test was used to measure mechanical hyperalgesia and the plantar test to measure thermal hyperalgesia in rats injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) treatment or had undergone surgery to induce chronic constriction injury (CCI), models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain respectively. The effects of morphine and I2 receptor ligands, 2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and CR4056, 3.2–32 mg·kg−1, i.p., on hyperalgesia or affective pain (as measured by a place escape/avoidance paradigm) were studied in separate experiments. Key Results Morphine and the I2 receptor ligands (2-BFI, BU224 and tracizoline) all dose-dependently attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CFA-treated rats. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of 2-BFI in CFA-treated and CCI rats were attenuated by the I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan. The combination of 2-BFI and morphine produced additive effects against mechanical hyperalgesia in CFA-treated rats. Repeated treatment (daily for 7–9 days) with 2-BFI or CR4056 did not produce antinociceptive tolerance in CFA-treated or CCI rats. Morphine and the I2 receptor ligands (2-BFI, BU224 and CR4056) were all effective at attenuating place escape/avoidance behaviour in CFA-treated rats. Conclusions and Implications Imidazoline I2 receptor ligands have antihyperalgesic effects in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and may represent a new class of pharmacotherapeutics for the management of chronic pain. PMID:24329196

  2. Tianeptine exerts neuroprotective effects in the brain tissue of rats exposed to the chronic stress model.

    PubMed

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Antunes, Altamir R; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Zappelinni, Giovanni; Steckert, Amanda V; Vuolo, Francieli; Galant, Letícia S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Kapczinski, Flávio; Quevedo, João

    2012-12-01

    Animal models of chronic stress represent valuable tools by which to investigate the behavioral, endocrine and neurobiological changes underlying stress-related psychopathologies, such as major depression, and the efficacy of antidepressant therapies. The present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical effects of the antidepressant tianeptine in rats exposed to the chronic stress model. To this aim, rats were subjected to 40days of chronic unpredictable stressful stimuli, after which the animals received saline or tianeptine (15mg/kg) once a day for 7days. Additionally, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α levels and oxidative stress parameters were assessed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HPC), amygdala (AMY) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in all of the experimental groups studied. The results indicated that chronic mild stress and tianeptine did not exercise any effects on cytokines in all of the structures studied; in the PFC and AMY thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels were decreased in control rats treated with tianeptine in the HPC; superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was found to have decreased in stressed rats treated with saline in the PFC, HPC, AMY and NAc, and tianeptine reversed this effect; catalase (CAT) activity was found to have decreased in the PFC, HPC and NAc of stressed rats treated with saline, but was shown to have increased in stressed rats treated with tianeptine, and tianeptine also reversed the decreases in CAT activity in stressed rats treated with saline, suggesting that tianeptine exerted antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the present findings open new vistas on the pharmacological activity of tianeptine, in particular, concerning its ability to attenuate oxidative stress.

  3. A rat model of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia carries a missense mutation in the Edaradd gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a congenital disorder characterized by sparse hair, oligodontia, and inability to sweat. It is caused by mutations in any of three Eda pathway genes: ectodysplasin (Eda), Eda receptor (Edar), and Edar-associated death domain (Edaradd), which encode ligand, receptor, and intracellular adaptor molecule, respectively. The Eda signaling pathway activates NF-κB, which is central to ectodermal differentiation. Although the causative genes and the molecular pathway affecting HED have been identified, no curative treatment for HED has been established. Previously, we found a rat spontaneous mutation that caused defects in hair follicles and named it sparse-and-wavy (swh). Here, we have established the swh rat as the first rat model of HED and successfully identified the swh mutation. Results The swh/swh rat showed sparse hair, abnormal morphology of teeth, and absence of sweat glands. The ectoderm-derived glands, meibomian, preputial, and tongue glands, were absent. We mapped the swh mutation to the most telomeric part of rat Chr 7 and found a Pro153Ser missense mutation in the Edaradd gene. This mutation was located in the death domain of EDARADD, which is crucial for signal transduction and resulted in failure to activate NF-κB. Conclusions These findings suggest that swh is a loss-of-function mutation in the rat Edaradd and indicate that the swh/swh rat would be an excellent animal model of HED that could be used to investigate the pathological basis of the disease and the development of new therapies. PMID:22013926

  4. Studies on the pathogenicity of anaerobes, especially Prevotella bivia, in a rat pyometra model.

    PubMed Central

    Mikamo, H; Kawazoe, K; Izumi, K; Watanabe, K; Ueno, K; Tamaya, T

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prevotella bivia is one of the anaerobic bacteria that resides in the flora of the female genital tract. We studied the pathogenicity of P. bivia in a rat pyometra model. METHODS: The experimental animal (rat) model of pyometra was developed to investigate the pathogenicity of P. bivia in a rat pyometra model. RESULTS: In the groups inoculated with aerobes alone, the infection rate was 10% (1/10) in the Staphylococcus aureus- or Staphylococcus agalactiae-inoculated group and 20% (2/10) in the Escherichia coli-inoculated group. Infection was not established in the groups inoculated with anaerobes alone. High infection rates were observed in all the mixed-infection groups. In the S. agalactiae- and Bacteroides fragilis-, S. agalactiae- and P. bivia-, F. coli- and B. fragilis-, and E. coli- and P. bivia-inoculated groups, an infection rate of 100% (10/10) was demonstrated. The efficacy of antibiotics such as flomoxef (FMOX) could be determined using a rat pyometra model. In relation to the alteration of vaginal microbial flora during the menstrual cycle, estrogen increased the growth of P. bivia. CONCLUSION: Mixture of aerobic bacteria and P. bivia increased the pathogenicity of P. bivia. Estrogen would be useful for raising up the inflammatory change of the uterus in experimental models of genital tract infection due to P. bivia. PMID:9702587

  5. Depressive-like symptoms in a reserpine-induced model of fibromyalgia in rats.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Escrihuela-Vidal, Francesc; González-Soler, Eva M; Martínez-Expósito, Fernando; Blasco-Ausina, M Carmen; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Valverde-Navarro, Alfonso A

    2015-11-01

    Since the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia is unknown, treatment options are limited, ineffective and in fact based on symptom relief. A recently proposed rat model of fibromyalgia is based on central depletion of monamines caused by reserpine administration. This model showed widespread musculoskeletal pain and depressive-like symptoms, but the methodology used to measure such symptoms has been criticized. Evidence relates the high prevalence of pain and depression in fibromyalgia to common pathogenic pathways, most probably focused on the monoaminergic system. The present study aims at a validation of the reserpine model of fibromyalgia. For this purpose, rats undergoing this model have been tested for depressive-like symptoms with a Novelty-Suppressed Feeding Test adaptation. Animals administered with reserpine and subjected to forced food deprivation performed a smaller number of incursions to the center of the open field, evidenced by a decrease in the per-minute rate of the rats' approaching, smelling or touching the food. They also took more time to eat from the central food than control rats. These NSFT findings suggest the presence of depressive-like disorders in this animal model of fibromyalgia.

  6. A Custom Rat and Baboon Hypertension Gene Array to Compare Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Carrie A.; Glenn, Jeremy P.; Shade, Robert E.; Kammerer, Candace M.; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Fink, Gregory D.; Haywood, Joseph R.; Cox, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    One challenge in understanding the polygenic disease of hypertension is elucidating the genes involved and defining responses to environmental factors. Many studies focus on animal models of hypertension; however, this does not necessarily extrapolate to humans. Current technology and cost limitations are prohibitive in fully evaluating hypertension within humans. Thus, we have designed a single array platform that allows direct comparison of genes relevant to hypertension in animal models and non-human primates/human hypertension. The custom array is targeted to 328 genes known to be potentially related to blood pressure control. Studies compared gene expression in the kidney from normotensive rats and baboons. We found 74 genes expressed in both the rat and baboon kidney, 41 genes expressed in the rat kidney that were not detected in the baboon kidney and 34 genes expression in the baboon kidney that were not detected in the rat kidney. To begin the evaluation of the array in a pathological condition, kidney gene expression was compared between the salt sensitive DOCA rat model of hypertension and sham animals. Gene expression in renal cortex and medulla from hypertensive DOCA compared with sham rats revealed 3 genes differentially expressed in the renal cortex: Annexin A1 (up-regulated; relative intensity: 1.316 ± 0.321 vs. 2.312 ± 0.283), Glutamate-cysteine ligase (down-regulated; relative intensity: 3.738 ± 0.174 vs. 2.645 ± 0.364) and Glutathione-S transferase (down-regulated; relative intensity: 5.572 ± 0.246 vs. 4.215 ± 0.411) and 21 genes differentially expressed in renal medulla. Interestingly, few genes were differentially expressed in the kidney in the DOCA-salt model of hypertension; this may suggest that the complexity of hypertension may be the result of only a few gene-by-environment responsive events. PMID:22228705

  7. Effects of Astragalus polysaccharides on memory impairment in a diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Changping; Liu, Junqian; Qiu, Fucheng; Wu, Xueda; Wang, Yakun; Zhao, Yongyan; Gu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) are active constituents of Astragalus membranaceus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of APS on memory impairment in a diabetic rat model and their mechanisms. Methods A diabetic model was established in 50 male Wistar rats with streptozotocin intra-peritoneal injection. A blood glucose level higher than 16.7 mmol/L obtained 72 hours after the injection was regarded as a successful diabetic model. The modeled rats were divided into model group, high, medium, and low doses of APS, and piracetam groups (positive control). A group of ten rats without streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used as a normal control. After respective consecutive 8-week treatments, the levels of blood fasting plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, memory performance, hippocampal malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase were determined. Results After the 8-week APS treatment, serum fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin levels were decreased compared with those of the model group (P<0.05). Importantly, memory impairment in the diabetic model was reversed by APS treatments. In addition, hippocampal malondialdehyde concentration was lowered, whereas that of superoxide dismutase was higher after APS treatments. Conclusion APS are important active components responsible for memory improvement in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The potential mechanism of action is associated with the effects of APS on glucose and lipid metabolism, and antioxidative and insulin resistance. APS are constituents of A. membranaceus that are potential candidate therapeutic agents for the treatment of memory deficit in diabetes. PMID:27445477

  8. Manifestation of Hyperandrogenism in the Continuous Light Exposure-Induced PCOS Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuezhi; Jia, Lina; Shen, Xueyong

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder, and its pathogenesis has yet to be completely clarified. A fully convincing animal model has not been established for PCOS. In earlier studies, researchers have shown that the exposure of rats to continuous light can induce PCOS; nevertheless, hyperandrogenism, a key characteristic observed in human PCOS, has not been reported previously. In the present study, we found that (1) body weights decreased in female rats in a continuous light environment with both ovarian and uterine augmentation; (2) the estrous cycle in rats under continuous light environment was disordered, and polycystic ovary-like changes occurred, accompanied with fur loss and lethargy; and (3) serum testosterone levels in rats in a continuous light environment significantly increased. Our data suggest that continuous light can lead to the occurrence of PCOS in female rats without the need for drugs; this is a reasonable PCOS animal model that is more consistent with the natural disease state in humans; and poor sleep habits or negligence of sleep hygiene may be an important lifestyle factor in pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:26064969

  9. The effect of clonidine pretreatment on epidural resiniferatoxin in a neuropathic pain rat model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Dong Kyu; Huh, Billy K; Choi, Sang Sik; Kim, Hee Zoo; Lim, Byung Gun; Kim, Hong Soon; Choi, Yun Suk; Hur, Won Seok; Lee, Mi Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is an ultrapotent synthetic TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist with significant initial transient hyperalgesia followed by a prolonged analgesic effect in response to thermal stimulus. Using a rat model of neuropathic pain, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with clonidine-which has been shown to relieve intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia-on the initial hyperalgesic response and the thermal analgesic property of RTX. Thirty-six male rats were divided into 6 treatment groups (n=6 each):RTX 500 ng, RTX 1 μg, clonidine 20 μg (Cl), Cl+RTX 500 ng, Cl+RTX 1 μg, or normal saline 20 μL (control). We evaluated the short-term (180 min) and long-term (20 days) analgesic effects of RTX after thermal stimulation and mechanical stimulation. RTX had significant initial transient hyperalgesia followed by a prolonged analgesic effect in response to the thermal stimulus, but the RTX 500 ng and RTX 1 μg groups showed no initial short-term thermal hyperalgesic responses when pretreated with clonidine. The Cl+RTX 1 μg rats' behavior scores indicated that they were more calm and comfortable compared to the RTX 1 μg rats. Even though we cannot precisely confirm that pretreatment with clonidine potentiates or adds to the analgesic effect of RTX, clonidine pretreatment with epidural RTX eliminated the initial RTX-associated hyperalgesic response and systemic toxicity in this neuropathic pain rat model.

  10. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  11. Early Detection of Tibial Cartilage Degradation and Cancellous Bone Loss in an Ovariectomized Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinong; Liu, Zhiwei; Chen, Wufan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate degradation of the articular cartilage and loss of the cancellous bone in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model simulating early human menopausal stage. Fourteen health female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups (n = 7 per group): an OVX group that underwent bilateral ovariectomy to create an OVX model with low estrogen levels and a sham group in which only the periovarian fatty tissue was exteriorized. All the animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks after ovariectomy. The left tibiae were harvested. The articular cartilage at medial tibial plateau (MTP) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP) was assessed with quantitative high-frequency ultrasound. The cancellous bone was evaluated with micro-CT. The results indicated that, in comparison with the sham rats, the OVX rats exhibited significant alterations in acoustic parameters of the articular cartilage but insignificant changes in microarchitectural parameters of the cancellous bone in early stage of low estrogen levels. The results of this study suggest that cartilage degradation induced by estrogen reduction was detected earlier with quantitative ultrasound than that of the cancellous bone loss in 3 wk OVX rats. PMID:28182095

  12. The effects of pentoxifylline adminstration on fracture healing in a postmenopausal osteoporotic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Vashghani Farahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahadi, Reza; Abdollahifar, Mohammadamin

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies report positive effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) alone or in combination with other drugs on some pathologic bone diseases as well as an ability to accelerate osteogensis and fracture healing in both animal models and human patients. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the effects of PTX administration on Hounsfield unit and bone strength at catabolic response (bone resorbing) of a fracture in an experimental rat model of ovariectomy induced osteoporosis (OVX-D). Thirty adult female rats were divided into groups as follows: 1 (OVX, control, no treatment); 2 (OVX, sham: daily distilled water); 3 (OVX, daily alendronate: 3 mg/kg); 4 (OVX, twice daily 100 mg/kg PTX) and 5 (OVX, PTX+alenderonate). OVX was induced by bilateral ovariectomy in all rats. A complete standardized osteotomy of the right femur was made after 3.5 months. PTX and alendronate treatments were performed for eight weeks. Then, rats were euthanized and had its right femur subjected to computerized tomography scanning for measuring Hounsfield unit; eventually, the samples were sent for a three point bending test for evaluation of the bone strength. Administration of PTX with 200 mg/kg and alendronate alone and in combination showed no significant alteration in Hounsfield unit and biomechanical properties of repairing callus of the complete osteotomy compared with the control group. Results showed increased bending stiffness and stress high load mean values of repairing complete osteotomy in PTX-treated rats compared to the control OVX-D.

  13. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  14. Functional MRI and neural responses in a rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Herman, Peter; Behar, Kevin L.; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that brain plaques and tangles can affect cortical functions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus modify functional activity, we investigated functional responses in an AD rat model (called the Samaritan Alzheimer’s rat achieved by ventricular infusion of amyloid peptide) and age-matched healthy control. High-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and extracellular neural activity measurements were applied to characterize sensory-evoked responses. Electrical stimulation of the forepaw led to BOLD and neural responses in the contralateral somatosensory cortex and thalamus. In AD brain we noted much smaller BOLD activation patterns in the somatosensory cortex (i.e., about 50% less activated voxels compared to normal brain). While magnitudes of BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex were markedly attenuated in AD rats compared to normal rats (by about 50%), the dynamic coupling between the BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex, as assessed by transfer function analysis, remained unaltered between the groups. However thalamic BOLD and neural responses were unaltered in AD brain compared to controls. Thus cortical responses in the AD model were indeed diminished compared to controls, but the thalamic responses in the AD and control rats were quite similar. Therefore these results suggest that Alzheimer’s disease may affect cortical function more than subcortical function, which may have implications for interpreting altered human brain functional responses in fMRI studies of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23648961

  15. Bamboo leaf extract improves spatial learning ability in a rat model with senile dementia*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-xiang; Zhu, Min-ying; Feng, Ci-yuan; Ding, Hai-bin; Zhan, Ying; Zhao, Zhan; Ding, Yue-min

    2015-01-01

    Senile dementia (SD) is a syndrome characterized by progressive neurological deterioration. Treatment for the disease is still under investigation. Bamboo leaf extract (B-extract) has been known for its biological efficacy in anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, study on B-extract for its protection against dementia is very limited. The effect of B-extract on a rat model with SD was examined. B-extract improved spatial learning ability of the dementia rats. The hippocampus of dementia model rats showed reduced levels of acetylcholine (ACh), epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA), and increased activities of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO). Treatment with B-extract 20 mg/(kg·d) for 7 weeks significantly inhibited the enzyme activity compared with untreated dementia rats, and raised the levels of ACh, E, and DA in the hippocampus. In addition, treatment with B-extract elevated the level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but reduced the level of glutamate (Glu) in the brain. These data suggest that B-extract might be a potential drug in treating impairment of spatial memory in dementia rats by regulating the central neurotransmitter function. PMID:26160717

  16. The Interaction of Intramuscular Ketorolac (Toradol) and Concussion in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Amanda O; Sherman, Sarah S; Bir, Cynthia A; Lemos, Stephen E

    2017-02-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction of a single dose of Toradol and head impact in an in vivo rat model for sport-related concussion using a validated rat concussion model. Thirty-five Sprague-Dawley rats were placed into one of four groups: (1) Control, (2) Impact Only, (3) Toradol Only, (4) Impact and Toradol. Animals in the impact groups were subjected to a single head impact. Animals in the Toradol group received a single intramuscular injection of Toradol prior to impact. We examined magnetic resonance imaging, serum S100-B and cognitive function using a Morris Water Maze. In the control group, latency decreased significantly from day 0 (74.9 s) to 24 h (57.4 s) after anesthesia. There was no statistically significant difference between time zero and 24 h after impact in the Impact only or Impact and Toradol group. Our findings indicate that there were no differences between cognitive ability, MRI findings or S100B in rats that were administered a single dose of Toradol and subjected to a single impact and rats that were subjected to a single impact only. In both impact groups there were transient changes in cognitive ability as measured by the Morris Water Maze.

  17. [The model specification of the period without recurrences in rats after Pliss lymphosarcoma resection].

    PubMed

    Samsoniia, M D; Lesnovskaia, E E; Gibradze, O T; Kandelaki, M A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to make an experimental model of the period without recurrences in rats after Pliss lymphosarcoma (PLS) resection. Experiments were carried out on white low-bred male rats (n=109). For the tumor transinoculation the rats received subcutaneously 0.2 ml of the aseptic 50% suspension of PLS prepared according to the standards on saline without antibiotic addition. The injections were done in the right abdomen region. The animals were classified into three groups. Group 1 was used for control. An operation of lymphosarcoma resection was carried out on the rats from group 2 on the fifth day from the tumor inoculation. The tumor in the animals from group 3 was dissected on 12-22nd day from its inoculation. At the same time the specification of the duration of the period without recurrences was estimated in every group. According to the suggested method the Pliss lymphosarcoma resection significantly increases the life duration of operated rats that proves the efficiency of surgical interventions. The absence of intraoperative and postoperative lethality on the fifth day from the Pliss lymphosarcoma resection and 100% animal death resulting from the recurrences makes the proposed model potentially suitable for the investigation of adjuvant methods that are used in the treatment of cancer.

  18. Does diclofenac increase the risk of cervical necrotizing fasciitis in a rat model?

    PubMed

    Eter, Elie G; Khazzaka, Aline; Mneimneh, Wadad; Karam-Sarkis, Dolla; Haddad, Amine; Sarkis, Riad

    2009-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known for aggravating in vitro infections and were reported in many cases of cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF). We developed a rat model of CNF, mimicking as closely as possible the human-CNF, to study the effect of a NSAIDs, diclofenac, as a promoting factor. Twenty rats were injected bilaterally in the neck with peptostreptococcus and with a fresh saliva specimen for another 20 rats. Half of each group was given an intramuscular injection of 4 mg/kg diclofenac at the time of inoculation and 24 h later, and the other half saline injections; rats were killed at day 7 and clinical, bacterial and histological studies were performed to assess the infectious process and the incidence of CNF. No statistically significant difference was found between groups treated with diclofenac vs. the saline injection groups. However a significant correlation was noted between clinical observation, bacterial density and histological signs of inflammation. CNF has a high mortality rate and the use of NSAIDs in conditions potentially leading to CNF is very common. However, our rat model does not support the hypothesis of a promoting role of diclofenac which was occasionally suggested in the medical literature. This study suggests that diclofenac does not seem to increase the risk of occurrence of CNF. Nonetheless, NSAIDs can mask inflammatory signs of an already spreading CNF.

  19. Application of Mathematical Modelling as a Tool to Analyze the EEG Signals in Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Pandey, A. K.; Patnaik, R.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper envisages the application of mathematical modelling with the autoregressive (AR) model method as a tool to analyze electroencephalogram data in rat subjects of transient focal cerebral ischemia. This modelling method was used to determine the frequencies and characteristic changes in brain waveforms which occur as a result of disorders or fluctuating physiological states. This method of analysis was utilized to ensure actual correlation of the different mathematical paradigms. The EEG data was obtained from different regions of the rat brain and was modelled by AR method in a MATLAB platform. AR modelling was utilized to study the long-term functional outcomes of a stroke and also is preferable for EEG signal analysis because the signals consist of discrete frequency intervals. Modern spectral analysis, namely AR spectrum analysis, was used to correlate the conditional and prevalent changes in brain function in response to a stroke.

  20. A rat EEG model for evaluating contrast media neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Adams, M D; Hopkins, R M; Ferrendelli, J A

    1988-09-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) effects of intracisternally administered x-ray contrast media were evaluated in rats as a means of assessing neurotoxicity. Rats were ventilated with a mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen (70/30) sufficient to maintain light anesthesia/analgesia and neuromuscular blockade was induced to prevent movement artifacts. A femoral artery was catheterized for monitoring arterial blood pressure (BP), heart rate, blood gases, and pH. Four 22-gauge stainless steel needle electrodes were inserted underneath the scalp for recording EEG. Approximately 1 hour after the start of EEG recording, test agents were injected via the cisterna magna and rats were placed in a 20 degrees head-down position. EEG and BP were monitored continuously for up to 160 minutes postinjection. Blood gases and pH were monitored periodically. The effects of meglumine iothalamate (IOT), metrizamide (MET), iogulamide (IOG), and ioversol (IOV) were compared at dose levels from 30 to 240 mgI/kg. Normal saline was injected as a control substance and caused no changes in EEG, blood gases, pH, and BP for up to 160 minutes postinjection. IOT (30 mg I/kg) produced profound EEG effects consistent with epileptogenic activity, followed by slowing and subsequent death in 3 of 4 animals. Metrizamide had minimal EEG effects at 30 mg I/kg but at 60 mg I/kg, and 120 mg I/kg produced moderate to severe EEG changes including epileptiform patterns and death in 33% of animals. IOV caused mild EEG abnormalities in 4 of 12 animals at 120 mg I/kg, mild EEG abnormalities in 6 of 11 animals, and moderate EEG abnormalities in 1 of 11 animals at 240 mg I/kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Downing, Laura E; Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Wong, Brian S; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Del Rey, Fernando; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as important mechanisms for

  2. Lycopene in the prevention of renal cell cancer in the TSC2 mutant Eker rat model.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Cross, Brian; Sahin, Nurhan; Ciccone, Karina; Suleiman, Shadeah; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Master, Viraj; Harris, Wayne; Carthon, Bradley; Mohammad, Ramzi; Bilir, Birdal; Wertz, Karin; Moreno, Carlos S; Walker, Cheryl L; Kucuk, Omer

    2015-04-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent upper urinary tract cancer in humans and accounts for 80-85% of malignant renal tumors. Eker rat represents a unique animal model to study RCC since these rats develop spontaneous renal tumors and leiomyoma, which may be due to tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) mutation resulting in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. This study examines the role of a lycopene-rich diet in the development of RCC in the TSC2 mutant Eker rat model. Ten-week old female Eker rats (n=90) were assigned in equal numbers to receive 0, 100 or 200mg/kg of lycopene as part of their daily diet. After 18 months the rats were sacrificed and the kidneys were removed. Immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against mTOR, phospho-S6 and EGFR were performed, as well as hematoxylin-eosin staining for histologic examination of the tumors. Tumors were counted and measured in individual kidneys. Presence of tumor decreased from 94% in control animals to 65% in the experimental group, but the difference was not statistically significant (P<0.12). However, mean numbers of renal carcinomas were statistically significantly decreased in the lycopene-treated rats (P<0.008) when compared to untreated controls. In the lycopene group, tumor numbers decreased (P<0.002) and the numbers tended to decrease linearly (P<0.003) as supplemental lycopene increased from 0 to 200. Control rats fed only basal diet had a greater length of tumors (23.98 mm) than rats fed lycopene supplement groups (12.90 mm and 11.07 mm) (P<0.05). Moreover tumor length decreased (P<0.02) and tumor length tended to decrease linearly (P<0.03) as supplemental lycopene increased from 0 to 200mg/kg. All tumors showed strong staining with antibodies against mTOR, phospho-S6 and EGFR. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with lycopene attenuates the development of renal cell cancers in the predisposed TSC2 mutant Eker rat model. These results suggest that lycopene may

  3. Procaine Attenuates Pain Behaviors of Neuropathic Pain Model Rats Possibly via Inhibiting JAK2/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghua; Yan, Yurong; Yu, Lingzhi; Duan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NPP) is the main culprit among chronic pains affecting the normal life of patients. Procaine is a frequently-used local anesthesia with multiple efficacies in various diseases. However, its role in modulating NPP has not been reported yet. This study aims at uncovering the role of procaine in NPP. Rats were pretreated with procaine by intrathecal injection. Then NPP rat model was induced by sciatic nerve chronic compression injury (CCI) and behavior tests were performed to analyze the pain behaviors upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations. Spinal expression of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. JAK2 was also overexpressed in procaine treated model rats for behavior tests. Results showed that procaine pretreatment improved the pain behaviors of model rats upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations, with the best effect occurring on the 15th day post model construction (p<0.05). Procaine also inhibited JAK2 and STAT3 expression in both mRNA (p<0.05) and protein levels. Overexpression of JAK2 increased STAT3 level and reversed the improvement effects of procaine in pain behaviors (p<0.01). These findings indicate that procaine is capable of attenuating NPP, suggesting procaine is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating NPP. Its role may be associated with the inhibition on JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27530113

  4. Strain Differences in Antioxidants in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the hypothesis that antioxidant substances and enzymes in lung, heart and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) are altered in response to 03 in cardiovascular disease and/or metabolic syndrome (CVD)-prone rat models. CVD strains [spontaneously hypertensive (SH), SH ...

  5. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  6. ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    Linskey, C.F.1, Harrison, R.A.2., Zhao, G.3., Barton, H.A., Lipscomb, J.C4., and Evans, M.V2., 1UNC, ESE, Chapel Hill, NC ; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 3 UN...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DELTAMETHRIN IN DEVELOPING SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work describes the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, in the developing male Sprague-Dawley rat. Generalized Michaelis-Menten equations were used to calculate metabolic rate constants and organ weights ...

  8. Bisphenol A Induces Hepatotoxicity through Oxidative Stress in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Zeinab K.; Elobeid, Mai A.; Virk, Promy; Omer, Sawsan A.; ElAmin, Maha; Daghestani, Maha H.; AlOlayan, Ebtisam M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cytotoxic agents that lead to significant oxidative damage. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a contaminant with increasing exposure to it and exerts both toxic and estrogenic effects on mammalian cells. Due to limited information concerning the effect of BPA on liver, this study investigates whether BPA causes hepatotoxicity by induction of oxidative stress in liver. Rats were divided into five groups: The first four groups, BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 50 mg/kg/day) were administrated orally to rats for four weeks. The fifth group was taken water with vehicle. The final body weights in the 0.1 mg group showed a significant decrease compared to control group. Significant decreased levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase activity were found in the 50 mg BPA group compared to control groups. High dose of BPA (50 mg/kg) significantly increased the biochemical levels of ALT, ALP and total bilirubin. BPA effect on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control. Data from this study demonstrate that BPA generate ROS and reduce the antioxidant gene expression that causes hepatotoxicity. PMID:22888396

  9. Evaluation of the relationship between hyperinsulinaemia and myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Solskov, Lasse; Løfgren, Bo; Pold, Rasmus; Kristiansen, Steen B; Nielsen, Torsten T; Overstreet, David H; Schmitz, Ole; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Lund, Sten; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-11-09

    Major depression is associated with medical co-morbidity, such as ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The FSL (Flinders Sensitive Line) rat is a genetic animal model of depression exhibiting features similar to those of depressed individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the myocardial responsiveness to I/R (ischaemia/reperfusion) injury and the effects of IPC (ischaemic preconditioning) in hearts from FSL rats using SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats as controls and to characterize differences in glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity between FSL and SD rats. Hearts were perfused in a Langendorff model and were subjected or not to IPC before 40 min of global ischaemia, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was found to be significantly larger in the FSL rats than in the SD rats following I/R injury (62.4+/-4.2 compared with 46.9+/-2.9%; P<0.05). IPC reduced the infarct size (P<0.01) and improved haemodynamic function (P<0.01) in both FSL and SD rats. No significant difference was found in blood glucose levels between the two groups measured after 12 h of fasting, but fasting plasma insulin (70.1+/-8.9 compared with 40.9+/-4.7 pmol/l; P<0.05) and the HOMA (homoeostatic model assessment) index (P<0.01) were significantly higher in FSL rats compared with SD rats. In conclusion, FSL rats had larger infarct sizes following I/R injury and were found to be hyperinsulinaemic compared with SD rats, but appeared to have a maintained cardioprotective mechanism against I/R injury, as IPC reduced infarct size in these rats. This animal model may be useful in future studies when examining the mechanisms that contribute to the cardiovascular complications associated with depression.

  10. Cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica regulates the diabetic and hyperlipidemic signs of high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Ciou, Jiun-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Ho, Hui-Ya

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism in high-fat (HF)-fed mice of cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica (TA), which contains a great number of pentacyclic terpenoids. Firstly, C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet (n = 9), whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was orally given TA or rosiglitazone or not for 4 weeks. Blood and visceral adipose tissue, liver tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Treatment with TA reduced body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT) (including epididymal, perirenal, mesenteric WAT and visceral fat), and hepatic triacylglycerol content significantly without affecting food intake in diet-induced diabetic mice. TA effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, leptin and HOMA-IR index (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively) and attenuated insulin resistance. Treatment with TA, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. TA effectively significantly increased the protein contents of phosphorylation of AMPK-α (Thr172) both in liver and adipose tissue. It is shown that TA exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by decreasing gene expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of triglycerides, and antidiabetic properties occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) down- regulation, improved insulin sensitization and TA (at 1.0 g/kg dose) decreased expression of hepatic and adipose 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11β-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Futhermore, TA at doses of 0

  11. First surgical tumour reduction of peritoneal surface malignancy in a rat's model.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Kilian, Maik; Atanassov, Vladimir; Braumann, Chris; Ordemann, Juergen; Jacobi, Christoph A

    2008-01-01

    Surgical therapy of peritoneal surface malignancy from colorectal origin in combination with Hyperthermic Intraoperative Peritoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) has now become an established treatment approach in very few specialised centres. A peritonectomy procedure is possible to perform with additional HIPEC in patients. An experimental model to simulate peritonectomy procedure and HIPEC does not exist so far in rats. Nevertheless, animal models seem to be very important for evaluation of new therapeutic opportunities and toxicity of different multimodal therapies. In a first step we analysed the surgical tumour debulking of peritoneal surface malignancy in rats. A peritoneal surface malignancy from colonic origin was induced in 75 male BD IX rats. Twenty one days after induction of peritoneal surface malignancy rats were randomised and animals intend to create an operation with surgical tumour debulking. There was no tumour growth in two animals. The aim of the peritonectomy procedure was the complete tumour reduction. In this study the results of the surgical approach will be described. A complete tumour reduction (R0) was achieved in 34 animals. In 39 rats a macroscopic tumour deposit was left behind (R2). The intraoperative experimental Peritoneal Cancer Index (ePCI) was used to describe tumour weight and number of tumour inoculations. Both parameters were found to be dependent factors of complete tumour reduction. Six animals died due to therapeutical interventions. Surgical tumour debulking in rats with peritoneal surface malignancy is possible with high reliability and a low mortality rate. This animal model could be an important step for investigation of multimodal treatment options and toxicity in treatment regimens of peritoneal surface malignancy.

  12. The JCR:LA-cp rat: a novel model for impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Barbara S; Ghahary, Aziz; Scott, Paul G; Iwashina, Takashi; Demare, Jack; Russell, James C; Tredget, Edward E

    2004-01-01

    JCR:LA-cp/cp obese rats and their lean controls were evaluated as a type 2 diabetic wound healing model and the healing quality was characterized. This model of insulin resistance has been used extensively to study atherosclerosis but has not previously been used to study wound healing. Six circular excisional wounds were made on the dorsum of each rat and followed to day 21. Tracings of the wounds were made and used to assess the rate of wound closure. Planimetry showed a significantly diminished contraction of wounds in obese rats, but no significant difference in reepithelialization was observed. Collagen content was determined from the hydroxyproline content in wounded and unwounded skin. There were significantly lower levels of hydroxyproline in the wounds of obese compared to lean animals at day 21. Histology showed adipose tissue in place of dermal tissue in the JCR:LA-cp/cp rat in both unwounded tissue and in the wound at day 21. Active transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) was measured in the serum using the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1/luciferase assay and serum total TGF-beta was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Active TGF-beta was significantly higher in the serum of obese animals compared with lean animals, while total TGF-beta 1 was not significantly different between the groups. Both active and total TGF-beta was measured in tissue sections using the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1/luciferase assay. There was no significant difference in active TGF-beta between genotypes, while obese rats had significantly higher levels of total TGF-beta at day 21. These results indicate a deficiency in wound healing in obese animals characterized by decreased wound contraction, decreased collagen production, and changes in histology. The JCR:LA-cp rat develops insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and early type 2 diabetes and may be a good model for impairment of wound healing in humans with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Chronic prostatic infection and inflammation by Propionibacterium acnes in a rat prostate infection model.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Drott, Johanna Bergh; Laurantzon, Lovisa; Laurantzon, Oscar; Bergh, Anders; Elgh, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the prostate, seen as infiltration of inflammatory cells into the prostate gland in histological samples, affects approximately half the male population without indication of prostate disease, and is almost ubiquitous in patients diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia and cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes to be frequently present in prostate tissue from men suffering from prostate disease. P. acnes has been shown to be associated with histological inflammation in human prostatectomy specimens, and also to induce strong inflammatory response in prostate-derived tissue culture models. The present paper describes a rat model for assessment of the pathogenic potential of P. acnes in prostate. Prostate glands of Sprague Dawley rats (n = 98) were exposed via an abdominal incision and live P. acnes or, in control rats, saline were injected into the ventral and dorso-lateral lobes. Rats were sacrificed 5 days, 3 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post infection, and prostate tissue was analyzed for bacterial content and histological inflammation. Rat sera were assessed for levels of CRP and anti-P. acnes IgG. Live P. acnes could be recovered from the dorso-lateral lobes up to 3 months post infection, while the ventral lobes were cleared from bacteria at that time. In samples up to 3 months post infection, the dorso-lateral lobes exhibited intense focal inflammation. CRP and IgG levels were elevated throughout the span of the experiment, and reached maximum levels 3 weeks and 3 months post infection, respectively. We show that P. acnes have the potential to cause chronic infection in previously healthy prostate, and that the infection has potential to cause chronic histological inflammation in the infected tissue. The high prevalence of P. acnes in human prostate tissue calls for resolution of pathogenic details. The present rat model suggests that complications such as chronic

  14. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents.

  15. Anti-Aging and Tissue Regeneration Ability of Policosanol Along with Lipid-Lowering Effect in Hyperlipidemic Zebrafish via Enhancement of High-Density Lipoprotein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lim, So-Mang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the tissue regeneration and lipid-lowering effects of policosanol (PCO) by employing a hyperlipidemic zebrafish model. A reconstituted high-density lipoprotein containing policosanol (PCO-rHDL) facilitated greater cell growth and replication with less apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BV-2 microglial cell lines. From in vivo study, injection of rHDL containing apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) caused 76 ± 4% (p = 0.01) greater tissue regeneration activity than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control, whereas PCO-rHDL caused 94 ± 7% (p = 0.002) increased regeneration. PCO in ethanol (EtOH) showed lower cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitory ability than did anacetrapib, whereas PCO-rHDL showed higher inhibitory ability than anacetrapib, suggesting a synergistic effect between PCO and rHDL. Following 9 weeks of PCO consumption, the PCO group (0.003% PCO in Tetrabit) showed the highest survivability (80%), whereas normal diet (ND) and high-cholesterol diet (HCD) control groups showed 67% and 70% survival rates, respectively. Supplementation with a HCD resulted in two-fold elevation of CETP activity along with 3- and 2.5-fold increases in serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TGs) levels, respectively. Consumption of PCO for 9 weeks resulted in 40 ± 5% (p = 0.01 vs. HCD) and 33 ± 4% (p = 0.02 vs. HCD) reduction of TC and TGs levels, respectively. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level increased up to 37 ± 2 mg/dL (p = 0.004), whereas the percentage of HDL-C/TC increased up to 20 ± 2% from 5 ± 1% compared to the HCD control. The serum glucose level was reduced to 47 ± 2% (p = 0.002) compared to the HCD control. Fatty liver change and hepatic inflammation levels were remarkably increased upon HCD consumption and were two-fold higher than that under ND. However, the PCO group showed 58 ± 5% (p = 0.001) and 50

  16. Decreased exposure of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Mian; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhong, Ze-yu; Jia, Ling-ling; Wang, Da-wei; Wu, Jie; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Simvastatin is frequently administered to diabetic patients with hypercholesterolemia. The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of simvastatin and its hydrolysate simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Methods: Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old rats by a treatment of high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin. After the rats received a single dose of simvastatin (20 mg/kg, po, or 2 mg/kg, iv), the plasma concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were determined. Simvastatin metabolism and cytochrome P4503A (Cyp3a) activity were assessed in hepatic microsomes, and its uptake was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes. The expression of Cyp3a1, organic anion transporting polypeptide 2 (Oatp2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) in livers was measured using qRT-PCR. Results: After oral or intravenous administration, the plasma concentrations and areas under concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were markedly decreased in diabetic rats. Both simvastatin metabolism and Cyp3a activity were markedly increased in hepatocytes of diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of hepatic Cyp3a1 mRNA. Furthermore, the uptake of simvastatin by hepatocytes of diabetic rats was markedly increased, which was associated with increased expression of the influx transporter Oatp2, and decreased expression of the efflux transporters Mrp2 and Bcrp. Conclusion: Diabetes enhances the metabolism of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in rats via up-regulating hepatic Cyp3a activity and expression and increasing hepatic uptake. PMID:25152023

  17. Schisandra chinensis reverses visceral hypersensitivity in a neonatal-maternal separated rat model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Paul S P; Wu, Justin C Y; Lao, Lixing; Fong, Harry H S; Sung, Joseph J Y; Berman, Brian; Yeung, John H K; Che, Chun-Tao

    2012-03-15

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important characteristic feature of functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study evaluated the effect of Schisandra chinensis on visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS) in an IBS rat model. The visceromotor responses to colorectal balloon distension (CRD) were measured by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) and electromyographic (EMG) activities. NMS control rats (receiving vehicle) underwent aggravated visceral pain in response to CRD as compared to normal rats, evidenced by the reduced pain threshold, enhanced AWR scores and EMG responses. Treatment with a 70% ethanol extract of S. chinensis (0.3g/kg and 1.5g/kg/day) for 7 days resulted in an increase in the pain threshold (NMS control: 19.1±1.0mmHg vs low-dose: 24.8±1.3mmHg and high-dose: 25.2±1.8mmHg, p<0.01), and abolished the elevated AWR and EMG responses to CRD in NMS rats (AUC values of EMG response curve were: 1952±202 in NMS control group vs 1074±90 in low-dose group and 1145±92 in high-dose group, p<0.001), indicating that S. chinensis could reverse the visceral hypersensitivity induced by early-life stress event. The result of ELSA measurement shows that the elevated serotonin (5-HT) level in the distal colon of NMS rats returned to normal level after treatment with S. chinensis. Moreover, the increase in pain threshold in rats treated with S. chinensis was associated with a decline of the mRNA level of 5-HT(3) receptor in the distal colon. All available results demonstrate that S. chinensis can reverse visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal-maternal separation, and the effect may be mediated through colonic 5-HT pathway in the rat.

  18. Schisandra chinensis reverses visceral hypersensitivity in a neonatal-maternal separated rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Paul SP; Wu, Justin CY; Lao, Lixing; Fong, Harry HS; Sung, Joseph JY; Berman, Brian; Yeung, John HK; Che, Chun-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important characteristic feature of functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study evaluated the effect of Schisandra chinensis on visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS) in an IBS rat model. The visceromotor responses to colorectal balloon distension (CRD) were measured by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) and electromyographic activities (EMG). NMS control rats (receiving vehicle) underwent aggravated visceral pain in response to CRD as compared to normal rats, evidenced by the reduced pain threshold, enhanced AWR scores and EMG responses. Treatment with a 70% ethanol extract of S. chinensis (0.3 g/kg and 1.5 g/kg per day) for seven days resulted in an increase in the pain threshold (NMS control: 19.1 ± 1.0 mmHg vs low-dose: 24.8 ± 1.3 mmHg and high-dose: 25.2 ± 1.8 mmHg, p<0.01), and abolished the elevated AWR and EMG responses to CRD in NMS rats (AUC values of EMG response curve were: 1952 ± 202 in NMS control group vs 1074 ± 90 in low-dose group and 1145 ± 92 in high-dose group, p<0.001), indicating that S. chinensis could reverse the visceral hypersensitivity induced by early-life stress event. The result of ELSA measurement shows that the elevated serotonin (5-HT) level in the distal colon of NMS rats returned to normal level after treatment with S. chinensis. Moreover, the increase in pain threshold in rats treated with S. chinensis was associated with a decline of the mRNA level of 5-HT3 receptor in the distal colon. All available results demonstrate that S. chinensis can reverse visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal-maternal separation, and the effect may be mediated through colonic 5-HT pathway in the rat. PMID:22230486

  19. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Vucelick, Mark E.; Gies, Richard A. ); Zangar, Richard C. ); Weitz, Karl K. ); Poet, Torka S. ); Springer, David L. ); Grant, Donna M. ); Benson, Janet M.

    2000-08-25

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  20. Hypoglycemic and Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Botryosphaeran from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 in Diabetes-Induced and Hyperlipidemia Conditions in Rats.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Nantes, Carolina C B O; Fonseca, Eveline A I; Zaia, Cassia T B V; Dekker, Robert F H; Khaper, Neelam; Castro, Inar A; Barbosa, Aneli M

    2011-09-01

    Botryosphaeran, a water-soluble exopolysaccharide of the β-(1 → 3;1 → 6)-D-glucan type that has been isolated from the culture medium of Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 grown in submerged fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, was previously demonstrated to be non-genotoxic in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and exhibited strong anticlastogenic activity. In the present study, the effects of botryosphaeran were investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as in high-fat diet-fed hyperlipidemic Wistar rats. The plasma glucose level was reduced by 52% in the diabetic group of rats after administration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg body weight of the rats (b.w.)/day by gavage over 15 days. A reduction in the median ration intake was accompanied by an increase in the median body weight gain, as well as the efficiency of food conversion. These results demonstrate that botryosphaeran has protective effects by reducing the symptoms of cachexia in Diabetes mellitus. Botryosphaeran administered by gavage at a concentration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg b.w./day over 15 days also reduced the plasma levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol by 18% and 27%, respectively, in hyperlipidemic rats. Based on these findings, we conclude that botryosphaeran possesses hypoglycemic and hypocholesterolemic properties in conditions of diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, respectively, and may be used as an oral anti-diabetic agent.

  1. Hypoglycemic and Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Botryosphaeran from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 in Diabetes-Induced and Hyperlipidemia Conditions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Nantes, Carolina C. B. O.; Fonseca, Eveline A. I.; Zaia, Cassia T. B. V.; Dekker, Robert F. H.; Khaper, Neelam; Castro, Inar A.

    2011-01-01

    Botryosphaeran, a water-soluble exopolysaccharide of the β-(1 → 3;1 → 6)-D-glucan type that has been isolated from the culture medium of Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 grown in submerged fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, was previously demonstrated to be non-genotoxic in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and exhibited strong anticlastogenic activity. In the present study, the effects of botryosphaeran were investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as in high-fat diet-fed hyperlipidemic Wistar rats. The plasma glucose level was reduced by 52% in the diabetic group of rats after administration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg body weight of the rats (b.w.)/day by gavage over 15 days. A reduction in the median ration intake was accompanied by an increase in the median body weight gain, as well as the efficiency of food conversion. These results demonstrate that botryosphaeran has protective effects by reducing the symptoms of cachexia in Diabetes mellitus. Botryosphaeran administered by gavage at a concentration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg b.w./day over 15 days also reduced the plasma levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol by 18% and 27%, respectively, in hyperlipidemic rats. Based on these findings, we conclude that botryosphaeran possesses hypoglycemic and hypocholesterolemic properties in conditions of diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, respectively, and may be used as an oral anti-diabetic agent. PMID:22783102

  2. Reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats, an animal model of depression: An autoradiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kovačević, Tomislav; Skelin, Ivan; Minuzzi, Luciano; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Diksic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a brain disorder and there is still only a partial understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Antidepressant medications with a fast onset have not yet been developed. In addition to the monoaminergic systems, the brain glutaminergic system has been implicated in the etiology of depression. Animal studies of depression have gained importance because they permit a more invasive manipulation of the subjects than human studies. In the present study, we measured the densities of the brain regional metabotropic glutaminergic receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression and two groups of control rats, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) and Sprague Dawley (SPD), the parent strain for both the FSL and FRL rats. The FSL rats showed lower densities of mGluR5 in many brain regions compared to either the SPD and/or FRL rats. In addition, the densities in the FRL rats were larger than in the SPD rats, suggesting possible problems in using FRL rats as controls. The presented data suggest that mGluR5 is lower in animal models of depression which could be related to the cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in the FSL rat model of depression and could be relevant to a better understanding of depression in humans. PMID:22310150

  3. Early Fesoterodine Fumarate Administration Prevents Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in a Spinal Cord Transected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Biardeau, Xavier; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Aharony, Shachar; Loutochin, George; Campeau, Lysanne; Kyheng, Maeva; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Background In spinal cord injury, onset of detrusor overactivity (DO) is detrimental for quality of life (incontinence) and renal risk. Prevention has only been achieved with complex sophisticated electrical neuromodulation techniques. Purpose To assess the efficacy of early fesoterodine fumarate (FF) administration in preventing bladder overactivity in a spinal cord transected (SCT) rat model. Methods 33 Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 6 groups–Group 1: 3 normal controls; Group 2: 6 SCT controls; Group 3: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d; Group 4: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d; Group 5: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period; Group 6: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period. SCT was performed at T10. FF was continuously administered. Cystometry was undertaken 6 weeks after SCT in awake rats recording intermicturition pressure (IMP), baseline pressure, threshold pressure (Pthres) and maximum pressure (Pmax). Normal controls and SCT controls were initially compared using the Mann-Whitney U tests in order to confirm the SCT effect on cystometric parameters. The comparisons in cystometric and metabolic cage parameters between SCT controls and treated rats were done using post-hoc Dunn’s tests for Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Statistical testing was conducted at the two-tailed α-level of 0.05. Results Pressure parameters were significantly higher in SCT control group compared to normal controls. Six weeks after SCT, IMP was significantly lower in low dose treated group than in SCT controls. Pmax was significantly lower in 3 treated groups compared to SCT controls. Pthres was significantly lower in full time treated groups than in SCT controls. Conclusion Early administration of FF modulates bladder overactivity in a SCT rat model. Whereas short-term prevention has been demonstrated, the long-term should be further analyzed. Clinical application of these results should confirm this finding through randomized research protocols. PMID:28060912

  4. Learning to use working memory: a reinforcement learning gating model of rule acquisition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Kevin; Becker, Nadine; Jones, Matthew W.; Bogacz, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    Learning to form appropriate, task-relevant working memory representations is a complex process central to cognition. Gating models frame working memory as a collection of past observations and use reinforcement learning (RL) to solve the problem of when to update these observations. Investigation of how gating models relate to brain and behavior remains, however, at an early stage. The current study sought to explore the ability of simple RL gating models to replicate rule learning behavior in rats. Rats were trained in a maze-based spatial learning task that required animals to make trial-by-trial choices contingent upon their previous experience. Using an abstract version of this task, we tested the ability of two gating algorithms, one based on the Actor-Critic and the other on the State-Action-Reward-State-Action (SARSA) algorithm, to generate behavior consistent with the rats'. Both models produced rule-acquisition behavior consistent with the experimental data, though only the SARSA gating model mirrored faster learning following rule reversal. We also found that both gating models learned multiple strategies in solving the initial task, a property which highlights the multi-agent nature of such models and which is of importance in considering the neural basis of individual differences in behavior. PMID:23115551

  5. Postdependent state in rats as a model for medication development in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Marcus W; Sommer, Wolfgang H

    2015-01-01

    Rational development of novel therapeutic strategies for alcoholism requires understanding of its underlying neurobiology and pathophysiology. Obtaining this knowledge largely relies on animal studies. Thus, choosing the appropriate animal model is one of the most critical steps in pre-clinical medication development. Among the range of animal models that have been used to investigate excessive alcohol consumption in rodents, the postdependent model stands out. It was specifically developed to test the role of negative affect as a key driving force in a perpetuating addiction cycle for alcoholism. Here, we will describe our approach to make rats dependent via chronic intermittent exposure to alcohol, discuss the validity of this model, and compare it with other commonly used animal models of alcoholism. We will summarize evidence that postdependent rats fulfill several criteria of a 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV/V-like' diagnostic system. Importantly, these animals show long-lasting excessive consumption of and increased motivation for alcohol, and evidence for loss of control over alcohol intake. Our conclusion that postdependent rats are an excellent model for medication development for alcoholism is underscored by a summary of more than two dozen pharmacological tests aimed at reversing these abnormal alcohol responses. We will end with open questions on the use of this model. In the tradition of the Sanchis-Segura and Spanagel review, we provide comic strips that illustrate the postdependent procedure and relevant phenotypes in this review.

  6. Modeling the toxicokinetics of inhaled toluene in rats: influence of physical activity and feeding status.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Elaina M; Benignus, Vernon; Eklund, Christopher; Highfill, Jerry W; Oshiro, Wendy M; Samsam, Tracey E; Bushnell, Philip J

    2008-01-01

    Toluene is found in petroleum-based fuels and used as a solvent in consumer products and industrial applications. The critical effects following inhalation exposure involve the brain and nervous system in both humans and experimental animals, whether exposure duration is acute or chronic. The goals of this physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development effort were twofold: (1) to evaluate and explain the influence of feeding status and activity level on toluene pharmacokinetics utilizing our own data from toluene-exposed Long Evans (LE) rats, and (2) to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate data from the published literature and explain differing toluene kinetics. Compartments in the model were lung, slowly and rapidly perfused tissue groups, fat, liver, gut, and brain; tissue transport was blood-flow limited and metabolism occurred in the liver. Chemical-specific parameters and initial organ volumes and blood flow rates were obtained from the literature. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the single most influential parameter for our experimental conditions was alveolar ventilation; other moderately influential parameters (depending upon concentration) included cardiac output, rate of metabolism, and blood flow to fat. Based on both literature review and sensitivity analysis, other parameters (e.g., partition coefficients and metabolic rate parameters) were either well defined (multiple consistent experimental results with low variability) or relatively noninfluential (e.g. organ volumes). Rats that were weight-maintained compared to free-fed rats in our studies could be modeled with a single set of parameters because feeding status did not have a significant impact on toluene pharmacokinetics. Heart rate (HR) measurements in rats performing a lever-pressing task indicated that the HR increased in proportion to task intensity. For rats acclimated to eating in the lab during the day, both sedentary rats and rats performing the lever

  7. Prolonged bile duct obstruction: a new experimental model for cirrhosis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kountouras, J.; Billing, B. H.; Scheuer, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatic morphological abnormalities were examined in rats whose bile ducts had been either cannulated and then obstructed or irreversibly ligated for 5, 10, 15 and 28 days or longer. Throughout the experiment most of the morphological changes observed in the cannulated group were comparable to those in the ligated group. Portal inflammation and marginal bile duct proliferation were noted with the same frequency in both groups. Biliary obstruction for 15 days or more led to cirrhosis. After 28 days obstruction, five out of six cannulated rats and four out of six ligated animals respectively developed cirrhosis. The development of cirrhosis was progressive and associated with ascites. It is concluded that in the rat the morphological sequelae of long term cholestasis induced by either cannulation and obstruction or ligation of bile ducts are similar and are accompanied by cirrhosis. The advantages of this experimental model for the study of human cirrhosis are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6743531

  8. Regulation of hematopoiesis in rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinetic/hypodynamia. I - Model description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Perez, L.; Nessel, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a 7-day suspension in a jacket and harness with 20-deg head-down tilt on body weight, food and water consumption, and hematological parameters is investigated experimentally in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150-175 g. The results are presented in graphs and compared with those for unsuspended controls and with published data on rats and humans exposed to microgravity in space flight. Suspended rats are found to have reduced red-blood-cell mass, erythropoiesis, plasma volume (leading to temporarily increased hematocrit), body weight, and food and water consumption; rightward-shifted oxyhemoglobin-dissociation curves; and unchanged platelet count, leucocyte count or PHA reactivity, and red-blood-cell shape distribution. Since many of these effects are also seen in space flight, the present experimental model is considered a promising technique for simulating the hematopoietic effects of microgravity at 1 g.

  9. Effects of acacia honey on wound healing in various rat models.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, F; Arshad, M; Rasheed, F; Amraiz, D; Anwar, P; Gulfraz, M

    2010-04-01

    Honey is a traditional remedy for the treatment of infected wounds, and is becoming more important as microbial resistance to conventional therapeutic agents increases. A study was conducted to assess the wound-healing activity of Acacia honey using incision, excision, burn and dead-space wound models in rats. Different formulations of honey were used and rats were treated topically as well as orally. Both the higher and lower doses of honey produced a significant effect on healing (p < 0.05). The area of epithelization was found to increase, followed by an increase in wound contraction, skin-breaking strength, tissue granulation. The hydroxyproline content also increased in the rats treated with higher doses of honey compared to control, indicating an increase in collagen formation.

  10. The discovery and development of the BB rat colony: an animal model of spontaneous diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chappel, C I; Chappel, W R

    1983-07-01

    The BB rat model of spontaneous diabetes mellitus was discovered in 1974 in Ottawa in a colony of specific pathogen-free Wistar rats. Investigations to determine the cause of rapid weight loss and death in a few weanling rats from this colony revealed polydypsia, polyuria, glucosuria, ketonuria, and hyperglycemia. These signs regressed and normal weight gain occurred when daily insulin therapy was given. Histologic studies of the pancreas of affected animals showed fibrosis and absence of beta cells. The original colony was established by crossbreeding the clinically normal parents of the diabetic animals. Approximately 10% of the offspring of these matings became diabetic. This incidence was increased to approximately 25% by father-daughter mating, suggesting a genetic component in the etiology.

  11. Protective effects of sivelestat in a caerulein-induced rat acute pancreatitis model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Quanyan

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of sivelestat on acute pancreatitis (AP) in a rat model. Sivelestat is a specific neutrophil elastase inhibitor, which has been developed in Japan in 1991. Varying doses of sivelestat in normal saline were infused continuously in sivelestat-treated groups through osmotic pumps. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies, and ten rats in each group were taken for survival observation. Increasing doses of sivelestat inhibits the expression of lipase, amylase, corticosterone, IL-1β, TNF-α, and nuclear factor-κB. Furthermore, sivelestat reduces the inflammatory cells infiltration, histological damage, and mortality rate. Meanwhile, the total antioxidant power and serum level of IL-4 in high-dose sivelestat-treated groups were increased. Our findings suggest that the increasing doses of sivelestat protect against caerulein-induced AP in rats, and this protection is possibly associated with the anti-inflammatory ability of sivelestat.

  12. Central effect of histamine in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hamzeh-Gooshchi, Nasrin; Seiednejhad-Yamchi, Sona

    2008-01-01

    In conscious rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (icv) cannula, effect of icv injections of histamine, chlorpheniramine (H(1)-receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (H(2)-receptor blocker) was investigated in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain. Acute trigeminal pain was induced by putting a drop of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface of the eye and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. Histamine (20, 40 microg) and chlorpheniramine (80 microg) significantly decreased the numbers of eye wipes. Ranitidine alone had no effect. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not change the histamine-induced analgesia, whereas the histamine effect on pain was inhibited with ranitidine pretreatment. These results indicate that the brain histamine, through central H(2) receptors, may be involved in the modulation of the acute trigeminal pain in rats.

  13. Cardiac Motion Analysis Using High-Speed Video Images in a Rat Model for Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Idaku; Okuda, Toshikazu; Nie, Yuman; Takaki, Takeshi; Orito, Kensuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    In this study, we performed a cardiac motion analysis by using 1000-frames per second (fps) stereo images to capture the three-dimensional motion of small color markers in a rat heart. This method of recording cardiac motion could quantify the rate of change in the myocardial area, which indicated localized myocardial activity of rhythmic expansion and contraction. We analyzed the three-dimensional motion distributions in a rat model for myocardial infarction, in which the heart rate was 4 times/s or more. In the analysis, we spatiotemporally quantified the characteristic cardiac motion in ischemic heart diseases and found that infarction due to ischemia in the rat heart was spread around the left ventricle.

  14. [Protective effect of adenosine receptor agonists in a model of spinal cord injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Sufianova, G Z; Usov, L A; Sufianov, A A; Perelomov, Iu P; Raevskaia, L Iu; Shapkin, A G

    2002-01-01

    Possibilities of the neuroprotector therapy using adenosine and cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an adenosine receptor agonist, were studied on a model of spinal cord injury by compression in rats (most closely reproducing the analogous clinical pathological process in humans). The model was induced by slow, graded compression of the spinal cord at the thoracic level. Adenosine and CPA were introduced 60 min before injury by subcutaneous injections in a dose of 300 and 2.5 micrograms/kg, respectively. The protective effect was judged by comparing the neurological, electromyographic, and histopathological changes in animals with the model injury and in the control group (adenosine and CPA background). The A1-agonist CPA injections produced a pronounced, statistically significant neuroprotector effect on the given spinal cord injury model in rats. The neuroprotective effect of adenosine was significant but not as strong. It is concluded that it is expedient to use A-agonists in clinics.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  16. Green and Black Cardamom in a Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaswant, Maharshi; Poudyal, Hemant; Mathai, Michael L; Ward, Leigh C; Mouatt, Peter; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-09-11

    Both black (B) and green (G) cardamom are used as flavours during food preparation. This study investigated the responses to B and G in a diet-induced rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats were fed either a corn starch-rich diet (C) or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with increased simple sugars along with saturated and trans fats (H) for 16 weeks. H rats showed signs of metabolic syndrome leading to visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance, cardiovascular remodelling and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Food was supplemented with 3% dried B or G for the final eight weeks only. The major volatile components were the closely related terpenes, 1,8-cineole in B and α-terpinyl acetate in G. HB (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + black cardamom) rats showed marked reversal of diet-induced changes, with decreased visceral adiposity, total body fat mass, systolic blood pressure and plasma triglycerides, and structure and function of the heart and liver. In contrast, HG (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + green cardamom) rats increased visceral adiposity and total body fat mass, and increased heart and liver damage, without consistent improvement in the signs of metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that black cardamom is more effective in reversing the signs of metabolic syndrome than green cardamom.

  17. Weight loss and brown adipose tissue reduction in rat model of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Denis; Vasconcellos, Luiz FT; de Oliveira, Patricia G; Konrad, Signorá P

    2008-01-01

    Background - Obesity is related to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), but its roles in OSAHS as cause or consequence are not fully clarified. Isocapnic intermittent hypoxia (IIH) is a model of OSAHS. We verified the effect of IIH on body weight and brown adipose tissue (BAT) of Wistar rats. Methods Nine-month-old male breeders Wistar rats of two groups were studied: 8 rats submitted to IIH and 5 control rats submitted to sham IIH. The rats were weighed at the baseline and at the end of three weeks, after being placed in the IIH apparatus seven days per week, eight hours a day, in the lights on period, simulating an apnea index of 30/hour. After experimental period, the animals were weighed and measured as well as the BAT, abdominal, perirenal, and epididymal fat, the heart, and the gastrocnemius muscle. Results Body weight of the hypoxia group decreased 17 ± 7 grams, significantly different from the variation observed in the control group (p = 0,001). The BAT was 15% lighter in the hypoxia group and reached marginally the alpha error probability (p = 0.054). Conclusion Our preliminary results justify a larger study for a longer time in order to confirm the effect of isocapnic intermittent hypoxia on body weight and BAT. PMID:18671859

  18. Excessive levels of nitric oxide in rat model of Parkinson’s disease induced by rotenone

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, ZHONG-KUI; LANG, JUAN; XU, GANG; LI, HAI-YU; ZHANG, YUN; WANG, LEI; SU, YAO; SUN, AI-JING

    2015-01-01

    Systemic rotenone models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are highly reproducible and may provide evidence on the pathogenesis of PD. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats (1-year-old) were subcutaneously administered with rotenone (1.5 mg/kg/day) for six days and observed for the following three weeks. Compared with the control rats, a significant decrease was observed in the body weight and a marked increase was observed in the areas under the behavioral scoring curves in the rotenone-treated rats. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the abundance of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons was markedly reduced following rotenone treatment. ELISA and neurochemical assays demonstrated a significant increase in the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase, whereas a marked decrease was observed in the thiol levels in the brains of the rotenone-treated rats. Thus, subacute rotenone treatment was found to induce behavioral deficits and the loss of nigral TH-positive neurons which may be associated with the excessive levels of NO in the rat brains. PMID:25574233

  19. Effect of systemic and intrathecal gabapentin on allodynia in a new rat model of postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2005-04-25

    Patients with postherpetic neuralgia often have an increased sensitivity to a tactile stimulus but impaired thermal sensitivity in the same affected dermatomes. We recently found that depletion of capsaicin-sensitive afferents by systemic treatment with a potent TRPV1 agonist, resiniferotoxin, in adult rats produces long-lasting paradoxical changes in mechanical and thermal sensitivities, which resemble the unique clinical features of postherpetic neuralgia. The anticonvulsant gabapentin is effective in reducing the subjective pain score in patients with postherpetic neuralgia. In this study, we quantified the potential effect of systemic and intrathecal gabapentin on tactile allodynia induced by resiniferotoxin in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of 200 microg/kg resiniferotoxin produced a rapid and sustained increase in the paw withdrawal latency to a radiant heat stimulus. Profound tactile allodynia developed in all the resiniferotoxin-treated rats within 3 weeks. Intraperitoneal injection of 30-60 mg/kg of gabapentin in resiniferotoxin-treated rats significantly increased the withdrawal threshold in response to von Frey filaments. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of 10-30 microg of gabapentin also produced a significant effect on the mechanical withdrawal threshold in all resiniferotoxin-treated rats. These data provide complementary new information that gabapentin administered systemically and spinally can effectively relieve tactile allodynia in this animal model of postherpetic neuralgia.

  20. Thymic involution in the suspended rat model for weightlessness - Decreased glucocorticoid receptor concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb muscle atrophy, thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy in rats during spaceflight can be simulated using suspension models. Skeletal muscle and thymus are sensitive to gluco-corticoids (GC), and previous studies have demonstrated that muscle atrophy in suspended rats is associated with increased GC receptor concentration. The objectives were to confirm thymic involution during suspension, and determine if involution correlated with increased GC receptor concentration. Seven days of antiorthostatic (AO) suspension of rats produced a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in thymic wet weight not associated with an alteration of percent water content. GC receptor concentration (pmol/mg protein) decreased 20 percent (P less than 0.025) in thymus glands from 7 day AO suspended rats. Suspension, therefore, is associated with involution of the thymus, but this is not dependent upon AO positioning. Thymus GC receptor concentrations were depressed in 7-day suspended rats, in contrast with previous observations on skeletal muscle, suggesting that different mechanisms may underlie these responses.

  1. Functional and histologic changes after repeated transcranial direct current stimulation in rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Jun; Kim, Byeong Kwon; Ko, Young Jin; Bang, Moon Suk; Kim, Man Ho; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2010-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is associated with enhancement or weakening of the NMDA receptor activity and change of the cortical blood flow. Therefore, repeated tDCS of the brain with cerebrovascular injury will induce the functional and histologic changes. Sixty-one Sprague-Dawley rats with cerebrovascular injury were used. Twenty rats died during the experimental course. The 41 rats that survived were allocated to the exercise group, the anodal stimulation group, the cathodal stimulation group, or the control group according to the initial motor function. Two-week treatment schedules started from 2 days postoperatively. Garcia, modified foot fault, and rota-rod performance scores were checked at 2, 9, and 16 days postoperatively. After the experiments, rats were sacrificed for the evaluation of histologic changes (changes of the white matter axon and infarct volume). The anodal stimulation and exercise groups showed improvement of Garcia's and modified foot fault scores at 16 days postoperatively. No significant change of the infarct volume happened after exercise and tDCS. Neuronal axons at the internal capsule of infarct hemispheres showed better preserved axons in the anodal stimul