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Sample records for hyperplastic human prostate

  1. Comparison of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in the microsomal fractions of hyperplastic, malignant and normal human prostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Hudson, R W

    1984-04-01

    The conversion of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to 3 alpha-androstanediol (3 alpha-adiol) was studied using the microsomal fractions of 15 hyperplastic, 5 malignant and 6 normal human prostatis tissues. Standard assay conditions were: 0.2 microM DHT, 1.0 mM NADPH, 1.0 mM NADH, 2.0 mM EDTA and the microsomal fractions equivalent to 200 mg of prostatic tissue, in 0.1 M MES buffer, pH 6.5. Under the conditions of this assay, the back-conversion of 3 alpha-adiol to DHT or the conversion of DHT to androstanediol were negligible. Optimum enzyme activity was achieved under standard assay conditions. In the absence of EDTA: enzyme activity was 65% of the standard assay; activity was diminished further by 2 mM Ca2+ and virtually eliminated by 2 mM Mg2+ or 2 microM Zn2+. Activity in the absence of either NADPH or NADH was only 50% of the activities seen in the presence of both cofactors. The pH optimum of the enzyme was between 6.0 and 6.5. The apparent Km values of the enzymes in hyperplastic, malignant and normal tissues were 0.03, 0.02 and 0.03 microM, respectively. The Vmax values for these tissues were 6.0 +/- 2.1, 1.6 +/- 0.5 and 14.0 +/- 3.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min incubation, respectively. The results of these experiments offer further explanation for the differences in DHT and 3 alpha-adiol levels seen in the 3 prostatic tissues.

  2. Alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in hyperplastic human prostate: identification and characterization using (/sup 3/H) rauwolscine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine ((/sup 3/H)Ra), a selective ligand for the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor, was used to identify and characterize alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in prostate glands of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)Ra to prostatic tissue homogenates was rapid and readily reversible by addition of excess unlabelled phentolamine. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments demonstrates a single, saturable class of high affinity binding sites (Bmax = 0.31 +/- 0.04 fmol./microgram. DNA, Kd = 0.9 +/- 0.11 nM.). The relative potency of alpha adrenergic drugs (clonidine, alpha-methylnorepinephrine and prazosin) in competing for (/sup 3/H)Ra binding sites was consistent with the order predicted for an alpha 2 subtype. The role of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in normal prostatic function and in men with bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH requires further investigation.

  3. Upregulation of Phosphodiesterase type 5 in the Hyperplastic Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhao; Zang, Ning; Jiang, Yaoming; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xinghuan; Zhang, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Both erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common in the aging male. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) for treating LUTS/BPH with/without ED. However, the influence of BPH on prostatic PDE5 expression has never been studied. A testosterone-induced rat model of BPH was developed and human hyperplastic prostate specimens were harvested during cystoprostatectomy. PDE5, nNOS, eNOS and α1-adrenoreceptor subtypes (α1aARs, α1bARs and α1dARs) were determined with real-time RT-PCR for rat tissues whilst PDE5 and α1-adrenoreceptor subtypes were determined in human samples. PDE5 was further analyzed with Western-blot and histological examination. Serum testosterone was measured with ELISA. The rat BPH model was validated as having a significantly enlarged prostate. PDE5 localized mainly in fibromuscular stroma in prostate. Our data showed a significant and previously undocumented upregulation of PDE5 in both rat and human BPH, along with increased expression of nNOS and α1dARs for rat tissues and α1aARs for human BPH. The upregulation of PDE5 in the hyperplastic prostate could explain the mechanism and contribute to the high effectiveness of PDE5-Is for treating LUTS/BPH. Fibromuscular stroma could be the main target for PDE5-Is within prostate. PMID:26657792

  4. INSL-3 is expressed in human hyperplastic and neoplastic thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Kehlen, Astrid; Hinze, Raoul; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Weber, Ekkehard; Fischer, Bernd; Dralle, Henning; Klonisch, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    The insulin-like hormone INSL-3, also named relaxin-like factor (RLF) or Leydig-derived insulin-like peptide (LEY-IL), is expressed in various reproductive tissues and is regarded a marker of differentiation in human testicular Leydig cells. Recently, we have identified differential expression of human INSL-3 in neoplastic Leydig cells and mammary epithelial cells suggesting an involvement of INSL-3 in tumor biology. Here we have investigated the expression of INSL-3 in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and in the human thyroid gland which has been shown to express transcripts for the G protein coupled INSL-3 receptor LGR8. When we determined the expression of INSL-3 in eight human thyroid carcinoma cell lines, a novel INSL-3 splice variant containing a 95 bp out-of-frame insertion at the beginning of exon II of the INSL-3 gene was discovered. Treatment of the human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C with diethylstilbestrol (DES) caused a significant dose-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of INSL-3 and a marked up-regulation of LGR8. Employing in situ hybridization to detect INSL-3 transcripts and specific rabbit antisera against the INSL-3 proteins, both INSL-3 isoforms were detected in patients with Graves' disease (n=10), follicular carcinomas (FTC; n=12), papillary carcinomas (PTC; n=9) and undifferentiated anaplastic carcinomas (UTC; n=15). By contrast, thyrocytes of all 15 benign goiter tissues studied were devoid of both INSL-3 isoforms, mRNA and protein. Our data indicate that INSL-3 hormone is up-regulated in hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes suggesting that the INSL-3 isoforms may serve as additional markers for hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes. In the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C, the regulation of both INSL-3 and LGR8 by estrogen may be the first indication of a novel hormonally responsive, auto-/paracrine INSL-3 LGR8 ligand receptor system active in human thyroid carcinoma cells.

  5. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human normal and hyperplastic gingiva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Li, Nan; Xie, Han; Jin, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Human gingiva plays an important role in the maintenance of oral health and shows unique fetal-like scarless healing process after wounding. Here we isolate and characterize mesenchymal stem cells from human normal and hyperplastic gingival tissues (N-GMSC and H-GMSC, respectively). Immunocytochemical staining indicated that gingival lamina propria contained Stro-1 and SSEA-4 positive cells, implying existence of putative gingival MSC. Under attachment-based isolating and culturing condition, gingival MSC displayed highly clonogenic and long-term proliferative capability. By using single colony isolation and expansion approaches, we found both N-GMSC and H-GMSC possessed self-renewal and multipotent differentiation properties. N-GMSC and H-GMSC showed distinct immunoregulatory functions in a murine skin allograft setting via up-regulation of putative systemic regulatory T cells (Tregs). N-GMSC and H-GMSC were capable of regenerating collagenous tissue following in vivo transplantation, in which H-GMSC exhibited more robust regenerative capability. These findings suggest that gingival tissue contains tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cell population and is an ideal resource for immunoregulatory therapy due to its substantial availability and accessibility. In addition, gingival MSC over-activation may contribute to gingival hyperplastic phenotype.

  6. P21-Activated Kinase Inhibitors FRAX486 and IPA3: Inhibition of Prostate Stromal Cell Growth and Effects on Smooth Muscle Contraction in the Human Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiming; Gratzke, Christian; Tamalunas, Alexander; Wiemer, Nicolas; Ciotkowska, Anna; Rutz, Beata; Waidelich, Raphaela; Strittmatter, Frank; Liu, Chunxiao; Stief, Christian G.; Hennenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate smooth muscle tone and hyperplastic growth are involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Available drugs are characterized by limited efficacy. Patients’ adherence is particularly low to combination therapies of 5α-reductase inhibitors and α1-adrenoceptor antagonists, which are supposed to target contraction and growth simultaneously. Consequently, molecular etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and new compounds interfering with smooth muscle contraction or growth in the prostate are of high interest. Here, we studied effects of p21-activated kinase (PAK) inhibitors (FRAX486, IPA3) in hyperplastic human prostate tissues, and in stromal cells (WPMY-1). In hyperplastic prostate tissues, PAK1, -2, -4, and -6 may be constitutively expressed in catecholaminergic neurons, while PAK1 was detected in smooth muscle and WPMY-1 cells. Neurogenic contractions of prostate strips by electric field stimulation were significantly inhibited by high concentrations of FRAX486 (30 μM) or IPA3 (300 μM), while noradrenaline- and phenylephrine-induced contractions were not affected. FRAX486 (30 μM) inhibited endothelin-1- and -2-induced contractions. In WPMY-1 cells, FRAX486 or IPA3 (24 h) induced concentration-dependent (1–10 μM) degeneration of actin filaments. This was paralleled by attenuation of proliferation rate, being observed from 1 to 10 μM FRAX486 or IPA3. Cytotoxicity of FRAX486 and IPA3 in WPMY-1 cells was time- and concentration-dependent. Stimulation of WPMY-1 cells with endothelin-1 or dihydrotestosterone, but not noradrenaline induced PAK phosphorylation, indicating PAK activation by endothelin-1. Thus, PAK inhibitors may inhibit neurogenic and endothelin-induced smooth muscle contractions in the hyperplastic human prostate, and growth of stromal cells. Targeting prostate smooth muscle contraction and stromal growth at once by a single compound is principally possible, at least under

  7. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  8. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  9. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  10. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  11. Expression of leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF/Pokemon) in human benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Hunter, William J; Yohannes, Paulos; Khan, Ansar U; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-04-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF), also known as Pokemon, is a protein that belongs to the POK family of transcriptional repressors. It has an oncogenic role in many different solid tumors. In this study, the expression of LRF was evaluated in benign prostate hyperplastic (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues. The functional expression of LRF was studied using multiple cellular and molecular methods including RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Paraffin-embedded human tissues of BPH and PC were used to examine LRF expression. Histological staining of the BPH and PC tissue sections revealed nuclear expression of LRF with minimal expression in the surrounding stroma. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western immunoblot analyses demonstrated significantly higher mRNA transcripts and protein expression in PC than BPH. High expression of LRF suggests that it may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of both BPH and prostate cancer. Further studies will help elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways that LRF may follow in the pathogenesis of prostate carcinoma. PMID:21251909

  12. Expression of leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF/Pokemon) in human benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Hunter, William J; Yohannes, Paulos; Khan, Ansar U; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-04-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF), also known as Pokemon, is a protein that belongs to the POK family of transcriptional repressors. It has an oncogenic role in many different solid tumors. In this study, the expression of LRF was evaluated in benign prostate hyperplastic (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues. The functional expression of LRF was studied using multiple cellular and molecular methods including RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Paraffin-embedded human tissues of BPH and PC were used to examine LRF expression. Histological staining of the BPH and PC tissue sections revealed nuclear expression of LRF with minimal expression in the surrounding stroma. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western immunoblot analyses demonstrated significantly higher mRNA transcripts and protein expression in PC than BPH. High expression of LRF suggests that it may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of both BPH and prostate cancer. Further studies will help elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways that LRF may follow in the pathogenesis of prostate carcinoma.

  13. Developmental Exposure to Estrogen Alters Differentiation and Epigenetic Programming in a Human Fetal Prostate Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Huse, Susan M.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM) isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure. PMID:25799167

  14. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  15. Metabolomic Imaging for Human Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Lee; Jordan, Kate W.; Ratai, Eva M.; Sheng, Jinhua; Adkins, Christen B.; DeFeo, Elita M; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Ying, Leslie; McDougal, W. Scott; Cheng, Leo L.

    2010-01-01

    As current radiological approaches cannot accurately localize prostate cancer in vivo, biopsies are conducted at random within prostates for at-risk patients, leading to high false-negative rates. Metabolomic imaging can map cancer-specific biomolecular profile values onto anatomical structures to direct biopsy. In this preliminary study, we evaluated five prostatectomy-removed whole prostates from biopsy-proven cancer patients on a 7 Tesla human, whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. Localized, multi-cross-sectional, multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectra were used to construct a malignancy index based on prostate cancer metabolomic profiles obtained from previous, intact tissue analyses by a 14 Tesla spectrometer. This calculated Malignancy Index shows linear correlation with lesion size (p<0.013) and demonstrates a 93–97% overall accuracy for detecting the presence of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:20371475

  16. Subcellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium in benign nodular hyperplasia of the human prostate: X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections

    SciTech Connect

    Tvedt, K.E.; Kopstad, G.; Haugen, O.A.; Halgunset, J.

    1987-01-01

    Biopsies from human prostates were obtained from normal and hyperplastic glands. The intracellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Two prostate biopsies were obtained from kidney donors, ages 19 and 50 years, without any sign of benign nodular hyperplasia. The normal tissues were frozen within 15 min after circulatory arrest. The central part of biopsies from eight elderly men suffering from benign nodular hyperplasia were frozen within 30 s after excision. Adjacent tissue was processed for light microscopy and histopathological diagnosis. All samples were fresh-frozen using liquid nitrogen cooled pliers, without the use of any freeze-protection, fixation, or staining. In both the normal and the hyperplastic prostates high concentrations (up to above 100 mmol/kg dry weight) of zinc were present in electron dense bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Together with zinc, about equal concentrations of magnesium were found. Calcium was detected in 4 to 8 times the concentration of zinc. Significant, positive correlation between calcium and zinc as well as between calcium and magnesium in the cytoplasm was a typical finding in both normal and hyperplastic glands. In six of eight patients, older than 60 years of age, high levels of calcium (17.0-38.8 mmol/kg dry weight) were observed in the nuclei of the epithelial cells, while very low values were found in the remaining two. In the two younger cases (19 and 50 years of age), the nuclear calcium level in prostatic epithelium was relatively low (about 10 mmol/kg dry weight). These observations suggest that an increase of intranuclear calcium with advancing age may be of pathogenetic significance to growth disturbances in the prostate.

  17. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  18. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  19. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  20. Androgen Regulated Genes in Human Prostate Xenografts in Mice: Relation to BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Booton, S. Erin; Boone, Braden E.; Breyer, Joan P.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P.; Shappell, Scott B.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues. PMID:20027305

  1. Trefoil factor 3 is overexpressed in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Garraway, Isla P; Seligson, David; Said, Jonathan; Horvath, Steve; Reiter, Robert E

    2004-11-01

    The trefoil factors are secreted peptides produced by normal intestinal mucosa. Members of the trefoil family are overexpressed in a variety of cancers and are associated with tumor invasion, resistance to apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent cDNA array analyses suggest that human intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) may be overexpressed in human prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a prostate cancer tissue microarray containing tumor tissue samples from 246 primary radical retropubic prostatectomy cases with antibodies specific for TFF3. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and morphologically normal prostatic epithelium were represented on this array. Additionally, 18 metastatic lesions were also stained. Two independent pathologists scored the tissue arrays, with positive cases defined as those containing TFF3 staining in a majority of target cells within any spots representing the appropriate designated histology. Forty-two percent of 236 cases containing prostate cancer stained positive for TFF3, while only 10% of 145 cases containing normal tissue and 18% of 91 cases containing BPH, stained positive. Seven of 18 (39%) metastatic lesions analyzed stained positive. Although TFF3 expression correlates significantly with prostate cancer, TFF3 expression did not correlate with Gleason grade, tumor stage, or rate of recurrence. These studies validate that TFF3 is overexpressed in a subset of primary and metastic prostate cancers.

  2. Diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Loreti, A; Sturla, M; Gentileschi, S; Bracaglia, R; Prat, Y; Fadda, G; Farallo, E

    2002-03-01

    Oncocytic tumours rarely affect the major salivary glands, accounting for less than 1% of all salivary-gland tumours. The World Health Organisation classification groups these tumours into three principal types: diffuse oncocytosis, focal adenomatous oncocytic hyperplasia and oncocytoma. Diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis is the rarest lesion: only six cases have been previously reported in the literature. This condition of putative hyperplastic pathogenesis follows a benign course, whereas oncocytomas may recur after excision. No metastatic dissemination or recurrence of diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis has been reported. We present and discuss a new case of diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis of the parotid gland.

  3. SCRIB expression is deregulated in human prostate cancer, and its deficiency in mice promotes prostate neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen B.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Dow, Lukas E.; Ryan, Andrew; Tennstedt, Pierre; Bogani, Debora; Elsum, Imogen; Greenfield, Andy; Tuveson, David A.; Simon, Ronald; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cellular polarity is a hallmark of epithelial cancers, raising the possibility that regulators of polarity have a role in suppressing tumorigenesis. The Scribble complex is one of at least three interacting protein complexes that have a critical role in establishing and maintaining epithelial polarity. In human colorectal, breast, and endometrial cancers, expression of the Scribble complex member SCRIB is often mislocalized and deregulated. Here, we report that Scrib is indispensable for prostate homeostasis in mice. Scrib heterozygosity initiated prostate hyperplasia, while targeted biallelic Scrib loss predisposed mice to prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Mechanistically, Scrib was shown to negatively regulate the MAPK cascade to suppress tumorigenesis. Further analysis revealed that prostate-specific loss of Scrib in mice combined with expression of an oncogenic Kras mutation promoted the progression of prostate cancer that recapitulated the human disease. The clinical significance of the work in mice was highlighted by our observation that SCRIB deregulation strongly correlated with poor survival in human prostate cancer. These data suggest that the polarity network could provide a new avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21965329

  4. Prostate-regenerating capacity of cultured human adult prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Taylor, R A; Richards, M G; Sved, P; Wong, J; Eisinger, D; Xie, C; Salomon, R; Risbridger, G P; Dong, Q

    2010-01-01

    Experimentation with the progenitor/stem cells in adult prostate epithelium can be inconvenient due to a tight time line from tissue acquisition to cell isolation and to downstream experiments. To circumvent this inconvenience, we developed a simple technical procedure for culturing epithelial cells derived from human prostate tissue. In this study, benign prostate tissue was enzymatically digested and fractionated into epithelium and stroma, which were then cultured in the medium designed for prostate epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. The cultured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry. Prostate tissue-regenerating capacity of cultured cells in vitro was determined by co-culturing epithelial and stromal cells in dihydrotestosterone-containing RPMI. Cell lineages in formed acini-like structures were determined by immunohistochemistry. The culture of epithelial cells mainly consisted of basal cells. A minor population was negative for known lineage markers and positive for CD133. The culture also contained cells with high activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase. After co-culturing with stromal cells, the epithelial cells were able to form acini-like structures containing multiple cell lineages. Thus, the established culture of prostate epithelial cells provides an alternative source for studying progenitor/stem cells of prostate epithelium.

  5. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions, and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7, 30, 90, 200, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (i.e. CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) were performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200 and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor-α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early- and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  6. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Robbins, Charles J.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2015-01-01

    Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The “transforming growth factor-beta signaling” and “Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation” pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran) for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26683658

  7. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  8. Binding of [3H] methyltrienolone (R 1881) in rat prostate and human benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).

    PubMed

    Asselin, J; Labrie, F; Gourdeau, Y; Bonne, C; Raynaud, J P

    1976-10-01

    Methyltrienolone (R 1881 - 17beta-hydroxy-17alpha-methyl-estra-4, 9, 11-trien-3-one) binding to rat ventral prostate cytosol has a specificity typical of an androgen receptor. In human benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) tissue, the specificity of [3H] R 1881 binding is different from that measured in rat prostate: progesterone and R 5020 (17, 21-dimethyl-19-nor-4, 9-pregnadiene-3, 20-dione) being more potent while 19-nortestosterone is less potent competitor. Moreover, the synthetic progestin [3H] R 5020 binds to BPH tissue with a similar specificity. These data suggest the presence of progestin binding components or of an atypical androgen receptor in human BPH cytosol.

  9. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  10. Nonylphenol effects on human prostate non tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Carrizzo, Albino; Valiante, Salvatore; Vecchione, Carmine; Laforgia, Vincenza; De Falco, Maria

    2016-05-16

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an industrial chemical with estrogenic activity both in vivo and in vitro; estrogens play a critical role in the development of prostate and may be the cause of some pathological states, including cancer. In this study we examined the effects of NP on human prostate non tumorigenic epithelial cells (PNT1A) investigating on cell proliferation, interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) and gene expression of genes involved in prostate diseases. We found that NP affects cell proliferation at 10(-6)M, promoting a cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of ERα and not ERβ, like the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Moreover, we showed that NP enhances gene expression of key regulators of cell cycle. Estrogen selective antagonist ICI182780 in part reverted the observed effects of NP. These results confirm the estrogenic activity of NP and suggest that other transduction pathways may be involved in NP action on prostate. PMID:27260121

  11. Annexin 1 is secreted by the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Haigler, H T; Christmas, P

    1990-12-01

    The human prostate expresses very high concentrations of annexins 1, 4, and 5 and secretes high concentrations of annexins 1 and 5. Although the biological roles of these proteins in prostate secretions are not known, these studies emphasize the need to consider extracellular sites for physiological functions of annexins. The clear demonstration of secretion of proteins that have blocked N-termini and lack hydrophobic signal sequences raises the possibility that novel cellular secretory pathways exist. Preliminary immunohistochemical experiments in collaboration with Dr. James Fallon indicate that both annexins 1 and 4 are expressed in prostate ductal secretory epithelium. Since annexin 1, but not annexin 4, is secreted, a comparison of the cellular fate of these two related proteins in the prostate may provide a useful model system for determining the structural elements that direct the secretion of proteins which lack conventional signal sequences.

  12. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  13. SEM and X-ray microanalysis of human prostatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Vilches, J; Lopez, A; De Palacio, L; Muñoz, C; Gomez, J

    1982-02-01

    Calculi removed from human prostates affected with nodular hyperplasia were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and EDAX system. The general spectrum was made up of Na, Al, Mg, S, P, Ca and Zn. Two types of stone were identified morphostructurally and microanalytically: calculi type I of nodular surface with high peaks of S, and calculi type II polyfaceted with high peaks of P and Ca. Their formation from corpora amylacea and/or exogenous constituents is discussed. The superficial deposit of Zn suggests its incorporation from the prostatic liquid and does not seem to play an important role in the genesis.

  14. Metastasis Update: Human Prostate Carcinoma Invasion via Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes that human prostate carcinoma primarily invades as a cohesive cell collective through a mechanism similar to embryonic tubulogenesis, instead of the popular epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) model. Evidence supporting a tubulogenesis model is presented, along with suggestions for additional research. Additionally, observations documenting cell adhesion molecule changes in tissue and stromal components are reviewed, allowing for comparisons between the current branching morphogenesis models and the tubulogenesis model. Finally, the implications of this model on prevailing views of therapeutic and diagnostic strategies for aggressive prostatic disease are considered. PMID:21949592

  15. Fibronectin induces MMP2 expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Andrei; Delella, Flávia K; Lacorte, Lívia M; Deffune, Elenice; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2013-01-25

    High-grade prostate cancers express high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), major enzymes involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the tumor cell lines commonly employed for prostate cancer research express only small amounts of MMPs when cultivated as monolayer cultures, in common culture media. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether culture conditions that include fibronectin can alter MMP2 and MMP9 expression by the human prostatic epithelial cell lines RWPE-1, LNCaP and PC-3. These cells were individually seeded at 2×10(4) cells/cm(2), cultivated until they reached 80% confluence, and then exposed for 4h to fibronectin, after which the conditioned medium was analyzed by gelatin zymography. Untreated cells were given common medium. Only RWPE-1 cells express detectable amounts of MMP9 when cultivated in common medium, whereas the addition of fibronectin induced high expression levels of pro and active forms of MMP2 in all tested cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that normal and tumor prostate cell lines express MMP2 activity when in contact with extracellular matrix components or blood plasma proteins such as fibronectin. Future studies of transcriptomes and proteomes in prostate cancer research using these cell lines should not neglect these important conclusions.

  16. A specific molecular beacon probe for the detection of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Lin; McGoldrick, Christopher A; Yin, Deling; Zhao, Jing; Patel, Vini; Brannon, Marianne F; Lightner, Janet W; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2012-06-01

    The small-molecule, water-soluble molecular beacon probe 1 is hydrolyzed by the lysate and living cells of human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP), resulting in strong green fluorescence. In contrast, probe 1 does not undergo significant hydrolysis in either the lysate or living cells of human nontumorigenic prostate cells (RWPE-1). These results, corroborated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and fluorescent microscopy, reveal that probe 1 is a sensitive and specific fluorogenic and chromogenic sensor for the detection of human prostate cancer cells among nontumorigenic prostate cells and that carboxylesterase activity is a specific biomarker for human prostate cancer cells.

  17. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  18. The prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) gene is localized to human chromosome 3q21-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.S.L.; Sharief, F.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) has been used as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. It is synthesized under androgen regulation and secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland. The authors have confirmed the previous assignment of the ACPP gene to chromosome 3 by probing a panel of 25 human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, and they have further localized the ACPP gene to chromosome 3q21-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. ICRAC controls the rapid androgen response in human primary prostate epithelial cells and is altered in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, Christian; Kilch, Tatiana; Kappel, Sven; Armbrüster, Andrea; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Bogeski, Ivan; Schwarz, Eva C.; Peinelt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Labelled 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding experiments have shown that expression levels of (yet unidentified) membrane androgen receptors (mAR) are elevated in prostate cancer and correlate with a negative prognosis. However, activation of these receptors which mediate a rapid androgen response can counteract several cancer hallmark functions such as unlimited proliferation, enhanced migration, adhesion and invasion and the inability to induce apoptosis. Here, we investigate the downstream signaling pathways of mAR and identify rapid DHT induced activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in primary cultures of human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from non-tumorous tissue. Consequently, down-regulation of Orai1, the main molecular component of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels results in an almost complete loss of DHT induced SOCE. We demonstrate that this DHT induced Ca2+ influx via Orai1 is important for rapid androgen triggered prostate specific antigen (PSA) release. We furthermore identified alterations of the molecular components of CRAC channels in prostate cancer. Three lines of evidence indicate that prostate cancer cells down-regulate expression of the Orai1 homolog Orai3: First, Orai3 mRNA expression levels are significantly reduced in tumorous tissue when compared to non-tumorous tissue from prostate cancer patients. Second, mRNA expression levels of Orai3 are decreased in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145 when compared to hPEC from healthy tissue. Third, the pharmacological profile of CRAC channels in prostate cancer cell lines and hPEC differ and siRNA based knock-down experiments indicate changed Orai3 levels are underlying the altered pharmacological profile. The cancer-specific composition and pharmacology of CRAC channels identifies CRAC channels as putative targets in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:24240085

  20. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Barbazza, Renzo; Marongiu, Barbara; Bonin, Serena; Stanta, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67%) patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS) (median 4.59 years) compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P = 0.0381). In multivariate analysis age (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), nuclear grading (P = 0.002), and HPV status (P = 0.034) were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24288430

  1. Calcification in human osteoblasts cultured in medium conditioned by the prostatic cancer cell line PC-3 and prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, G; Sugisaki, Y; Masugi, Y; Nakazawa, N

    1992-01-01

    A medium that had been conditioned by PC-3 cells stimulated the calcification of a human osteoblastic cell line, Tak-10, in a nonmitogenic culture. The calcification of the osteoblasts was stimulated maximally at a 25% concentration of the conditioned medium. Calcification activity was markedly enhanced by the addition of both prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and its substrate, alpha-glycerophosphate, to the medium; however, PAP added alone did not enhance this activity. These results suggest that human prostatic carcinoma cells produce a factor that stimulates the calcification of the human osteoblasts. Results have also suggested that PAP is a requisite for osteogenesis provided that its substrates are abundant in the medium.

  2. Deletion of the Olfactomedin 4 Gene Is Associated with Progression of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhen; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Jianqiong; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Pack, Svetlana; Zhuang, Zhengping; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene is located on chromosome 13q14.3, which frequently is deleted in human prostate cancer. However, direct genetic evidence of OLFM4 gene alteration in human prostate cancer has not yet been obtained. In this study, we investigated the genetics, protein expression, and functions of the OLFM4 gene in human prostate cancer. We found overall 25% deletions within the OLFM4 gene in cancerous epithelial cells compared with adjacent normal epithelial cells that were microdissected from 31 prostate cancer specimens using laser-capture microdissection and genomic DNA sequencing. We found 28% to 45% hemizygous and 15% to 57% homozygous deletions of the OLFM4 gene via fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis from 44 different prostate cancer patient samples. Moreover, homozygous deletion of the OLFM4 gene significantly correlated with advanced prostate cancer. By using immunohistochemical analysis of 162 prostate cancer tissue array samples representing a range of Gleason scores, we found that OLFM4 protein expression correlated inversely with advanced prostate cancer, consistent with the genetic results. We also showed that a truncated mutant of OLFM4 that lacks the olfactomedin domain eliminated suppression of PC-3 prostate cancer cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that OLFM4 is a novel candidate tumor-suppressor gene for chromosome 13q and may shed new light on strategies that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24070418

  3. An Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavese, Janet; Ogden, Irene M.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed a novel orthotopic implantation model of human prostate cancer (PCa). As PCa death is not due to the primary tumor, but rather the formation of distinct metastasis, the ability to effectively model this progression pre-clinically is of high value. In this model, cells are directly implanted into the ventral lobe of the prostate in Balb/c athymic mice, and allowed to progress for 4-6 weeks. At experiment termination, several distinct endpoints can be measured, such as size and molecular characterization of the primary tumor, the presence and quantification of circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow, and formation of metastasis to the lung. In addition to a variety of endpoints, this model provides a picture of a cells ability to invade and escape the primary organ, enter and survive in the circulatory system, and implant and grow in a secondary site. This model has been used effectively to measure metastatic response to both changes in protein expression as well as to response to small molecule therapeutics, in a short turnaround time. PMID:24084571

  4. [Diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Zagólski, Olaf; Czajecki, Krzysztof; Gajda, Mariusz

    2006-10-01

    An intracellular metabolic disturbance associated with mitochondriopathy, due to an age dependent metabolic defect, is suggested to cause metaplasia of salivary gland cells into oncocytes. The WHO classification of salivary gland diseases considers 3 oncocytic lesions: oncocytosis, oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma. In case of diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis of the parotid gland, extensive metaplasia of acinic and ductal cells leads to transformation of nearly all cells of the gland into oncocytes, which is clinically characterised by swelling of the parotid gland, and is an extremely rare condition. A 82-year-old man (the eldest of all reported) presented with a 2-month history of increasing diffuse swelling of the left parotid gland, 6 cm in diameter. The mass was soft, painless to palpation and grew in the superficial lobe of the parotid gland. The patient underwent surgical removal of the lesion with wide margins of healthy tissue. Histopathological examination of the operative specimen disclosed oncocytosis of the salivary gland. The patient has been followed-up for 6 months. He is doing well without recurrence. Surgical removal of the diffuse hyperplastic oncocytosis of the parotid gland, with indications and extent of the resection like in benign tumors, was effective in the presented patient.

  5. Antitumor effects of methotrexate-monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase antibody conjugate on human prostate tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, T.; Chu, T.M.; Leong, S.S.; Horoszewicz, J.S.; Lee, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to an IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody (MCA) specific for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) by an active ester method, resulting in a molar ratio of MTX to IgG/sub 1/ of 14. MTX-MCA conjugate retained 94% of free antibody activity and preserved 90% of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitory activity of free MTX. MTX-MCA conjugate was shown to be accumulated in vitro by prostate tumor cells (LNCaP) 1.3 times higher than that of MTX conjugate to normal mouse IgG (NIgG) and 6.2 times higher than that of free MTX. Antitumor activity in vitro exhibited that MTX-MCA conjugate is more effective on inhibition (52%) of /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine incorporation into LNCaP cells than that of MTX-NIgG (39%), but both were less effective than free MTX (70%). The in vivo distribution of /sup 3/H-MTX-MCA conjugate in human prostate tumor xenograft (tumor: blood ratio 5.1) was higher than those of /sup 3/H-MTX-NIgG conjugate (1.1) and of free /sup 3/H-MTX (1.5). Anti-tumor activity in vivo demonstrated that MTX-MCA conjugate retarded the growth of xenografted human prostate tumor greatly and persistently, as compared with the control groups. These results suggested that MTX-monoclonal anti-PAP antibody conjugate represents a potential reagent for immunochemotherapy of human prostate tumor (NIH CA-34536, CA-15437 and ACS CH-269.

  6. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  7. Elevated expression of UBE2T exhibits oncogenic properties in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Mingxin; Kwon, Yongwon; Wang, Yongsheng; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2T (UBE2T) is reported in human prostate cancer. However, whether UBE2T plays any functional role in prostate cancer development remains unknown. We here report the first functional characterization of UBE2T in prostate carcinogenesis. Prostate cancer tissue array analysis confirmed upregulation of UBE2T in prostate cancer, especially these with distant metastasis. Moreover, higher level of UBE2T expression is associated with poorer prognosis of prostate cancer patients. Ectopic expression of UBE2T significantly promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion, while UBE2T depletion by shRNA significantly inhibits these abilities of prostate cancer cells. Xenograft mouse model studies showed that overexpression of UBE2T promotes whereas UBE2T depletion inhibits tumor formation and metastasis significantly. Collectively, we identify critical roles of UBE2T in prostate cancer development and progression. These findings may serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensive determination of UBE2T as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26308072

  8. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  9. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for

  10. Deletion of antigens of the Lewis a/b blood group family in human prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Young, W. W.; Mills, S. E.; Lippert, M. C.; Ahmed, P.; Lau, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of antigens of the blood group Lewis a/b family were studied in a series of 42 prostatectomy specimens from patients with adenocarcinoma clinically confined to the prostate; 19 of these were later reclassified as pathologic Stage C. Staining of normal or hyperplastic versus neoplastic epithelium was assessed in routinely processed, paraffin-embedded tissue using murine monoclonal antibodies and an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. Antigens screened and the antibodies used to recognize them were Lewis a (CF4C4), Lewis b and Type 1 H (NS10), monosialosyl Lewis a I (19.9), and disialosyl Lewis a and monosialosyl Lewis a II (FH7). FH7 strongly stained the benign epithelium of all 39 Lewis positive cases, suggesting that the sialyltransferase responsible for synthesis of FH7-reactive determinants is highly active in benign prostatic tissue. When compared to the reactivity of benign epithelium in Lewis positive cases, the staining of the carcinomas was markedly reduced in 18 cases (46%) and absent in 16 cases (41%). This reduction or loss of staining of the malignant epithelium was observed for all antibodies that stained the corresponding benign epithelium of each case. In only five of the cases (13%) was the intensity of staining in the carcinoma equal to that of the surrounding benign epithelium. No cases in this latter group had recurrence of disease, whereas in the other staining groups 25-33% of the cases had recurrences; median follow-up for the entire group was 78 months. No correlation was apparent between Gleason score and the staining pattern with these antigens. In summary, antigens of the Lewis a/b family are deleted in a high percentage of cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2454582

  11. Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woo; Jung, Ae Ryang; Kwon, Oh Sung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of prostate-specific EVs in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Plasma and prostate tissue were collected from patients who underwent surgery for PCa (n = 82) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, n = 28). To analyze the quantity of EVs in prostate, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immuno-TEM with CD63 and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and immunofluorescence staining. After EV isolation from plasma, CD63 and PSMA concentration was measured using ELISA kits. PSMA-positive areas in prostate differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (2.4, 8.2, 17.5, 26.5%, p < 0.001). Plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (21.9, 43.4, 49.2, 59.9 ng/mL, p < 0.001), and ROC curve analysis indicated that plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differentiated PCa from BPH (AUC 0.943). Patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration had greater prostate volume (50.2 vs. 33.4 cc, p < 0.001) and lower pathologic Gleason score (p = 0.025). During the median follow-up of 18 months, patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration tended to have a lower risk of biochemical failure than those with higher levels of prostate-specific EVs (p = 0.085). PMID:27503267

  12. Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woo; Jung, Ae Ryang; Kwon, Oh Sung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of prostate-specific EVs in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Plasma and prostate tissue were collected from patients who underwent surgery for PCa (n = 82) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, n = 28). To analyze the quantity of EVs in prostate, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immuno-TEM with CD63 and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and immunofluorescence staining. After EV isolation from plasma, CD63 and PSMA concentration was measured using ELISA kits. PSMA-positive areas in prostate differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (2.4, 8.2, 17.5, 26.5%, p < 0.001). Plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (21.9, 43.4, 49.2, 59.9 ng/mL, p < 0.001), and ROC curve analysis indicated that plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differentiated PCa from BPH (AUC 0.943). Patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration had greater prostate volume (50.2 vs. 33.4 cc, p < 0.001) and lower pathologic Gleason score (p = 0.025). During the median follow-up of 18 months, patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration tended to have a lower risk of biochemical failure than those with higher levels of prostate-specific EVs (p = 0.085). PMID:27503267

  13. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  14. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  15. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  16. Laser Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Dosimetric and Thermodynamic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most commonly occurring neoplastic disease in the aging human male. Currently, surgical treatment of BPH is the primary therapeutic method. However, due to surgical complications, less invasive methods of treatment are desirable. In recent years, thermal coagulation of the hyperplastic prostate by a laser has received a considerable amount of attention. Nevertheless, the optimum laser irradiation parameters that lead to a successful and safe treatment of BPH have not been determined. This dissertation studies the physics of laser coagulation of prostate from both basic science and practical perspectives. Optical properties of prostatic tissue are determined over a spectrum of wavelengths. Knowledge of these properties allows for selection of appropriate laser wavelengths and provides a basis for performing dose equivalency studies among various types of lasers. Furthermore, knowledge of optical properties are needed for development of computer simulation models that predict the extent of thermal injury during laser irradiation of prostate. A computer model of transurethral heating of prostate that can be used to guide the clinical studies in determining an optimum dosimetry is then presented. Studies of the effects of non-laser heating devices, optical properties, blood perfusion, surface irrigation, and beam geometry are performed to examine the extent of heat propagation within the prostate. An in vitro model for transurethral laser irradiation of prostate is also presented to examine the effects of an 810 nm diode laser, thermal boundary conditions, and energy deposition rate during Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Results of these studies suggest that in the presence of laminar irrigation, the convective boundary condition is dominated by thermal diffusion as opposed to the bulk motion of the irrigation fluid. Distinct phases of thermal events are also identified during the laser irradiation. The in vivo studies of

  17. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  18. Interleukin-6: a multifunctional targetable cytokine in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran; Puhr, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Several cytokines are involved in regulation of cellular events in prostate cancer. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was frequently investigated in prostate cancer models because of its increased expression in cancer tissue at early stages of the disease. In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, it is well-known that IL-6 levels increase in serum. High levels of IL-6 were measured in the supernatants of cells which do not respond to androgenic stimulation. IL-6 expression in prostate cancer increases due to enhanced expression of transforming growth factor-beta, and members of the activating protein-1 complex, and loss of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor. IL-6 activation of androgen receptor (AR) may contribute to progression of a subgroup of prostate cancers. Results obtained with two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b, indicate that IL-6 activation of AR may cause either stimulatory or inhibitory responses on proliferation. Interestingly, prolonged treatment with IL-6 led to establishment of an IL-6 autocrine loop, suppressed signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 activation, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. In several cell lines IL-6 acts as a survival molecule through activation of the signalling pathway of phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase. Expression of suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) has been studied in prostate cancer. SOCS-3 prevents phosphorylation of STAT3 and is an important anti-apoptotic factor in AR-negative prostate cancer cells. Experimental therapy against IL-6 in prostate cancer is based on the use of the monoclonal antibody siltuximab which may be used for personalised therapy coming in the future. PMID:21664423

  19. The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William G; Demarzo, Angelo M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the π-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of

  20. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. PMID:21640721

  1. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis.

  2. Diversity of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts in the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Clark, J; Merson, S; Jhavar, S; Flohr, P; Edwards, S; Foster, C S; Eeles, R; Martin, F L; Phillips, D H; Crundwell, M; Christmas, T; Thompson, A; Fisher, C; Kovacs, G; Cooper, C S

    2007-04-19

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have recently been reported to be present in a high proportion of human prostate cancers. In the current study, we show that great diversity exists in the precise structure of TMPRSS2-ERG hybrid transcripts found in human prostates. Fourteen distinct hybrid transcripts are characterized, each containing different combinations of sequences from the TMPRSS2 and ERG genes. The transcripts include two that are predicted to encode a normal full-length ERG protein, six that encode N-terminal truncated ERG proteins and one that encodes a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein. Interestingly, distinct patterns of hybrid transcripts were found in samples taken from separate regions of individual cancer-containing prostates, suggesting that TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions may be arising independently in different regions of a single prostate.

  3. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  4. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  5. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  6. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  7. Bauhinia purprea agglutinin-modified liposomes for human prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Keisuke; Shimizu, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kento; Takeuchi, Yoshihito; Shimizu, Motohiro; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Bauhinia purprea agglutinin (BPA) is a well-known lectin that recognizes galactosyl glycoproteins and glycolipids. In the present study, we firstly found that BPA bound to human prostate cancer specimens but not to normal prostate ones. Therefore, we sought to develop BPA-PEG-modified liposomes (BPA-PEG-LP) encapsulating anticancer drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer. We examined the tumor targetability of BPA-PEG-LP with human prostate cancer DU145 cells, and observed that fluorescently labeled BPA-PEG-LP dominantly associated with the cells via the interaction between liposome-surface BPA and cell-surface galactosyl molecules. We also observed that BPA-PEG-LP accumulated in the prostate cancer tissue after the i.v. injection to DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice, and strongly bound to the cancer cells. In a therapeutic study, DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice were i.v. injected thrice with BPA-PEG-LP encapsulating doxorubicin (BPA-PEG-LPDOX, 2 mg/kg/day as the DOX dosage) or PEG-modified liposomes encapsulating DOX (PEG-LPDOX). As a result, BPA-PEG-LPDOX significantly suppressed the growth of the DU145 cancer cells, whereas PEG-LPDOX at the same dosage as DOX showed little anti-cancer effect. The present study suggested that BPA-PEG-LP could be a useful drug carrier for the treatment of human prostate cancers. PMID:26495901

  8. Splice variant PRKC-ζ-PrC is a novel biomarker of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Ireland, S J; Bee, A; Beesley, C; Forootan, S S; Dodson, A; Dickinson, T; Gerard, P; Lian, L-Y; Risk, J M; Smith, P; Malki, M I; Ke, Y; Cooper, C S; Gosden, C; Foster, C S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, using gene-knockdown techniques together with genome expression array analysis, we showed the gene protein Kinase C (PKC)-zeta (PRKCZ) to mediate the malignant phenotype of human prostate cancer. However, according to NCBI, the gene has undergone several major iterations. Therefore, to understand the relationship between its structure and biological activities, we have analysed its expressed sequence in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. Methods: Transcriptome-walking and targeted PCR were used to sequence the mRNA transcribed from PRKCZ. Hydropathy analysis was employed to analyse the hypothetical protein sequence subsequently translated and to identify an appropriate epitope to generate a specific monoclonal antibody. Results: A novel sequence was identified within the 3′-terminal domain of human PRKCZ that, in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues, is expressed during transcription and thereafter translated into protein (designated PKC-ζ-PrC) independent of conventional PKC-ζ-a. The monoclonal antibody detected expression of this 96 kD protein only within malignant prostatic epithelium. Interpretation: Transcription and translation of this gene sequence, including previous intronic sequences, generates a novel specific biomarker of human prostate cancer. The presence of catalytic domains characteristic of classic PKC-β and atypical PKC-ι within PKC-ζ-PrC provides a potential mechanism for this PRKCZ variant to modulate the malignant prostatic phenotype out-with normal cell-regulatory control. PMID:22644296

  9. Screening and Characterization of a Novel RNA Aptamer That Specifically Binds to Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase and Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) expression increases proportionally with prostate cancer progression, making it useful in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers. A novel ligand that can specifically bind to PAP would be very helpful for guiding prostate cancer therapy. RNA aptamers bind to target molecules with high specificity and have key advantages such as low immunogenicity and easy synthesis. Here, human PAP-specific aptamers were screened from a 2′-fluoropyrimidine (FY)-modified RNA library by SELEX. The candidate aptamer families were identified within six rounds followed by analysis of their sequences and PAP-specific binding. A gel shift assay was used to identify PAP binding aptamers and the 6N aptamer specifically bound to PAP with a Kd value of 118 nM. RT-PCR and fluorescence labeling analyses revealed that the 6N aptamer bound to PAP-positive mammalian cells, such as PC-3 and LNCaP. IMR-90 negative control cells did not bind the 6N aptamer. Systematic minimization analyses revealed that 50 nucleotide sequences and their two hairpin structures in the 6N 2′-FY RNA aptamer were equally important for PAP binding. Renewed interest in PAP combined with the versatility of RNA aptamers, including conjugation of anti-cancer drugs and nano-imaging probes, could open up a new route for early theragnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25591398

  10. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M M; Santos, Lina G; Freitas, Antônio C; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C; Rey, Juan A; Burbano, Rommel R; Silva, Benedito B da; Yoshioka, France K N; Pinto, Giovanny R

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied.

  11. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P.; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M.M.; Santos, Lina G.; Freitas, Antônio C.; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C.; Rey, Juan A.; Burbano, Rommel R.; da Silva, Benedito B.; Yoshioka, France K.N.; Pinto, Giovanny R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  12. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M M; Santos, Lina G; Freitas, Antônio C; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C; Rey, Juan A; Burbano, Rommel R; Silva, Benedito B da; Yoshioka, France K N; Pinto, Giovanny R

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  13. Light penetration in the human prostate: a whole prostate clinical study at 763 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Caroline M.; Mosse, C. Alexander; Allen, Clare; Payne, Heather; Emberton, Mark; Bown, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being investigated as a treatment for localized prostate cancer. Photodynamic therapy uses a photosensitizing drug which is activated by a specific wavelength of light, in the presence of oxygen. The activated drug reacts with tissue oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species which are responsible for localized tissue necrosis. One of the determinants of the PDT effect is the penetration of light in the prostate. This study assesses the penetration depth of 763 nm light throughout the prostate. Eight men undergoing multiple hollow needle insertion for high dose rate brachytherapy were recruited. 763 nm light, produced by a diode laser, was delivered to the prostate using cylindrically diffusing optical fibers within the plastic needles. Light was detected at different distances from the source, using an isotropic detector within nearby needles. Penetration depth was calculated using the Boltzmann approximation to the diffusion equation. Delivery detector fiber separation was measured on computed tomography. The mean penetration depth was 0.57 cm, but there was within patient variation of a mean factor of 4.3. Further work is ongoing to assess the effect of such variability in light penetration, on the PDT effect.

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa. PMID:26483423

  15. Modulation of mitochondrial aconitase on the bioenergy of human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juang, Horng-Heng

    2004-03-01

    A bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy proposed that normal citrate-producing prostate epithelial cell become citrate-oxidizing cells, in which mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) is not limiting, providing the energy required for the onset and progression of malignancy and metastasis. However, no direct evidence has been approved to support the hypothesis. A full-length cDNA encoding human skeletal muscle mACON cDNA was cloned and sequenced. mACON cDNA contains 19-bp 5' untranslated region, a 2343-bp coding segment, and 376-bp 3' untranslated region. This precursor enzyme contains mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acid residues and mature enzyme of 753 amino acids residues. A human anti-mACON overexpression vector containing the 1171-bp mACON cDNA fragment in the reverse orientation was stable transfected into human prostate carcinoma cells, PC-3 and DU145 cells. Results showed that mACON antisense blocked 40-60% mACON expression and enzymatic activity which induced decrease in the intracellular ATP biosynthesis but increase citrate secretion in the human prostate carcinoma cells. mACON antisense-transfected cells have lower cell proliferation ratio than the mock of DNA-transfected cells. Our study demonstrated the key role of the mACON in the cellular bioenergy and cell proliferation of human prostate carcinoma cells. PMID:14972331

  16. New models to define factors determining the growth and spread of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Passaniti, A; Adler, S H; Martin, G R

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of many cancers shows a sharp increase with age. This is particularly true of prostate cancer, which arises in many older males. Little or no morbidity is observed as the tumor develops in situ in the prostate. However, once malignant cells escape from the primary lesion and metastasize, the disease assumes a much more serious course. Here we report on the activity of human prostate cancer cells in culture as well as their behavior when transplanted into nude mice. In vitro, several lines of prostate carcinoma cells obtained from metastatic lesions were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane proteins (Matrigel) and found to exhibit highly invasive activity as observed with malignant cells from other types of tumors. Also, we report an improved method for obtaining an increased growth of human prostate cancer cells in nude mice by injecting these cells in Matrigel. Since there are no adequate animal models of prostate cancer, the systems described here may prove useful in defining events underlying the development and progression of the tumor cells to malignant status, as well as facilitate the analyses of novel therapeutic agents to prevent the growth and the spread of this cancer.

  17. Human and murine prostate basal/stem cells are not direct targets of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Angelergues, Antoine; Boutillon, Florence; d'Acremont, Bruno; Maidenberg, Marc; Oudard, Stéphane; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    Local overexpression of prolactin (PRL) in the prostate of Pb-PRL transgenic mice induces benign prostate tumors exhibiting marked amplification of the epithelial basal/stem cell compartment. However, PRL-activated intracellular signaling seems to be restricted to luminal cells, suggesting that basal/stem cells may not be direct targets of PRL. Given their described role as prostate cancer-initiating cells, it is important to understand the mechanisms that regulate basal/stem cells. In this study, we evaluated whether PRL can act directly on these cells, by growing them as prostaspheres. For this, primary 3D prostasphere cultures were prepared from unfractionated cells isolated from freshly harvested human and mouse benign prostate tissues and subjected to PRL stimulation in vitro. None of the various concentrations of PRL tested showed any effects on the sizes or numbers of the prostaspheres generated. In addition, neither activation of canonical PRL-induced signaling pathways (Stat5, Stat3 or Erk1/2) nor increased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 were detected by immunostaining in PRL-stimulated prostaspheres. Consistent with the absence of response, PRL receptor mRNA levels were generally undetectable in mouse sphere cells. We conclude that human and mouse prostate basal/stem cells are not direct targets of PRL action. The observed amplification of basal/stem cells in Pb-PRL prostates might be due to paracrine mechanisms originating from PRL action on other cell compartments. Our current efforts are aimed at unraveling these mechanisms.

  18. Preliminary report on the correlations among pineal concretions, prostatic calculi and age in human adult males.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kodaka, Tetsuo; Sano, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-09-01

    By using quantitative image analysis of soft X-ray photographs on the bulk of extracted pineal glands and prostates, we made a preliminary investigation into the correlations among pineal concretions (% by mass), prostatic calculi (% by mass) and age (years) in 40 human adult males, ranging in age from 31 to 95 years (mean (+/-SD) 69.9 +/- 15.2 years), who died and underwent the routine dissection course. The mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi were 17.68 +/- 13.56% (range 0-51.34%) and 0.93 +/- 1.31% (range 0-5.82%), respectively. There was no correlation between the mass concentration of pineal concretions and aging (r = 0.03; P < 1.0). There was no correlation between mass concentration of prostatic calculi and aging (r = 0.28; P < 0.5). No pineal concretions and no prostatic calculi were observed in seven and 10 cases, respectively; in addition, in one case, neither-concretions nor calculi were seen. From such data and from the previously reported suggestion on the counteracting functions between the pineal gland and prostate, a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi was expected. This was certainly obtained, but the correlation was low (r = -0.39; P < 0.05). Such a low correlation and no correlations between the concentrations of pineal concretions and aging or between prostatic calculi and aging may have been caused by the examination of relatively older humans. Therefore, further investigations using a number of pair samples collected from males including younger age generations will be necessary. PMID:14527133

  19. Preliminary report on the correlations among pineal concretions, prostatic calculi and age in human adult males.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kodaka, Tetsuo; Sano, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-09-01

    By using quantitative image analysis of soft X-ray photographs on the bulk of extracted pineal glands and prostates, we made a preliminary investigation into the correlations among pineal concretions (% by mass), prostatic calculi (% by mass) and age (years) in 40 human adult males, ranging in age from 31 to 95 years (mean (+/-SD) 69.9 +/- 15.2 years), who died and underwent the routine dissection course. The mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi were 17.68 +/- 13.56% (range 0-51.34%) and 0.93 +/- 1.31% (range 0-5.82%), respectively. There was no correlation between the mass concentration of pineal concretions and aging (r = 0.03; P < 1.0). There was no correlation between mass concentration of prostatic calculi and aging (r = 0.28; P < 0.5). No pineal concretions and no prostatic calculi were observed in seven and 10 cases, respectively; in addition, in one case, neither-concretions nor calculi were seen. From such data and from the previously reported suggestion on the counteracting functions between the pineal gland and prostate, a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi was expected. This was certainly obtained, but the correlation was low (r = -0.39; P < 0.05). Such a low correlation and no correlations between the concentrations of pineal concretions and aging or between prostatic calculi and aging may have been caused by the examination of relatively older humans. Therefore, further investigations using a number of pair samples collected from males including younger age generations will be necessary.

  20. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Vitamin D 24-Hydroxylase/CYP24A1 in Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Karpf, Adam R.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Muindi, Josephia R.; Morrison, Carl D.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitriol, a regulator of calcium homeostasis with antitumor properties, is degraded by the product of the CYP24A1 gene which is downregulated in human prostate cancer by unknown mechanisms. We found that CYP24A1 expression is inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells. In vitro methylation of the CYP24A1 promoter represses its promoter activity. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A (TSA) enhances the expression of CYP24A1 in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-qPCR reveals that specific histone modifications are associated with the CYP24A1 promoter region. Treatment with TSA increases H3K9ac and H3K4me2 and simultaneously decreases H3K9me2 at the CYP24A1 promoter. ChIP-qPCR assay reveals that treatment with DAC and TSA increases the recruitment of VDR to the CYP24A1 promoter. RT-PCR analysis of paired human prostate samples reveals that CYP24A1 expression is down-regulated in prostate malignant lesions compared to adjacent histologically benign lesions. Bisulfite pyrosequencing shows that CYP24A1 gene is hypermethylated in malignant lesions compared to matched benign lesions. Our findings indicate that repression of CYP24A1 gene expression in human prostate cancer cells is mediated in part by promoter DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications. PMID:20587525

  2. Sodium butyrate regulates androgen receptor expression and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonga; Park, Hyeyoung; Im, Ji Young; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to modify the expression of a variety of genes related to cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several cancer cells. However, the precise mode of action of HDAC inhibitors in prostate cancer cells is not completely understood. This study examined whether an HDAC inhibitor affects cell death in human prostate cancer cells through the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression. The molecular mechanism of the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate, on the epigenetic alterations of cell cycle regulators was evaluated in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. The expression levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 increased significantly after 48 h treatment with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate induced the expression of AR after 48 h treatment. In addition, immunofluorescence assay revealed the nuclear localization of the AR after sodium butyrate treatment. Sodium butyrate also significantly decreased the expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins (cyclin D1/cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)4, CDK6, and cyclin E/CDK2) in the LNCaP cells after 48 h treatment. Furthermore, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were upregulated as a result of the sodium butyrate treatment. These results suggest that sodium butyrate effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells by altering the expression of cell cycle regulators and AR. This study indicated that sodium butyrate may be a potential agent in prostate cancer treatment.

  3. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  4. Human kallikrein 3 (prostate specific antigen) and human kallikrein 5 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Tsai, S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 5 protein (hK5) is expressed in many normal tissues, most notably in skin, breast, salivary gland and esophagus. It has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for breast, ovarian and testicular cancer. Human kallikrein 3 (hK3; prostate-specific antigen) is the most useful marker for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK3 and hK5 are expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors do not show high levels of expression of hK5. Staining was most prominent in keratinizing epithelia in pleomorphic adenomas. hK3 is not expressed in salivary gland tumors.

  5. Role of hormonal and other factors in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Donald T; Turner, Michelle C; Gomes, James; Parent, Marie-Elise

    2008-03-01

    American men have a lifetime risk of about 18% for prostate cancer diagnosis. Large international variations in prostate cancer risks and increased risks among migrants from low- to high-risk countries indicate important roles for environmental factors. Major known risk factors include age, family history, and country/ethnicity. Type 2 diabetes appears to reduce risk, while high birth weight and adult height are linked to increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Limited evidence supports an association with a history of sexually transmitted infections. A previous meta-analysis of eight cohort studies indicated no associations with plasma androgen, estrogen, or sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels. However, there were dose-response relationships with baseline plasma testosterone levels in two studies that adjusted for other serum hormones and obesity. Finasteride (a drug that blocks testosterone activation) reduced prostate cancer risk by 25%. Low-frequency genes linked to familial prostate cancer only explain a small fraction of all cases. Sporadic cases were linked to relatively common polymorphisms of genes involved in (1) androgen synthesis, activation, inactivation and excretion, (2) hormone and vitamin D receptors, (3) carcinogen metabolism, and (4) DNA repair. Epidemiologic evidence supports protective roles for dietary selenium, vitamin E, pulses, tomatoes/lycopene, and soy foods, and high plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels. There is inadequate evidence that vegetables, fruit, carotenoids, and vitamins A and C reduce risk and that animal fat, alpha-linoleic acid, meat, coffee, and tea increase risk. Two major cohort studies found dose-response relationships with dietary calcium intake. Total dietary energy intake may enhance risk. Limited evidence supports a protective role for physical activity and elevated risk for farmers and other men with occupational pesticide exposure, particularly to organochlorine compounds and phenoxy herbicides

  6. Human hepatocytes support the hypertrophic but not the hyperplastic response to the murine nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen sodium phenobarbital in an in vivo study using a chimeric mouse with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Takeuchi, Hayato; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takako; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    High doses of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator, have been shown to produce hepatocellular tumors in rodents by a mitogenic mode of action (MOA) involving CAR activation. The effect of 1-week dietary treatment with NaPB on liver weight and histopathology, hepatic CYP2B enzyme activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA expression, replicative DNA synthesis and selected genes related to cell proliferation, and functional transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses was studied in male CD-1 mice, Wistar Hannover (WH) rats, and chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. The treatment of chimeric mice with 1000-1500-ppm NaPB resulted in plasma levels around 3-5-fold higher than those observed in human subjects given therapeutic doses of NaPB. NaPB produced dose-dependent increases in hepatic CYP2B activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA levels in all animal models. Integrated functional metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the responses to NaPB in the human liver were clearly different from those in rodents. Although NaPB produced a dose-dependent increase in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CD-1 mice and WH rats, no increase in replicative DNA synthesis was observed in human hepatocyte-originated areas of chimeric mice. In addition, treatment with NaPB had no effect on Ki-67, PCNA, GADD45β, and MDM2 mRNA expression in chimeric mice, whereas significant increases were observed in CD-1 mice and/or WH rats. However, increases in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis were observed in chimeric mice both in vivo and in vitro after treatment epidermal growth factor. Thus, although NaPB could activate CAR in both rodent and human hepatocytes, NaPB did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice, whereas it was mitogenic to rat and mouse hepatocytes. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of NaPB, the MOA for NaPB-induced rodent liver tumor formation is thus not relevant for humans.

  7. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Le Tortorec, Anna; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Denis, Hélène; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Havard, Laurence; Ruffault, Annick; Jégou, Bernard; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. Results The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. Conclusion The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains. PMID:19117522

  8. Coagulation of human prostate volumes with MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy: Results in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    N’Djin, William Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Hadjis, Stefan; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy were demonstrated recently in a preliminary human study in which a small subvolume of prostate tissue was treated prior to radical prostatectomy. Translation of this technology to full clinical use, however, requires the capability to generate thermal coagulation in a volume up to that of the prostate gland itself. The aim of this study was to investigate the parameters required to treat a full 3D human prostate accurately with a multi-element transurethral applicator and multiplanar MR temperature control. Methods: The approach was a combination of simulations (to select appropriate parameters) followed by experimental confirmation in tissue-mimicking phantoms. A ten-channel, MRI-compatible transurethral ultrasound therapy system was evaluated using six human prostate models (average volume: 36 cm3) obtained from the preliminary human feasibility study. Real-time multiplanar MR thermometry at 3 T was used to control the spatial heating pattern in up to nine planes simultaneously. Treatment strategies incorporated both single (4.6 or 8.1 MHz) and dual (4.6 and 14.4 MHz) frequencies, as well as maximum acoustic surface powers of 10 or 20 W cm−2. Results: Treatments at 4.6 MHz were capable of coagulating a volume equivalent to 97% of the prostate. Increasing power from 10 to 20 W cm−2 reduced treatment times by approximately 50% with full treatments taking 26 ± 3 min at a coagulation rate of 1.8 ± 0.4 cm3 min−1. A dual-frequency 4.6/14.4 MHz treatment strategy was shown to be the most effective configuration for achieving full human prostate treatment while maintaining good treatment accuracy for small treatment radii. The dual-frequency approach reduced overtreatment close to the prostate base and apex, confirming the simulations. Conclusions: This study reinforces the capability of MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy to treat

  9. Genetic Regulation of Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Joshua; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic development is a dynamic process in which basic mechanisms of epithelial outgrowth and epithelial-mesenchymal interaction are initiated by androgens and androgen receptor signaling. Even in adulthood, the prostate's function remains tightly regulated by androgens--without them, pathologic diseases including hyperplastic and malignant growth which together plague nearly 50% of aging males does not occur. Unraveling the etiology of these pathologic processes is a complex and important goal. In fact, many insights into these processes have come from an intimate understanding of the complex signaling networks that regulate physiologic prostatic growth in development. This review aims to highlight important key molecules such as Nkx3.1, sonic hedgehog and Sox9 as well as key signaling pathways including the Fibroblast growth factor and Wnt pathways. These molecules and pathways are critical for prostate development with both know and postulated roles in prostatic pathology. PMID:20930191

  10. A New Murine Model of Osteoblastic/Osteolytic Lesions from Human Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Serre, Claire Marie; Farlay, Delphine; Turtoi, Andrei; Bellahcene, Akeila; Follet, Hélène; Castronovo, Vincent; Clézardin, Philippe; Bonnelye, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 80% of patients dying from prostate carcinoma have developed bone metastases that are incurable. Castration is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. Although the disease initially responds to androgen blockade strategies, it often becomes castration-resistant (CRPC for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer). Most of the murine models of mixed lesions derived from prostate cancer cells are androgen sensitive. Thus, we established a new model of CRPC (androgen receptor (AR) negative) that causes mixed lesions in bone. Methods PC3 and its derived new cell clone PC3c cells were directly injected into the tibiae of SCID male mice. Tumor growth was analyzed by radiography and histology. Direct effects of conditioned medium of both cell lines were tested on osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. Results We found that PC3c cells induced mixed lesions 10 weeks after intratibial injection. In vitro, PC3c conditioned medium was able to stimulate tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and endothelin-1 (ET1) were highly expressed by PC3c while dikkopf-1 (DKK1) expression was decreased. Finally, PC3c highly expressed bone associated markers osteopontin (OPN), Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and produced mineralized matrix in vitro in osteogenic conditions. Conclusions We have established a new CRPC cell line as a useful system for modeling human metastatic prostate cancer which presents the mixed phenotype of bone metastases that is commonly observed in prostate cancer patients with advanced disease. This model will help to understand androgen-independent mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer in bone and provides a preclinical model for testing the effects of new treatments for bone metastases. PMID:24069383

  11. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Yanxi; Wu, Bo; Cao, Qiuhui; Wu, Lingyun; Yang, Guangdong

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  12. The regulation of adiponectin receptors in human prostate cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, T.; Digby, J.E.; Chen, J.; Desai, K.M.; Randeva, H.S. . E-mail: H.Randeva@warwick.ac.uk

    2006-09-29

    Obesity is a risk factor for prostate cancer, and plasma levels of the adipokine, adiponectin, are low in the former but high in the latter. Adiponectin has been shown to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis, suggesting that adiponectin and its receptors (Adipo-R1, Adipo-R2) may provide a molecular association between obesity and prostate carcinogenesis. We show for First time, the protein distribution of Adipo-R1 and Adipo-R2 in LNCaP and PC3 cells, and in human prostate tissue. Using real-time RT-PCR we provide novel data demonstrating the differential regulation of Adipo-R1 and Adipo-R2 mRNA expression by testosterone, 5-{alpha} dihydrotestosterone, {beta}-estradiol, tumour necrosis factor-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin in LNCaP and PC3 cells. Our findings suggest that adiponectin and its receptors may contribute to the molecular association between obesity and prostate cancer through a complex interaction with other hormones and cytokines that also play important roles in the pathophysiology of obesity and prostate cancer.

  13. Monitoring changes in tissue optical properties following interstitial photothermal therapy of ex vivo human prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weersink, Robert A.; He, Jie; Veilleux, Israel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a method of monitoring treatment progression of interstitial photothermal therapy of focal prostate cancer using transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT) combined with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS). Measurements of prostate tissue optical properties were made on ex vivo human prostate samples prior to and post coagulation. Interstitial photothermal treatments were delivered to the ex vivo samples and monitored using an interstitial probe near the treatment fiber. After treatment, bulk optical properties were measured on native and coagulated zones of tissue. Changes in optical properties across the boundary between native and coagulated tissues were spatially mapped using a small diffuse reflectance probe. The optical property estimates and spatial information obtained using each method was compared.

  14. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Congcong; Dienhart, Jason A.; Bolton, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS), TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2) were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1) were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins, such that

  15. Human prostatic tumor cells in culture produce growth and differentiation factors active on osteoblasts: a new biological and clinical parameter for prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Festuccia, C; Teti, A; Bianco, P; Guerra, F; Vicentini, C; Tennina, R; Villanova, I; Sciortino, G; Bologna, M

    1997-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PRCA) cells metastasize to bone with high frequency, inducing typical osteosclerotic lesions. To establish if local stimuli on the bone tissue may derive from metastatic colonies of prostatic origin, we evaluated the biologic activities secreted by human prostatic epithelium and effective on osteoblast-like cells in vitro. Supernatant from short-term tissue cultures of human prostatic tissue samples obtained from PRCA (35 cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, 12 cases) patients were applied to three models of cells with osteoblastic phenotype: two normal [rabbit osteoblasts (OB) and rat periosteal cells (PO)] and one transformed (human osteosarcoma cell line, MG63). Proliferative activity was monitored through enzymatic reduction of tetrazolium salts and expressed as relative mitogenic activities (RMA). Analysis of proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast function, demonstrates that conditioned media (CM) from PRCA cultures stimulate both growth and activity of osteoblast-like cells to a greater extent compared to CM from BPH. Furthermore, cell growth and activity of osteoblast-like cells are progressively increased by CM derived from patients with stage B (tumor confined within the prostate capsule), stage C (locally invasive tumor), and stage D (invasive tumor with distant metastasis) disease. One of the mechanisms potentially underlying the CM-stimulated effects on bone cells is associated with the urokinase (uPA) enzyme route, whose release progressively increases with the stage of disease. However, antibodies against uPA and p-aminobenzamidine (a low molecular weight urokinase inhibitor) treatment, which both inhibit the proliferative and differentiative effects induced by exogenous urokinase, partially slow down the effects of CM from PRCA tissue cultures, suggesting that additional factors are secreted by prostatic tumor cells in vitro. In conclusion, we show that the mitogenic and differentiative

  16. Response to luteinizing releasing hormone, thyrotrophic releasing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin administration in healthy men at different risks for prostatic cancer and in prostatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hill, P; Wynder, E L; Garbaczewski, L; Garnes, H; Walker, A R

    1982-05-01

    A comparative study of the pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing releasing hormone (LHRH), thyrotrophic releasing hormone (TRH), and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) administration was carried out in (a) low-risk young South African black men and high-risk North American black men for prostatic cancer and (b) healthy elderly South African men and South African black men with prostatic cancer. A comparable HCG response occurred in young South African and North American black men, while a greater release of prolactin, but a lesser release of luteinizing hormone in response to LHRH:TRH occurred in South African black men. The response to HCG was comparable in elderly and young South African black men, although the prolactin release in response to TRH was greater in elderly men. A more prolonged release of luteinizing hormone was evident in men with prostatic cancer. Higher estradiol and estrone but lower androstenedione levels occurred in men with prostatic cancer. Data suggest that, in the elderly South African black men with prostatic cancer, estrogen metabolism is modified and that either the estrogen level or the higher estrogen:androgen levels modify the pituitary response to LHRH:TRH. A Western diet enhanced the changes in hormone profiles evident in black South African men with prostatic cancer. PMID:6802486

  17. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Dendritic cells in hyperplastic thymuses from patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Yuriko; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Obara, Daiji; Yamagata, Munehisa; Tohgi, Hideo

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the hyperplastic myasthenia gravis (MG) thymus, we studied the frequency and distribution of three mature DC phenotypes (CD83(+)CD11c(+), CD86(+)CD11c(+), and HLA-DR(+)CD11c(+)) in samples from patients with MG whose symptoms dramatically improved following thymectomy and in non-MG control thymuses. In hyperplastic MG thymuses, mature DCs were much more numerous in nonmedullary areas, such as the subcapsular/outer cortex; around the germinal centers; and in extralobular connective tissue, particularly around blood vessels. Mature DCs strongly coexpressed CD44 and appeared to be components of a CD44-highly positive (CD44(high)) cell population migrating from the vascular system. Furthermore, in the hyperplastic MG thymus, the expression of secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC) markedly increased especially around extralobular blood vessels, where the CD44(high) cell population accumulated. These findings suggest that DCs may migrate into the hyperplastic thymus from the vascular system via mechanisms that involve CD44 and SLC. DCs may present self-antigens, thereby promoting the priming and/or boosting of potentially autoreactive T cells against the acetylcholine receptor.

  19. Selenomethionine Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Brooks, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We determined the effects of selenomethionine, the major organic selenium containing compound found in the diet and the form of selenium being used in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, on prostate cancer cells. Materials and Methods We assessed global transcript profiles of selenomethionine treated LNCaP using cDNA microarrays and compared them to those of cells treated with methylselenic acid, a direct precursor of methylselenol, which is the active form of selenium in vivo. Results After treatment with selenomethionine 2,336 unique genes showed expression changes of at least 1.5-fold in at least 3 time points during 48 hours and 366 unique transcripts differed significantly between selenomethionine and methylselenic acid treated LNCaP. Approximately half of the 76 cell cycle regulated genes affected by selenomethionine were down-regulated and enriched for genes associated with the G2/M phase. Flow cytometry analysis showed that selenomethionine induced G2/M arrest in LNCaP at low concentrations. Selenomethionine also affected expression levels of 35 known androgen responsive genes and 18 of these transcripts showed changes that were the inverse of those seen after androgen stimulation. At high concentrations selenomethionine decreased prostate specific antigen promoter driven luciferase expression. Conclusions Selenomethionine modulates transcript levels of genes involved in a number of biological processes, including cell cycle/apoptosis androgen signaling, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Although the pathways affected paralleled in many ways those that are modulated by methylselenic acid, distinct differences in transcript patterns and effects on cell cycle regulation suggest that different selenium compounds could exert unique effects in prostate cells. PMID:17222674

  20. Zinc Ionophore (Clioquinol) Inhibition of Human ZIP1-Deficient Prostate Tumor Growth in the Mouse Ectopic Xenograft Model: A Zinc Approach for the Efficacious Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.; Zou, Jing; Zheng, Yao; Naslund, Michael J.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in males. This is mainly due to the absence of an available efficacious chemotherapy despite decades of research in pursuit of effective treatment approaches. A plausible target for the treatment is the established clinical relationship that the zinc levels in the malignant cells are markedly decreased compared to the normal epithelium in virtually all cases of prostate cancer, and at all stages malignancy. The decrease in zinc results from the downregulation of the functional zinc uptake transporter, ZIP1; which occurs during early development of prostate malignancy. This is an essential requirement for the development of malignancy to prevent the cytotoxic/tumor-suppressor effects of increased zinc on the premalignant and malignant cells. Thus prostate cancer is a ZIP1-deficient malignancy. This relationship provides the basis for a treatment regimen that will facilitate the uptake and accumulation of zinc into the premalignant and malignant cells. In this report we employed a zinc ionophore (clioquinol) approach in the treatment of mice with human ZIP1-deficient prostate tumors (ectopic xenograft model). Clioquinol treatment resulted in 85%inhibition of tumor growth due to the cytotoxic effects of zinc. Coupled with additional results from earlier studies, the compelling evidence provides a plausible approach for the effective treatment of human prostate cancer; including primary site malignancy, hormone-resistant cancer, and metastasis. Additionally, this approach might be effective in preventing the development of malignancy in individuals suspected of presenting with early development of malignancy. Clinical trials are now required in leading to the potential for an efficacious zinc-treatment approach, which is urgently needed for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26878064

  1. Relationship between electrical admittivity and quantitative histopathology in human prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, Ryan; Milone, Michael; Schned, Alan; Heaney, John

    2010-04-01

    Passive bioelectrical properties have been demonstrated to provide sufficient contrast for use in differentiating benign from malignant tissue in a number of different organs including breast, prostate, cervix, bladder, and skin. The underlying microscopic anatomy responsible for these measured differences has been primarily speculative in the past. In this study we recorded electrical conductivity and permittivity spectra (100 Hz - 100 kHz) from 464 three mm diameter circular prostate samples. Each of these tissue specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, processed onto microscopy slides, and digitized using optical microscopy. We used digital imaging processing tools to extract quantitative morphological features including total number of glands, average and total glandular lumen size, shape characteristics of the luminal spaces, and average and total glandular perimeter lengths. Correlative analysis was performed to assess the relationships between the tissue architectural features and the precisely co-registered electrical properties. We report on the findings from this analysis. This statistical assessment aims to provide a valuable piece of new information to help formulate a better understanding of the precise influence morphological architecture has on the flow of current through tissue.

  2. The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Robert H; Nguyen, Carvell; Weight, Christopher J; Klein, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (0-27%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 0-67%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

  3. Action of the Src family kinase inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Kim, Donghwa; Cheng, Jin Q; Zhang, Shumin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Buettner, Ralf; Mirosevich, Janni; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2005-10-15

    Src family kinases (SFK) are currently being investigated as targets for treatment strategies in various cancers. The novel SFK/Abl inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), is a promising therapeutic agent with oral bioavailability. Dasatinib has been shown to inhibit growth of Bcr-Abl-dependent chronic myeloid leukemia xenografts in nude mice. Dasatinib also has been shown to have activity against cultured human prostate and breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which dasatinib acts on epithelial tumor cells remains unknown. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks the kinase activities of the SFKs, Lyn, and Src, in human prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)) signaling downstream of SFKs are also inhibited at similar concentrations of dasatinib. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways, dasatinib suppresses cell adhesion, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, dasatinib has potential as a therapeutic agent for metastatic prostate cancers harboring activated SFK and focal adhesion kinase signaling.

  4. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  5. Sodium butyrate and tributyrin induce in vivo growth inhibition and apoptosis in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuefer, R; Hofer, M D; Altug, V; Zorn, C; Genze, F; Kunzi-Rapp, K; Hautmann, R E; Gschwend, J E

    2004-01-26

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACs) are known to exhibit antiproliferative effects on various carcinoma cells. In this study, the in vivo efficiency of two HDACs, sodium butyrate and tributyrin, on prostate cancer growth inhibition were investigated. To gain an insight into the possible underlying pathways, cell culture experiments were performed focusing on the expression of p21, Rb and c-myc. For in vivo testing, prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and TSU-Pr1) were seeded on the chorioallantois membrane (CAM) and implanted in a xenograft model using nude mice. Standard Western blot analysis was performed for protein expression of p21, Rb and c-myc in HDAC-treated vs untreated prostate cancer cells. Both sodium butyrate and tributyrin had a considerable treatment effect on microtumours on the chicken egg at already very low concentrations of 0.1 mM. Tributyrin-treated tumours showed the strongest effect with 38% apoptotic nuclei in the prostate cancer cell line PC3. In the mouse model, there was almost no difference between sodium butyrate and tributyrin. In untreated animals the tumours were almost double the size 4 weeks after implantation. Tumours of the treatment groups had a significantly lower percentage of Ki-67-positive-stained nuclei. As demonstrated by Western blot analysis, these effects seem to be independent of p53 status and a pathway via p21-Rb-c-myc is possibly involved. In this study we have demonstrated a substantial in vivo treatment effect, which can be induced by the application of sodium butyrate or the orally applicable tributyrin in human prostate cancer. The given results may provide the rationale to apply these drugs in well-controlled clinical trials in patients being at high risk of recurrence after specific therapy or in patients with locally or distant advanced prostate cancer. PMID:14735205

  6. Crystal structure of human prostate-specific antigen in a sandwich antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Stura, Enrico A; Muller, Bruno H; Bossus, Marc; Michel, Sandrine; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 3) present in small quantities in the sera of healthy men becomes elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) and other prostate disorders. The ability to identify the free PSA fraction associated with PCa could increase the reliability of the PSA diagnostic test. Here we present the crystal structure of human PSA from seminal fluid in a sandwich complex with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 5D5A5 captures total PSA with exceptionally high affinity, and mAb 5D3D11 selectively discriminates between free PSA subforms that are more abundant in sera from patients with PCa. Although the antigen is not of seric origin, several insights into cancer diagnosis can be discerned from this complex. MAb 5D3D11 recognizes a PSA conformation different from that previously reported. Interacting with the kallikrein loop, the PSA N-linked glycan attached to asparagine 61 is an uncommonly complex sialated triantennary chain. O-linked glycosylation is observed at threonine 125. The description of how PSA subforms in prostatic fluid can be discriminated using pairs of antibodies is a first step in the design of new strategies that are capable of real discrimination among PSA subforms, which will lead to the formulation of more reliable diagnostic tests. In a companion article [Muller, B. H., Savatier, A., L'Hostis, G., Costa, N., Bossus, M., Michel, S., et al. (2011). In vitro affinity maturation of an anti-PSA antibody for prostate cancer diagnostic assay. J. Mol. Biol.], we describe engineering efforts to improve the affinity of mAb 5D3D11, a first step towards such goal. PMID:22037582

  7. Androgen receptor–negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Zurita, Amado J.; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V.; Prieto, Victor G.; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor–negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer–induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor–null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  8. Androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Zurita, Amado J; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V; Prieto, Victor G; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K; Logothetis, Christopher J; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M

    2008-08-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer-induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor-null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  9. Colorectal carcinomas arising in the hyperplastic polyposis syndrome progress through the chromosomal instability pathway.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, N J; Gorman, P; Tomlinson, I P; Bullpitt, P; Ward, R L

    2000-08-01

    The hyperplastic polyposis syndrome is characterized by the presence within the colon of multiple large hyperplastic polyps. We describe a case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome associated with two synchronous carcinomas, one of which arises within a pre-existing hyperplastic lesion. Comparative genomic hybridization was used to determine genetic changes in both carcinomas and several associated hyperplastic lesions. Microsatellite analysis at five loci was performed on carcinomas and representative hyperplastic polyps, and p53 status was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both carcinomas showed multiple genetic aberrations, including high level gains of 8q and 13q, and loss of 5q. These changes were not seen in the hyperplastic polyps. Microsatellite instability was not seen in the carcinomas, four separate hyperplastic polyps, the hyperplastic polyp with mild adenomatous change associated with the carcinoma, or a separate serrated adenoma. Allelic imbalance in the cancers at D5S346 and D17S938 suggested allelic loss of both p53 and APC, as well as at the loci D13S263, D13S174, D13S159, and D18S49. An early invasive carcinoma in one hyperplastic polyp stained for p53 protein, but the associated hyperplastic polyp was negative. In this case, neoplastic progression followed the typical genetic pathway of common colorectal carcinoma and occurred synchronously with mutation of p53.

  10. Is STAT3 and PTEN Expression Altered in Canine Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Lin, H-Y; Palmieri, C

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) are, respectively, an oncogene and tumour suppressor gene whose dysregulated expression in human prostate cancer is associated with increased malignancy and poor prognosis. Both markers were evaluated in 12 samples of canine benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 17 canine prostatic carcinomas (PCs) by immunohistochemistry, to understand their possible role in canine prostate carcinogenesis. STAT3 was expressed in 25% and 82.35% of BPH and PC, respectively, with a significantly higher number of STAT3-positive cells in malignant compared with hyperplastic lesions. Three PCs had occasional nuclear expression of STAT3. PTEN was expressed in BPH and PC with a similar distribution and percentage of positive cells; however, four PCs were PTEN negative. Solid PCs contained more STAT3-positive and fewer PTEN-positive cells compared with the other subtypes. A reduced number of PTEN-positive cells was observed in PCs with a high Gleason score (GS10), while no association was demonstrated between STAT3 expression and Gleason score. The data suggest that overexpression of STAT3 and downregulation of PTEN may be an important step in canine prostate carcinogenesis and both markers may be related to the histological subtypes of PC and the degree of differentiation of neoplastic cells.

  11. Animal models relevant to human prostate carcinogenesis underlining the critical implication of prostatic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent development of animal models relevant to human prostate cancer (PC) etiopathogenesis has provided important information on the specific functions provided by key gene products altered during disease initiation and progression to locally invasive, metastatic and hormone-refractory stages. Especially, the characterization of transgenic mouse models has indicated that the inactivation of distinct tumor suppressor proteins such as phosphatase tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), Nkx3.1, p27KIP1 and p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) may cooperate for the malignant transformation of prostatic stem/progenitor cells into PC stem/progenitor cells and tumor development and metastases. Moreover, the sustained activation of diverse oncogenic signaling elements, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), sonic hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, c-Myc, Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) also may contribute to the acquisition of more aggressive and hormone-refractory phenotypes by PC stem/progenitor cells and their progenies during disease progression. Importantly, it has also been shown that an enrichment of PC stem/progenitor cells expressing stem cell-like markers may occur after androgen deprivation therapy and docetaxel treatment in the transgenic mouse models of PC suggesting the critical implication of these immature PC cells in treatment resistance, tumor re-growth and disease recurrence. Of clinical interest, the molecular targeting of distinct gene products altered in PC cells by using different dietary compounds has also been shown to counteract PC initiation and progression in animal models supporting their potential use as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents for eradicating the total tumor cell mass, improving current anti-hormonal and chemotherapies and preventing disease relapse. PMID:21396984

  12. Expression of melanocortin receptors in human prostate cancer cell lines: MC2R activation by ACTH increases prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Saly; Dennis, John C; Schwartz, Dean; Judd, Robert; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Khazal, Kamel; Akingbemi, Benson; Mo, Xiu-Lei; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Morrison, Edward; Mansour, Mahmoud

    2012-10-01

    The melanocortin receptors (MCRs 1-5) are G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) that regulate food intake, inflammation, skin pigmentation, sexual function and steroidogenesis. Their peptide ligands, the melanocortins, are α-, β- and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) all of which are secreted from the anterior pituitary gland under hypothalamic control. MC2R binds ACTH but has no affinity for the other melanocortins and is, thereby, pharmacologically different from MCRs that bind those ligands. Evidence suggests that elevated GPCRs transactivate the androgen receptor (AR), the critical mediator of prostate cell growth, and consequently promote prostate cancer cell proliferation. It may be that reduced central melanocortin signaling is coincidental with reversal of prostate cancer cachexia, but no data are available on the expression of, or the role for, MCRs in prostate cancer. Here, we show that MCR (1-5) mRNAs are expressed in androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cell lines. Further, MC2R, the specific target of ACTH, is expressed in LNCaP, PC3 and DU-145 cells. Among the several synthetic MCR peptide ligands that we used, only ACTH promoted concentration-dependent cell proliferation in the three cell lines as shown by MTT cell proliferation assay. In LNCaP cells, the effect was additive with testosterone stimulation and was partially blunted with SHU9119, a non-selective MCR antagonist. In the same cells, ACTH induced cAMP production and increased AR nuclear labeling in immunocytochemical assays. Our observations suggest that MC2R is involved in prostate carcinogenesis and that targeting MC2R signaling may provide a novel avenue in prostate carcinoma treatment. PMID:22842514

  13. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kou, Bo; Ma, Zhen-Kun; Tang, Xiao-Shuang; Lv, Chuan; Ye, Min; Chen, Jia-Qi; Li, Lei; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting. PMID:25677131

  14. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Kou, Bo; Ma, Zhen-Kun; Tang, Xiao-Shuang; Lv, Chuan; Ye, Min; Chen, Jia-Qi; Li, Lei; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC–3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting. PMID:25677131

  15. Modulation of iron on mitochondrial aconitase expression in human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juang, Horng-Heng

    2004-10-01

    The mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) containing a [4Fe-4S] cluster is regarded as the key enzyme for citrate oxidation in the epithelial cells of human prostate. In vitro studies using the human prostatic carcinoma cells, PC-3 cells, found that both hemin and ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) significantly increased mACON enzymatic activity and gene expression. The effect of FAC on mACON was enhanced 2-fold by co-treating with ascorbic acid but blocked by co-treating with iron chelator, deferoxamine mesylate. Hemin treatments blocked 30% of citrate secretion from PC-3 cells but upregualted 2-fold of intracellular ATP biosynthesis. Results from reporter assay by using a cytomegalovirus enhance/promoter driven luciferase mRNA ligated to the iron response element (IRE) of mACON as a reporter construct demonstrated that modulation of FAC on gene translation of mACON gene is dependent on the IRE. Transient gene expression assays indicated that upregulation of mACON gene transcription by FAC may through the putative antioxidant response element (ARE) signal pathway. This study provides the first evidence of the biologic mechanism of human mACON gene translation/transcription and suggests a regulatory link between the energy utilization and the iron metabolism in human prostatic carcinoma cells. PMID:15543948

  16. Identification of Prognostic Molecular Features in the Reactive Stroma of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Provero, Paolo; Fusco, Carlo; Delorenzi, Mauro; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value. PMID:21611158

  17. Comparative immunohistochemical study of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic C cells of the rat thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lacave, I; Rojas, F; Bernabé, R; Utrilla, J C; Fernández-Santos, J M; De Miguel, M; Conde, E

    2002-09-01

    In rats, the frequency of spontaneous C-cell tumours is very high and is both age and gender dependent. The three specific stages of neoplastic progression can be distinguished into diffuse C-cell hyperplasia, focal C-cell hyperplasia and bona fide C-cell tumours. Based on this hypothetical model of human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we carried out an immunohistochemical study using different markers (calcitonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, somatostatin and chromogranin) to verify the existence of any relationship between their expression and the successive steps of tumour development. We found a characteristic immunohistochemical staining pattern, particularly for calcitonin and somatostatin, which distinguishes C-cell tumours from both normal and hyperplastic C cells, with no differences related to the gender of the animals under study. Specifically, a considerable heterogeneity in calcitonin expression was only displayed by C-cell carcinomas, being less pronounced in C-cell adenomas. As for somatostatin, this regulatory peptide was found only in a minority of calcitonin-positive cells in normal and hyperplastic glands. However, in some C-cell adenomas and most C-cell carcinomas nearly all calcitonin-positive cells also coexpressed somatostatin. We conclude that rat C-cell neoplasms constitute a very particular tumour entity which shares many but not all immunohistochemical features with human MTC.

  18. [Histopathological and immunological analysis of hyperplastic palatine tonsils and adenoids in children with coexisting atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, Marek; Grochowski, Paweł; Zawisza, Edward; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    Allergic sensitisation of the airways occurs in the mucosa of the shock organ, or in the lymphatic stations draining these structures. The lymphatic structure closest to the nasal mucosa in humans is the adenoid and tonsils. Research done in respect to Waldeyer's ring on people dealing at the same time with allergy, is seldom the subject of dissertation in polish as well as world wide medical literature. In the enclosed dissertation, writers present the results of histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of hyperplastic tonsils and adenoid, taken from children with coexisting atopy. The authors describe an immunohistochemical analyses of the hyperplastic human palatine tonsil. They present the expression of antigen CD3, CD20, CD45, CD68, EMA, SMA, Vimentin, Desmin, S-100, von Willebrand Factor, p35, Bcl-2, melanin, cytokeratin, estrogen receptor, progesteron receptor, kolagen IV and NSE in every region of pallatine tonsil. It is worthwhile to remark, that many of these cases, the presence of eosinophilia and subepithelial oedema was observed. Our immunohistochemical findings support the hypothesis that allergic sensitization takes place in the adenoid and tonsils. Furthermore, this study confirms that dendritic cells ad macrophages are involved and important in allergic disease.

  19. [PROBLEM OF ENDOMETRIUM HYPERPLASTIC PROCESSES IN REPRODUCTIVE AGE WOMEN].

    PubMed

    Bazyuta, L Z; Polyova, S P; Tsintar, S A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the risk factors of endometrium hyperplastic processes (EHP) in reproduc- tive age women. It is shown that EHP occur in response to hormonal homeostasis violations of the target tissues. It is established that the biologically active substances, which are closely related to immune mechanisms of the reproductive system functioning take place in regulatory mechanisms of cell growth and differentiation of endometrium. PMID:27491143

  20. Multiple calcifying hyperplastic dental follicles: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ulkem; Baykul, Timucin; Yildirim, Benay; Yildirim, Derya; Karaduman, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a 31-year-old female patient with six impacted teeth. The crowns of the impacted teeth were surrounded with cyst-like lesions with a mixed internal structure and well-defined cortical borders. Microscopic examination of the specimen obtained from the follicle of the left mandibular third molar tooth revealed loose to moderately dense collagenous connective tissue with abundant calcified material and sparse epithelial islands. A diagnosis of multiple calcifying hyperplastic dental follicles was made. PMID:24380071

  1. Mapping MRI/MRS Parameters with Genetic Over-expression Profiles In Human Prostate Cancer: Demonstrating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lenkinski, Robert E.; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Liu, Fangbing; Frangioni, John V.; Perner, Sven; Rubin, Mark A.; Genega, Elizabeth; Rofsky, Neil M.; Gaston, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy can probe a variety of physiological (e.g. blood vessel permeability) and metabolic characteristics of prostate cancer. However, little is known about the changes in gene expression that underlie the spectral and imaging features observed in prostate cancer. Tumor induced changes in vascular permeability and angiogenesis are thought to contribute to patterns of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI images of prostate cancer even though the genetic basis of tumor vasculogenesis is complex and the specific mechanisms underlying these DCEMRI features have not yet been determined. In order to identify the changes in gene expression that correspond to MRS and DCEMRI patterns in human prostate cancers, we have utilized tissue print micropeel techniques to generate “whole mount” molecular maps of radical prostatectomy specimens that correspond to pre-surgical MRI/MRS studies. These molecular maps include RNA expression profiles from both Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qrt-PCR) analysis, as well as immunohistochemical studies. Using these methods on patients with prostate cancer, we found robust over-expression of choline kinase a in the majority of primary tumors. We also observed overexpression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a newly identified angiogenic factor, in a subset of DCEMRI positive prostate cancers. These studies set the stage for establishing MRI/MRS parameters as validated biomarkers for human prostate cancer. PMID:18752015

  2. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs), have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq) now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal samples and 9 lung cancer

  3. Overexpression and knock-down studies highlight that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 controls proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Caroline; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; McLaughlin, Claire; Leedman, Peter J.; Stuart, Lisa; Epis, Michael; Hoyne, Gerard; Boulos, Sherif; Johnson, Liam; Schlaich, Markus; Matthews, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in men. It is critical to identify and characterize oncogenes that drive the pathogenesis of human prostate cancer. The current study builds upon previous research showing that a disintegrin and metallproteinase (ADAM)28 is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. Our novel study used overexpression, pharmacological, and molecular approaches to investigate the biological function of ADAM28 in human prostate cancer cells, with a focus on cell proliferation and migration. The results of this study provide important insights into the role of metalloproteinases in human prostate cancer. The expression of ADAM28 protein levels was assessed within human prostate tumors and normal adjacent tissue by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to assess ADAM28 protein expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. Functional assays were conducted to assess proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer cells in which ADAM28 protein expression or activity had been altered by overexpression, pharmacological inhibition, or by siRNA gene knockdown. The membrane bound ADAM28 was increased in human tumor biopsies and prostate cancer cell lines. Pharmacological inhibition of ADAM28 activity and/or knockdown of ADAM28 significantly reduced proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells, while overexpression of ADAM28 significantly increased proliferation and migration. ADAM28 is overexpressed in primary human prostate tumor biopsies, and it promotes human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration. This study supports the notion that inhibition of ADAM28 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for human prostate cancer. PMID:27749584

  4. Assessment of prostate cancer detection with a visual-search human model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Anando; Kalantari, Faraz; Gifford, Howard C.

    2014-03-01

    Early staging of prostate cancer (PC) is a significant challenge, in part because of the small tumor sizes in- volved. Our long-term goal is to determine realistic diagnostic task performance benchmarks for standard PC imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This paper reports on a localization receiver operator characteristic (LROC) validation study comparing human and model observers. The study made use of a digital anthropomorphic phantom and one-cm tumors within the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Uptake values were consistent with data obtained from clinical In-111 ProstaScint scans. The SPECT simulation modeled a parallel-hole imaging geometry with medium-energy collimators. Nonuniform attenua- tion and distance-dependent detector response were accounted for both in the imaging and the ordered-subset expectation-maximization (OSEM) iterative reconstruction. The observer study made use of 2D slices extracted from reconstructed volumes. All observers were informed about the prostate and nodal locations in an image. Iteration number and the level of postreconstruction smoothing were study parameters. The results show that a visual-search (VS) model observer correlates better with the average detection performance of human observers than does a scanning channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) model observer.

  5. Cisplatin induces production of reactive oxygen species via NADPH oxidase activation in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Terazawa, Riyako; Kojima, Keitaro; Nakane, Keita; Deguchi, Takashi; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Ito, Masafumi; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cisplatin treatment of human prostate cancer cells; hormone-sensitive LNCaP and hormone-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells. Intracellular levels of ROS and H(2)O(2) were measured and visualized using specific fluorescent probes. NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity was detected by lucigenin chemiluminescence assay. Expression levels of NOX isoforms were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment increased the intracellular levels of ROS and H(2)O(2) in three prostate cancer cell lines. The increase was transient and robust in hormone-sensitive LNCaP cells compared with hormone-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells. Consistent with these findings, the NOX activity induced by cisplatin was higher in LNCaP cells than in PC3 and DU145 cells. Expression pattern of NOX isoforms varied among three cell lines and the NOX activity was independent of NOX expression. Taken together, we have shown that cisplatin induces production of ROS and H(2)O(2) via NOX activation in human prostate cancer cell lines, which is most prominent in hormone-sensitive LNCaP cells. PMID:21682664

  6. Zinc blocks gene expression of mitochondrial aconitase in human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster as the key enzyme for citrate oxidation in the human prostatic epithelial cell. Although there is accumulating evidence indicating that accumulation of high levels of zinc in prostate epithelial cells causes reduced efficiency of citrate oxidation, zinc regulation on the mACON is still not well understood. From in vitro studies, zinc chloride treatment has been developed using humic acid as the carrier (Zn-HA) in human prostatic carcinoma cells, PC-3. Zn-HA treatment (0.1-10 microM) restricts mACON enzymatic activity, which attenuates citrate utility and decreases intracellular ATP levels in PC-3 cells, whereas the effect is blocked by adding the zinc chelator, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Immunoblot, ribonuclease-protection and transient gene-expression assays indicate that Zn-HA treatments inhibit mACON gene expression. Mutation of the putative metal response element (MRE) from CTCGCCTTCA to TGATCCTTCA abolishes Zn-HA inhibition of mACON promoter activity. Our results have demonstrated that zinc possesses a specific regulatory mechanism on the mACON gene, and a biologic function of the putative metal regulatory system in mACON gene transcription has been identified. PMID:16094633

  7. Selective secretion of annexin 1, a protein without a signal sequence, by the human prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P; Callaway, J; Fallon, J; Jones, J; Haigler, H T

    1991-02-01

    Annexins are primarily intracellular proteins as would be predicted from their lack of hydrophobic signal sequences. However, we now report that the human prostate gland selectively secretes high concentrations of annexin 1 (also called lipocortin 1 and p35) and a proteolytic cleavage product, des1-29-annexin 1, into seminal plasma. Secreted annexin 1 had a blocked amino terminus and was structurally indistinguishable from intracellular annexin 1. Although annexin 1 and the structurally related protein, annexin 4, co-localized to many of the same cells of the ductal epithelium of the prostate, annexin 4 was not secreted. Thus, the secretion of annexin 1 appears to involve a highly selective mechanism that does not involve targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum by a hydrophobic signal sequence.

  8. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  9. Intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin type- A relieves bladder outlet obstruction in human and induces prostate apoptosis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Tu, Chieh-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hsin-Ju; Chiang, Po-Hui; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Background With the increasing interest with botulinum toxin – A (BTX-A) application in the lower urinary tract, we investigated the BTX-A effects on the canine prostate and also in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods Transperineal injection into the prostate using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) was performed throughout the study. Saline with or without 100 U of BTX-A was injected into mongrel dogs prostate. One or 3 months later, the prostate was harvested for morphologic and apoptotic study. In addition, eight BPH patients refractory to α-blockers were treated with ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection of 200 U of BTX-A. Results In the BTX-A treated dogs, atrophy and diffuse apoptosis was observed with H&E stain and TUNEL stain at 1 and 3 months. Clinically, the mean prostate volume, symptom score, and quality of life index were significantly reduced by 18.8%, 73.1%, and 61.5% respectively. Maximal flow rate significantly increased by 72.0%. Conclusion Intraprostatic BTX-A injection induces prostate apotosis in dogs and relieves BOO in humans. It is therefore a promising alternative treatment for refractory BOO due to BPH. PMID:16620393

  10. 5α-Reductase Type 3 Expression in Human Benign and Malignant Tissues: A Comparative Analysis During Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Alejandro; Kawinski, Elzbieta; Li, Yun; Oka, Daizo; Alexiev, Borislav; Azzouni, Faris; Titus, Mark A.; Mohler, James L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A third isozyme of human 5α-steroid reductase, 5α-reductase-3, was identified in prostate tissue at the mRNA level. However, the levels of 5α-reductase-3 protein expression and its cellular localization in human tissues remain unknown. METHODS A specific monoclonal antibody was developed, validated, and used to characterize for the first time the expression of 5α-reductase-3 protein in 18 benign and 26 malignant human tissue types using immunostaining analyses. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In benign tissues, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was high in conventional androgen-regulated human tissues, such as skeletal muscle and prostate. However, high levels of expression also were observed in non-conventional androgen-regulated tissues, which suggest either multiples target tissues for androgens or different functions of 5α-reductase-3 among human tissues. In malignant tissues, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was ubiquitous but particularly over-expressed in some cancers compared to their benign counterparts, which suggests a potential role for 5α-reductase-3 as a biomarker of malignancy. In benign prostate, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was localized to basal epithelial cells, with no immunostaining observed in secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was localized in both basal epithelial cells and neoplastic epithelial cells characteristic of HGPIN. In androgen-stimulated and castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CaP), 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was present in most epithelial cells and at similar levels, and at levels higher than observed in benign prostate. Analyses of expression and functionality of 5α-reductase-3 in human tissues may prove useful for development of treatment for benign prostatic enlargement and prevention and treatment of CaP. PMID:21557268

  11. p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) repress prostate specific antigen levels in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lilian I L; Labrecque, Mark P; Ibuki, Naokazu; Cox, Michael E; Elliott, John E; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2015-03-25

    Despite stringent restrictions on their use by many countries since the 1970s, the endocrine disrupting chemicals, DDT and DDE are still ubiquitous in the environment. However, little attention has been directed to p,p'-DDT and the anti-androgen, p,p'-DDE on androgen receptor (AR) target gene transcription in human cells. Inhibitors of androgenic activity may have a deleterious clinical outcome in prostate cancer screens and progression, therefore we determined whether environmentally relevant concentrations of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE negatively impact AR-regulated expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and other AR target genes in human LNCaP and VCaP prostate cancer cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and immuno-blotting techniques were used to measure intracellular PSA, PSMA and AR mRNA and protein levels. We have shown for the first time that p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible PSA mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we used the fully automated COBAS PSA detection system to determine that extracellular PSA levels were also significantly repressed. These chemicals achieve this by blocking the recruitment of AR to the PSA promoter region at 10 μM, as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in LNCaP cells. Both p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible AR protein accumulation at 10 μM. Thus, we conclude that men who have been exposed to either DDT or DDE may produce a false-negative PSA test when screening for prostate cancer, resulting in an inaccurate clinical diagnosis. More importantly, prolonged exposure to these anti-androgens may mimic androgen ablation therapy in individuals with prostate cancer, thus exacerbating the condition by inadvertently forcing adaptation to this stress early in the disease.

  12. [Hyperplastic polyp with neoplastic transformation in a patient with atrophic gastritis and multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Moura, E G H; Domingos, T A; Alvarado, H; Iriya, K; Kishi, H S; Martins, B C; Moura, E T H; P, P Sakai

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplastic gastric polyps are often found at GI endoscopy and are not considered premalignant lesions, although some cases of malignancy have been reported. Neuroendocrine tumors, conversely, are rare and account for approximately 1% to 2% of gastric polyps. Both hyperplastic gastric polyps and neuroendocrine tumors are related to gastric atrophy. The case of a hyperplastic polyp with multifocal areas of adenocarcinoma within the polyp associated to multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors is reported.

  13. Human α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) epithelial prostate stem cells express low levels of active androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Hepburn, Anastasia C; Wilson, Laura; Coffey, Kelly; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A; Pal, Deepali; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Heer, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to be the cell of origin in malignant transformation in many tissues, but their role in human prostate carcinogenesis continues to be debated. One of the conflicts with this model is that cancer stem cells have been described to lack androgen receptor (AR) expression, which is of established importance in prostate cancer initiation and progression. We re-examined the expression patterns of AR within adult prostate epithelial differentiation using an optimised sensitive and specific approach examining transcript, protein and AR regulated gene expression. Highly enriched populations were isolated consisting of stem (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE)), transiently amplifying (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE)) and terminally differentiated (α(2)β(1)(LOW) CD133(-VE)) cells. AR transcript and protein expression was confirmed in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) and CD133(-VE) progenitor cells. Flow cytometry confirmed that median (±SD) fraction of cells expressing AR were 77% (±6%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells and 68% (±12%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE) transiently amplifying cells. However, 3-fold lower levels of total AR protein expression (peak and median immunofluorescence) were present in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells compared with differentiated cells. This finding was confirmed with dual immunostaining of prostate sections for AR and CD133, which again demonstrated low levels of AR within basal CD133(+VE) cells. Activity of the AR was confirmed in prostate progenitor cells by the expression of low levels of the AR regulated genes PSA, KLK2 and TMPRSS2. The confirmation of AR expression in prostate progenitor cells allows integration of the cancer stem cell theory with the established models of prostate cancer initiation based on a functional AR. Further study of specific AR functions in prostate stem and differentiated cells may highlight novel mechanisms of prostate homeostasis and insights into tumourigenesis.

  14. Heat shock protein 27 regulates human prostate cancer cell motility and metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Eric A; Ogden, Irene M; Pavese, Janet M; Huang, XiaoKe; Xu, Li; Jovanovic, Borko D; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer in American men. Mortality from PCa is caused by the movement of cancer cells from the primary organ to form metastatic tumors at distant sites. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is known to increase human PCa cell invasion and its overexpression is associated with metastatic disease. The role of HSP27 in driving PCa cell movement from the prostate to distant metastatic sites is unknown. Increased HSP27 expression increased metastasis as well as primary tumor mass. In vitro studies further examined the mechanism of HSP27-induced metastatic behavior. HSP27 did not affect cell detachment, adhesion, or migration, but did increase cell invasion. Cell invasion was dependent upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), whose expression was increased by HSP27. In vivo, HSP27 induced commensurate changes in MMP-2 expression in tumors. These findings demonstrate that HSP27 drives metastatic spread of cancer cells from the prostate to distant sites, does so across a continuum of expression levels, and identifies HSP27-driven increases in MMP-2 expression as functionally relevant. These findings add to prior studies demonstrating that HSP27 increases PCa cell motility, growth and survival. Together, they demonstrate that HSP27 plays an important role in PCa progression. PMID:24798191

  15. Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Characteristics of Histologically Defined Prostate Cancer in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junqian; Humphrey, Peter A.; Kibel, Adam S.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Narra, Vamsidhar R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2010-01-01

    The contrast provided by diffusion-sensitive magnetic resonance offers the promise of improved tumor localization in organ-confined human prostate cancer (PCa). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements of PCa were performed in vivo, in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, and later, ex vivo, in the same patients’ prostatectomy specimens. The imaging data were coregistered to histological sections of the prostatectomy specimens, thereby enabling unambiguous characterization of diffusion parameters in cancerous and benign tissues. Increased cellularity, and hence decreased luminal spaces, in peripheral zone PCa led to approximately 40% and 50% apparent diffusion policy (ADC) decrease compared with benign peripheral zone tissues in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. In contrast, no significant diffusion anisotropy differences were observed between the cancerous and noncancerous peripheral zone tissues. However, the dense fibromuscular tissues in prostate, such as stromal tissues in benign prostatic hyperplasia in central gland, exhibited high diffusion anisotropy. A tissue classification method is proposed to combine DTI and T2-weighted image contrasts that may provide improved specificity of PCa detection over T2-weighted imaging alone. PCa identified in volume rendered MR images qualitatively correlates well with histologically determined PCa foci. PMID:19215051

  16. Large scale phosphoproteome analysis of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Myung, Jae-Kyung; Sadar, Marianne D

    2012-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the western world. The androgen receptor, a phosphoprotein, is suspected to be involved in all stages of the prostate cancer. Androgen receptor activity can be modulated by various kinases such as PKA, MAPK, AKT, and Src. Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification and serves as a molecular on-off switch to regulate signaling. Disruptions of cellular phosphorylation are associated with various diseases such as cancer and kinases provide important drug targets. Here we present an analysis of the phosphoproteome in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. The analytical strategy employed here used proteomics based methodologies with a combination of detergents and chaotropic reagents during trypsin digestion followed by titanium dioxide enrichment of phosphopeptides. Over the course of multiple analyses by mass spectrometry we identified a total of 746 phosphorylation sites in 540 phosphopeptides corresponding to 116 phosphoproteins, of which 56 had not been previously reported. Phosphoproteins identified included transcription factors, co-regulators of the androgen receptor, and cancer-related proteins that include β-catenin, USP10, and histone deacetylase-2. The information of signaling pathways, motifs of phosphorylated peptides, biological processes, molecular functions, cellular components, and protein interactions from the identified phosphoproteins established a map of phosphoproteome and signaling pathways in LNCaP cells.

  17. Tocopherols and saponins derived from Argania spinosa exert, an antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drissi, A; Bennani, H; Giton, F; Charrouf, Z; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols obtained from alimentary virgin argan oil extracted from the endemic argan tree of Morocco and of saponins extracted from argan press cake on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol as antiproliferative drug candidates. Cytotoxicity and antiproliferative effects were investigated after cells' treatment with tocopherols and saponins compared to 2-Methoxyoestradiol as the positive control. Tocopherols and saponins extracted from argan tree and 2-methoxyestradiol exhibit a dose-response cytotoxic effect and an antiproliferative action on the tested cell lines. The best antiproliferative effect of tocopherols is obtained with DU145 and LNCaP cell lines (28 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively, as GI50). The saponins fraction displayed the best antiproliferative effect on the PC3 cell line with 18 microg/ml as GI50. Our results confirm the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and show for the first time the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols and saponins extracted from the argan tree on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil is of potential interest in developing new strategies for prostate cancer prevention. PMID:16982463

  18. Tocopherols and saponins derived from Argania spinosa exert, an antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drissi, A; Bennani, H; Giton, F; Charrouf, Z; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols obtained from alimentary virgin argan oil extracted from the endemic argan tree of Morocco and of saponins extracted from argan press cake on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol as antiproliferative drug candidates. Cytotoxicity and antiproliferative effects were investigated after cells' treatment with tocopherols and saponins compared to 2-Methoxyoestradiol as the positive control. Tocopherols and saponins extracted from argan tree and 2-methoxyestradiol exhibit a dose-response cytotoxic effect and an antiproliferative action on the tested cell lines. The best antiproliferative effect of tocopherols is obtained with DU145 and LNCaP cell lines (28 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively, as GI50). The saponins fraction displayed the best antiproliferative effect on the PC3 cell line with 18 microg/ml as GI50. Our results confirm the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and show for the first time the antiproliferative effect of tocopherols and saponins extracted from the argan tree on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil is of potential interest in developing new strategies for prostate cancer prevention.

  19. Biological effect of human serum collected before and after oral intake of Pygeum africanum on various benign prostate cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Larré, Stéphane; Camparo, Philippe; Comperat, Eva; Boulbés, Delphine; Haddoum, Mohammed; Baulande, Sylvain; Soularue, Pascal; Costa, Pierre; Cussenot, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Pygeum africanum (Tadenan) is a popular phytotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. The active compounds of the drug have not been identified, and determining the plasma concentration of the drug is, therefore, not possible. Because there are conflicting results on the efficacy of this drug, we aimed to investigate its effect on prostate cell growth in vitro using human serum collected before and after Pygeum africanum intake. We used primary and organotypic cultures of human prostatic stromal myofibroblast cell line WPMY and prostatic epithelial cell line PNT2. We also used fresh benign prostatic tissue. The serum of a treated man induced decreases in the proliferation of primary cells, organotypic cells and WPMY cells but not PNT2 cells. We also analysed the effect of treated serum on the gene expression profile of WPMY cells. The transcriptome analysis revealed an upregulation of genes involved in multiple tumour suppression pathways and a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and oxidative-stress pathways. The oral intake of Pygeum africanum resulted in serum levels of active substances that were sufficient to inhibit the proliferation of cultured myofibroblasts prostatic cells. This inhibition was associated with changes in the transcriptome.

  20. Biological effect of human serum collected before and after oral intake of Pygeum africanum on various benign prostate cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Larré, Stéphane; Camparo, Philippe; Comperat, Eva; Boulbés, Delphine; Haddoum, Mohammed; Baulande, Sylvain; Soularue, Pascal; Costa, Pierre; Cussenot, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Pygeum africanum (Tadenan) is a popular phytotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. The active compounds of the drug have not been identified, and determining the plasma concentration of the drug is, therefore, not possible. Because there are conflicting results on the efficacy of this drug, we aimed to investigate its effect on prostate cell growth in vitro using human serum collected before and after Pygeum africanum intake. We used primary and organotypic cultures of human prostatic stromal myofibroblast cell line WPMY and prostatic epithelial cell line PNT2. We also used fresh benign prostatic tissue. The serum of a treated man induced decreases in the proliferation of primary cells, organotypic cells and WPMY cells but not PNT2 cells. We also analysed the effect of treated serum on the gene expression profile of WPMY cells. The transcriptome analysis revealed an upregulation of genes involved in multiple tumour suppression pathways and a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and oxidative-stress pathways. The oral intake of Pygeum africanum resulted in serum levels of active substances that were sufficient to inhibit the proliferation of cultured myofibroblasts prostatic cells. This inhibition was associated with changes in the transcriptome. PMID:22198631

  1. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  2. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Binding to Human Prostate Cancer Cells Triggers Insulin-like Responses

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Uma Kant; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface GRP78 by activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) promotes cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis. α2M*-treated human prostate cancer cells exhibit a 2–3-fold increase in glucose uptake and lactate secretion, an effect similar to insulin treatment. In both α2M* and insulin-treated cells, the mRNA levels of SREBP1-c, SREBP2, fatty-acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, ATP citrate lyase, and Glut-1 were significantly increased together with their protein levels, except for SREBP2. Pretreatment of cells with α2M* antagonist antibody directed against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78 blocks these α2M*-mediated effects, and silencing GRP78 expression by RNAi inhibits up-regulation of ATP citrate lyase and fatty-acid synthase. α2M* induces a 2–3-fold increase in lipogenesis as determined by 6-[14C]glucose or 1-[14C]acetate incorporation into free cholesterol, cholesterol esters, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phosphatidylcholine, which is blocked by inhibitors of fatty-acid synthase, PI 3-kinase, mTORC, or an antibody against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78. We also assessed the incorporation of [14CH3]choline into phosphatidylcholine and observed similar effects. Lipogenesis is significantly affected by pretreatment of prostate cancer cells with fatostatin A, which blocks sterol regulatory element-binding protein proteolytic cleavage and activation. This study demonstrates that α2M* functions as a growth factor, leading to proliferation of prostate cancer cells by promoting insulin-like responses. An antibody against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78 may have important applications in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:25720493

  3. Effect of vicanicin and protolichesterinic acid on human prostate cancer cells: role of Hsp70 protein.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Caggia, S; Piovano, M; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of identifying novel agents with antigrowth and pro-apoptotic activity on prostate cancer cells, in the present study, we evaluated the effect of five lichen secondary metabolites the depsides atranorin (1), diffrattaic (2) and divaricatic (3) acids, the depsidone vicanicin (4) and the protolichesterinic acid (5) on cell growth in androgen-sensitive (LNCaP) and androgen-insensitive (DU-145) human prostate cancer cells. The cell viability was measured using MTT assay. LDH release, a marker of membrane breakdown, was also measured. For the detection of apoptosis, the evaluation of DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) and caspase-3 activity assay were employed. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, TRAIL, COX-2, NOS2 and Hsp70 proteins was detected by western blot analysis. Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by using a fluorescent probe. It was observed that atranorin (1), diffrattaic (2) and divaricatic (3) acids showed a lower activity inhibiting the prostate cancer cells only at more high concentrations (25 and 50μM). Whereas compounds vicanicin (4) and protolichesterinic acid (5) showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50μM concentrations in DU-145 and LNCaP cells, activating an apoptotic process. The novel finding, in the present study, is that apoptosis induced by these compounds appears to be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of Hsp70 expression, that may be correlated with a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. The combination of vicanicin (4) and protolichesterinic acid (5) with other anti-prostate cancer therapies could be considered a promising strategy that warrants further in vivo evaluation. PMID:22063921

  4. Expression and potential role of the peptide orexin-A in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valiante, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Tafuri, Simona; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Campese, Roberto; Monaco, Roberto; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Assisi, Loredana; Mirabella, Nicola; Forte, Maurizio; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo

    2015-09-01

    The peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and their G protein-coupled OX1 and OX2 receptors are involved in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Altered expression or signaling dysregulation of orexins and their receptors have been associated with a wide range of human diseases including narcolepsy, obesity, drug addiction, and cancer. Although orexin-A, its precursor molecule prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor have been detected in the human normal and hyperplastic prostate tissues, their expression and function in the prostate cancer (PCa) remains to be addressed. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the immunohistochemical localization of orexin-A in human PCa specimens, and the expression of prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor at both protein and mRNA levels in these tissues. Orexin-A administration to the human androgen-dependent prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP up-regulates OX1 receptor expression resulting in a decrease of cell survival. Noteworthy, nanomolar concentrations of the peptide counteract the testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor in the cells: the orexin-A action is prevented by the addition of the OX1 receptor antagonist SB-408124 to the test system. These findings indicate that orexin-A/OX1 receptor interaction interferes with the activity of the androgen receptor which regulates PCa onset and progression, thus suggesting that orexin-A and its receptor might represent novel therapeutic targets to challenge this aggressive cancer.

  5. A novel anticancer agent, decursin, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dongsool; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Chapla; Lee, Sookyeon; Chi, Hyungjoon; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2005-02-01

    We isolated a coumarin compound decursin (C(19)H(20)O(5); molecular weight 328) from Korean angelica (Angelica gigas) root and characterized it by spectroscopy. Here, for the first time, we observed that decursin (25-100 micromol/L) treatment for 24 to 96 hours strongly inhibits growth and induces death in human prostate carcinoma DU145, PC-3, and LNCaP cells. Furthermore, we observed that decursinol [where (CH(3))(2)-C=CH-COO- side chain of decursin is substituted with -OH] has much lower effects compared with decursin, suggesting a possible structure-activity relationship. Decursin-induced growth inhibition was associated with a strong G(1) arrest (P < 0.001) in DU145 and LNCaP cells, and G(1), S as well as G(2)-M arrests depending upon doses and treatment times in PC-3 cells. Comparatively, decursin was nontoxic to human prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells and showed only moderate growth inhibition and G(1) arrest. Consistent with G(1) arrest in DU145 cells, decursin strongly increased protein levels of Cip1/p21 but showed a moderate increase in Kip1/p27 with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK); CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1, and inhibited CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and cyclin E kinase activity, and increased binding of CDK inhibitor (CDKI) with CDK. Decursin-caused cell death was associated with an increase in apoptosis (P < 0.05-0.001) and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; however, pretreatment with all-caspases inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) only partially reversed decursin-induced apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. These findings suggest the novel anticancer efficacy of decursin mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate carcinoma cells.

  6. Xenotransplanted human prostate carcinoma (DU145) cells develop into carcinomas and cribriform carcinomas: ultrastructural aspects.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Jamison, James M; Neal, Deborah R; Summers, Jack L; Taper, Henryk S

    2012-10-01

    Androgen-independent, human prostate carcinoma cells (DU145) develop into solid, carcinomatous xenotransplants on the diaphragm of nu/nu mice. Tumors encompass at least two poorly differentiated cell types: a rapidly dividing, eosinophilic cell comprises the main cell population and a few, but large basophilic cells able to invade the peritoneal stroma, the muscular tissue, lymph vessels. Poor cell contacts, intracytoplasmic lumina, and signet cells are noted. Lysosomal activities are reflected by entoses and programmed cell deaths forming cribriform carcinomas. In large tumors, degraded cells may align with others to facilitate formation of blood supply routes. Malignant cells would spread via ascites and through lymphatics.

  7. Animal models of human prostate cancer: The Consensus Report of the New York Meeting of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium Prostate Pathology Committee

    PubMed Central

    Ittmann, Michael; Huang, Jiaoti; Radaelli, Enrico; Martin, Philip; Signoretti, Sabina; Sullivan, Ruth; Simons, Brian W.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Robinson, Brian D.; Chu, Gerald C.; Loda, Massimo; Thomas, George; Borowsky, Alexander; Cardiff, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models, particularly mouse models, play a central role in the study of the etiology, prevention and treatment of human prostate cancer (PCa). While tissue culture models are extremely useful in understanding the biology of PCa, they cannot recapitulate the complex cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment that play a key role in cancer initiation and progression. The NCI Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium convened a group of human and veterinary pathologists to review the current animal models of PCa and make recommendations regarding the pathological analysis of these models. Over 40 different models with 439 samples were reviewed including genetically engineered mouse models, xenograft, rat and canine models. Numerous relevant models have been developed over the last 15 years and each approach has strengths and weaknesses. Analysis of multiple genetically engineered models has shown that reactive stroma formation is present in all the models developing invasive carcinomas. In addition, numerous models with multiple genetic alterations display aggressive phenotypes characterized by sarcomatoid carcinomas and metastases, which is presumably a histological manifestation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The significant progress in development of improved models of PCa has already accelerated our understanding the complex biology of PCa and promises to enhance development of new approaches to prevention, detection and treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:23610450

  8. Contouring variability of human- and deformable-generated contours in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Kim, Jinkoo; Liu, Chang; Pradhan, Deepak; Aref, Ibrahim; Cattaneo, Richard, II; Vance, Sean; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate contouring variability of human-and deformable-generated contours on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT for ten patients with low-or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For each patient in this study, five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate, bladder, and rectum, on one PCT dataset and five CBCT datasets. Consensus contours were generated using the STAPLE method in the CERR software package. Observer contours were compared to consensus contour, and contour metrics (Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, Contour Distance, Center-of-Mass [COM] Deviation) were calculated. In addition, the first day CBCT was registered to subsequent CBCT fractions (CBCTn: CBCT2-CBCT5) via B-spline Deformable Image Registration (DIR). Contours were transferred from CBCT1 to CBCTn via the deformation field, and contour metrics were calculated through comparison with consensus contours generated from human contour set. The average contour metrics for prostate contours on PCT and CBCT were as follows: Dice coefficient—0.892 (PCT), 0.872 (CBCT-Human), 0.824 (CBCT-Deformed); Hausdorff distance—4.75 mm (PCT), 5.22 mm (CBCT-Human), 5.94 mm (CBCT-Deformed); Contour Distance (overall contour)—1.41 mm (PCT), 1.66 mm (CBCT-Human), 2.30 mm (CBCT-Deformed); COM Deviation—2.01 mm (PCT), 2.78 mm (CBCT-Human), 3.45 mm (CBCT-Deformed). For human contours on PCT and CBCT, the difference in average Dice coefficient between PCT and CBCT (approx. 2%) and Hausdorff distance (approx. 0.5 mm) was small compared to the variation between observers for each patient (standard deviation in Dice coefficient of 5% and Hausdorff distance of 2.0 mm). However, additional contouring variation was found for the deformable-generated contours (approximately 5.0% decrease in Dice coefficient and 0.7 mm increase in Hausdorff distance relative to human-generated contours on CBCT). Though deformable contours provide a reasonable starting point for contouring on

  9. Dietary Influences on Tissue Concentrations of Phytanic Acid and AMACR Expression in the Benign Human Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Yachana; Wright, Margaret; Deaton, Ryan J.; Rueter, Erika Enk; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Moser, Ann B.; Ananthanrayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Gann, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) is an enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism that is markedly over-expressed in virtually all prostate cancers (PCa), relative to benign tissue. One of AMACR’s primary substrates, phytanic acid, is derived predominately from red meat and dairy product consumption. Epidemiological evidence suggests links between dairy/red meat intake, as well as phytanic acid levels, and elevated PCa risk. This study investigates the relationships among dietary intake, serum and tissue concentrations of phytanic acid, and AMACR expression (mRNA and protein) in the histologically benign human prostate. METHODS Men undergoing radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized disease provided a food frequency questionnaire (n = 68), fasting blood (n = 35), benign fresh frozen prostate tissue (n = 26), and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections (n = 67). Serum and tissue phytanic acid concentrations were obtained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. We extracted RNA from epithelial cells using laser capture microdissection and quantified mRNA expression of AMACR and other genes involved in the peroxisomal phytanic acid metabolism pathway via qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry for AMACR was performed on FFPE sections and subsequently quantified via digital image analysis. Associations between diet, serum, and tissue phytanic acid levels, as well as AMACR and other gene expression levels were assessed by partial Spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS High-fat dairy intake was the strongest predictor of circulating phytanic acid concentrations (r = 0.35, P = 0.04). Tissue phytanic acid concentrations were not associated with any dietary sources and were only weakly correlated with serum levels (r = 0.29, P = 0.15). AMACR gene expression was not associated with serum phytanic acid (r = 0.13, P = 0.47), prostatic phytanic acid concentrations (r = 0.03, P = 0.88), or AMACR protein expression (r = −0.16, P = 0

  10. First Evidence that Sika Deer (Cervus nippon) Velvet Antler Extract Suppresses Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, YuJiao; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Wang, Yanmei; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Park, Pyo-Jam; Moon, Sang Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Deer velvet antler (DVA) is one of the most popular medicines in China. Numerous studies have demonstrated that velvet antler possess biological effects. However, data regarding its anti-migration activity on prostate cancer is scarce. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of top DVA (T-DVA) on the expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and migration-related genes in the human prostate cancer cell, LNCaP. The T-DVA down-regulated the expression of PSA. In addition, the Radius(TM) assay revealed that T-DVA inhibited the migration behavior of prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also decreased with T-DVA. On the contrary, T-DVA increased the tissue inhibition of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and (TIMP)-2. Taken together, our findings indicate that the T-DVA possesses anti-migration activity on prostate cancer cells. This is the first study of DVA to report the anti-migration activity on prostate cancer. PMID:26761873

  11. First Evidence that Sika Deer (Cervus nippon) Velvet Antler Extract Suppresses Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, YuJiao; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Wang, Yanmei; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Park, Pyo-Jam; Moon, Sang Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Deer velvet antler (DVA) is one of the most popular medicines in China. Numerous studies have demonstrated that velvet antler possess biological effects. However, data regarding its anti-migration activity on prostate cancer is scarce. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of top DVA (T-DVA) on the expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and migration-related genes in the human prostate cancer cell, LNCaP. The T-DVA down-regulated the expression of PSA. In addition, the RadiusTM assay revealed that T-DVA inhibited the migration behavior of prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also decreased with T-DVA. On the contrary, T-DVA increased the tissue inhibition of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and (TIMP)-2. Taken together, our findings indicate that the T-DVA possesses anti-migration activity on prostate cancer cells. This is the first study of DVA to report the anti-migration activity on prostate cancer. PMID:26761873

  12. Mineralized human primary osteoblast matrices as a model system to analyse interactions of prostate cancer cells with the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Johannes C; Quent, Verena M C; Burke, Leslie J; Stansfield, Scott H; Clements, Judith A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis is reliant on the reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone niche/micro-environment. The production of suitable matrices to study metastasis, carcinogenesis and in particular prostate cancer/bone micro-environment interaction has been limited to specific protein matrices or matrix secreted by immortalised cell lines that may have undergone transformation processes altering signaling pathways and modifying gene or receptor expression. We hypothesize that matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts are a suitable means to develop an in vitro model system for bone metastasis research mimicking in vivo conditions. We have used a decellularized matrix secreted from primary human osteoblasts as a model for prostate cancer function in the bone micro-environment. We show that this collagen I rich matrix is of fibrillar appearance, highly mineralized, and contains proteins, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin, and growth factors characteristic of bone extracellular matrix (ECM). LNCaP and PC3 cells grown on this matrix, adhere strongly, proliferate, and express markers consistent with a loss of epithelial phenotype. Moreover, growth of these cells on the matrix is accompanied by the induction of genes associated with attachment, migration, increased invasive potential, Ca(2+) signaling and osteolysis. In summary, we show that growth of prostate cancer cells on matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts mimics key features of prostate cancer bone metastases and thus is a suitable model system to study the tumor/bone micro-environment interaction in this disease.

  13. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-12-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462-484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake-metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities.

  14. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-01-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462–484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake–metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities. PMID:26678364

  15. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary. PMID:27785389

  16. Milk thistle and prostate cancer: differential effects of pure flavonolignans from Silybum marianum on antiproliferative end points in human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Davis-Searles, Paula R; Nakanishi, Yuka; Kim, Nam-Cheol; Graf, Tyler N; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Wani, Mansukh C; Wall, Monroe E; Agarwal, Rajesh; Kroll, David J

    2005-05-15

    Extracts from the seeds of milk thistle, Silybum marianum, are known commonly as silibinin and silymarin and possess anticancer actions on human prostate carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Seven distinct flavonolignan compounds and a flavonoid have been isolated from commercial silymarin extracts. Most notably, two pairs of diastereomers, silybin A and silybin B and isosilybin A and isosilybin B, are among these compounds. In contrast, silibinin is composed only of a 1:1 mixture of silybin A and silybin B. With these isomers now isolated in quantities sufficient for biological studies, each pure compound was assessed for antiproliferative activities against LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 human prostate carcinoma cell lines. Isosilybin B was the most consistently potent suppressor of cell growth relative to either the other pure constituents or the commercial extracts. Isosilybin A and isosilybin B were also the most effective suppressors of prostate-specific antigen secretion by androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. Silymarin and silibinin were shown for the first time to suppress the activity of the DNA topoisomerase IIalpha gene promoter in DU145 cells and, among the pure compounds, isosilybin B was again the most effective. These findings are significant in that isosilybin B composes no more than 5% of silymarin and is absent from silibinin. Whereas several other more abundant flavonolignans do ultimately influence the same end points at higher exposure concentrations, these findings are suggestive that extracts enriched for isosilybin B, or isosilybin B alone, might possess improved potency in prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

  17. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  18. Protein kinase G II-mediated proliferative effects in human cultured prostatic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anna-Louise M; Haynes, John M

    2004-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of protein kinase G (PKG) activation upon proliferation of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. The PKG II activator (8-pCPT-cGMP; IC50 of 113+/-42 nM) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, zaprinast (up to 50 microM), but not the PKG I isoform activators (APT-cGMP and PET-cGMP), reduced foetal calf serum-stimulated proliferation. The effect of 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) was blocked by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (5 microM) and Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP (5 microM), but not Rp-cAMPS (5 microM). 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) and zaprinast (50 microM), but not PET-cGMP (30 microM), caused a significant increase in atypical nuclei and an increase in annexin-V staining. These data indicate that activation of PKG II induces apoptosis of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. PMID:14636895

  19. Identification of organoselenium compounds that possess chemopreventive properties in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Terazawa, Riyako; Garud, Dinesh R; Hamada, Nanako; Fujita, Yasunori; Itoh, Tomohiro; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Nakane, Keita; Deguchi, Takashi; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ito, Masafumi

    2010-10-01

    The process of cancer development consists of three sequential stages termed initiation, promotion, and progression. Oxidative stress damages DNA and introduces mutations into oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, thus contributing to cancer development. Cancer chemoprevention is defined to prevent or delay the development of cancer by the use of natural or synthetic substances. In the present study, we synthesized a series of organoselenium compounds and evaluated their possible chemopreventive properties in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Among 42 organoselenium compounds tested, two compounds, 3-selena-1-dethiacephem 13 and 3-selena-1-dethiacephem 14 strongly activated the Nrf2/ARE (antioxidant response element) signaling and thus markedly increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II antioxidant enzyme. Translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus preceded HO-1 protein induction by two compounds. The intracellular ROS level was strongly reduced immediately after treatment with these compounds, showing that they are potent antioxidants. Finally, both compounds inhibited cell growth via cell cycle arrest. Our findings suggest that compounds 13 and 14 could not only attenuate oxidative stress through Nrf2/ARE activation and direct ROS scavenging but also inhibit cell growth. Thus, these compounds possess the potential as pharmacological agents for chemoprevention of human prostate cancer.

  20. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C.; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  1. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  2. Novel antiproliferative flavonoids induce cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Haddad, A Q; Venkateswaran, V; Viswanathan, L; Teahan, S J; Fleshner, N E; Klotz, L H

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an inverse association between flavonoid intake and prostate cancer (PCa) risk. The East Asian diet is very high in flavonoids and, correspondingly, men in China and Japan have the lowest incidence of PCa worldwide. There are thousands of different naturally occurring and synthetic flavonoids. However, only a few have been studied in PCa. Our aim was to identify novel flavonoids with antiproliferative effect in PCa cell lines, as well as determine their effects on cell cycle. We have screened a representative subgroup of 26 flavonoids for antiproliferative effect on the human PCa (LNCaP and PC3), breast cancer (MCF-7), and normal prostate stromal cell lines (PrSC). Using a fluorescence-based cell proliferation assay (Cyquant), we have identified five flavonoids, including the novel compounds 2,2'-dihydroxychalcone and fisetin, with antiproliferative and cell cycle arresting properties in human PCa in vitro. Most of the flavonoids tested exerted antiproliferative effect at lower doses in the PCa cell lines compared to the non-PCa cells. Flow cytometry was used as a means to determine the effects on cell cycle. PC3 cells were arrested in G2/M phase by flavonoids. LNCaP cells demonstrated different cell cycle profiles. Further studies are warranted to determine the molecular mechanism of action of 2,2'-DHC and fisetin in PCa, and to establish their effectiveness in vivo.

  3. Effects of a human plasma membrane-associated sialidase siRNA on prostate cancer invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaojie; Zhang, Ling; Shao, Yueting; Liang, Zuowen; Shao, Chen; Wang, Bo; Guo, Baofeng; Li, Na; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yang; Xu, Deqi

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neu3 is as one of the sialidases and regulates cell surface functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostrate cancer cell invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostate cancer metastasis in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting Neu3 may have utility for gene-based therapy of human cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Human plasma membrane-associated sialidase (Neu3) is one of several sialidases that hydrolyze sialic acids in the terminal position of the carbohydrate groups of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Neu3 is mainly localized in plasma membranes and plays crucial roles in the regulation of cell surface functions. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of Neu3 on cell invasion and migration in vivo and in vitro. Initially, we found that the levels of Neu3 expression were higher in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines than in normal prostate tissues based on RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. We then applied a Neu3 siRNA approach to block Neu3 signaling using PC-3M cells as model cells. Transwell invasion assays and wound assays showed significantly decreased invasion and migration potential in the Neu3 siRNA-transfected cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that Neu3 knockdown decreased the expressions of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In vivo, mice injected with PC-3M cell tumors were evaluated by SPECT/CT to determine the presence of bone metastases. Mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying the Neu3 siRNA developed fewer bone metastases than mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying a control Scramble siRNA, attenuated Salmonella alone or PBS. The results for bone metastasis detection by pathology were consistent with the data obtained by SPECT/CT. Tumor blocks were evaluated by histochemical, RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. The results revealed

  4. Telomerase-immortalized non-malignant human prostate epithelial cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongzhen; Zhou Jianjun; Miki, Jun; Furusato, Bungo; Gu Yongpeng; Srivastava, Shiv; McLeod, David G.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding prostate stem cells may provide insight into the origin of prostate cancer. Primary cells have been cultured from human prostate tissue but they usually survive only 15-20 population doublings before undergoing senescence. We report here that RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells, a clonal cell line from hTERT-immortalized primary non-malignant tissue-derived human prostate epithelial cell line (RC170N/h), retain multipotent stem cell properties. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells expressed a human embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, and potential prostate epithelial stem cell markers, CD133, integrin {alpha}2{beta}1{sup hi} and CD44. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells proliferated in KGM and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 5 {mu}g/ml insulin (DMEM + 10% FBS + Ins.) medium, and differentiated into epithelial stem cells that expressed epithelial cell markers, including CK5/14, CD44, p63 and cytokeratin 18 (CK18); as well as the mesenchymal cell markers, vimentin, desmin; the neuron and neuroendocrine cell marker, chromogranin A. Furthermore the RC170 N/h/clone 7 cells differentiated into multi tissues when transplanted into the sub-renal capsule and subcutaneously of NOD-SCID mice. The results indicate that RC170N/h/clone 7 cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells and will be useful as a novel cell model for studying the mechanisms of human prostate stem cell differentiation and transformation.

  5. PRUNE2 is a human prostate cancer suppressor regulated by the intronic long noncoding RNA PCA3

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Lee, Alessandro K.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Nunes, Diana N.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Marchiò, Serena; Navone, Nora M.; Hosoya, Hitomi; Lauer, Richard C.; Wen, Sijin; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Hoang, Anh; Newsham, Irene; Lima, Leandro A.; Carraro, Dirce M.; Oliviero, Salvatore; Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Do, Kim-Anh; Troncoso, Patricia; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Calin, George A.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) is the most specific prostate cancer biomarker but its function remains unknown. Here we identify PRUNE2, a target protein-coding gene variant, which harbors the PCA3 locus, thereby classifying PCA3 as an antisense intronic long noncoding (lnc)RNA. We show that PCA3 controls PRUNE2 levels via a unique regulatory mechanism involving formation of a PRUNE2/PCA3 double-stranded RNA that undergoes adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)-dependent adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing. PRUNE2 expression or silencing in prostate cancer cells decreased and increased cell proliferation, respectively. Moreover, PRUNE2 and PCA3 elicited opposite effects on tumor growth in immunodeficient tumor-bearing mice. Coregulation and RNA editing of PRUNE2 and PCA3 were confirmed in human prostate cancer specimens, supporting the medical relevance of our findings. These results establish PCA3 as a dominant-negative oncogene and PRUNE2 as an unrecognized tumor suppressor gene in human prostate cancer, and their regulatory axis represents a unique molecular target for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26080435

  6. Dietary tocopherols inhibit PhIP-induced prostate carcinogenesis in CYP1A-humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jayson X; Li, Guangxun; Wang, Hong; Liu, Anna; Lee, Mao-Jung; Reuhl, Kenneth; Suh, Nanjoo; Bosland, Maarten C; Yang, Chung S

    2016-02-01

    Tocopherols, the major forms of vitamin E, exist as alpha-tocopherol (α-T), β-T, γ-T and δ-T. The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies, but recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-T yielded disappointing results. Our hypothesis that other forms of tocopherols have higher cancer preventive activities than α-T was tested, herein, in a novel prostate carcinogenesis model induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP), a dietary carcinogen, in the CYP1A-humanized (hCYP1A) mice. Treatment of hCYP1A mice with PhIP (200 mg/kg b.w., i.g.) induced high percentages of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN), mainly in the dorsolateral glands. Supplementation with a γ-T-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT, 0.3% in diet) significantly inhibited the development of mPIN lesions and reduced PhIP-induced elevation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, COX-2, nitrotyrosine, Ki-67 and p-AKT, and the loss of PTEN and Nrf2. Further studies with purified δ-T, γ-T or α-T (0.2% in diet) showed that δ-T was more effective than γ-T or α-T in preventing mPIN formations and p-AKT elevation. These results indicate that γ-TmT and δ-T could be effective preventive agents of prostate cancer.

  7. Cryosurgical technique: assessment of the fundamental variables using human prostate cancer model systems.

    PubMed

    Klossner, Daniel P; Robilotto, Anthony T; Clarke, Dominic M; VanBuskirk, Robert G; Baust, John M; Gage, Andrew A; Baust, John G

    2007-12-01

    Cryosurgery offers a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of prostate cancer. While often successful, complete cryoablation of cancerous tissues sometimes fails due to technical challenges. Factors such as the end temperature, cooling rate, duration of the freezing episode, and repetition of the freezing cycle have been reported to influence cryosurgical outcome. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of these variables in an in vitro prostate cancer model. Human prostate cancer PC-3 and LNCaP cultures were exposed to a range of sub-zero temperatures (-5 to -40 degrees C), and cells were thawed followed by return to 37 degrees C. Post-thaw viability was assessed using a variety of fluorescent probes including alamarBlue (metabolic activity), calceinAM (membrane integrity), and propidium iodide (necrosis). Freeze duration following ice nucleation was investigated using single and double freezing cycles (5, 10, and 20 min). The results demonstrated that lower freezing temperatures yielded greater cell death, and that LNCaP cells were more susceptible to freezing than PC-3 cells. At -15 degrees C, PC-3 yielded approximately 55% viability versus approximately 20% viability for LNCaP. Double freezing cycles were found to be more than twice as destructive versus a single freeze-thaw cycle. Both cell types experienced increased cell death when exposed to freezing temperatures for longer durations. When thawing rates were considered, passive (slower) thawing following freezing yielded greater cell death than active (faster) thawing. A 20% difference in viability between passive and active thawing was observed for PC-3 for a 10 min freeze. Finally, the results demonstrate that just reaching -40 degrees C in vitro may not be sufficient to obtain complete cell death. The data support the use of extended freeze times, multiple freeze-thaw cycles, and passive thawing to provide maximum cell destruction. PMID:17888898

  8. Human Prostate Cancer Cells Secrete Neuro-Protective Factors in Response to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Seema; Varghese, Mini; Shareef, Mohammed M; Ahmed, Mansoor M

    2009-01-01

    Cryoablation is one of the established treatment modalities for prostate cancer management. Although, it is target specific, it may still lead to damage to the nerve fibers around the prostate tumor. In this study, by directly exposing the co-cultures of prostate cancer cells, PC-3 and Schwann cell-Dorsal Root Ganglion neuron (SC-DRG) to cryo-shock and by exposing SC-DRG to cryo-shock conditioned media (CSCM) obtained from PC-3 cells, robust neuro-protective effects were observed. Since this neuro-protective effect originated from cryotherapy-treated PC-3 cells, the presence of putative factors secreted by PC-3 cells in the medium following cryo-shock was analyzed. Using human cytokine antibody array analysis, differential release of cytokines in CSCM was observed with induced release of cytokines involved in neuro-protection like IL-1α, MIP-4, MIP-5, Leptin, IL-15 and ICAM-1 with simultaneous inhibition of TNFRI and TNFRII that are implicated in killing of nerve cells. Further, using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) sequencing, two proteins were identified namely, CypA (cyclophilin A) and NM23 (nonmetastatic protein 23) in the CSCM. CypA functions as a mediator of intracellular as well as extracellular neuro-protective mechanisms and NM23 has been implicated as a potential suppressor protein of tumor metastasis. Thus, this study revealed the presence of factors in CSCM that has the potential to protect normal neuronal cells and suppress metastasis.

  9. Xanthohumol Impairs Human Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Invasion and Diminishes the Incidence and Progression of Advanced Tumors in TRAMP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Venè, Roberta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Astigiano, Simonetta; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer, management of the disease, especially in the phase resistant to androgen ablation, remains a significant challenge. The long latency and high incidence of prostate carcinogenesis provides the opportunity to intervene with chemoprevention to prevent or eradicate prostate malignancies. In this study, we have used human hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of xanthohumol (XN) against cell growth, motility and invasion. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer cells with low micromolar doses of XN inhibits proliferation and modulates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT phosphorylation leading to reduced cell migration and invasion. Oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was associated with these effects. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) transgenic mice were used as an in vivo model of prostate adenocarcinoma. Oral gavage of XN, three times per week, beginning at 4 wks of age, induced a decrease in the average weight of the urogenital (UG) tract, delayed advanced tumor progression and inhibited the growth of poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma. The ability of XN to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo suggests that XN may be a novel agent for the management of prostate cancer. PMID:22952060

  10. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Gierszal, Esther L; Prins, Gail S

    2015-01-01

    Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA) can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20-30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures.

  11. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Gierszal, Esther L.; Prins, Gail S.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA) can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20–30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures. PMID:26222054

  12. Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gupta, Sanjay . E-mail: sanjay.gupta@case.edu

    2006-07-28

    One of the requisite of cancer chemopreventive agent is elimination of damaged or malignant cells through cell cycle inhibition or induction of apoptosis without affecting normal cells. In this study, employing normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3), we evaluated the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm oil. TRF treatment to PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 resulted in almost identical growth-inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, TRF treatment resulted in significant decreases in cell viability and colony formation in all three prostate cancer cell lines. The IC{sub 5} values after 24 h TRF treatment in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 cells were in the order 16.5, 17.5, and 22.0 {mu}g/ml. TRF treatment resulted in significant apoptosis in all the cell lines as evident from (i) DNA fragmentation (ii) fluorescence microscopy, and (iii) cell death detection ELISA, whereas the PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 cells did not undergo apoptosis, but showed modestly decreased cell viability only at a high dose of 80 {mu}g/ml. In cell cycle analysis, TRF (10-40 {mu}g/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G0/G1 phase arrest and sub G1 accumulation in all three cancer cell lines but not in PZ-HPV-7 cells. These results suggest that the palm oil derivative TRF is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. TRF offers significant promise as a chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  13. Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) in two Siberian husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Ori, J; Yoshikai, T; Yoshimura, S; Takenaka, S

    1998-02-01

    Three eyes in two Siberian husky dogs were clinically diagnosed as persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) by means of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasonography (USG). Examination of mildly affected PHPV eyes with an ophthalmoscope showed the axial part of the posterior capsule to be opaque. The central lesion of the posterior capsule in severely affected eyes had been opaque with many blood vessels. Echographic changes in mild cases of PHPV were outside of the lens, linearly hyperechoic, parallel to the posterior lens capsule. In a severely affected eyeball, funnel-shaped hyperechoic change was noted in the retrolental space. Two months later, phacoemulsification was performed for diagnostic treatment of PHPV since progressive cataract was observed in this eye.

  14. Chimeric Adenoviral Vectors Incorporating a Fiber of Human Adenovirus 3 Efficiently Mediate Gene Transfer into Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Miho; Ugai, Hideyo; Belousova, Natalya; Pereboev, Alexander; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B.; Everts, Maaike; Curiel, David T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have developed a range of adenoviral (Ad) vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) displaying the fiber shaft and knob domains of species B viruses (HAdV-3, HAdV-11, or HAdV-35). These species B Ads utilize different cellular receptors than HAdV-5 for infection. We evaluated whether Ad vectors displaying species B fiber shaft and knob domains (Ad5F3Luc1, Ad5F11Luc1, and Ad5F35Luc1) would efficiently infect cancer cells of distinct origins, including prostate cancer. METHODS The fiber chimeric Ad vectors were genetically generated and compared with the original Ad vector (Ad5Luc1) for transductional efficiency in a variety of cancer cell lines, including prostate cancer cells and primary prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), using luciferase as a reporter gene. RESULTS Prostate cancer cell lines infected with Ad5F3Luc1 expressed higher levels of luciferase than Ad5Luc1, as well as the other chimeric Ad vectors. We also analyzed the transductional efficiency via monitoring of luciferase activity in prostate cancer cells when expressed as a fraction of the gene transfer in PrEC cells. In the PC-3 and DU145 cell lines, the gene transfer ratio of cancer cells versus PrEC was once again highest for Ad5F3Luc1. CONCLUSION Of the investigated chimeric HAdV-5/species B vectors, Ad5F3Luc1 was judged to be the most suitable for targeting prostate cancer cells as it showed the highest transductional efficiency in these cells. It is foreseeable that an Ad vector incorporating the HAdV-3 fiber could potentially be used for prostate cancer gene therapy. PMID:19902467

  15. Development of peptide-containing nerves in the human fetal prostate gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jen, P Y; Dixon, J S

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the developing peptidergic innervation of the human fetal prostate gland in a series of specimens ranging in gestational age from 13 to 30 wk. The overall innervation of each specimen was visualised using protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), a general nerve marker. The onset and development of specific neuropeptide-containing subpopulations were investigated using antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bombesin (BOM), somatostatin (SOM), leu-enkephalin (l-ENK) and met-enkephalin (m-ENK). In addition the occurrence and distribution of presumptive noradrenergic nerves was studied using antisera to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 13 wk numerous branching PGP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerves were observed in the capsule of the developing prostate gland and surrounding the preprostatic urethra but the remainder of the gland was devoid of nerves. The majority of nerves in the capsule contained D beta H and TH and were presumed to be noradrenergic in type while other nerves (in decreasing numbers) contained NPY, l-ENK, SP and CGRP. Nerves associated with the preprostatic urethra did not contain any of the neuropeptides under investigation. At 17 wk the density of nerves in the capsule had increased and occasional m-ENK-, VIP- and BOM-IR nerve fibres were also observed. In addition PGP, D beta H-, TH-, NPY- and l-ENK-IR nerves occurred in association with smooth muscle bundles which at 17 wk were present in the outer part of the gland. Occasional PGP-IR nerves were also present at the base of the epithelium forming some of the prostatic glands. At 23 wk some of the subepithelial nerves showed immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP or l-ENK. At 26 wk smooth muscle bundles occurred throughout the gland and were richly innervated by PGP, D beta H and TH-IR nerves while a less dense plexus was formed by NPY- and l

  16. Bortezomib and etoposide combinations exert synergistic effects on the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3

    PubMed Central

    ARAS, BEKIR; YERLIKAYA, AZMI

    2016-01-01

    Novel treatment modalities are urgently required for androgen-independent prostate cancer. In order to develop an alternative treatment for prostate cancer, the cytotoxic effects of the 26S proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, either alone or in combination with the two commonly used chemotherapeutic agents irinotecan and etoposide, on the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 were evaluated in the present study. The PC-3 cell line was maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and treated with various doses of bortezomib, irinotecan, etoposide or their combinations. The growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects were determined by water-soluble tetrazolium (WST)-1 assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay or iCELLigence system. The combination index values were determined by the Chou-Talalay method. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of bortezomib on the PC-3 cell line was determined to be 53.4 nM by WST-1 assay, whereas the IC50 values of irinotecan and etoposide were determined to be 2.1 and 26.5 µM, respectively. These results suggest that the 26S proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is more potent, compared with irinotecan and etoposide, in the androgen-insensitive and tumor protein p53-null cell line PC-3. The combined effects of bortezomib+irinotecan and bortezomib+etoposide were also tested on PC-3 cells. The effect of bortezomib+irinotecan combination was not significantly different than that produced by either monotherapy, according to the results of iCELLigence system and MTT assay. However, 40 nM bortezomib+5 µM etoposide or 40 nM bortezomib+20 µM etoposide combinations were observed to be more effective than each drug tested alone. The results of the current study suggest that bortezomib and etoposide combination may be additionally evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. PMID:27123085

  17. Molecular classification and genetic pathways in hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Carmona, L G; Howarth, K M; Lockett, M; Polanco-Echeverry, G M; Volikos, E; Gorman, M; Barclay, E; Martin, L; Jones, A M; Saunders, B; Guenther, T; Donaldson, A; Paterson, J; Frayling, I; Novelli, M R; Phillips, R; Thomas, H J W; Silver, A; Atkin, W; Tomlinson, I P M

    2007-08-01

    Hyperplastic Polyposis (HPPS) is a poorly characterized syndrome that increases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We aimed to provide a molecular classification of HPPS. We obtained 282 tumours from 32 putative HPPS patients with >or= 10 hyperplastic polyps (HPs); some patients also had adenomas and CRCs. We found no good evidence of microsatellite instability (MSI) in our samples. The epithelium of HPs was monoclonal. Somatic BRAF mutations occurred in two-thirds of our patients' HPs, and KRAS2 mutations in 10%; both mutations were more common in younger cases. The respective mutation frequencies in a set of 'sporadic' HPs were 18% and 10%. Importantly, the putative HPPS patients generally fell into two readily defined groups, one set whose polyps had BRAF mutations, and another set whose polyps had KRAS2 mutations. The most plausible explanation for this observation is that there exist different forms of inherited predisposition to HPPS, and that these determine whether polyps follow a BRAF or KRAS2 pathway. Most adenomas and CRCs from our putative HPPS patients had 'classical' morphology and few of these lesions had BRAF or KRAS2 mutations. These findings suggest that tumourigenesis in HPPS does not necessarily follow the 'serrated' pathway. Although current definitions of HPPS are sub-optimal, we suggest that diagnosis could benefit from molecular analysis. Specifically, testing BRAF and KRAS2 mutations, and perhaps MSI, in multiple polyps could help to distinguish HPPS from sporadic HPs. We propose a specific model which would have diagnosed five more of our cases as HPPS compared with the WHO clinical criteria.

  18. Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Na; Lee, Robert J; Sun, Yating; Cai, Guangsheng; Wang, Junyang; Wang, Mengqiao; Lu, Jiahui; Meng, Qingfan; Teng, Lirong; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (Cbz-NPs) were synthesized to overcome vehicle-related toxicity of current clinical formulation of the drug based on Tween-80 (Cbz-Tween). A salting-out method was used for NP synthesis that avoids the use of chlorinated organic solvent and is simpler compared to the methods based on emulsion-solvent evaporation. Cbz-NPs had a narrow particle size distribution, suitable drug loading content (4.9%), and superior blood biocompatibility based on in vitro hemolysis assay. Blood circulation, tumor uptake, and antitumor activity of Cbz-NPs were assessed in prostatic cancer xenograft-bearing nude mice. Cbz-NPs exhibited prolonged blood circulation and greater accumulation of Cbz in tumors along with reduced toxicity compared to Cbz-Tween. Moreover, hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining of organs revealed consistent results. The levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine in drug-treated mice showed that Cbz-NPs were less toxic than Cbz-Tween to the kidneys. In conclusion, Cbz-NPs provide a promising therapeutic for prostate cancer. PMID:27555767

  19. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells. PMID:24942387

  20. Immunolocalisation of ghrelin and obestatin in human testis, seminal vesicles, prostate and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E; Vindigni, C; Tripodi, S A; Mazzi, L; Nuti, R; Figura, N; Collodel, G

    2014-01-01

    The role of ghrelin and obestatin in male reproduction has not completely been clarified. We explored ghrelin and obestatin localisation in the male reproductive system. Polyclonal antibodies anti-ghrelin and anti-obestatin were used to detect the expression of these hormones in human testis, prostate and seminal vesicles by immunocytochemistry, while in ejaculated and swim up selected spermatozoa by immunofluorescence. Sertoli cells were positive for both peptides and Leydig cells for ghrelin; germ cells were negative for both hormones. Mild signals for ghrelin and obestatin were observed in rete testis; efferent ductules were the most immune reactive region for both peptides. Epididymis was moderately positive for ghrelin; vas deferens and seminal vesicles showed intense obestatin and moderate ghrelin labelling; prostate tissue expressed obestatin alone. Ejaculated and selected spermatozoa were positive for both peptides in different head and tail regions. This study confirms ghrelin localisation in Leydig and Sertoli cells; the finding that ghrelin is expressed in rete testis, epididymis, vas deferens and seminal vesicles is novel, as well as the localisation of obestatin in almost all tracts of the male reproductive system. This research could offer insights for stimulating other studies, particularly on the role of obestatin in sperm physiology, which is still obscure.

  1. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  2. Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Na; Lee, Robert J; Sun, Yating; Cai, Guangsheng; Wang, Junyang; Wang, Mengqiao; Lu, Jiahui; Meng, Qingfan; Teng, Lirong; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (Cbz-NPs) were synthesized to overcome vehicle-related toxicity of current clinical formulation of the drug based on Tween-80 (Cbz-Tween). A salting-out method was used for NP synthesis that avoids the use of chlorinated organic solvent and is simpler compared to the methods based on emulsion-solvent evaporation. Cbz-NPs had a narrow particle size distribution, suitable drug loading content (4.9%), and superior blood biocompatibility based on in vitro hemolysis assay. Blood circulation, tumor uptake, and antitumor activity of Cbz-NPs were assessed in prostatic cancer xenograft-bearing nude mice. Cbz-NPs exhibited prolonged blood circulation and greater accumulation of Cbz in tumors along with reduced toxicity compared to Cbz-Tween. Moreover, hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining of organs revealed consistent results. The levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine in drug-treated mice showed that Cbz-NPs were less toxic than Cbz-Tween to the kidneys. In conclusion, Cbz-NPs provide a promising therapeutic for prostate cancer. PMID:27555767

  3. Real Time Metastatic Route Tracking of Orthotopic PC-3-GFP Human Prostate Cancer Using Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Xiaoen; Hoffman, Robert M; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-04-01

    The cellular basis of metastasis is poorly understood. An important step to understanding this process is to be able to visualize the routes by which cancer cells migrate from the primary tumor to various distant sites to eventually form metastasis. Our laboratory previously developed single-cell in vivo imaging using fluorescent proteins to label cancer cells. In the present study, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and orthotopic tumor transplantation, we have imaged in live mice various highly diverse routes by which PC-3 cells metastasize superiorly and inferiorly to distant sites, including in the portal area, stomach area, and urogenital system. Imaging began at day 9, at which time distant metastasis had already occurred, and increased at each imaging point at days 10, 13, 14, and 16. Metastatic cells were observed migrating superiorly and inferiorly from the primary tumor as well as in lymphatic channels and trafficking in various organ systems demonstrating that PC-3 has multiple metastatic routes similar to hormone-independent advanced-stage prostate cancer in the clinic. PMID:26515240

  4. Novel Schiff base copper complexes of quinoline-2 carboxaldehyde as proteasome inhibitors in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Adsule, Shreelekha; Barve, Vivek; Chen, Di; Ahmed, Fakhara; Dou, Q Ping; Padhye, Subhash; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2006-11-30

    We report the synthesis of novel 1:1 Schiff base copper complexes of quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde showing dose-dependent, antiproliferative, and proapoptotic activity in PC-3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We found that quinoline thiosemicarbazone 2 (FPA-137) was the most potent and inhibited proteosome activity in intact human prostate cancer PC-3 and LNCaP cells (IC50 of 4 and 3.2 microM, respectively) compared to clioquinol and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (IC50 of 10 and 20 microM), supporting the novelty of 2. PMID:17125278

  5. MicroRNA-143 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting hexokinase 2 in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chen, Wei-Guo; Li, Xiao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in cancer progression through regulating gene expression. Down-regulation of miR-143 has been reported in a number of cancers. However, the biological functions of miR-143 in prostate cancer remain largely unexplored. In this study, we showed that miR-143 expression was reduced in approximately 62.5% of the specimens examined. By loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells, we demonstrated that miR-143 has an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation as evidenced by decreased cell viability, increased cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. Furthermore, we identified hexokinase 2 (HK2), a metabolic enzyme that executes the first step of aerobic glycolysis, as a target of miR-143 in prostate cancer. Knockdown of HK2 recapitulated the effects of miR-143 and accompanied with decreased glucose metabolism. Taken together, these data indicate that miR-143/HK2 axis plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer and represents a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26269764

  6. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

    PubMed

    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  7. 2-methoxyestradiol blocks cell-cycle progression at G(2)/M phase and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A P; Garcia, G E; Slaga, T J

    2001-07-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME), an endogenous metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, is present in human blood and urine. Here we show for the first time that 2-ME significantly inhibited the growth of normal prostate epithelial cells and androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cells. This growth inhibition was accompanied by a twofold increase in the G(2)/M population, with a concomitant decrease in the G(1) population, as shown by cell-cycle analysis. 2-ME treatment affected the cell-cycle progression of prostate cancer cells specifically by blocking cells in the G(2) phase. Immunoblot analysis of the key cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the G(2)/M phase showed a 14-fold increase in the expression of p21 and an eightfold increase in the expression of p34 cell division cycle 2 (cdc2). We also found an accumulation of phosphorylated cdc2 after 2-ME treatment. Furthermore, Wee 1 kinase was detectable after 2-ME treatment. 2-ME treatment also led to an increase in the activity of caspase-3, followed by apoptosis, as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling and fluorescein isothiocyanate-poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase assay. Estrogen receptor levels did not change after treatment with 2-ME. Examination of the signaling pathways that mediate 2-ME-induced apoptosis showed reduction in the level of p53 expression and its DNA-binding activity. Given the fact that p53 mutations are common in patients with metastatic prostate cancer, our finding that 2-ME-mediated growth inhibition of human prostate cancer cells occurred in a p53-independent manner has considerable clinical significance. These findings, combined with the limited toxicity of 2-ME, may have significant implications for alternative treatment of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:11479920

  8. Linking γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor to epidermal growth factor receptor pathways activation in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weijuan; Yang, Qing; Fung, Kar-Ming; Humphreys, Mitchell R; Brame, Lacy S; Cao, Amy; Fang, Yu-Ting; Shih, Pin-Tsen; Kropp, Bradley P; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation has been attributed to the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Growth factor pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling have been implicated in the development of NE features and progression to a castration-resistant phenotype. However, upstream molecules that regulate the growth factor pathway remain largely unknown. Using androgen-insensitive bone metastasis PC-3 cells and androgen-sensitive lymph node metastasis LNCaP cells derived from human prostate cancer (PCa) patients, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R) ligand (GABA) and agonist (isoguvacine) stimulate cell proliferation, enhance EGF family members expression, and activate EGFR and a downstream signaling molecule, Src, in both PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Inclusion of a GABA(A)R antagonist, picrotoxin, or an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib (ZD1839 or Iressa), blocked isoguvacine and GABA-stimulated cell growth, trans-phospohorylation of EGFR, and tyrosyl phosphorylation of Src in both PCa cell lines. Spatial distributions of GABAAR α₁ and phosphorylated Src (Tyr416) were studied in human prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry. In contrast to extremely low or absence of GABA(A)R α₁-positive immunoreactivity in normal prostate epithelium, elevated GABA(A)R α₁ immunoreactivity was detected in prostate carcinomatous glands. Similarly, immunoreactivity of phospho-Src (Tyr416) was specifically localized and limited to the nucleoli of all invasive prostate carcinoma cells, but negative in normal tissues. Strong GABAAR α₁ immunoreactivity was spatially adjacent to the neoplastic glands where strong phospho-Src (Tyr416)-positive immunoreactivity was demonstrated, but not in adjacent to normal glands. These results suggest that the GABA signaling is linked to the EGFR pathway and may work through autocrine or paracine mechanism to promote CRPC progression.

  9. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  10. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; et al

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  11. Expression and potential role of the peptide orexin-A in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valiante, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Tafuri, Simona; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Campese, Roberto; Monaco, Roberto; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Assisi, Loredana; Mirabella, Nicola; Forte, Maurizio; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo

    2015-09-04

    The peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and their G protein-coupled OX1 and OX2 receptors are involved in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Altered expression or signaling dysregulation of orexins and their receptors have been associated with a wide range of human diseases including narcolepsy, obesity, drug addiction, and cancer. Although orexin-A, its precursor molecule prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor have been detected in the human normal and hyperplastic prostate tissues, their expression and function in the prostate cancer (PCa) remains to be addressed. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the immunohistochemical localization of orexin-A in human PCa specimens, and the expression of prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor at both protein and mRNA levels in these tissues. Orexin-A administration to the human androgen-dependent prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP up-regulates OX1 receptor expression resulting in a decrease of cell survival. Noteworthy, nanomolar concentrations of the peptide counteract the testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor in the cells: the orexin-A action is prevented by the addition of the OX1 receptor antagonist SB-408124 to the test system. These findings indicate that orexin-A/OX1 receptor interaction interferes with the activity of the androgen receptor which regulates PCa onset and progression, thus suggesting that orexin-A and its receptor might represent novel therapeutic targets to challenge this aggressive cancer. - Highlights: • Orexin-A and OX1 receptor are present in human cancer prostate tissues. • Orexin-A up-regulates OX1 receptor expression in LNCaP cells. • Orexin-A inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of androgen receptor.

  12. [Cycloferon in therapy of hyperplastic laryngitis for decrease of the number of relapses].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, S S; Romantsov, M G; Demchenko, E V; Kovalenko, A L

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the clinical forms of chronic hyperplastic laryngitis, characterized by persistent and recurrent course, a tendency to the formation of oncological pathology, at the expense of hyperplastic changes in the larynx, leading to a malignancy of the inflammatory process. It was demonstrated the bacterization of larynx by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Mycoplasma in imbalance of system of interferon. Clinical recovery, depending on the clinical form of the disease, using cycloferon, was observed in 57.4% of patients. The inclusion in the complex of the medical support of chronic hyperplastic laryngitis inducer of interferon - cycloferon, provided the reduction of the number of relapses.

  13. Stabilization of human prostate acid phosphatase by cross-linking with diimidoesters.

    PubMed

    Wasylewska, E; Dulińska, J; Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Ostrowski, W S

    1987-01-01

    1. Modification of dimeric human prostate acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) by diimidoesters leads to the formation of water-soluble preparations of high enzymatic activity, resistant to denaturing agents. 2. Monomeric, dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric species were found in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the phosphatase cross-linked with dimethyl-suberimidate, and dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzymatically active species on thin-layer Sephadex 200 gel filtration. This molecular pattern evidenced formation of the inter-subunit covalent linkages. All molecular forms are immunoreactive against the polyclonal rabbit anti-phosphatase antibodies. 3. The catalytic properties of the modified phosphatase are almost the same as those of the native enzyme. Differences in the optical properties between the modified and the native enzymes point to slight conformational transitions in the modified enzyme.

  14. Stabilization of human prostatic acid phosphatase by coupling with chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Luchter-Wasylewska, E; Dulińska, J; Ostrowski, W S; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S

    1991-02-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) (EC 3.1.3.2) was covalently linked to chondroitin sulfate A from whale cartilage. In order to bind the protein amino groups with the preactivated carboxyl groups of chondroitin sulfate, 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminepropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide were used as coupling agents. The product was soluble and enzymatically active. The activity was on average 25% higher than that of the free enzyme. The product was heterogeneous in respect to charge and Mr (50-1500) kDa, as determined by chromatography on Sephacryl S 300 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The resulting polymers contained covalently bound chondroitin sulfate, as shown by the biotin-avidin test. The modified enzyme is more resistant against various denaturing agents, e.g., urea, ethanol, and heat. Thus covalent modification of PAP by cross-linking to chondroitin sulfate could be the preferred method for stabilization of its biological activity.

  15. Expression of SOCSs in human prostate cancer and their association in prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-guo; Dai, Qi-shan; Han, Zhao-dong; He, Hui-chan; Mo, Ru-jun; Chen, Guo; Chen, Yan-fei; Wu, Yong-ding; Yang, Sheng-bang; Jiang, Fu-neng; Chen, Wei-hong; Sun, Zhao-lin; Zhong, Wei-de

    2013-09-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins have been identified as negative feedback regulators of cytokine-mediated signaling in various tissues, and demonstrated to play critical roles in tumorigenesis and tumor development of different cancers. The involvement of SOCSs in human prostate cancer (PCa) has not been fully elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns and the clinical significance of SOCSs in PCa. The expression changes of SOCSs at mRNA and protein levels in human PCa tissues compared with adjacent benign prostate tissues were, respectively, detected by using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry analyses. The associations of SOCSs expression with clinicopathological features and clinical outcome of PCa patients were further statistically analyzed. Among SOCSs, both QRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses found that SOCS2 expression was upregulated (at mRNA level: change ratio = 1.98, P = 0.031; at protein level: 5.12 ± 0.60 vs. 2.68 ± 0.37, P = 0.016) and SOCS6 expression was downregulated (at mRNA level: change ratio = -1.65, P = 0.008; at protein level: 3.03 ± 0.32 vs. 4.0.72 ± 0.39, P = 0.004) in PCa tissues compared with those in non-cancerous prostate tissues. In addition, the upregulation of SOCS2 in PCa tissues was correlated with the lower Gleason score (P < 0.001), the absence of metastasis (P < 0.001) and the negative PSA failure (P = 0.009); the downregulation of SOCS6 tended to be found in PCa tissues with the higher Gleason score (P = 0.016), the advanced pathological stage (P = 0.007), the positive metastasis (P = 0.020), and the positive PSA failure (P = 0.032). Furthermore, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the downregulation of SOCS2 was an independent predictor of shorter biochemical recurrence-free survival. Our data offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the dysregulation of SOCS2

  16. Extracellular alpha 6 integrin cleavage by urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, Manolis C.; Pennington, Michael E.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    During human prostate cancer progression, the integrin α6β1 (laminin receptor) is expressed on the cancer cell surface during invasion and in lymph node metastases. We previously identified a novel structural variant of the α6 integrin called α6p. This variant was produced on the cell surface and was missing the β-barrel extracellular domain. Using several different concentrations of amiloride, aminobenzamidine and PAI-1 and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) function-blocking antibody (3689), we showed that uPA, acting as a protease, is responsible for production of α6p. We also showed that addition of uPA in the culture media of cells that do not produce α6p, resulted in a dose-dependent α6p production. In contrast, the addition of uPA did not result in the cleavage of other integrins. Using α2-antiplasmin and plasmin depleted media, we observed that uPA cleaves the α6 integrin directly. Further, 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced the production of α6p, and this induction was abolished by PAI-1 but not α2-antiplasmin. Finally, the α6p integrin variant was detected in invasive human prostate carcinoma tissue indicating that this is not a tissue culture phenomenon. These data, taken together, suggest that this is a novel function of uPA, that is, to remove the β-barrel ligand-binding domain of the integrin while preserving its heterodimer association. PMID:15023541

  17. SPA-1 controls the invasion and metastasis of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Hamazaki, Yoko; Hattori, Masakazu; Doi, Keiko; Terada, Naoki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Toda, Yoshinobu; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Inoue, Takahiro; Kajita, Yoichiro; Maeno, Atsushi; Kamba, Tomomi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Kanno, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kiyotsugu; Ogawa, Osamu; Minato, Nagahiro; Nakamura, Eijiro

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that SIPA1 encoding a Rap GTPase-activating protein SPA-1 is a candidate metastasis efficiency-modifying gene in human breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of SPA-1 in human prostate cancer (CaP). Immunohistochemical studies of tumor specimens from CaP patients revealed a positive correlation of SPA-1 expression with disease progression and metastasis. The correlation was recapitulated in human CaP cell lines; LNCaP that rarely showed metastasis in SCID mice expressed an undetectable level of SPA-1, whereas highly metastatic PC3 showed abundant SPA-1 expression. Moreover, SIPA1 transduction in LNCaP caused prominent abdominal lymph node metastasis without affecting primary tumor size, whereas shRNA-mediated SIPA1 knockdown or expression of a dominant-active Rap1 mutant (Rap1V12) in PC3 suppressed metastasis. LNCaP transduced with SPA-1 (LNCaP/SPA-1) showed attenuated adhesion to the precoated extracellular matrices (ECM) including collagens and fibronectin, due to defective ECM-medicated Rap1 activation. In addition, LNCaP/SPA-1 showed a diminished level of nuclear Brd4, which is known to bind SPA-1, resulting in reduced expression of a series of ECM-related genes. These results suggest that SPA-1 plays an important role in controlling metastasis efficiency of human CaP by regulating the expression of and interaction with ECM in the primary sites.

  18. Hypoxia primes human normal prostate epithelial cells and cancer cell lines for the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) remain largely unknown. Because hypoxia stimulates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which “primes” cells for inflammasome activation by inducing the expression of NLRP3 or AIM2 receptor and pro-IL-1β, we investigated whether hypoxia could activate the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and cancer cell lines. Here we report that hypoxia (1% O2) treatment of PrECs, prostate cell lines, and a macrophage cell line (THP-1) increased the levels of NLRP3, AIM2, and pro-IL-1β. Further, hypoxia in cells potentiated activation of the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activity. Notably, hypoxia “primed” cells for NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation through stimulation of the NF-κB activity. Our observations support the idea that hypoxia in human prostatic tumors contributes to PCI, in part, by priming cells for the activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome. PMID:27058421

  19. Comprehensively evaluating cis-regulatory variation in the human prostate transcriptome by using gene-level allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas B; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2015-06-01

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E-5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate.

  20. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  1. Examining the Relationship Between Cu-ATSM Hypoxia Selectivity and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Vāvere, Amy L.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction PET imaging with Cu-ATSM for delineating hypoxia has provided valuable clinical information, but investigations in animal models of prostate cancer have shown some inconsistencies. As a defense mechanism in prostate cancer cells, the fatty acid synthesis pathway harnesses its oxidizing power for improving the redox balance despite conditions of extreme hypoxia, potentially altering Cu-ATSM hypoxia-selectivity. Methods Human prostate tumor cultured cell lines (PC-3, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and LAPC-4), were treated with an FAS inhibitor (C75, 100 μM) under anoxia. 64Cu-ATSM uptake into these treated cells, and non-treated anoxic cells, was then examined. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression level in each cell line was subsequently quantified by ELISA. An additional study was performed in PC-3 cells to examine the relationship between the restoration of 64Cu-ATSM hypoxia-selectivity and the concentration of C75 (100, 20, 4, or 0.8 μM) administered to the cells. Results Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis with C75 resulted in a significant increase in 64Cu-ATSM retention into prostate tumor cells in vitro under anoxia over 60 mins. Inhibition studies demonstrated higher uptake values of 20.9 ± 3.27, 103.0 ± 32.6, 144.2 ± 32.3, and 200.1 ± 79.3% at 15 mins over control values for LAPC-4, PC-3, LNCaP, and 22Rv1 cells, respectively. A correlation was seen (R2 = 0.911) with FAS expression plotted against % change in 64Cu-ATSM uptake with C75 treatment. Conclusions Although Cu-ATSM has clinical relevance in the PET imaging of hypoxia in many tumor types, its translation to the imaging of prostate cancer may be limited by the over-expression of FAS associated with prostatic malignancies. PMID:18355682

  2. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ~3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22121333

  3. Xanthomatous hyperplastic polyps of the stomach: clinicopathologic study of 5 patients with polypoid gastric lesions showing combined features of gastric xanthelasma and hyperplastic polyp.

    PubMed

    Bassullu, Nuray; Turkmen, Ilknur; Uraz, Suleyman; Yagiz Korkmaz, Pinar; Memisoglu, Resat; Gultekin, Orhan Sami; Bulbul Dogusoy, Gulen

    2013-02-01

    Gastric xanthelasmas are uncommon benign lesions that are macroscopically well-demarcated yellow or yellow-white plaques and are microscopically formed by collections of foamy macrophages. Because gastric hyperplastic polyps may rarely be associated with xanthelasma, we aimed to report 5 cases of combined lesions showing features of gastric xanthelasma and hyperplastic polyps observed over the past 3 years at our institution among 4497 patients who underwent gastric endoscopy. The patients were 3 men and 2 women aged 45 to 78 years. The lesions were located in oxyntic mucosa, except one in the antrum, and measured 2 to 6 mm. Three patients showed associated chronic gastritis; none showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Combined lesions of hyperplastic polyp with xanthelasma appear to have an association with chronic gastritis, and the lipid accumulation may be the cause of hyperplasia in the overlying mucosa.

  4. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  5. Anticancer effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin induces apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Zhou, Qiang; Wu, Wan-Rui; Duan, Yi-Xing; Gao, Zhi-Yong; Li, Yuan-Wei; Lu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPPT) is extracted and separated from citrus-related plants, including Podophyllum (P.) peltatum, P. pleianthum, P. emodi (also called P. hexandrum) and Diphylleia grayi. DPPT has significant antitumor and antiviral activity. However, due to its strong toxicity and side effects, its use is limited in practical applications. The in vitro antitumor efficacy of DPPT on human prostate cancer (PCa) cells remains to be determined. The present study investigated the anticancer effect of DPPT on human PCa cells and its potential mechanism. The data revealed that DPPT markedly reduced cell proliferation and activated the caspase-3 expression level by an increase in apoptotic cell death in DU-145 cells. In addition, treatment with DPPT markedly downregulated the levels of phosphorylated Akt and activated the p53/B-cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax)/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) signaling pathway in DU-145 cells, suggesting that caspase-mediated pathways were involved in DPPT-induced apoptosis. The present study suggested the role of DPPT as a novel chemotherapeutic drug for human PCa, which may function through the Akt/p53/Bax/PTEN signaling pathway. PMID:27698880

  6. Anticancer effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin induces apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Zhou, Qiang; Wu, Wan-Rui; Duan, Yi-Xing; Gao, Zhi-Yong; Li, Yuan-Wei; Lu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPPT) is extracted and separated from citrus-related plants, including Podophyllum (P.) peltatum, P. pleianthum, P. emodi (also called P. hexandrum) and Diphylleia grayi. DPPT has significant antitumor and antiviral activity. However, due to its strong toxicity and side effects, its use is limited in practical applications. The in vitro antitumor efficacy of DPPT on human prostate cancer (PCa) cells remains to be determined. The present study investigated the anticancer effect of DPPT on human PCa cells and its potential mechanism. The data revealed that DPPT markedly reduced cell proliferation and activated the caspase-3 expression level by an increase in apoptotic cell death in DU-145 cells. In addition, treatment with DPPT markedly downregulated the levels of phosphorylated Akt and activated the p53/B-cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax)/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) signaling pathway in DU-145 cells, suggesting that caspase-mediated pathways were involved in DPPT-induced apoptosis. The present study suggested the role of DPPT as a novel chemotherapeutic drug for human PCa, which may function through the Akt/p53/Bax/PTEN signaling pathway.

  7. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  8. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion

  9. Human prostatic acid phosphatase directly stimulates collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase content of isolated bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, M.; Rosier, R.N.; Puzas, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) directly enhances the differentiated characteristics of isolated bone cells in vitro. This enzyme, when added to cell cultures for 24 h in vitro stimulates collagen synthesis and the production of alkaline phosphatase. The effects are dose dependent, with statistically significant effects occurring from 0.1-100 nM hPAP. Concentrations higher than 100 nM do not evoke greater effects. The maximal effect of hPAP occurs between 12 and 24 h of exposure. The cells stimulated to the greatest degree are osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts. Fibroblasts isolated from the same tissue show a lesser sensitivity to hPAP. hPAP has no detectable effect on cell proliferation, as measured by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation or total DNA synthesis. None of the observations reported in this work can be attributed to contaminating proteins in the hPAP preparation. hPAP was radiolabeled with 125I and was used for affinity binding and cross-linking studies. Scatchard analysis of specific binding indicated the presence of 1.0 X 10(5) high affinity binding sites/cell, with a Kd of 6.5 nM. Cross-linking studies demonstrated the presence of one 320-kDa binding complex. The pH profile and kinetic determinations of Km and maximum velocity for hPAP were similar to those previously reported, except for the finding of positive cooperativity of the substrate with the enzyme under the conditions of our assay. We believe that the direct stimulation of bone-forming cells by hPAP may contribute to the sclerotic nature of skeletal bone around sites of neoplastic prostatic metastases and that the effect of the enzyme is probably mediated by a plasma membrane receptor.

  10. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; D’Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G.; Bu, Xiu R.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents. PMID:26121643

  11. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Lyons, Anastesia S; Muniyan, Sakthivel; D'Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G; Bu, Xiu R; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents. PMID:26121643

  12. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  13. Celastrol Potentiates Radiotherapy by Impairment of DNA Damage Processing in Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yao; DeSano, Jeffrey T.; Meng Yang; J, Qing; Ljungman, Mats; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Xu Liang

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Celastrol is an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine and has recently been identified as a potent natural proteasome inhibitor. In the present study, we evaluated the radiosensitizing potential of celastrol in the human prostate cancer PC-3 model. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the radiosensitizing effect of celastrol. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide staining and by a caspase-3 activation assay. DNA damage processing was examined by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot for phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX). The PC-3 xenograft model in the athymic nude mouse was used for the determination of the in vivo efficacy of celastrol combined with radiotherapy. The tumor samples were also analyzed for apoptosis and angiogenesis. Results: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to ionizing radiation (IR) in a dose- and schedule-dependent manner, in which pretreatment with celastrol for 1 h followed by IR achieved maximal radiosensitization. Celastrol significantly prolonged the presence of IR-induced {gamma}H2AX and increased IR-induced apoptosis. Celastrol, combined with fractionated radiation, significantly inhibited PC-3 tumor growth in vivo without obvious systemic toxicity. The combination treatment increased {gamma}H2AX levels and apoptosis, induced cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose)polymerase and Mcl-1, and reduced angiogenesis in vivo compared with either treatment alone. Conclusion: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo by impairing DNA damage processing and augmenting apoptosis. Celastrol might represent a promising new adjuvant regimen for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  14. Hyperplastic corneal pannus: an immunohistochemical analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Jakobiec, Frederick A; Stacy, Rebecca C; Mendoza, Pia R; Chodosh, James

    2014-01-01

    An exuberant corneal pannus usually develops in adults with a history of surgery or trauma in the anterior central stroma and appears as a glistening, vascularized, moderately elevated, well circumscribed white nodule. We describe a 78-year-old woman with such a pannus, which in the past has typically been referred to as keloidal or hypertrophic. The involved eye had only light perception, and she underwent a penetrating keratoplasty that improved her vision to 20/100. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical evaluations of a the specimen disclosed a reactive spindle cell stromal proliferation of myofibroblasts that were smooth muscle actin positive with a low Ki67 proliferation index. Desmin, caldesmon, and calponin were negative, in keeping with the incomplete myofilamentary differentiation of a myofibroblast. There was a generous admixture of CD68/163-positive histiocytes and dispersed C3/5-positive T-lymphocytes. An absence of CD138- and IgG4-positive plasma cells ruled out an IgG4-related disease. For a lesion to be keloidal, the collagen must have a thick hyaline character, sharp edges, and a sparsity of intervening cells and vessels. A hypertrophic pannus would be composed of large swollen cells not necessarily increased in number. We therefore recommend adoption of the term hyperplastic for lesions like that described here because of the obvious increase in cellularity from proliferating myofibroblasts and the lack of true keloidal collagen.

  15. Lysyl hydroxylation in collagens from hyperplastic callus and embryonic bones.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, H W; Bodo, M; Frohn, C; Nerlich, A; Rimek, D; Notbohm, H; Müller, P K

    1992-01-01

    Tissue from two patients with osteogenesis imperfecta suffering from a hyperplastic callus was studied. Although collagen type I from the compact bone and the skin and fibroblast cultures of these patients showed normal lysyl hydroxylation, collagen types I, II, III and V from the callus tissue were markedly overhydroxylated. Furthermore, the overhydroxylation of lysine residues covered almost equally the entire alpha 1 (I) collagen chain, as demonstrated by the analysis of individual CNBr-derived peptides. In addition, collagen type I was isolated from femoral compact bone of 33 individuals who died between the 16th week of gestational age and 22 years. Lysyl hydroxylation rapidly decreased in both collagen alpha 1 (I) and alpha 2 (I) chains during fetal development, and only little in the postnatal period. The transient increase in lysyl hydroxylation and the involvement of various collagen types in callus tissue argue for a regulatory mechanism that may operate in bone repair and during fetal development. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1546948

  16. Antivascular Effects of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation for Prostate Cancer: An In Vivo Human Study Using Susceptibility and Relaxivity Dynamic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzi, Roberto; Padhani, Anwar R.; Taylor, N. Jane; Collins, David J.; D'Arcy, James A.; Stirling, J. James; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The antivascular effects of androgen deprivation have been investigated in animal models; however, there has been minimal investigation in human prostate cancer. This study tested the hypothesis that androgen deprivation causes significant reductions in human prostate tumor blood flow and the induction of hypoxia at a magnitude and in a time scale relevant to the neoadjuvant setting before radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients were examined, each with five multi-parameter magnetic resonance imaging scans: two scans before the commencement of androgen suppression, one scan after 1 month of hormone treatment, and two further scans after 3 months of therapy. Quantitative parametric maps of the prostate informing on relative blood flow (rBF), relative blood volume (rBV), vascular permeability (transfer constant [K{sup trans}]), leakage space (v{sub e}) and blood oxygenation (intrinsic relaxivity [R{sub 2}*]) were calculated. Results: Tumor blood volume and blood flow decreased by 83% and 79%, respectively, in the first month (p < 0.0001), with 74% of patients showing significant changes. The proportion of individual patients who achieved significant changes in T1 kinetic parameter values after 3 months of androgen deprivation for tumor measurements was 68% for K{sup trans} and 53% for v{sub e} By 3 months, significant increases in R{sub 2}* had occurred in prostate tumor, with a rise of 41.1% (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Androgen deprivation induces profound vascular collapse within 1 month of starting treatment. Increased R{sub 2}* in regions of prostate cancer and a decrease in blood volume suggest a reduction in tumor oxygenation.

  17. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  18. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  19. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  20. Identification of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human prostate: expression site of the estrogen receptor in the benign and neoplastic gland.

    PubMed

    Rago, V; Romeo, F; Giordano, F; Ferraro, A; Carpino, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are involved in growth, differentiation and pathogenesis of human prostate through the mediation of the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 'novel' mediator of estrogen signaling which has been recently recognized in some human reproductive tissues, but its expression in the prostate gland is still unknown. Here, we investigated GPER in benign (from 5 patients) and neoplastic prostatic tissues (from 50 patients) by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting. Normal areas of benign prostates revealed a strong GPER immunoreactivity in the basal epithelial cells while luminal epithelial cells were unreactive and stromal cells were weakly immunostained. GPER was also immunolocalized in adenocarcinoma samples but the immunoreactivity of tumoral areas decreased from Gleason pattern 2 to Gleason pattern 4. Furthermore, a strong GPER immunostaining was also revealed in cells of pre-neoplastic lesions (high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia). Western blot analysis of benign and tumor protein extracts showed the presence of a ~42 kDa band, consistent with the GPER molecular weight. An increase in both pAkt and p cAMP-response-binding protein (pCREB) levels was also observed in poorly differentiated PCa samples. Finally, this work identified GPER in the epithelial basal cells of benign human prostate, with a different localization with respect to the classical estrogen receptors. Furthermore, the expression of GPER in prostatic adenocarcinoma cells was also observed but with a modulation of the immunoreactivity according to tumor cell arrangements.

  1. PACE4 regulates apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhiyong; Sun, Bin; Hong, Quan; Yan, Jingmin; Mu, Dawei; Li, Jianye; Sheng, Haibo; Guo, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background PACE4 is a proprotein convertase capable of processing numerous substrates involved in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. However, the precise role of PACE4 during prostate cancer cell apoptosis has not been reported. Methods In the present study, human prostate cancer cell lines DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 were transfected with PACE4 small interfering (si)RNA to investigate the underlying mechanisms of apoptosis. Results We revealed that PACE4 siRNA exhibited antitumor activity by inducing apoptosis, as determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltet-razolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell cycle analysis, Hoechst staining, caspase-3/7 activity, and western blot analysis. In addition, PACE4 siRNA significantly increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, which led to the release of cytochrome c. Moreover, PACE4 siRNA also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by increasing the expression of GRP78, GRP94, p-PERK, and p-eIF2α. The ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and GRP78 were also increased in PACE4 gene knockdown prostate cancer cells compared with the control cells. Conclusion These data demonstrate that PACE4 siRNA may exert its antitumor activity through mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathways, indicating it may be a novel therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26604689

  2. LC/LC-MS/MS of an Innovative Prostate Human Epithelial Cancer (PHEC) in vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Lapek, John D.; McGrath, James L.; Ricke, William A.; Friedman, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the proteomic characterization of a novel in vitro prostate cancer model system, the clonal Prostatic Human Epithelial Cancer (PHEC) cell lines. The model is composed of three cell lines representing the three progressive cancer states found in vivo: non-tumorigenic, tumorigenic, and metastatic. The cell lines were evaluated for differential protein expression between states using two dimensional liquid:liquid chromatographic separation followed by mass spectral identification. The proteins from cellular extracts were first separated using liquid:liquid primary separation based on their isoelectric points and molecular masses. The resulting peptide fractions were applied to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) separation for mass determination and protein identification based on Mascot database inquiry. Over 200 proteins that change expression over the course of progression of this in vitro prostate cancer model were discovered during the comparative analysis of the three cell lines. The importance of these proteins on prostate cancer progression remains to be elucidated with further characterizations. The combination of the two dimensional liquid:liquid separation and mass spectral identifications was used to successfully analyze differential protein expression between multiple cell lines. PMID:22425387

  3. Growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalone present in hops, in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deeb, D; Gao, X; Jiang, H; Arbab, A S; Dulchavsky, S A; Gautam, S C

    2010-09-01

    Promotion of apoptosis in cancer cells could potentially lead to the regression and improved prognosis of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone-derived from hops, has shown strong antitumorigenic activity towards diverse types of cancer cells. In the present study, the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity of XN was tested in hormone-sensitive and hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cells lines. Cell growth/viability assay (MTS) demonstrated that prostate cancer cells are highly sensitive to XN at a concentration range of 20-40 μM. The primary mode of tumor cell destruction was apoptosis as demonstrated by the binding of annexin V-FITC, cleavage of PARP-1, activation of procaspases -3, -8, and -9, mitochondrial depolarization and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Induction of apoptosis by XN was associated with the inhibition of prosurvival Akt, NF-κB and mTOR signaling proteins and NF-κB-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and survivin. These studies provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of XN for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20944105

  4. Growth Inhibitory and Apoptosis-inducing Effects of Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Chalcone Present in Hops, in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    DEEB, D.; GAO, X.; JIANG, H.; ARBAB, A.S.; DULCHAVSKY, S.A.; GAUTAM, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Promotion of apoptosis in cancer cells could potentially lead to the regression and improved prognosis of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone-derived from hops, has shown strong antitumorigenic activity towards diverse types of cancer cells. In the present study, the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity of XN was tested in hormone-sensitive and hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cells lines. Cell growth/viability assay (MTS) demonstrated that prostate cancer cells are highly sensitive to XN at a concentration range of 20-40 μM. The primary mode of tumor cell destruction was apoptosis as demonstrated by the binding of annexin V-FITC, cleavage of PARP-1, activation of procaspases -3, -8, and -9, mitochondrial depolarization and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Induction of apoptosis by XN was associated with the inhibition of prosurvival Akt, NF-κB and mTOR signaling proteins and NF-κB-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and survivin. These studies provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of XN for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20944105

  5. A Rac1/Cdc42 GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor suppresses growth of primary human prostate cancer xenografts and prolongs survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Zins, Karin; Lucas, Trevor; Reichl, Patrick; Abraham, Dietmar; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 have been discovered in various tumors, including prostate and Rac protein expression significantly increases in prostate cancer. The Rac and Cdc42 pathways promote the uncontrolled proliferation, invasion and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. We synthesized the novel compound AZA1 based on structural information of the known Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766. In the current study we investigated the effects of inhibition of these pathways by AZA1 on prostate tumorigenicity by performing preclinical studies using a xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer. In androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, AZA1 inhibited both Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA GTPase activity in a dose-dependent manner and blocked cellular migration and proliferation. Cyclin D1 expression significantly decreased following Rac1/Cdc42 inhibition in prostate cancer cells. AZA1 treatment also down-regulated PAK and AKT activity in prostate cancer cells, associated with induction of the pro-apoptotic function of BAD by suppression of serine-112 phosphorylation. Daily systemic administration of AZA1 for 2 weeks reduced growth of human 22Rv1 prostate tumor xenografts in mice and improved the survival of tumor-bearing animals significantly. These data suggest a role of AZA1 in blocking Rac1/Cdc42-dependent cell cycle progression, cancer cell migration and increase of cancer cell apoptosis involving down-regulation of the AKT and PAK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells. We therefore propose that a small-molecule inhibitor therapy targeting Rac1/Cdc42 Rho GTPase signaling pathways may be used as a novel treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer.

  6. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  7. Role of androgen and vitamin D receptors in endothelial cells from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Buttyan, Ralph; Johnson, Candace S.; Smith, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Judah Folkman (Folkman. N Engl J Med 285: 1182–1186, 1971) proposed that tumor growth might be controlled by limiting formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) needed to supply a growing tumor with oxygen and nutrients. To this end, numerous “antiangiogenic” agents have been developed and tested for therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients, including prostate cancer (CaP) patients, with limited success. Despite the lack of clinical efficacy of lead anti-angiogenic therapeutics in CaP patients, recent published evidence continues to support the idea that prostate tumor vasculature provides a reasonable target for development of new therapeutics. Particularly relevant to antiangiogenic therapies targeted to the prostate is the observation that specific hormones can affect the survival and vascular function of prostate endothelial cells within normal and malignant prostate tissues. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that both androgen(s) and vitamin D significantly impact the growth and survival of endothelial cells residing within prostate cancer and that systemic changes in circulating androgen or vitamin D drastically affect blood flow and vascularity of prostate tissue. Furthermore, recent evidence will be discussed about the expression of the receptors for both androgen and vitamin D in prostate endothelial cells that argues for direct effects of these hormone-activated receptors on the biology of endothelial cells. Based on this literature, we propose that prostate tumor vasculature represents an unexplored target for modulation of tumor growth. A better understanding of androgen and vitamin D effects on prostate endothelial cells will support development of more effective angiogenesis-targeting therapeutics for CaP patients. PMID:23548616

  8. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monosphosphate mediate prolactin regulation of mitochondrial aconitase in human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juang, Horng-Heng

    2004-04-30

    Mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) is regarded as the key enzyme for citrate oxidation in human prostatic epithelial cells. The results of RT-PCR and immunoblot assays indicated that human prostatic carcinoma cells (PC-3 cells) express the long-form of the prolactin receptor. In vitro studies determined that prolactin upregulates mACON enzymatic activity and cell proliferation of PC-3 cells. Immunoblot assay revealed that prolactin treatments increase the gene expression of mACON. Transient gene expression assay indicated that the regulation by prolactin of mACON gene expression depends on the presence of the cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monosphosphate (cAMP) response element on the promoter of the mACON gene. Both prolactin and dibutyryl-cAMP doubled the promoter activity of the mACON gene; however, adding H-89, a specific protein kinase A inhibitor, suppressed the prolactin response. The intracellular cAMP levels, but not the cGMP levels, increased after treatment with prolactin. This study showed that prolactin regulates the expression of the mACON gene via the cAMP signal pathway in human prostatic carcinoma cells. PMID:15149735

  9. A Novel Gene Signature for Molecular Diagnosis of Human Prostate Cancer by RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Crafa, Pellegrino; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Remondini, Daniel; Ferretti, Stefania; Cortellini, Piero; Corti, Arnaldo; Bettuzzi, Saverio

    2008-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (CaP) is one of the most relevant causes of cancer death in Western Countries. Although detection of CaP at early curable stage is highly desirable, actual screening methods present limitations and new molecular approaches are needed. Gene expression analysis increases our knowledge about the biology of CaP and may render novel molecular tools, but the identification of accurate biomarkers for reliable molecular diagnosis is a real challenge. We describe here the diagnostic power of a novel 8-genes signature: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (OAZ), adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), histone H3 (H3), growth arrest specific gene (GAS1), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Clusterin (CLU) in tumour detection/classification of human CaP. Methodology/Principal Findings The 8-gene signature was detected by retrotranscription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in frozen prostate surgical specimens obtained from 41 patients diagnosed with CaP and recommended to undergo radical prostatectomy (RP). No therapy was given to patients at any time before RP. The bio-bank used for the study consisted of 66 specimens: 44 were benign-CaP paired from the same patient. Thirty-five were classified as benign and 31 as CaP after final pathological examination. Only molecular data were used for classification of specimens. The Nearest Neighbour (NN) classifier was used in order to discriminate CaP from benign tissue. Validation of final results was obtained with 10-fold crossvalidation procedure. CaP versus benign specimens were discriminated with (80±5)% accuracy, (81±6)% sensitivity and (78±7)% specificity. The method also correctly classified 71% of patients with Gleason score<7 versus ≥7, an important predictor of final outcome. Conclusions/Significance The method showed high sensitivity in a collection of specimens in which a significant

  10. Abrogation of prostaglandin E-EP4 signaling in osteoblasts prevents the bone destruction induced by human prostate cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Matsumoto, Chiho; Maruyama, Takayuki; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato; Inada, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    The metastasis of tumors to bone is known to be promoted by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by the tumor host stromal tissue. Although bone metastases frequently occur in prostate cancer patients, the significance of PGE2 in stromal responses to the tumor is not known. In this study, we report that PGE2 and its receptor EP4 play a pivotal role in bone destruction and metastasis in an experimental metastasis model of prostate cancer in nude mice. Using human prostate cancer PC-3 cells that are stably transfected with luciferase, we showed that the development of bone metastasis was accompanied by increased osteoclastic bone resorption in the bone metastasis microenvironment, and could be abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. The growth of PC-3 cells in vitro was not influenced by PGE2 or by the EP4 receptor. However, cell-cell interactions between fixed PC-3 cells and host osteoblasts induced PGE2 production and RANKL expression in the osteoblasts. Addition of an EP4 antagonist suppressed both PGE2 and RANKL expression induced by the PC3-osteoblast interaction, which would have consequent effects on osteoclast activation and osteolysis. These results indicate that the blockage of PGE2-EP4 signaling prevents the bone destruction required for prostate cancer metastases, and that this is, in part due to the abrogation of bone cell responses. The study provides further evidence that an EP4 antagonist is a candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer in the blockade of bone metastasis.

  11. Responsiveness of neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to calcium in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Habener, J F

    1978-01-01

    Secretory and biosynthetic responses of adenomatous, carcinomatous, and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to variable concentrations of extracellular calcium were assessed in vitro. Tissues, obtained at the time of parathyroidectomy, were incubated for 4 h in media containing radioactive amino acids and varying (0.5-5.0 mM) concentrations of calcium. Amounts of newly synthesized and total parathyroid hormone and proparathyroid hormone in extracts of tissues and media were measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by radioimmunoassay, respectively. All tissues studied (six adenomas, two specimens of chief-cell hyperplasia, one carcinoma, and normal bovine and human glands) responded to changes in calcium concentrations; decreasing concentrations of calcium stimulated release and decreased tissue storage of hormone. Six of the abnormal tissues required greater than normal concentrations of calcium (1.8-2.4 mM for 50% of effect) to elicit secretory responses comparable with those of normal glands (1.4 mM). Maximum effects of calcium on release of hormone varied from 2- to 10-fold among different tissues. Release of some hormone persisted even in concentrations of calcium as high as 5.0 mM. Relative amounts of hormone released from and retained in the tissues varied greatly among the tissues, as did the absolute amounts of hormone produced; newly synthesized, labeled hormone ranged between 0.6 and 12% of total labeled protein, and immunoreactive hormone ranged between 0.015 and 0.9% of total tissue protein. Effects of calcium on hormone biosynthesis, as determined by analyses of amounts of proparathyroid hormone in the tissues, were variable among tissues and in many cases were negligible. These results indicate that neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues retain secretory responsiveness to changes in extracellular concentrations of calcium. Responses, however, are highly variable among different tissues, and in many instances are abnormal, inasmuch as

  12. Review of Prostate Anatomy and Embryology and the Etiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Aaron, LaTayia; Franco, Omar E; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-08-01

    Prostate development follows a common pattern between species and depends on the actions of androgens to induce and support ductal branching morphogenesis of buds emerging from the urogenital sinus. The human prostate has a compact zonal anatomy immediately surrounding the urethra and below the urinary bladder. Rodents have a lobular prostate with lobes radiating away from the urethra. The human prostate is the site of benign hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The rodent prostate has little naturally occurring disease. Rodents can be used to model aspects of human benign hyperplasia, but care should be taken in data interpretation and extrapolation to the human condition. PMID:27476121

  13. Nine genes that may contribute to partial trisomy (6)(p22→pter) and unique presentation of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous with retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Su, Pen-Hua; Lee, Inn-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Ng, Yan-Yan; Liu, Chan-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Yuh

    2012-04-01

    We report on a newborn girl with facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, feeding problems, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Cytogenetic analysis by high resolution GTG banding showed extra chromosomal material on the short arm of one chromosome 1 of the patient, but neither parent. SKY and CGH analysis demonstrated that the patient had a de novo 46,XX, der(1)t(1;6)(p36.3; p22). Compared with previously reported cases of partial trisomy 6p22 syndrome, this patient exhibited a unique condition for this syndrome: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) with retinal detachment. The human genome database was searched for candidate genes and we propose the following nine genes located in the 6p22→6pter region for their potential contribution to the phenotype of partial trisomy 6p22→pter and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) with retinal detachment: Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1), FOXF2, FOXC1, NRN1, EDN1, ATXN1, DEK oncogene, E2F3, and NRNS1. PMID:22407547

  14. Asymmetric synthesis and evaluation of a hydroxyphenylamide voltage-gated sodium channel blocker in human prostate cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gary C.; Kong, Yali; Paige, Mikell; Li, Zhang; Merrick, Ellen C.; Hansen, Todd; Suy, Simeng; Wang, Kan; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Cordova, Antoinette; McManus, Owen B.; Williams, Brande S.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to be expressed in neurons and other excitable cells. Recently, voltage-gated sodium channels have been found to be expressed in human prostate cancer cells. α-Hydroxy-α-phenylamides are a new class of small molecules that have demonstrated potent inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The hydroxyamide motif, an isostere of a hydantoin ring, provides an active scaffold from which several potent racemic sodium channel blockers have been derived. With little known about chiral preferences, the development of chiral syntheses to obtain each pure enantiomer for evaluation as sodium channel blockers is important. Using Seebach and Frater's chiral template, cyclocondensation of (R)-3-chloromandelic acid with pivaldehyde furnished both the cis- and trans-2,5-disubsituted dioxolanones. Using this chiral template, we synthesized both enantiomers of 2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxynonanamide, and evaluated their ability to functionally inhibit hNav isoforms, human prostate cancer cells and xenograft. Enantiomers of lead demonstrated significant ability to reduce prostate cancer in vivo. PMID:22364743

  15. North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) stimulates apoptotic pathways in DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Malcolm A; Scott, Bradley E; Deziel, Bob A; Nunnelley, Melissa C; Liberty, Anne M; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine T; Neto, Catherine C; Hurta, Robert A R

    2011-01-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been shown to improve patient prognosis in a variety of cancers, a benefit partly derived from phytochemicals, many of which target cell death pathways in tumor cells. Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) are a phytochemical-rich fruit containing a variety of polyphenolic compounds. As flavonoids have been shown to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells, this study investigated the hypothesis that cranberry-mediated cytotoxicity in DU145 human prostate adenocarcinoma cells involves apoptosis. The results showed that induction of apoptosis in these cells occurred in response to treatment with whole cranberry extract and occurred through caspase-8 mediated cleavage of Bid protein to truncated Bid resulting in cytochrome-C release from the mitochondria. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 ultimately resulted in cell death as characterized by DNA fragmentation. Increased Par-4 protein expression was observed, and this is suggested to be at least partly responsible for caspase-8 activation. Proanthocyanidin-enriched and flavonol-enriched fractions of cranberry also increased caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity, suggesting that these compounds play a possible role in apoptosis induction. These findings indicate that cranberry phytochemicals can induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells in vitro, and these findings further establish the potential value of cranberry phytochemicals as possible agents against prostate cancer.

  16. Antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells by a stinging nettle root (Urtica dioica) extract.

    PubMed

    Konrad, L; Müller, H H; Lenz, C; Laubinger, H; Aumüller, G; Lichius, J J

    2000-02-01

    In the present study the activity of a 20% methanolic extract of stinging nettle roots (Urtica dioica L., Urticaceae) on the proliferative activity of human prostatic epithelial (LNCaP) and stromal (hPCPs) cells was evaluated using a colorimetric assay. A concentration-dependent and significant (p < 0.05) antiproliferative effect of the extract was observed only on LNCaP cells during 7 days, whereas stromal cell growth remained unaltered. The inhibition was time-dependent with the maximum of growth reduction (30%) at a concentration of 1.0E-6 mg/ml on day 5 compared to the untreated control. On day 4 and 6, the reduction in proliferation of LNCaP cells showed the minimal effective dose at 1.0E-9 mg/ml. No cytotoxic effect of ME-20 on cell proliferation was observed. The antiproliferative effect of ME-20 of stinging nettle roots observed both in an in vivo model and in an in vitro system clearly indicates a biologically relevant effect of compounds present in the extract. PMID:10705733

  17. Proliferation-independent growth factor modulation of the radiation sensitivity of human prostate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, S.P.; Groch, K.M.; Lindstrom, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    The survival of human prostatic epithelial cells irradiated in different physiological states is reported. Exponentially growing cells and contact-inhibited cells grown and irradiated in the presence of the growth factors epidermal growth factor (EGF) and bovine pituitary extract (bPE) had overlapping radiation dose-cell survival curves. However, when EGF and bPE were removed from exponentially growing cells before irradiation, an increase in radiosensitivity was observed if the cells were replated into medium containing growth factors (EGF and bPE) immediately after irradiation. Treating cells with the nonspecific growth factor receptor antagonist suramin had similar effects as did growth factor deprivation. In contrast, when growth factor-deprived cells were maintained in this same medium for 12 h postirradiation, an increase in radiation survival was observed. This increase in survival is attributed to the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD). Both the increase in radiosensitivity induced by deprivation of growth factor before irradiation and the repair of PLD caused by deprivation of growth factor after irradiation were independent of changes in cellular proliferation. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tab.

  18. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  19. Safrole-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cytotoxicity in human PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Cheng, H H; Huang, C J; Chen, W C; Chen, I S; Liu, S I; Hsu, S S; Chang, H T; Wang, J K; Lu, Y C; Chou, C T; Jan, C R

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and on viability of human PC3 prostate cancer cells was examined. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) were measured by using fura-2 as a probe. Safrole at concentrations above 10 microM increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 350 microM. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by more than half after removing extracellular Ca2+ but was unaffected by nifedipine, nicardipine, nimodipine, diltiazem, or verapamil. In Ca2+-free medium, after treatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) failed to release Ca2+. Neither inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 nor modulation of protein kinase C activity affected safrole-induced Ca2+ release. Overnight incubation with 0.65-65 microM safrole did not affect cell viability, but incubation with 325-625 microM safrole decreased viability. Collectively, the data suggest that in PC3 cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+]i increase by causing Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C- and protein kinase C-independent fashion, and by inducing Ca2+ influx. Safrole can decrease cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner.

  20. Production and response of a human prostatic cancer line to transforming growth factor-like molecules.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A.; Chisholm, G. D.; Habib, F. K.

    1990-01-01

    Serum-free media conditioned by the androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell line DU145 showed immunological transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) activity, as well as competing activity in epidermal growth factor (EGF) radioreceptor assays (RRA). Furthermore, there were factors in the conditioned media which inhibited and stimulated DNA synthesis by DU145 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Fractionation of the concentrated conditioned media by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography revealed several peaks containing EGF-like competitive activity only one of which demonstrated TGF alpha activity. However, none of the peaks corresponded to immunoreactive EGF. Measurement of EGF receptors on DU145 cells by competition and saturation analysis revealed high levels of receptors (mean +/- s.d. = 2.5 +/- 1 x 10(5) surface receptors per cell) which were of high affinity (Kd +/- s.d. = 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol l-1). Although DU145 cells express high levels of EGF receptors, DNA synthesis was only minimally affected by exogenous EGF and TGF alpha. PMID:2223575

  1. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  2. Cholesterol modulation of the expression of mitochondrial aconitase in human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2005-06-30

    Mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) is the key enzyme for the citrate oxidation in the mitochondrial Krebs cycle. Cholesterol treatment (10 microg/ml of cholesterol and 1 microg/ml of 25-hydroxycholesterol) for 24 h stimulates mACON enzymatic activity in human prostatic carcinoma cells (PC-3) and hepatoma cells (HepG2). Mevastatin, a cholesterol synthesis antagonist, blocked the effect of cholesterol treatment on mACON. The cholesterol treatment stimulated mACON enzymatic activity, which enhanced the citrate utility but decreased intracellular ATP levels in PC-3 cells. The immunoblotting and transient gene expression assays demonstrated that cholesterol treatment enhances the gene expression of mACON. Mutation of the putative sterol response element (SRE) from GACGCCCCACT to GACGCCCATAT abolished the stimulating effects of cholesterol on the promoter activity of mACON gene. The results suggest that cholesterol treatment induces the mACON gene expression through the SRE signal transduction pathway. Our study demonstrated the deregulation of cholesterol on the citrate metabolism. PMID:16201454

  3. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  4. Pomegranate extract induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by modulation of the IGF-IGFBP axis

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Satomi; Cobb, Laura J; Mehta, Hemal H; Seeram, Navindra P.; Heber, David; Pantuck, Allan J.; Cohen, Pinchas

    2009-01-01

    The IGF axis is critical for the regulation of apoptosis in many human cancer cell lines. Recently, potent anti-tumorigenic effects of pomegranate juice and extracts have been reported. Consequently, pomegranate has potential not only as a treatment but also as a preventative measure against certain types of cancer, including prostate. In this study, we investigated the relationship between pomegranate-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and the IGF/IGFBP system. Treatment of LAPC4 prostate cancer cells with 10 μg/ml POMx, a highly potent pomegranate extract prepared from skin and arils minus seeds and standardized to ellagitannin content (37% punicalagins by HPLC), resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, co-treatment with POMx and IGFBP-3 revealed synergistic stimulation of apoptosis and additive inhibition of cell growth. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment with POMx or POMx/IGFBP-3 combination resulted in increased JNK phosphorylation, and decreased Akt and mTOR activation, consistent with a growth inhibitory, pro-apoptotic function. We also investigated the relationship between IGF-1 and pomegranate-induced apoptosis in 22RV1 prostate cancer cells. Co-treatment with 100 ng/ml IGF-1 completely blocked apoptosis induction by POMx. In contrast, IGF-I failed to inhibit POMx-induced apoptosis in R- cells, suggesting the importance of IGF-IR. POMx-treatment decreased Igf1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner indicating that its actions also involve tumor-specific suppression of IGF-1. These studies revealed novel interactions between the IGF system and pomegranate-induced apoptosis. PMID:19853487

  5. Heterogeneity in intratumor distribution of p53 mutations in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mirchandani, D.; Zheng, J.; Miller, G. J.; Ghosh, A. K.; Shibata, D. K.; Cote, R. J.; Roy-Burman, P.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma from 65 patients have been examined for the occurrence of point mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene locus within the region of exons 5 to 8. Overall, only a small fraction of tumors (12.3%) was found to contain p53 mutations. No significant correlation was detected between the presence of the mutant gene and either tumor volume or histopathological grade. However, metastatic prostatic tumors are found to display a higher percentage (21.4%) of p53 mutations compared with primary adenocarcinomas (9.8%). Analysis of the topographical distribution of the p53 mutant genotype revealed two remarkable findings. First, multifocal tumors within a prostate appear to differ in harboring the mutant gene, and second, evidence is obtained for intratumor heterogeneity in the distribution of the mutant p53 allele. Together these findings appear to explain, at least in part, why there has been a wide discrepancy in the reported detection frequency of p53 mutations in prostate cancer specimens. It appears that the outcome of mutation analysis would depend not only on which tumors but also which regions of the tumors are included in the study. Furthermore, the observed heterogeneous topographical distribution of the mutation, if confirmed to be unique to prostate cancer, may have important implications in the understanding of the biology of prostate carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7604888

  6. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Systematic dissection of phenotypic, functional, and tumorigenic heterogeneity of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Deng, Qu; Jeter, Collene; Liu, Can; Honorio, Sofia; Li, Hangwen; Davis, Tammy; Suraneni, Mahipal; Laffin, Brian; Qin, Jichao; Li, Qiuhui; Yang, Tao; Whitney, Pamela; Shen, Jianjun; Huang, Jiaoti; Tang, Dean G.

    2015-01-01

    Human cancers are heterogeneous containing stem-like cancer cells operationally defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) that possess great tumor-initiating and long-term tumor-propagating properties. In this study, we systematically dissect the phenotypic, functional and tumorigenic heterogeneity in human prostate cancer (PCa) using xenograft models and >70 patient tumor samples. In the first part, we further investigate the PSA−/lo PCa cell population, which we have recently shown to harbor self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells and present several novel findings. We show that discordant AR and PSA expression in both untreated and castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) results in AR+PSA+, AR+PSA−, AR−PSA−, and AR−PSA+ subtypes of PCa cells that manifest differential sensitivities to therapeutics. We further demonstrate that castration leads to a great enrichment of PSA−/lo PCa cells in both xenograft tumors and CRPC samples and systemic androgen levels dynamically regulate the relative abundance of PSA+ versus PSA−/lo PCa cells that impacts the kinetics of tumor growth. We also present evidence that the PSA−/lo PCa cells possess distinct epigenetic profiles. As the PSA−/lo PCa cell population is heterogeneous, in the second part, we employ two PSA− (Du145 and PC3) and two PSA+ (LAPC9 and LAPC4) PCa models as well as patient tumor cells to further dissect the clonogenic and tumorigenic subsets. We report that different PCa models possess distinct tumorigenic subpopulations that both commonly and uniquely express important signaling pathways that could represent therapeutic targets. Our results have important implications in understanding PCa cell heterogeneity, response to clinical therapeutics, and cellular mechanisms underlying CRPC. PMID:26246472

  8. Expression of Beta-Defensin 131 Promotes an Innate Immune Response in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jong; Lee, Jaehyouk; Myung, Soon Chul

    2015-01-01

    Previously, using the Illumina HumanHT-12 microarray we found that β-defensin 131 (DEFB131), an antimicrobial peptide, is upregulated in the human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 upon stimulation with lipoteichoic acid (LTA; a gram-positive bacterial component), than that in the untreated RWPE-1 cells. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of DEFB131 in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection. We examined the intracellular signaling pathways and nuclear responses in RWPE-1 cells that contribute to DEFB131 gene induction upon stimulation with LTA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to determine whether NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter after LTA stimulation in RWPE-1 cells. We found that DEFB131 expression was induced by LTA stimulation through TLR2 and p38MAPK/NF-κB activation, which was evident in the phosphorylation of both p38MAPK and IκBα. We also found that SB203580 and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of p38MAPK and NF-κB, respectively, suppressed LTA-induced DEFB131 expression. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter, suggesting that NF-κB is a direct regulator, and is necessary for LTA-induced DEFB131 expression in RWPE-1 cells. Interestingly, with DEFB131 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells, the accumulation of mRNA and protein secretion of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12α) and chemokines (CCL20, CCL22, and CXCL8) were significantly enhanced. In addition, DEFB131-transfected RWPE-1 cells markedly induced chemotactic activity in THP-1 monocytes. We concluded that DEFB131 induces cytokine and chemokine upregulation through the TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection and promotes an innate immune response. PMID:26649771

  9. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells.

  10. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... plan and then place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with ...

  11. Colocalisation of CD9 and mortalin in CD9-induced mitotic catastrophe in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zvereff, V; Wang, J-C; Shun, K; Lacoste, J; Chevrette, M

    2007-01-01

    CD9, a member of the tetraspanin family of proteins, is involved in a variety of cellular interactions with many other proteins and molecules. Although CD9 has been implicated in cell fusion, migration and cancer progression, the detailed function of this protein is not completely understood and likely depends on interactions with different protein partners, which are not yet all known. Using co-immunoprecipitation and mass-spectrometric protein sequencing, we have identified in prostate cancer cells, a novel CD9 partner, the 75-kDa protein HSPA9B, also known as mortalin. We further show that introduction and overexpression of wild-type CD9 into human PC-3 prostate cancer cells induces mitotic catastrophe. We also demonstrate, by immunocolocalisation studies, the interaction of CD9 and mortalin in PC-3 cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe. Our results not only identified mortalin as a new CD9 partner, but also clarify the mechanisms by which CD9 may control prostate cancer progression. PMID:17848953

  12. Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human tumors: relationship to breast, colorectal, and prostate tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Han, Zeqiu; Slack, Rebecca S; Li, Wenping; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-01-01

    High levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), the alternative-binding site for diazepam, are part of the aggressive human breast cancer cell phenotype in vitro. We examined PBR levels and distribution in normal tissue and tumors from multiple cancer types by immunohistochemistry. Among normal breast tissues, fibroadenomas, primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas, there is a progressive increase in PBR levels parallel to the invasive and metastatic ability of the tumor (p < 0.0001). In colorectal and prostate carcinomas, PBR levels were also higher in tumor than in the corresponding non-tumoral tissues and benign lesions (p < 0.0001). In contrast, PBR was highly concentrated in normal adrenal cortical cells and hepatocytes, whereas in adrenocortical tumors and hepatomas PBR levels were decreased. Moreover, malignant skin tumors showed decreased PBR expression compared with normal skin. These results indicate that elevated PBR expression is not a common feature of aggressive tumors, but rather may be limited to certain cancers, such as those of breast, colon-rectum and prostate tissues, where elevated PBR expression is associated with tumor progression. Thus, we propose that PBR overexpression could serve as a novel prognostic indicator of an aggressive phenotype in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  14. SPOCK1 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Yao, Yuan-ting; Xu, Huan; Chen, Yan-bo; Gu, Meng; Cai, Zhi-kang; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed noncutaneous cancer and ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American males. Metastasis is the primary cause of prostate cancer mortality. Survival rate is only 28% for metastatic patients, but is nearly 100% for patients with localized prostate cancers. Molecular mechanisms that underlie this malignancy remain obscure, and this study investigated the role of SPARC/osteonectin, cwcv, and kazal-like domain proteoglycan 1 (SPOCK1) in prostate cancer progression. Initially, we found that SPOCK1 expression was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissues relative to noncancerous tissues. In particular, SPOCK1 expression was also markedly high in metastatic tissues compared with nonmetastatic cancerous tissues. SPOCK1 expression knockdown by specific short hairpin RNA in PC3 cells was significantly inhibited, whereas SPOCK1 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells promoted cell viability, colony formation in vitro, and tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, the SPOCK1 knockdown in PC3 cells was associated with cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, while the SPOCK1 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. The SPOCK1 knockdown in PC3 cells even increased cell apoptosis. SPOCK1 modulation was also observed to affect cancerous cell proliferation and apoptotic processes in the mouse model of prostate cancer. Additionally, the SPOCK1 knockdown decreased, whereas the SPOCK1 overexpression increased cell migration and invasion abilities in vitro. Injection of SPOCK1-depleted PC3 cells significantly decreased metastatic nodules in mouse lungs. These findings suggest that SPOCK1 is a critical mediator of tumor growth and metastasis in prostate cancer. PMID:27486308

  15. SPOCK1 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Yao, Yuan-Ting; Xu, Huan; Chen, Yan-Bo; Gu, Meng; Cai, Zhi-Kang; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed noncutaneous cancer and ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American males. Metastasis is the primary cause of prostate cancer mortality. Survival rate is only 28% for metastatic patients, but is nearly 100% for patients with localized prostate cancers. Molecular mechanisms that underlie this malignancy remain obscure, and this study investigated the role of SPARC/osteonectin, cwcv, and kazal-like domain proteoglycan 1 (SPOCK1) in prostate cancer progression. Initially, we found that SPOCK1 expression was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissues relative to noncancerous tissues. In particular, SPOCK1 expression was also markedly high in metastatic tissues compared with nonmetastatic cancerous tissues. SPOCK1 expression knockdown by specific short hairpin RNA in PC3 cells was significantly inhibited, whereas SPOCK1 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells promoted cell viability, colony formation in vitro, and tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, the SPOCK1 knockdown in PC3 cells was associated with cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, while the SPOCK1 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. The SPOCK1 knockdown in PC3 cells even increased cell apoptosis. SPOCK1 modulation was also observed to affect cancerous cell proliferation and apoptotic processes in the mouse model of prostate cancer. Additionally, the SPOCK1 knockdown decreased, whereas the SPOCK1 overexpression increased cell migration and invasion abilities in vitro. Injection of SPOCK1-depleted PC3 cells significantly decreased metastatic nodules in mouse lungs. These findings suggest that SPOCK1 is a critical mediator of tumor growth and metastasis in prostate cancer. PMID:27486308

  16. Influence of polyphenol extract from evening primrose (Oenothera paradoxa) seeds on human prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Urszula; Owczarek, Katarzyna; Szewczyk, Karolina; Podsędek, Anna; Koziołkiewicz, Maria; Hrabec, Elżbieta

    2014-02-03

    There is growing interest in plant polyphenols which exhibit pleiotropic biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. The objective of our study was to evaluate the influence of an evening primrose extract (EPE) from defatted seeds on viability and invasiveness of three human cell lines: PNT1A (normal prostate cells), DU145 (prostate cancer cells) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cells). The results revealed that after 72 h of incubation the tested extract reduced the viability of DU 145 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 equal to 14.5 μg/mL for both cell lines. In contrast, EPE did not inhibit the viability of normal prostate cells. Furthermore, EPE reduced PNT1A and MDA-MB-231 cell invasiveness; at the concentration of 21.75 μg/mL the suppression of invasion reached 92% and 47%, respectively (versus control). Additionally, zymographic analysis revealed that after 48 h of incubation EPE inhibited metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities in a dose-dependent manner. For PNT1A the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased 4- and 2-fold, respectively, at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL. In the case of MDA-MB-231 and DU 145 the decrease in MMP-9 activity at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL was 5.5-fold and almost 1.9-fold, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that EPE may exhibit antimigratory, anti-invasive and antimetastatic potential towards prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

  17. Inhibitory effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth and invasiveness of PC3 human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Arenas, M Isabel; Schally, Andrew V; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Zarka, Elías; González-Santander, Marta; Carmena, María J; Vacas, Eva; Prieto, Juan C; Bajo, Ana M

    2013-02-15

    New approaches are needed to the therapy of advanced prostate cancer. This study determined the effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists, JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on growth of PC3 tumors as well as on angiogenesis and metastasis through the evaluation of various factors that contribute largely to the progression of prostate cancer. Human PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) or JV-1-38 (20 μg/day) lasted 41 days. We also evaluated the effects of JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on proliferation, cell adhesion and migration in PC-3 cells in vitro. Several techniques (Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and zymography) were used to evaluate the expression levels of GHRH receptors and its splice variants, GHRH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, β-catenin and E-cadherin. GHRH antagonists suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro and significantly inhibited growth of PC3 tumors. After treatment with these analogues, we found an increase in expression of GHRH receptor accompanied by a decrease of GHRH levels, a reduction in both VEGF and HIF-1α expression and in active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9, a significant increase in levels of membrane-associated β-catenin and a significant decline in E-cadherin. These results support that the blockade of GHRH receptors can modulate elements involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Consequently, GHRH antagonists could be considered as suitable candidates for therapeutic trials in the management of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  18. ILs-3, 6 and 11 increase, but ILs-10 and 24 decrease stemness of human prostate cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dandan; Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Cao, Jing; Fan, Huijie; Yuan, Yuan; Ji, Zhenyu; Qiao, Baoping; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are associated with cancer recurrence and metastasis. Prostate cancer cells often metastasize to the bone with a complex microenvironment of cytokines favoring cell survival. In this study, the cell stemness influence of a group of interleukins including IL-3, 6, 10, 11 and 24 on human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 was explored in vitro. Sulforhodamine B(SRB) and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assays were applied to examine the effect on cell proliferation, and wound healing and transwell assays were used for migration and invasion studies, in addition to colony formation, Western blotting and flowcytometry for the expression of stemness factors and chemotherapy sensitivity. We observed that ILs-3, 6 and 11 stimulated while ILs-10 and 24 inhibited the growth, invasion and migration of both cell lines. Interestingly, ILs-3, 6 and 11 significantly promoted colony formation and increased the expression of SOX2, CD44 and ABCG2 in both prostate cancer cell lines. However, ILs-10 and 24 showed the opposite effect on the expression of these factors. In line with the above findings, treatment with either IL-3 or IL-6 or IL-11 decreased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel while treatment with either IL-10 or IL-24 increased the sensitivity of docetaxel chemotherapy. In conclusion, our results suggest that ILs-3, 6 and 11 function as tumor promoters while ILs-10 and 24 function as tumor suppressors in the prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP in vitro, and such differences may attribute to their different effect on the stemness of PCa cells. PMID:26528857

  19. Development of invasive colon cancer with microsatellite instability in a patient with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horii, Joichiro; Kato, Jun; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Sun, Dong-Sheng; Watanabe, Kazuo; Fujita, Isao; Toyokawa, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2012-05-01

    The serrated pathway has recently been proposed as a route for the development of colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome is a rare syndrome defined by the presence of numerous serrated polyps, with a high risk of developing into colorectal cancer. We present here a case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome developing into colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability from a serrated polyp. BRAF mutation and the loss of MLH1 protein were observed in the colorectal cancer, but not in the other serrated polyps around the colorectal cancer, suggesting that colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability develops rapidly from a specific serrated polyp with distinct molecular properties.

  20. Differential vitamin D 24-hydroxylase/CYP24A1 gene promoter methylation in endothelium from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Karpf, Adam R; Omilian, Angela R; Bshara, Wiam; Tian, Lili; Tangrea, Michael A; Morrison, Carl D; Johnson, Candace S

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations occur in tumor-associated vessels in the tumor microenvironment. Methylation of the CYP24A1 gene promoter differs in endothelial cells isolated from tumors and non-tumor microenvironments in mice. The epigenetic makeup of endothelial cells of human tumor-associated vasculature is unknown due to difficulty of isolating endothelial cells populations from a heterogeneous tissue microenvironment. To ascertain CYP24A1 promoter methylation in tumor-associated endothelium, we utilized laser microdissection guided by CD31 immunohistochemistry to procure endothelial cells from human prostate tumor specimens. Prostate tissues were obtained following robotic radical prostatectomy from men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Adjacent histologically benign prostate tissues were used to compare endothelium from benign versus tumor microenvironments. Sodium bisulfite sequencing of CYP24A1 promoter region showed that the average CYP24A1 promoter methylation in the endothelium was 20% from the tumor microenvironment compared with 8.2% in the benign microenvironment (p < 0.05). A 2-fold to 17-fold increase in CYP24A1 promoter methylation was observed in the prostate tumor endothelium compared with the matched benign prostate endothelium in four patient samples, while CYP24A1 promoter methylation remained unchanged in two patient samples. In addition, there is no correlation of the level of CYP24A1 promoter methylation in prostate tumor-associated endothelium with that of epithelium/stroma. This study demonstrates that the CYP24A1 promoter is methylated in tumor-associated endothelium, indicating that epigenetic alterations in CYP24A1 may play a role in determining the phenotype of tumor-associated vasculature in the prostate tumor microenvironment. PMID:21725204

  1. VHF-induced thermoacoustic imaging of fresh human prostates using a clinical ultrasound transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; See, W. A.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that a clinical ultrasound transducer array can practically detect thermoacoustic pulses induced by irradiation by very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic energy. This is an important step because thermoacoustic signal strength is directly proportional to the specific absorption rate (SAR), which is lower in the VHF regime than in microwave or optical regimes. A 96-channel transducer array (P4-1) providing 3 cm coverage was incorporated into a benchtop thermoacoustic imaging system for imaging fresh surgical specimens. Thermoacoustic signal was generated by 700 ns irradiation pulses with 11 kV/m electric field strength and 108 MHz carrier frequency. To improve SNR 1024 pulses were averaged at a 250 Hz repetition rate. Two sets of sinograms were acquired, separated by a 2 cm translation along the tomographic axis and reconstructed over a 6 x 6 x 5 cm3 volume. Contrast and in-plane resolution were measured by imaging a homogeneous cylindrical phantom and an 80- micron wire designed to highlight E-field polarization effects. FWHM of the in-plane point spread function varied from 250 microns to 1.1 mm, depending upon transducer used and phantom orientation relative to the electric field. Several fresh human prostates were imaged immediately after surgery. Rudimentary comparison to histology was performed and volumetric reconstruction of the multi-channel P4-1 data visualizes anatomic features that are rarely seen in ultrasound, CT, or MRI. The single element transducer provided superior image contrast, but with inferior resolution.

  2. Mechanosensitive Ca2+ permeant cation channels in human prostate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maroto, Rosario; Kurosky, Alexander; Hamill, Owen P.

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of cell motility plays a critical role in the spread of prostate cancer (PC), therefore, identifying a sensitive step that regulates PC cell migration should provide a promising target to block PC metastasis. Here, we report that a mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable cation channel (MscCa) is expressed in the highly migratory/invasive human PC cell line, PC-3 and that inhibition of MscCa by Gd3+ or GsMTx-4 blocks PC-3 cell migration and associated elevations in [Ca2+]i. Genetic suppression or overexpression of specific members of the canonical transient receptor potential Ca2+ channel family (TRPC1 and TRPC3) also inhibit PC-3 cell migration, but they do so by mechanisms other that altering MscCa activity. Although LNCaP cells are nonmigratory, they also express relatively large MscCa currents, indicating that MscCa expression alone cannot confer motility on PC cells. MscCa in both cell lines show similar conductance and ion selectivity and both are functionally coupled via Ca2+ influx to a small Ca2+-activated K+ channel. However, MscCa in PC-3 and LNCaP cell patches show markedly different gating dynamics—while PC-3 cells typically express a sustained, non-inactivating MscCa current, LNCaP cells express a mechanically-fragile, rapidly inactivating MscCa current. Moreover, mechanical forces applied to the patch, can induce an irreversible transition from the transient to the sustained MscCa gating mode. Given that cancer cells experience increasing compressive and shear forces within a growing tumor, a similar shift in channel gating in situ would have significant effects on Ca2+ signaling that may play a role in tumor progression. PMID:22874798

  3. The urokinase inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine inhibits growth of a human prostate tumor in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Billström, A; Hartley-Asp, B; Lecander, I; Batra, S; Astedt, B

    1995-05-16

    Malignant cells possess a high degree of proteolytic activity in which the plasminogen activator system plays an important role. An increased expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) is of significance for degradation of the extracellular tumor matrix, facilitating invasiveness and growth. Inhibition of the active site of uPA makes it possible to evaluate the significance of uPA in tumor growth. We report here experiments on a uPA-producing human prostate xenograft (DU 145) using a competitive inhibitor of uPA, p-aminobenzamidine. In vitro experiments with DU 145 cells showed that p-aminobenzamidine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of uPA activity. DU 145 cells were inoculated s.c. in SCID mice and, once tumors were established, treatment with p-aminobenzamidine added to drinking water was started and lasted for 23 days. Mice receiving 250 mg/kg/day of p-aminobenzamidine showed a clear decrease in tumor-growth rate compared to the non-treated mice, resulting in 64% lower final tumor weight. In addition, uPA-antigen levels in the membrane fractions of DU 145 tumors from p-aminobenzamidine-treated mice were found to be decreased by 59%. We also show that p-aminobenzamidine has an anti-proliferative effect in cell culture at low cell number, correlating with a dose-dependent decrease in uPA production. In conclusion, we show that a low-molecular-weight uPA-inhibitor, p-aminobenzamidine, has a growth-inhibitory effect on a solid uPA-producing tumor. PMID:7759160

  4. MPC1, a key gene in cancer metabolism, is regulated by COUPTFII in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leiming; Xu, Mafei; Qin, Jun; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Hui-Ju; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) and MPC 2 form a transporter complex in cells to control pyruvate transportation into mitochondria. Reduced expression of MPC1 disrupts the transporter function, induces metabolic shift to increase glycolysis, and thus plays important roles in several diseases, including cancer. However, the role of MPC1 in prostate cancer and the underlying mechanism causing the down-regulation of MPC1 in tumor cells remain to be defined. Here, we show that MPC1 serves as a critical regulator of glycolysis in prostate cancer cells, which in turn controls cancer cell growth, invasion, and the tumorigenic capability. More importantly, we identified that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), a steroid receptor superfamily member, transcriptionally regulates the expression of MPC1. We further demonstrate that COUP-TFII, which is upregulated in the prostate cancer patient, regulates MPC1 and glycolysis to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Our findings reveal that COUP-TFII represses MPC1 expression in prostate cancer cells to facilitate a metabolism switch to increase glycolysis and promote cancer progression. This observation raises an intriguing possibility of targeting COUP-TFII to modulate cancer cell metabolism for prostate cancer intervention. PMID:26895100

  5. O-GlcNAc transferase integrates metabolic pathways to regulate the stability of c-MYC in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Minner, Sarah; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Sandmann, Mareike Julia; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Schlomm, Thorsten; Mills, Ian G

    2013-08-15

    Metabolic disruptions that occur widely in cancers offer an attractive focus for generalized treatment strategies. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) senses metabolic status and produces an essential substrate for O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), which glycosylates and thereby modulates the function of its target proteins. Here, we report that the HBP is activated in prostate cancer cells and that OGT is a central regulator of c-Myc stability in this setting. HBP genes were overexpressed in human prostate cancers and androgen regulated in cultured human cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of human specimens (n = 1987) established that OGT is upregulated at the protein level and that its expression correlates with high Gleason score, pT and pN stages, and biochemical recurrence. RNA interference-mediated siliencing or pharmacologic inhibition of OGT was sufficient to decrease prostate cancer cell growth. Microarray profiling showed that the principal effects of OGT inhibition in prostate cancer cells were related to cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. In particular, c-MYC was identified as a candidate upstream regulator of OGT target genes and OGT inhibition elicited a dose-dependent decrease in the levels of c-MYC protein but not c-MYC mRNA in cell lines. Supporting this relationship, expression of c-MYC and OGT was tightly correlated in human prostate cancer samples (n = 1306). Our findings identify HBP as a modulator of prostate cancer growth and c-MYC as a key target of OGT function in prostate cancer cells.

  6. Detection of TMPRSS2-ERG translocations in human prostate cancer by expression profiling using GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays.

    PubMed

    Jhavar, Sameer; Reid, Alison; Clark, Jeremy; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Christmas, Timothy; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Ogden, Christopher; Fisher, Cyril; Corbishley, Cathy; De-Bono, Johann; Eeles, Rosalind; Brewer, Daniel; Cooper, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Translocation of TMPRSS2 to the ERG gene, found in a high proportion of human prostate cancer, results in overexpression of the 3'-ERG sequences joined to the 5'-TMPRSS2 promoter. The studies presented here were designed to test the ability of expression analysis on GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays to detect 5'-TMPRSS2-ERG-3' hybrid transcripts encoded by this translocation. Monitoring the relative expression of each ERG exon revealed altered transcription of the ERG gene in 15 of a series of 27 prostate cancer samples. In all cases, exons 4 to 11 exhibited enhanced expression compared with exons 2 and 3. This pattern of expression indicated that the most abundant hybrid transcripts involve fusions to ERG exon 4, and RT-PCR analyses confirmed the joining of TMPRSS2 exon 1 to ERG exon 4 in all 15 cases. The exon expression patterns also indicated that TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts commonly contain deletion of ERG exon 8. Analysis of gene-level data from the arrays allowed the identification of genes whose expression levels significantly correlated with the presence of the translocation. These studies demonstrate that expression analyses using exon arrays represent a valuable approach for detecting ETS gene translocation in prostate cancer, in parallel with analyses of gene expression profiles.

  7. Subditine, a New Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid from Bark of Nauclea subdita (Korth.) Steud. Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook Yee; Looi, Chung Yeng; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Cheah, Foo Kit; Leong, Kok Hoong; Wong, Won Fen; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new apoptotic monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, subditine (1), and four known compounds were isolated from the bark of Nauclea subdita. Complete 1H- and 13C- NMR data of the new compound were reported. The structures of isolated compounds were elucidated with various spectroscopic methods such as 1D- and 2D- NMR, IR, UV and LCMS. All five compounds were screened for cytotoxic activities on LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell-lines. Among the five compounds, the new alkaloid, subditine (1), demonstrated the most potent cell growth inhibition activity and selective against LNCaP with an IC50 of 12.24±0.19 µM and PC-3 with an IC50 of 13.97±0.32 µM, compared to RWPE human normal epithelial cell line (IC50 = 30.48±0.08 µM). Subditine (1) treatment induced apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 as evidenced by increased cell permeability, disruption of cytoskeletal structures and increased nuclear fragmentation. In addition, subditine (1) enhanced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as reflected by increased expression of glutathione reductase (GR) to scavenge damaging free radicals in both prostate cancer cell-lines. Excessive ROS could lead to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), release of cytochrome c and subsequent caspase 9, 3/7 activation. Further Western blot analyses showed subditine (1) induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl expression, whereas p53 was up-regulated in LNCaP (p53-wild-type), but not in PC-3 (p53-null). Overall, our data demonstrated that the new compound subditine (1) exerts anti-proliferative effect on LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. PMID:24551054

  8. Oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial function differ between human prostate tissue and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, Bernd; Schäfer, Georg; Weber, Anja; Talasz, Heribert; Eder, Iris E; Klocker, Helmut; Gnaiger, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer. Cell lines are frequently used as models to study mitochondrial (dys)function, but little is known about their mitochondrial respiration and metabolic properties in comparison to the primary tissue of origin. We have developed a method for assessment of oxidative phosphorylation in prostate tissue samples of only 2 mg wet weight using high-resolution respirometry. Reliable protocols were established to investigate the respiratory activity of different segments of the mitochondrial electron transfer system (ETS) in mechanically permeabilized tissue biopsies. Additionally, the widely used immortalized prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell lines, RWPE1 and NAF, representing the major cell types in prostate tissue, were analyzed and compared to the tissue of origin. Our results show that mechanical treatment without chemical permeabilization agents or sample processing constitutes a reliable preparation method for OXPHOS analysis in small amounts of prostatic tissue typically obtained by prostate biopsy. The cell lines represented the bioenergetic properties of fresh tissue to a limited extent only. Particularly, tissue showed a higher oxidative capacity with succinate and glutamate, whereas pyruvate was a substrate supporting significantly higher respiratory activities in cell lines. Several fold higher zinc levels measured in tissue compared to cells confirmed the role of aconitase for prostate-specific metabolism in agreement with observed respiratory properties. In conclusion, combining the flexibility of cell culture models and tissue samples for respirometric analysis are powerful tools for investigation of mitochondrial function and tissue-specific metabolism. PMID:27060259

  9. Selective cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by a polyphenol-rich extract of Solanum nigrum.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Akbar; Thakur, Vijay S; Yunus, Mohammad; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Progression of prostate cancer is associated with escape of tumor cells from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Agents capable of selectively eliminating cancer cells by cell cycle arrest and/or induction of apoptosis offer a highly desirable approach. Here we demonstrate that a polyphenolic extract derived from ripe berries of Solanum nigrum (SN) differentially causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various human prostate cancer cells without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. Virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial PZ-HPV-7 cells and their cancer counterpart CA-HPV-10 cells, were used to evaluate the growth-inhibitory effects of the SN extract. SN treatment (5-20 µg/ml) of PZ-HPV-7 cells resulted in growth inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, SN treatment of CA-HPV-10 cells increased cytotoxicity, decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Similar results were noted in the human prostate cancer LNCaP, 22Rv1, DU145 and PC-3 cell lines, where significant reductions in cell viability and induction of apoptosis was observed in all these cells, an effect independent of disease stage and androgen association. Cell cycle analysis revealed that SN treatment (5-20 µg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G2/M phase arrest and subG1 accumulation in the CA-HPV-10 but not in the PZ-HPV-7 cell line. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that the SN extract is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. SN may be developed as a promising therapeutic and/or preventive agent against prostate cancer. PMID:22076244

  10. Selective cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by a polyphenol-rich extract of Solanum nigrum

    PubMed Central

    NAWAB, AKBAR; THAKUR, VIJAY S.; YUNUS, MOHAMMAD; MAHDI, ABBAS ALI; GUPTA, SANJAY

    2012-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer is associated with escape of tumor cells from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Agents capable of selectively eliminating cancer cells by cell cycle arrest and/or induction of apoptosis offer a highly desirable approach. Here we demonstrate that a polyphenolic extract derived from ripe berries of Solanum nigrum (SN) differentially causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various human prostate cancer cells without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. Virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial PZ-HPV-7 cells and their cancer counterpart CA-HPV-10 cells, were used to evaluate the growth-inhibitory effects of the SN extract. SN treatment (5–20 μg/ml) of PZ-HPV-7 cells resulted in growth inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, SN treatment of CA-HPV-10 cells increased cytotoxicity, decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Similar results were noted in the human prostate cancer LNCaP, 22Rv1, DU145 and PC-3 cell lines, where significant reductions in cell viability and induction of apoptosis was observed in all these cells, an effect independent of disease stage and androgen association. Cell cycle analysis revealed that SN treatment (5–20 μg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G2/M phase arrest and subG1 accumulation in the CA-HPV-10 but not in the PZ-HPV-7 cell line. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that the SN extract is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. SN may be developed as a promising therapeutic and/or preventive agent against prostate cancer. PMID:22076244

  11. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  12. Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in North American farmed silver fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Hudson, Robert C; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis is a progressive growth of gingival tissues in foxes resulting in dental encapsulation. It is an autosomal recessive condition displaying a gender-biased penetrance, with an association with superior fur quality. This disease has been primarily described in European farmed foxes. Here we document its emergence in Canada.

  13. Repeated salicylic acid peels for the treatment of hyperplastic sebaceous glands in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sgontzou, Themis; Armyra, Kalliopi; Kouris, Anargyros; Bokotas, Charalampos; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2014-12-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. Hypertrophic sebaceous glands (HSGs) are rarely present but they cause an aesthetic problem. We report a case of a patient suffering from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, treated with salicylic acid peels for the hyperplastic sebaceous glands.

  14. Analysis of the genomic response of human prostate cancer cells to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kortenhorst, Madeleine SQ; Wissing, Michel D; Rodriguez, Ronald; Kachhap, Sushant K; Jans, Judith JM; Van der Groep, Petra; Verheul, Henk MW; Gupta, Anuj; Aiyetan, Paul O; van der Wall, Elsken; Carducci, Michael A; Van Diest, Paul J; Marchionni, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as important targets for cancer treatment. HDAC-inhibitors (HDACis) are well tolerated in patients and have been approved for the treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). To improve the clinical benefit of HDACis in solid tumors, combination strategies with HDACis could be employed. In this study, we applied Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) to provide a comprehensive list of genes and pathways affected upon HDACi-treatment in prostate cancer cells. This approach provides an unbiased and objective approach to high throughput data mining. By performing AFA on gene expression data from prostate cancer cell lines DU-145 (an HDACi-sensitive cell line) and PC3 (a relatively HDACi-resistant cell line) treated with HDACis valproic acid or vorinostat, we identified biological processes that are affected by HDACis and are therefore potential treatment targets for combination therapy. Our analysis revealed that HDAC-inhibition resulted among others in upregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and deregulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint by downregulation of genes involved in mitosis. These findings were confirmed by AFA on publicly available data sets from HDACi-treated prostate cancer cells. In total, we analyzed 375 microarrays with HDACi treated and non-treated (control) prostate cancer cells. All results from this extensive analysis are provided as an online research source (available at the journal’s website and at http://luigimarchionni.org/HDACIs.html). By publishing this data, we aim to enhance our understanding of the cellular changes after HDAC-inhibition, and to identify novel potential combination strategies with HDACis for the treatment of prostate cancer patients. PMID:23880963

  15. Sensitivity of human prostate cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs depends on EndoG expression regulated by promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoying; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Shah, Sudhir V.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Basnakian, Alexei G.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of promoter sequences of all known human cytotoxic endonucleases showed that endonuclease G (EndoG) is the only endonuclease that contains a CpG island, a segment of DNA with high G+C content and a site for methylation, in the promoter region. A comparison of three human prostate cancer cell lines showed that EndoG is highly expressed in 22Rv1 and LNCaP cells. In PC3 cells, EndoG was not expressed and the EndoG CpG island was hypermethylated. The expression of EndoG correlated positively with sensitivity to cisplatin and etoposide, and the silencing of EndoG by siRNA decreased the sensitivity of the cells to the chemotherapeutic agents in the two EndoG-expressing cell lines. 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine caused hypomethylation of the EndoG promoter in PC3 cells, induced EndoG mRNA and protein expression, and made the cells sensitive to both cisplatin and etoposide. The acetylation of histones by trichostatin A, the histone deacetylase inhibitor, induced EndoG expression in 22Rv1 cells, while it had no such effect in PC3 cells. These data are the first indication that EndoG may be regulated by methylation of its gene promoter, and partially by histone acetylation, and that EndoG is essential for prostate cancer cell death in the used models. PMID:18565644

  16. Regulation of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase expression by vitamin D{sub 3} metabolites in human prostate stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-H. . E-mail: Jinghuan.Wang@uta.fi; Tuohimaa, Pentti

    2006-06-30

    Vitamin D{sub 3} plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) is an enzyme converting cholesterol into 25-hydroxycholesterol. Vitamin D{sub 3} as well as 25-hydroxycholesterol has been shown to inhibit cell growth and induce cell apoptosis. Here we show that 10 nM 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} and 500 nM 25OHD{sub 3} upregulate CH25H mRNA expression in human primary prostate stromal cells (P29SN). Protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide does not block 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} mediated upregulation of CH25H mRNA. Transcription inhibitor actinomycin D blocks basal level as well as 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induced CH25H mRNA expression. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} has no effect on CH25H mRNA stability. 25-Hydroxycholesterol significantly decreased the P29SN cell number. A CH25H enzyme inhibitor, desmosterol, increases basal cell number but has no significant effect on vitamin D{sub 3} treated cells. Our data suggest that ch25h could be a vitamin D{sub 3} target gene and may partly mediate anti-proliferative action of vitamin D{sub 3} in human primary prostate stromal cells.

  17. Testosterone modulates mitochondrial aconitase in the full-length human androgen receptor-transfected PC-3 prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juang, H-H; Hsieh, M-L; Tsui, K-H

    2004-08-01

    In vitro studies indicated that dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulates the enzymatic activity of the mitochondrial aconitase (mACON) in androgen-sensitive prostatic carcinoma cells, LNCaP. Cell proliferation assay determined that DHT doubles the optimal proliferation response of LNCaP cells. The androgen-insensitive human prostatic carcinoma cells, PC-3, were overexpressed in the human androgen receptor to assess the involvement of the native androgen receptor in the regulation by DHT of mACON gene expression. A stable-transfected clone that expresses the full-length androgen receptor was selected and termed PCAR9. The results revealed that DHT-treated PCAR9 cells paradoxically not only reduced the enzymatic activity of mACON but also blocked the biosynthesis of intracellular ATP attenuating cell proliferation. Transient gene expression assay indicated that DHT divergently regulates the promoter activity of the mACON gene in LNCaP and PCAR9 cells. This study suggested that DHT regulates mACON gene expression and the proliferation of cells in a receptor-dependent model through modulation by unidentified non-receptor factors. PMID:15291747

  18. Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Suparji, Noor Shahirah; Chan, Gomathi; Sapili, Hani; Arshad, Norhafiza M.; In, Lionel L. A.; Awang, Khalijah; Hasima Nagoor, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could

  19. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity.

  20. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Edwards, Christopher; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulation of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells for 96 hr either in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. 24 hr after the culture started, mitoxantrone was introduced to the cells at a final concentration of 1 M. The mitoxantrone treatment lasted 72 hr and then the cells were collected for various measurements. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not show significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, in response to mitoxantrone (1uM), a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells (30%) was arrested at G2 phase and a significant number of these cells were apoptotic in comparison to their static controls. The expressions of 84 oxidative stress related genes were analyzed using Qiagen PCR array to identify the possible mechanism underlying the altered responses of bioreactor culture cells to mitoxantrone. Nine out of 84 genes showed higher expression at four hour post mitoxantrone treatment in cells cultured at rotating condition compared to those at static. Taken together, the results reported here indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the responses of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. The alteration of oxidative stress pathways

  1. Micro and bulk analysis of prostate tissues classified as hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, W. M.; Banaś, A.; Banaś, K.; Cinque, G.; Dyduch, G.; Falkenberg, G.; Kisiel, A.; Marcelli, A.; Podgórczyk, M.

    2007-07-01

    BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) is the most common benign neoplasm (non cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland), whose prevalence increases with age. The gland, when increased in size, exerts pressure on the urethra, causing obstruction to urine flow. The latter may result in severe urinary tract and kidney conditions. In this work prostate samples from patients diagnosed with BPH were analyzed using synchrotron radiation. Micro-analysis of the hyperplastic samples was carried out on the L-beam line at HASYLAB, DESY (Germany), while bulk analysis on selected samples was performed at the DRX2 beamline at LNF, Frascati (Italy). Microanalysis with a mono-energetic beam 15 μm in diameter confirmed that concentrations of certain elements, such as S, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn, are good indicators of pathological disorders in prostate tissue that may be considered effective tracers of developing compliant. The concentrations of Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn are higher in hyperplastic tissues, as compared to normal ones, while for sulphur the opposite is observed. Additionally, Fe and S K-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy experiments were carried out in order to determine the chemical speciation of these elements in our samples.

  2. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic determination of levofloxacin in human plasma and prostate tissue with use of experimental design optimization procedures.

    PubMed

    Szerkus, O; Jacyna, J; Wiczling, P; Gibas, A; Sieczkowski, M; Siluk, D; Matuszewski, M; Kaliszan, R; Markuszewski, M J

    2016-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are considered as gold standard for the prevention of bacterial infections after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. However, recent studies reported that fluoroquinolone- resistant bacterial strains are responsible for gradually increasing number of infections after transrectal prostate biopsy. In daily clinical practice, antibacterial efficacy is evaluated only in vitro, by measuring the reaction of bacteria with an antimicrobial agent in culture media (i.e. calculation of minimal inhibitory concentration). Such approach, however, has no relation to the treated tissue characteristics and might be highly misleading. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop, with the use of Design of Experiments approach, a reliable, specific and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography- diode array detection method for the quantitative analysis of levofloxacin in plasma and prostate tissue samples obtained from patients undergoing prostate biopsy. Moreover, correlation study between concentrations observed in plasma samples vs prostatic tissue samples was performed, resulting in better understanding, evaluation and optimization of the fluoroquinolone-based antimicrobial prophylaxis during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize chromatographic conditions of the isocratic elution program in order to obtain desirable retention time, peak symmetry and resolution of levofloxacine and ciprofloxacine (internal standard) peaks. Fractional Factorial design 2(4-1) with four center points was used for screening of significant factors affecting levofloxacin extraction from the prostatic tissue. Due to the limited number of tissue samples the prostatic sample preparation procedure was further optimized using Central Composite design. Design of Experiments approach was also utilized for evaluation of parameter robustness. The method was found linear over the range of 0.030-10μg/mL for human

  3. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic determination of levofloxacin in human plasma and prostate tissue with use of experimental design optimization procedures.

    PubMed

    Szerkus, O; Jacyna, J; Wiczling, P; Gibas, A; Sieczkowski, M; Siluk, D; Matuszewski, M; Kaliszan, R; Markuszewski, M J

    2016-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are considered as gold standard for the prevention of bacterial infections after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. However, recent studies reported that fluoroquinolone- resistant bacterial strains are responsible for gradually increasing number of infections after transrectal prostate biopsy. In daily clinical practice, antibacterial efficacy is evaluated only in vitro, by measuring the reaction of bacteria with an antimicrobial agent in culture media (i.e. calculation of minimal inhibitory concentration). Such approach, however, has no relation to the treated tissue characteristics and might be highly misleading. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop, with the use of Design of Experiments approach, a reliable, specific and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography- diode array detection method for the quantitative analysis of levofloxacin in plasma and prostate tissue samples obtained from patients undergoing prostate biopsy. Moreover, correlation study between concentrations observed in plasma samples vs prostatic tissue samples was performed, resulting in better understanding, evaluation and optimization of the fluoroquinolone-based antimicrobial prophylaxis during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize chromatographic conditions of the isocratic elution program in order to obtain desirable retention time, peak symmetry and resolution of levofloxacine and ciprofloxacine (internal standard) peaks. Fractional Factorial design 2(4-1) with four center points was used for screening of significant factors affecting levofloxacin extraction from the prostatic tissue. Due to the limited number of tissue samples the prostatic sample preparation procedure was further optimized using Central Composite design. Design of Experiments approach was also utilized for evaluation of parameter robustness. The method was found linear over the range of 0.030-10μg/mL for human

  4. Forkhead protein FKHR and its phosphorylated form p-FKHR in human prostate cancer⋆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rile; Erdamar, Sibel; Dai, Hong; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Frolov, Anna; Scardino, Peter T.; Thompson, Timothy C.; Ayala, Gustavo E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In vitro studies suggest that the proapoptotic function of forkhead protein FKHR is probably inactivated by means of phosphorylation through the protein kinase B pathway. However, the clinical significance of FKHR in prostate cancer remains unclear. Six hundred forty radical prostatectomies were used for building tissue microarrays. Slides were stained with antibodies against FKHR and phosphorylated FKHR (p-FKHR). Correlations with clinicopathologic parameters were analyzed by Spearman rank test. Cox regression test and Kaplan-Meier test were used to determine the probability of disease recurrence, which is defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 0.4 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy. Nuclear FKHR level was higher in normal prostate than in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (P = .0000). Nuclear expression of FKHR was correlated with preoperative PSA level (ρ = 0.108, P = .029), extracapsular extension (ρ = 0.137, P = .005), and seminal vesicle invasion (ρ = 0.101, P = .039). FKHR expression was not a significant indicator of biochemical failure by either univariate or multivariate analysis. Nuclear p-FKHR expression correlated with patients’ age (ρ = 0.179, P = .0003), Gleason score (ρ = 0.130, P = .0083), extracapsular extension (ρ = 0.227, P = .0000), clinical stage (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer system) (ρ = 0.166, P = .0007), and lymph node status (ρ = 0.101, P = .0401). Cytoplasmic p-FKHR correlated with patients’ age (ρ = 0.146, P = .0030) and clinical stage (ρ = 0.117, P = .0180). Cytoplasmic p-FKHR was a significant indicator of biochemical recurrence (P = .0164; hazard ratio, 1.114–2.929). Nuclear p-FKHR strongly correlated with phosphorylated protein kinase B (ρ = 0.368, P = .0000), androgen receptor (ρ = 0.385, P = .0000), and Skp-2 (ρ = 0.170, P = .0036). Our data suggest that the proapoptotic role of FKHR is probably regulated by several signaling pathways in prostate

  5. In vivo measurement of fluorescence emission in the human prostate during photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Stripp, Diana; Malkowicz, S. B.; Whittington, Richard; Miles, Jeremy; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2005-04-01

    Among the challenges to the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the delivery of a uniform photodynamic dose to induce uniform damage to the target tissue. As the photodynamic dose depends on both the local sensitizer concentration and the local fluence rate of treatment light, knowledge of both of these factors is essential to the delivery of uniform dose. In this paper, we investigate the distribution and kinetics of the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu, Lutrin) as revealed by its fluorescence emission. Our current prostate treatment protocol involves interstitial illumination of the organ via cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF"s) inserted into the prostate though clear catheters. For planning and treatment purposes, the prostate is divided into 4 quadrants. We use one catheter in each quadrant to place an optical fiber-based fluorescence probe into the prostate. This fiber is terminated in a beveled tip, allowing it to deliver and collect light perpendicular to the fiber axis. Excitation light is provided by a 465 nm light emitting diode (LED) source coupled to a dichroic beamsplitter, which passes the collected fluorescence emission to a CCD spectrograph. Spectra are obtained before and after PDT treatment in each quadrant of the prostate and are analyzed via a linear fitting algorithm to separate the MLu fluorescence from the background fluorescence originating in the plastic catheter. A computer-controlled step motor allows the excitation/detection fiber to be moved along the catheter, building up a linear profile of the fluorescence emission spectrum of the tissue as a function of position. We have analyzed spectral fluorescence profiles obtained in 4 patients before and after MLu-mediated PDT. We find significant variation both within individual prostates and among patients. Within a single quadrant, we have observed the fluorescence signal to change by as much as a factor of 3 over a distance of 2 cm. Comparisons of pre- and post

  6. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:26530987

  7. Effect of extracellular calcium on regucalcin expression and cell viability in neoplastic and non-neoplastic human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Cátia V; Rodrigues, Daniel B; Socorro, Sílvia; Maia, Cláudio J

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) and its receptor, the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR), play an important role in prostate physiology, and it has been shown that the deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis and the overexpression of CaSR are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). Regucalcin (RGN), a Ca2+-binding protein that plays a relevant role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, was identified as an under-expressed protein in human PCa. Moreover, RGN was associated with suppression of cell proliferation, suggesting that the loss of RGN may favor development and progression of PCa. This work aims to unveil the role of Ca2+o on RGN expression and viability of non-neoplastic (PNT1A) and neoplastic (LNCaP) prostate cell lines. It was demonstrated that Ca2+o up-regulates RGN expression in both cell lines, but important differences were found between cells for dose- and time-responses to Ca2+o treatment. It was also shown that high [Ca2+]o triggers different effects on cell proliferation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic PCa cells, which seems to be related with RGN expression levels. This suggests the involvement of RGN in the regulation of cell proliferation in response to Ca2+o treatment. Also, the effect of Ca2+o on CaSR expression seems to be dependent of RGN expression, which is strengthened by the fact that RGN-knockdown in PNT1A cells increases the CaSR expression, whereas transgenic rats overexpressing RGN exhibit low levels of CaSR. Overall, our results highlighted the importance of RGN as a regulatory protein in Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways and its deregulation of RGN expression by Ca2+o may contribute for onset and progression of PCa.

  8. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    PubMed Central

    OGURA, TAKEHARU; TANAKA, YOSHIYUKI; TAMAKI, HIROKI; HARADA, MAMORU

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemo-resistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  9. Sporadic and syndromic hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas of the colon: classification, molecular genetics, natural history, and clinical management.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Saunders, Brian P; Jass, Jeremy R

    2008-03-01

    There is now strong evidence for an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis implicating hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas. This article briefly reviews the evidence for this serrated pathway, provides diagnostic criteria for clinically significant hyperplastic polyps and allied serrated polyps, and suggests how this information may be translated into safe, effective guidelines for colonoscopy-based colon cancer prevention. Consideration also is given to the definition and management of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome. The currently proposed management plan for serrated polyps is tentative because of incomplete knowledge of the nature and behavior of these polyps. This article highlights key areas warranting further research.

  10. Human prostate cancer vaccines – proposed mechanisms of action and future combinatorial treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Sean M.; Lemke, Caitlin D.; Lubaroff, David M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is responsible for the deaths of more than 33,000 American men annually. Once PCa has become metastatic there is no curative treatment. Oncologists worldwide are becoming increasingly convinced that alternative therapies to chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy need to be explored. Cancer vaccines (CaVacs) that promote the cancer patient’s own immune system to develop a tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune attack have been investigated in clinical trials with modest yet encouraging results. Here we look at the rationale behind different prostate CaVacs and propose key immune events that are likely to contribute to the efficacy of each vaccine. Finally, we prognosticate upon what improvements may be required to generate more effective CaVacs in the future with full consideration of the mechanisms of action. PMID:23399727

  11. Biomarker Discovery in Human Prostate Cancer: an Update in Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Rita; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Márcia; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in Western countries. Current screening techniques are based on the measurement of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and digital rectal examination. A decisive diagnosis of PCa is based on prostate biopsies; however, this approach can lead to false-positive and false-negative results. Therefore, it is important to discover new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa, preferably noninvasive ones. Metabolomics is an approach that allows the analysis of the entire metabolic profile of a biological system. As neoplastic cells have a unique metabolic phenotype related to cancer development and progression, the identification of dysfunctional metabolic pathways using metabolomics can be used to discover cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, we review several metabolomics studies performed in prostatic fluid, blood plasma/serum, urine, tissues and immortalized cultured cell lines with the objective of discovering alterations in the metabolic phenotype of PCa and thus discovering new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa. Encouraging results using metabolomics have been reported for PCa, with sarcosine being one of the most promising biomarkers identified to date. However, the use of sarcosine as a PCa biomarker in the clinic remains a controversial issue within the scientific community. Beyond sarcosine, other metabolites are considered to be biomarkers for PCa, but they still need clinical validation. Despite the lack of metabolomics biomarkers reaching clinical practice, metabolomics proved to be a powerful tool in the discovery of new biomarkers for PCa detection.

  12. Biomarker Discovery in Human Prostate Cancer: an Update in Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Rita; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Márcia; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in Western countries. Current screening techniques are based on the measurement of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and digital rectal examination. A decisive diagnosis of PCa is based on prostate biopsies; however, this approach can lead to false-positive and false-negative results. Therefore, it is important to discover new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa, preferably noninvasive ones. Metabolomics is an approach that allows the analysis of the entire metabolic profile of a biological system. As neoplastic cells have a unique metabolic phenotype related to cancer development and progression, the identification of dysfunctional metabolic pathways using metabolomics can be used to discover cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, we review several metabolomics studies performed in prostatic fluid, blood plasma/serum, urine, tissues and immortalized cultured cell lines with the objective of discovering alterations in the metabolic phenotype of PCa and thus discovering new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa. Encouraging results using metabolomics have been reported for PCa, with sarcosine being one of the most promising biomarkers identified to date. However, the use of sarcosine as a PCa biomarker in the clinic remains a controversial issue within the scientific community. Beyond sarcosine, other metabolites are considered to be biomarkers for PCa, but they still need clinical validation. Despite the lack of metabolomics biomarkers reaching clinical practice, metabolomics proved to be a powerful tool in the discovery of new biomarkers for PCa detection. PMID:27567960

  13. Urtica dioica dichloromethane extract induce apoptosis from intrinsic pathway on human prostate cancer cells (PC3).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Mansoori, B; Aghapour, M; Baradaran, B

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is considered as the major cause of death among men around the world. There are a number of medicinal plants triggering apoptosis response in cancer cells, thus have a therapeutic potential. Therefore, further studies to characterize beneficial properties of these plants in order to introduce novel anti-cancer drugs are the interest of recent researches on the alternative medicine. On the other hand, due to traditional uses and availability of Urtica dioica extract, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of this medicinal herb on pc3 prostate cancer cell line. In the present study the cytotoxic effects of Urtica dioica extract were assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and trypan blue viability dye. Then, DNA fragmentation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were exploited to measure cell death and apoptosis stage. The expression levels of caspase 3, caspase 9 and Bcl-2 genes were quantified by Real-Time PCR. Finally, Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. MTT assay showed that dichloromethanolic extract of Urtica dioica significantly inhibited the cell growth. According to the DNA fragmentation and TUNEL assay results, the herbal extract was able to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Our findings also demonstrated that the plant extract substantially increases the caspase 3 and 9 mRNA expression, while decreases Bcl-2. Cell cycle arrest was occurred in G2 stage, due to the results of flow cytometry. These results indicate that dichloromethanolic extract of Urtica dioica can successfully induce apoptosis in PC3 cells. Therefore, it could be used as a novel therapeutic candidate for prostate tumor treatment. PMID:27064877

  14. Increase of human prostate cancer cell (DU145) apoptosis by telmisartan through PPAR-delta pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tony Tong-Lin; Niu, Ho-Shan; Chen, Li-Jen; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Tong, Yat-Ching

    2016-03-15

    The effect of telmisartan on prostate cancer DU145 cell survival and the underlying mechanism of apoptosis involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway were investigated. Cultured DU145 cells were treated pharmacologically with telmisartan and GSK0660 (a PPAR-delta antagonist); or by RNA interference with siRNA of PPAR-delta. The treatment effects on cell survival were evaluated with cell viability assay, life and dead cell staining and flow cytometry. Western blot analysis for PPAR-delta protein expression was also performed. The results showed that telmisartan (0-80 µm) dose-dependently reduced DU145 cell survival. Flow cytometry demonstrated cancer cell cycle arrest with increase of sub-G1 phase. GSK0660 partially but significantly restored the telmisartan-treated cell viability. Similarly, siRNA of PPAR-delta significantly reversed the telmisartan-induced apoptosis. Western blot showed that telmisartan significantly increased DU145 cell PPAR-delta protein expression. Co-incubation with siRNA of PPAR-delta inhibited the telmisartan effect of PPAR-delta up-regulation. In conclusion, telmisartan induces prostate cancer DU145 cells apoptosis through the up-regulation of PPAR-delta protein expression. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic silencing of PPAR-delta activity can both reverse the telmisartan-induced apoptotic effect. Thus the PPAR-delta pathway might be a potential target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Antiproliferative mechanisms of the flavonoids 2,2'-dihydroxychalcone and fisetin in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Ahmed Q; Fleshner, Neil; Nelson, Colleen; Saour, Basil; Musquera, Mireia; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Klotz, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the antiproliferative effect of two flavonoids-2,2'-dihydroxychalcone (DHC), a novel synthetic flavonoid, and fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonol-in prostate cancer cells. In this study, we further examine the mechanisms of these compounds on survival and proliferation pathways. DHC and fisetin (1-50 microM) caused a dose-dependent reduction in viability, a concomitant increase in apoptosis in PC3 cells at 72 h, and a decrease in clonogenic survival at 24 h treatment. DHC was considerably more potent than fisetin in these cytotoxicity assays. The mechanism of accelerated cellular senescence was not activated by either compound in PC3 or lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells. Gene expression alterations in PC3 and LNCaP cells treated with 15 muM DHC and 25 microM fisetin for 6 to 24 h were determined by oligonucleotide array. Amongst the most highly represented functional categories of genes altered by both compounds was the cell cycle category. In total, 100 cell cycle genes were altered by DHC and fisetin including 27 genes with key functions in G2/M phase that were downregulated by both compounds. Other functional categories altered included chromosome organization, apoptosis, and stress response. These results demonstrate the multiple mechanisms of antitumor activity of DHC and fisetin in prostate cancer cells in vitro.

  16. Antibody microarray profiling of human prostate cancer sera: antibody screening and identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy C; Zhou, Heping; Kwekel, Joshua; Cavallo, Robert; Burke, Jocelyn; Butler, E Brian; Teh, Bin S; Haab, Brian B

    2003-01-01

    We developed a practical strategy for serum protein profiling using antibody microarrays and applied the method to the identification of potential biomarkers in prostate cancer serum. Protein abundances from 33 prostate cancer and 20 control serum samples were compared to abundances from a common reference pool using a two-color fluorescence assay. Robotically spotted microarrays containing 184 unique antibodies were prepared on two different substrates: polyacrylamide based hydrogels on glass and poly-1-lysine coated glass with a photoreactive cross-linking layer. The hydrogel substrate yielded an average six-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio than the other substrate, and detection of protein binding was possible from a greater number of antibodies using the hydrogels. A statistical filter based on the correlation of data from "reverse-labeled" experiment sets accurately predicted the agreement between the microarray measurements and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, showing that this parameter can serve to screen for antibodies that are functional on microarrays. Having defined a set of reliable microarray measurements, we identified five proteins (von Willebrand Factor, immunoglobulinM, Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, Villin and immunoglobulinG) that had significantly different levels between the prostate cancer samples and the controls. These developments enable the immediate use of high-density antibody and protein microarrays in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:12548634

  17. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yao; Bae, Kyungmi; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia ({>=}24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia ({<=}6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1{alpha}. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  18. Inverse association between gluthathione peroxidase activity and both selenium-binding protein 1 levels and gleason score in human prostate tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. Data from human epidemiological studies, cultured mammalian cells, and animal models have supported a potentially beneficial role of selenium (Se) in prostate cancer prevention. In addition, Se-containing proteins including members of the gutathione peroxidase (GPx) family and Selenium-B...

  19. A biospectroscopic analysis of human prostate tissue obtained from different time periods points to a trans-generational alteration in spectral phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M. G.; Briggs, Matthew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Stringfellow, Helen F.; Martin, Francis L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed malignancy in males worldwide; however, there is marked geographic variation in incidence that may be associated with a Westernised lifestyle. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis or variable selection techniques employing genetic algorithm or successive projection algorithm could be utilised to explore differences between prostate tissues from differing years. In total, 156 prostate tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia from 1983 to 2013 were collected. These were distributed to form seven categories: 1983–1984 (n = 20), 1988–1989 (n = 25), 1993–1994 (n = 21), 1998–1999 (n = 21), 2003–2004 (n = 21), 2008–2009 (n = 20) and 2012–2013 (n = 21). Ten-μm-thick tissue sections were floated onto Low-E (IR-reflective) slides for ATR-FTIR or Raman spectroscopy. The prostate tissue spectral phenotype altered in a temporal fashion. Examination of the two categories that are at least one generation (30 years) apart indicated highly-significant segregation, especially in spectral regions containing DNA and RNA bands (≈1,000–1,490 cm−1). This may point towards alterations that have occurred through genotoxicity or through epigenetic modifications. Immunohistochemical studies for global DNA methylation supported this. This study points to a trans-generational phenotypic change in human prostate. PMID:26310632

  20. Resveratrol Inhibits IL-6-Induced Transcriptional Activity of AR and STAT3 in Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP-FGC Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Keum, Young-Sam; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Surh, Young-Joon; Choi, Bu Young

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Although prostate tumors respond to androgen ablation therapy at an early stage, they often acquire the potential of androgen-independent growth. Elevated transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) and/or signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) contributes to the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, on the reporter gene activity of AR and STAT3 in human prostate cancer (LNCaP-FGC) cells stimulated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Our study revealed that resveratrol suppressed the growth of LNCaP-FGC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Whereas the AR transcriptional activity was induced by treatment with either IL-6 or DHT, the STAT3 transcriptional activity was induced only by treatment with IL-6 but not with DHT. Resveratrol significantly attenuated IL-6-induced STAT3 transcriptional activity, and DHT- or IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Treatment of cells with DHT plus IL-6 significantly increased the AR transcriptional activity as compared to DHT or IL-6 treatment alone and resveratrol markedly diminished DHT plus IL-6-induced AR transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was decreased by resveratrol in the DHT-, IL-6- or DHT plus IL-6-treated LNCaP-FGC cells. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on IL-6- and/or DHT-induced AR transcriptional activity in LNCaP prostate cancer cells are partly mediated through the suppression of STAT3 reporter gene activity, suggesting that resveratrol may be a promising therapeutic choice for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Novel In Vivo Model for Combinatorial Fluorescence Labeling in Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaolan; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Nickkholgh, Bita; Cline, J. Mark; Balaji, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The epithelial layer of prostate glands contains several types of cells, including luminal and basal cells. Yet there is paucity of animal models to study the cellular origin of normal or neoplastic development in the prostate to facilitate the treatment of heterogenous prostate diseases by targeting individual cell lineages. METHODS We developed a mouse model that expresses different types of fluorescent proteins (XFPs) specifically in prostatic cells. Using an in vivo stochastic fluorescent protein combinatorial strategy, XFP signals were expressed specifically in prostate of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and PKD1 double knock-out mice under the control of PB-Cre promoter. RESULTS In vivo XFP signals were observed in prostate of PKD1 knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and PTEN PKD1 double knock-out mice, which developed normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic prostate, respectively. The patchy expression pattern of XFPs in neoplasia tissue indicated the clonal origin of cancer cells in the prostate. CONCLUSIONS The transgenic mouse models demonstrate combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in normal and cancerous prostatic tissues. This novel prostate-specific fluorescent labeled mouse model, which we named Prorainbow, could be useful in studying benign and malignant pathology of prostate. PMID:25753731

  2. Recombinant disintegrin domain of human ADAM9 inhibits migration and invasion of DU145 prostate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ana Carolina Baptista Moreno; Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro; Cominetti, Márcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important features of malignant cells is their capacity to invade adjacent tissues and metastasize to distant organs. This process involves the creation, by tumor and stroma cells, of a specific microenvironment, suitable for proliferation, migration and invasion of tumor cells. The ADAM family of proteins has been involved in these processes. This work aimed to investigate the role of the recombinant disintegrin domain of the human ADAM9 (rADAM9D) on the adhesive and mobility properties of DU145 prostate tumor cells. rADAM9D was able to support DU145 cell adhesion, inhibit the migration of DU145 cells, as well as the invasion of this cell line through matrigel in vitro. Overall this work demonstrates that rADAM9D induces specific cellular migratory properties when compared with different constructs having additional domains, specially those of metalloproteinase and cysteine-rich domains. Furthermore, we showed that rADAM9D was able to inhibit cell adhesion, migration and invasion mainly through interacting with α6β1 in DU145 tumor cell line. These results may contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. PMID:26211476

  3. An Sp1 Modulated Regulatory Region Unique to Higher Primates Regulates Human Androgen Receptor Promoter Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hay, Colin W; Hunter, Irene; MacKenzie, Alasdair; McEwan, Iain J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mediated signalling is necessary for normal development of the prostate gland and also drives prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth and survival, with many studies showing a correlation between increased receptor levels and therapy resistance with progression to fatal castrate recurrent PCa (CRPC). Although it has been held for some time that the transcription factor Sp1 is the main stimulator of AR gene transcription, comprehensive knowledge of the regulation of the AR gene remains incomplete. Here we describe and characterise in detail two novel active regulatory elements in the 5'UTR of the human AR gene. Both of these elements contain overlapping binding sites for the positive transcription factor Sp1 and the repressor protein pur-α. Aberrant cell signalling is characteristic of PCa and the transcriptional activity of the AR promoter in PCa cells is dependent upon the relative amounts of the two transcription factors. Together with our corroboration of the dominant role of Sp1, the findings support the rationale of targeting this transcription factor to inhibit tumour progression. This should be of particular therapeutic relevance in CRPC where the levels of the repressor pur-α are reduced. PMID:26448047

  4. Realtime light dosimetry software tools for interstitial photodynamic therapy of the human prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Ann; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Swartling, Johannes

    2007-11-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of prostate cancer has been demonstrated to be a safe treatment option capable of inducing tissue destruction and decreasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. However, prostate-PDT results in large intra- and interpatient variations in treatment response, possibly due to biological variations in tissue composition and short-term response to the therapeutic irradiation. Within our group, an instrument for interstitial PDT on prostate tissue has been developed that combines therapeutic light delivery and monitoring of light transmission via numerous bare-ended optical fibers. Here, we present algorithms that utilize data on the light distribution within the target tissue to provide realtime treatment feedback based on a light dose threshold model for PDT. This realtime dosimetry module is implemented to individualize the light dose and compensate for any treatment-induced variations in light attenuation. More specifically, based on the light transmission signals between treatment fibers, spatially resolved spectroscopy is utilized to assess the effective attenuation coefficient of the tissue. These data constitute input to a block-Cimmino optimization algorithm, employed to calculate individual fiber irradiation times provided the requirement to deliver a predetermined light dose to the target tissue while sparing surrounding sensitive organs. By repeatedly monitoring the light transmission signals during the entire treatment session, optical properties and individual fiber irradiation times are updated in realtime. The functionality of the algorithms is tested on diffuse light distribution data simulated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The feasibility of utilizing spatially resolved spectroscopy within heterogeneous media such as the prostate gland is discussed. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of the block-Cimmino algorithm to discriminate between target tissue and organs at risk (OAR). Finally

  5. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila; Kumar, Atul; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  6. Annatto Tocotrienol Induces a Cytotoxic Effect on Human Prostate Cancer PC3 Cells via the Simultaneous Inhibition of Src and Stat3.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Ryosuke; Sato, Ayami; Uchida, Asuka; Shiozawa, Shinya; Sato, Chiaki; Virgona, Nantiga; Yano, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently occurring cancers and often acquires the potential of androgen-independent growth as a malignant phenotype. Androgen-independent prostate cancer has severe chemoresistance towards conventional chemotherapeutic agents, so a new treatment approach is required for curing such prostate cancer. In this context, the present study was undertaken to check if annatto tocotrienol (main component δ-tocotrienol) could suppress cell growth in human prostate cancer (PC3, androgen-independent type) cells via the inhibition of Src and Stat3. The tocotrienol showed cytotoxic effects on PC3 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the effect depended on G1 arrest in the cell cycle and subsequent induction of apoptosis. In a cytotoxic dose, the tocotrienol suppressed cellular growth via the simultaneous inhibition of Src and Stat3. Similarly, the treatment combination of both Src and Stat3 inhibitors induced cytotoxic effects in PC3 cells in an additive manner compared to each by itself. With respect to cell cycle regulation and the induction of apoptosis, the combination treatment showed a similar effect to that of the tocotrienol treatment. These results suggest that annatto tocotrienol effectively induces cytotoxicity in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via the suppression of Src and Stat3. PMID:26875492

  7. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27102611

  8. Expression and Localization of Aquaporins in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Insang; Hwang, Eu-Chang; Song, Seung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek-Won; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) families of water channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that facilitate selective water and small solute movement across the plasma membrane. The purposes of this study were to determine the expression and localization of AQPs in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Prostatic tissue was collected from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer by transurethral resection of the prostate. The expression and cellular localization of the AQPs were determined in the human prostate by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3, and 9 were expressed in the human prostate. Western blot analysis revealed bands at 28-36 kDa for the AQP1, 3, and 9 proteins. Of these proteins, AQP3 and 9 were expressed in the epithelium. Immunolabeling showed that AQP1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the prostate, AQP9 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the epithelium, and AQP3 was mainly associated with the plasma membrane of the prostatic epithelium. Only AQP3 expression was localized in the cell membrane, and expressed AQP3 was translocated to the cytoplasm in prostate cancer. The epithelium in the human prostate expresses AQP3 and 9 proteins, and the capillaries and venules of the prostate express AQP1. Characterizing or modifying the expression of AQP3 may lead to an understanding of the role of the AQPs in human prostatic disease. PMID:23323224

  9. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  10. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  11. 1′-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:21427164

  12. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-06-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth.

  13. Detection of canine oral papillomavirus DNA in conjunctival epithelial hyperplastic lesions of three dogs.

    PubMed

    Brandes, K; Fritsche, J; Mueller, N; Koerschgen, B; Dierig, B; Strebelow, G; Teifke, J P

    2009-01-01

    Papillomavirus infections are responsible for plaques and papillomas in various locations on the skin and in mucous membranes. The aim of this report was to describe morphologic features of a viral pigmented conjunctival plaque and 2 conjunctival squamous papillomas in 3 dogs, and to investigate these lesions for the presence of papillomavirus DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequence analysis, and in situ hydridization (ISH). Histopathology revealed in all neoplasms various degrees of epithelial hyperplasia, acanthosis, and hyperkeratosis with koilocytosis. In all lesions E6, E7, and L1 gene fragments of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) DNA were detected by PCR and sequencing analysis. ISH revealed COPV DNA in a highly specific pattern within nuclei of the hyperplastic epithelium. The presence of canine papillomavirus in ocular conjunctival plaques and papillomas suggests these benign lesions may have the potential for malignant transformation. This is the first time that the lambdapapillomavirus COPV has been detected in ocular epithelial hyperplastic lesions. PMID:19112112

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of papillomavirus structural antigens in animal hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Sironi, G; Caniatti, M; Scanziani, E

    1990-12-01

    One hundred and seventy-two hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions from 8 different mammalian and 1 avian species have been tested with an immunohistochemical technique to detect papillomavirus structural antigens. Selected lesions were diagnosed histologically as papilloma, fibropapilloma, equine sarcoid, squamous cell carcinoma, basalioma, epulis, keratoacanthoma, trichoepithelioma, pilomatrixoma, epidermal inclusion cyst, and hyperkeratotic or acanthotic epidermal lesions. Positive nuclear staining was detected in 14 out of 23 papillomas, 8 out of 32 fibropapillomas and in 1 out of 3 hyperplastic epidermal lesions. Positive samples were found in 5 of 8 mammalian species. Selected samples were also examined by transmission electron microscopy. In 4 samples papillomavirus was seen. In two other samples, negative with immunoperoxidase technique, papovavirus-like particles were observed.

  15. Management of Chronic Hyperplastic Pulpitis in Mandibular Molars of Middle Aged Adults- A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Kanakamedala; Lingeswaran, Somiya; Ari, Geetha; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Logaranjani, Anitha

    2016-01-01

    The molar tooth of children and young adults is a common site for chronic hyperplastic pulpitis (pulp polyp). It rarely occurs in middle aged adults. This condition is usually characterized by extensive involvement of the pulp, dictating the extraction of involved tooth. Extraction of permanent molars can lead to transient or permanent malocclusion, aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems. Here we report a case of pulp polyp in mandibular first molar of a 33-year-old woman that grew into the carious cavity. The aim of this case report is to describe the diagnosis of a chronic hyperplastic pulpitis involving the permanent molar as well as to describe its management in order to preserve them as a functional unit of the dentition. PMID:26894192

  16. Management of Chronic Hyperplastic Pulpitis in Mandibular Molars of Middle Aged Adults- A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lingeswaran, Somiya; Ari, Geetha; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Logaranjani, Anitha

    2016-01-01

    The molar tooth of children and young adults is a common site for chronic hyperplastic pulpitis (pulp polyp). It rarely occurs in middle aged adults. This condition is usually characterized by extensive involvement of the pulp, dictating the extraction of involved tooth. Extraction of permanent molars can lead to transient or permanent malocclusion, aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems. Here we report a case of pulp polyp in mandibular first molar of a 33-year-old woman that grew into the carious cavity. The aim of this case report is to describe the diagnosis of a chronic hyperplastic pulpitis involving the permanent molar as well as to describe its management in order to preserve them as a functional unit of the dentition. PMID:26894192

  17. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  18. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration

  19. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration

  20. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  1. Functional and Structural Consequences of Damaging Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Human Prostate Cancer Predisposition Gene RNASEL.

    PubMed

    Datta, Amit; Mazumder, Md Habibul Hasan; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana; Hasan, Md Anayet

    2015-01-01

    A commonly diagnosed cancer, prostate cancer (PrCa), is being regulated by the gene RNASEL previously known as PRCA1 codes for ribonuclease L which is an integral part of interferon regulated system that mediates antiviral and antiproliferative role of the interferons. Both somatic and germline mutations have been implicated to cause prostate cancer. With an array of available Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data on dbSNP this study is designed to sort out functional SNPs in RNASEL by implementing different authentic computational tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen, SNPs&GO, Fathmm, ConSurf, UTRScan, PDBsum, Tm-Align, I-Mutant, and Project HOPE for functional and structural assessment, solvent accessibility, molecular dynamics, and energy minimization study. Among 794 RNASEL SNP entries 124 SNPs were found nonsynonymous from which SIFT predicted 13 nsSNPs as nontolerable whereas PolyPhen-2 predicted 28. SNPs found on the 3' and 5' UTR were also assessed. By analyzing six tools having different perspectives an aggregate result was produced where nine nsSNPs were found to be most likely to exert deleterious effect. 3D models of mutated proteins were generated to determine the functional and structural effect of the mutations on ribonuclease L. The initial findings were reinforced by the results from I-Mutant and Project HOPE as these tools predicted significant structural and functional instability of the mutated proteins. Expasy-ProSit tool defined the mutations to be situated in the functional domains of the protein. Considering previous analysis this study revealed a conclusive result deducing the available SNP data on the database by identifying the most damaging three nsSNP rs151296858 (G59S), rs145415894 (A276V), and rs35896902 (R592H). As such studies involving polymorphisms of RNASEL were none to be found, the results of the current study would certainly be helpful in future prospects concerning prostate cancer in males. PMID:26236721

  2. Proteomic analysis of cancer stem cells in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Hyungdon; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. {yields} We confirmed CD44+ DU145 cells are more proliferative and tumorigenic than CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} We analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} Cofilin and Annexin A5 associated with cancer were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. -- Abstract: Results from recent studies support the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and formation. Here, we applied a proteome profiling approach to investigate the mechanisms of CSCs and to identify potential biomarkers in the prostate cancer cell line DU145. Using MACS, the DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. In sphere culture, CD44+ cells possessed stem cell characteristics and highly expressed genes known to be important in stem cell maintenance. In addition, they showed strong tumorigenic potential in the clonogenic assay and soft agar colony formation assay. We then analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Cofilin and Annexin A5, which are associated with proliferation or metastasis in cancer, were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. These results provide information that will be important to the development of new cancer diagnostic tools and understanding the mechanisms of CSCs although a more detailed study is necessary to investigate the roles of Cofilin and Annexin A5 in CSCs.

  3. 5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid-induced destruction of mitochondria in human prostate cells (PC-3).

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T. M.; Wilson, D. E.; Harris, J. E.; Biological and Medical Research; Rush Medical Coll.

    1992-01-01

    Culturing human prostate PC-3 cells for 4, 24, or 72 h in the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), an inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism and cholesterol biosynthesis, markedly altered the morphology and reduced the number of mitochondria in the treated cells. Using quantitative electron microscopic morphometry, we documented changes in the number, form, area, matrix density, and integrity of the cristae and limiting membranes of mitochondria in cells cultured with ETYA. The inhibition of cholesterol synthesis or the substitution of ETYA for polyunsaturated fatty acids in the inner membrane may participate in the disruption of the mitochondria, which resembles the morphologic sequelae of oxidative stress. If sufficiently extensive, these changes could contribute to the inhibition of cellular proliferation by ETYA.

  4. Development of hyperplastic polyps following argon plasma coagulation of gastric antral vascular ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nihar; Cavanagh, Yana; Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Shaikh, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome or gastric hyperplastic polyps (HPs) is not fully understood. We report a case of gastric HP arising in a patient treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) for GAVE syndrome. Despite unclear etiologic progression, this and previously reported cases suggest a temporal relationship between the treatment of GAVE and HP. A 68-year-old male with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and diabetes type II who initially presented with symptomatic anemia 2 weeks after starting aspirin and clopidogrel therapy. Diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) demonstrated diffuse GAVE. He was treated with 5 APC treatments, at 6-week intervals, over a 30 weeks period. 16 months after the initial APC treatment, an EGD performed secondary to persistent anemia demonstrated innumerable, large, bleeding polyps in the gastric antrum. Biopsy performed at that time confirmed hyperplastic gastric polyps. It has been proposed that HPs are regenerative lesions that arise at sites of severe mucosal injury. Our patient's treatment of GAVE with APC created significant mucosal injury, resulting in HP. Technique and genetic factors may have promoted hyperplastic changes during the regeneration of mucosa, at sites previously treated with APC. This case highlights the potential progression of GAVE to HP in a patient with persistent anemia after APC therapy. PMID:26283860

  5. Some general remarks on hyperplasticity modelling and its extension to partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiaoqin; Wong, Henry; Fabbri, Antonin; Bui, Tuan Anh; Limam, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The essential ideas and equations of classic plasticity and hyperplasticity are successively recalled and compared, in order to highlight their differences and complementarities. The former is based on the mathematical framework proposed by Hill (The mathematical theory of plasticity. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1950), whereas the latter is founded on the orthogonality hypothesis of Ziegler (An introduction to thermomechanics. Elsevier, North-Holland, 1983). The main drawback of classic plasticity is the possibility of violating the second principle of thermodynamics, while the relative ease to conjecture the yield function in order to approach experimental results is its main advantage. By opposition, the a priori satisfaction of thermodynamic principles constitutes the chief advantage of hyperplasticity theory. Noteworthy is also the fact that this latter approach allows a finer energy partition; in particular, the existence of frozen energy emerges as a natural consequence from its theoretical formulation. On the other hand, the relative difficulty to conjecture an efficient dissipation function to produce accurate predictions is its main drawback. The two theories are thus better viewed as two complementary approaches. Following this comparative study, a methodology to extend the hyperplasticity approach initially developed for dry or saturated materials to the case of partially saturated materials, accounting for interface energies and suction effects, is developed. A particular example based on the yield function of modified Cam-Clay model is then presented. It is shown that the approach developed leads to a model consistent with other existing works.

  6. No differences in morphological characteristics between hyperplastic condyle and class III condyle.

    PubMed

    Goulart, D R; Muñoz, P; Olate, S; de Moraes, M; Fariña, R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this research was to compare the condylar morphology of patients with unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH) and patients with a class III skeletal relationship using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A prospective study was conducted on patients with facial asymmetry attending the division of oral and maxillofacial surgery of the study university in Chile. Fifteen patients with UCH and 15 with a class III skeletal relationship were selected. Linear measurements of the condylar processes were obtained at a scale of 1:1 using the software Ez3D Viewer Plus. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the paired t-test were used, considering P<0.05. Patients with UCH presented statistical differences between the hyperplastic condyle and non-hyperplastic condyle for anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters, condylar neck length, and ramus height. Patients with a class III skeletal relationship showed no differences between the right and left sides; the morphology of their condyles was similar to the condyles with hyperplasia and presented statistical differences when compared with the non-hyperplastic condyles (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05). The condylar morphology of UCH patients could be related to the development of a class III skeletal relationship. These findings provide an insight into the possibility of some class III patients presenting bilateral condylar hyperplasia.

  7. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shinji Sawada, Ken; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Karashima, Takashi; Shuin, Taro; Nishioka, Akihito; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone, and combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH{sub 4}Cl before the X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  8. Suppression of growth and invasive behavior of human prostate cancer cells by ProstaCaid™: mechanism of activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Eliaz, Isaac; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Since the use of dietary supplements as alternative treatments or adjuvant therapies in cancer treatment is growing, a scientific verification of their biological activity and the detailed mechanisms of their action are necessary for the acceptance of dietary supplements in conventional cancer treatments. In the present study we have evaluated the anti-cancer effects of dietary supplement ProstaCaid™ (PC) which contains mycelium from medicinal mushrooms (Ganoderma lucidum, Coriolus versicolor, Phellinus linteus), saw palmetto berry, pomegranate, pumpkin seed, green tea [40% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)], Japanese knotweed (50% resveratrol), extracts of turmeric root (BCM-95®), grape skin, pygeum bark, sarsaparilla root, Scutellaria barbata, eleuthero root, Job's tears, astragalus root, skullcap, dandelion, coptis root, broccoli, and stinging nettle, with purified vitamin C, vitamin D3, selenium, quercetin, citrus bioflavonoid complex, β sitosterolzinc, lycopene, α lipoic acid, boron, berberine and 3.3'-diinodolymethane (DIM). We show that PC treatment resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation of the highly invasive human hormone refractory (independent) PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 56.0, 45.6 and 39.0 µg/ml for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. DNA-microarray analysis demonstrated that PC inhibits proliferation through the modulation of expression of CCND1, CDK4, CDKN1A, E2F1, MAPK6 and PCNA genes. In addition, PC also suppresses metastatic behavior of PC-3 by the inhibition of cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion, which was associated with the down-regulation of expression of CAV1, IGF2, NR2F1, and PLAU genes and suppressed secretion of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from PC-3 cells. In conclusion, the dietary supplement PC is a promising natural complex with the potency to inhibit invasive human prostate cancer.

  9. Suppression of growth and invasive behavior of human prostate cancer cells by ProstaCaid™: mechanism of activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Eliaz, Isaac; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Since the use of dietary supplements as alternative treatments or adjuvant therapies in cancer treatment is growing, a scientific verification of their biological activity and the detailed mechanisms of their action are necessary for the acceptance of dietary supplements in conventional cancer treatments. In the present study we have evaluated the anti-cancer effects of dietary supplement ProstaCaid™ (PC) which contains mycelium from medicinal mushrooms (Ganoderma lucidum, Coriolus versicolor, Phellinus linteus), saw palmetto berry, pomegranate, pumpkin seed, green tea [40% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)], Japanese knotweed (50% resveratrol), extracts of turmeric root (BCM-95®), grape skin, pygeum bark, sarsaparilla root, Scutellaria barbata, eleuthero root, Job's tears, astragalus root, skullcap, dandelion, coptis root, broccoli, and stinging nettle, with purified vitamin C, vitamin D3, selenium, quercetin, citrus bioflavonoid complex, β sitosterolzinc, lycopene, α lipoic acid, boron, berberine and 3.3'-diinodolymethane (DIM). We show that PC treatment resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation of the highly invasive human hormone refractory (independent) PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 56.0, 45.6 and 39.0 µg/ml for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. DNA-microarray analysis demonstrated that PC inhibits proliferation through the modulation of expression of CCND1, CDK4, CDKN1A, E2F1, MAPK6 and PCNA genes. In addition, PC also suppresses metastatic behavior of PC-3 by the inhibition of cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion, which was associated with the down-regulation of expression of CAV1, IGF2, NR2F1, and PLAU genes and suppressed secretion of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from PC-3 cells. In conclusion, the dietary supplement PC is a promising natural complex with the potency to inhibit invasive human prostate cancer. PMID:21468543

  10. [Giant phyllodes tumor of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Kawamorita, Naoki; Inaba, Yasuo; Soma, Fumihiko; Katayama, Yousei; Mikami, Yoshiki

    2007-09-01

    A 55 year-old man complained dysuria and visited to our hospital. Physical examination showed firm large mass occupying whole abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a huge retroperitoneal tumor which compressed intestine, liver, kidney, and urinary bladder. We performed extirpation of the tumor (8.6 kg, largest diameter 60 cm) which was composed of myxoid stromal region associated with cystic pattern. Histological examination revealed that the epithelium of the cystic region was positive for prostate specific antigen (PSA) immunostaining. The tumor was diagnosed phyllodes tumor of the prostate (prostatic stromal proliferation of uncertain malignancy, PSTUMP). Serum PSA was declined 3.9 ng/ml to 0.9 ng/ml; however, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a residual (recurrent?) tumor in the pelvis one month after the operation. We carried out total prostatectomy and residual tumor resection. Phyllodes tumor of the prostate is histologically characterized with biphasic pattern of hyperplastic epithelial cysts and variably cellular spindle stroma. The tumor is considered to have malignant potential and several histological factors including cellularity, atypia, etc. are utilized to assess it. However diagnostic criteria and subsequent treatment modalities are not established thus far. Previous reports showed efficacy of total surgical removal rather than partial resection and that we performed radical extirpation of the entire tumor. Close follow up is needed against this frequently recurrent disease.

  11. Effects of Sorafenib on C-Terminally Truncated Androgen Receptor Variants in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zengerling, Friedemann; Streicher, Wolfgang; Schrader, Andres J.; Schrader, Mark; Nitzsche, Bianca; Cronauer, Marcus V.; Höpfner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa) is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR). A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa) cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa. PMID:23109869

  12. Effects of sorafenib on C-terminally truncated androgen receptor variants in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zengerling, Friedemann; Streicher, Wolfgang; Schrader, Andres J; Schrader, Mark; Nitzsche, Bianca; Cronauer, Marcus V; Höpfner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa) is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR). A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa) cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa. PMID:23109869

  13. Irradiation of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Increases Uptake of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Anai, Satoshi; Brown, Bob D.; Nakamura, Kogenta; Goodison, Steve; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Rosser, Charles J. . E-mail: charles.rosser@urology.ufl.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether irradiation before antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) administration enhances tissue uptake, and whether periodic dosing enhances cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled ODN relative to constant dosing. Methods and Materials: PC-3-Bcl-2 cells (prostate cancer cell line engineered to overexpress Bcl-2) were subjected to increasing doses of irradiation (0-10 Gy) with or without increasing concentrations of fluorescently labeled antisense Bcl-2 ODN (G4243). The fluorescent signal intensity was quantified as the total grain area with commercial software. In addition, PC-3-Bcl-2 subcutaneous xenograft tumors were treated with or without irradiation in combination with various dosing schemas of G4243. The uptake of fluorescent G4243 in tumors was quantitated. Results: The uptake of G4243 was increased in prostate cancer cells exposed to low doses of irradiation both in vitro and in vivo. Irradiation before G4243 treatment resulted in increased fluorescent signal intensity in xenograft tumors compared with those irradiated after G4243 treatment. A single weekly dose of G4243 produced higher G4243 uptake in xenograft tumors than daily dosing, even when the total dose administered per week was held constant. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ionizing radiation increases the uptake of therapeutic ODN in target tissues and, thus, has potential to increase the efficacy of ODN in clinical applications.

  14. Pyridine analogues of curcumin exhibit high activity for inhibiting CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cell growth and androgen receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DAI-YING; ZHAO, SU-QING; DU, ZHI-YUN; ZHENG, XI; ZHANG, KUN

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations required for curcumin to exert its anticancer activity (IC50, 20 µM) are difficult to achieve in the blood plasma of patients, due to the low bioavailability of the compound. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to the development of curcumin analogues that exhibit stronger anticancer activity and a lower IC50 than curcumin. The present study investigated twelve pyridine analogues of curcumin, labeled as groups AN, BN, EN and FN, to determine their effects in CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. The inhibitory effects of these compounds on testosterone (TT)-induced androgen receptor (AR) activity was determined by performing an AR-linked luciferase assay and by TT-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen. The results of the current study suggested that the FN group of analogues had the strongest inhibitory effect of growth on CWR-22Rv1 cultured cells, and were the most potent inhibitor of AR activity compared with curcumin, and the AN, BN and EN analogues. Thus, the results of the present study indicate the inhibition of the AR pathways as a potential mechanism for the anticancer effect of curcumin analogues in human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, curcumin analogues with pyridine as a distal ring and tetrahydrothiopyran-4-one as a linker may be good candidates for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer, by targeting the AR signaling pathway. PMID:27313760

  15. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  16. Immunohistochemical characterization of 53 monoclonal antibodies to prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Nap, M; van der Kwast, T M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-three antibodies submitted to the ISOBM TD-3 Workshop on the prostate specific antigen (PSA) were evaluated for their reactivity in frozen and formalin fixed tissue from benign hyperplastic prostate and salivary gland tissue. Only 13/53 antibodies showed clear reactivity in both frozen and paraffin sections, while some antibodies appeared to react only in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Many antibodies showed extensive nonspecific reactivity in tissue sections. These results highlight the fact that the number of monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunohistochemical detection of PSA is still relatively limited.

  17. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers. PMID:26718024

  18. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  19. Soy milk digestion extract inhibits progression of prostate cancer cell growth via regulation of prostate cancer‑specific antigen and cell cycle-regulatory genes in human LNCaP cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Shin, Hee-Chang; Oh, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyun-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-08-01

    Soy milk, which is produced from whole soybeans, contains a variety of biologically active components. Isoflavones are a class of soy-derived phytoestrogens with beneficial effects, among which genistein (GEN) has been previously indicated to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The present study evaluated the effects of soy milk digestion extract (SMD) on the progression of prostate cancer via the estrogen receptor (ER)β in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the effects of SMD (daizein, 1.988 mg/100g, glycitein, 23.537 mg/100 g and GEN, 0.685 mg/100g) on cell proliferation, LNCaP cells were cultured in media containing vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide), 17β‑estradiol (E2; 2.7x10‑7 mg/ml), GEN (2.7x10-2 mg/ml) of SMD (total aglycon concentration, 0.79 mg/ml), after which the cell viability was examined using an MTT assay. The cell viability was significantly elevated by E2 (by 45±0.18%), while it was markedly reduced by GEN (73.2±0.03%) or SMD (74.8±0.09%). Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes, including ERβ, prostate cancer‑specific antigen (PSA) and cell cycle regulators p21, Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4. The expression of ERβ was almost completely diminished by E2, whereas it was significantly elevated by SMD. In addition, the expression levels of PSA were considerably reduced by SMD. The expression of p21 was significantly elevated by SMD, while it was markedly reduced by E2. Of note, the expression levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were considerably elevated by E2, while being significantly reduced by GEN and SMD. All of these results indicated that SMD may inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via regulating the expression of ERβ, PSA, p21, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in an ER-dependent manner.

  20. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer. PMID:25813723

  1. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer.

  2. α-Solanine inhibits invasion of human prostate cancer cell by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition and MMPs expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Hung; Liao, Alex Chien-Hwa; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Hu, Kai-Chieh; Lin, Pin-Tsen; Liao, Ruei-Fang; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2014-08-11

    α-Solanine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid found in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), was found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism involved in suppression of cancer cell metastasis by α-solanine remains unclear. This study investigates the suppression mechanism of α-solanine on motility of the human prostate cancer cell PC-3. Results show that α-solanine reduces the viability of PC-3 cells. When treated with non-toxic doses of α-solanine, cell invasion is markedly suppressed by α-solanine. α-Solanine also significantly elevates epithelial marker E-cadherin expression, while it concomitantly decreases mesenchymal marker vimentin expression, suggesting it suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). α-Solanine reduces the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and extracellular inducer of matrix metalloproteinase (EMMPRIN), but increases the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and TIMP-2. Immunoblotting assays indicate α-solanine is effective in suppressing the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt and ERK. Moreover, α-solanine downregulates oncogenic microRNA-21 (miR-21) and upregulates tumor suppressor miR-138 expression. Taken together, the results suggest that inhibition of PC-3 cell invasion by α-solanine may be, at least in part, through blocking EMT and MMPs expression. α-Solanine also reduces ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and regulates expression of miR-21 and miR-138. These findings suggest an attractive therapeutic potential of α-solanine for suppressing invasion of prostate cancer cell.

  3. Examination of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in human benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Qaiser, Fatima; Trembley, Janeen H; Sadiq, Sarah; Muhammad, Iqbal; Younis, Rubina; Hashmi, Shoaib Naiyar; Murtaza, Badar; Rector, Thomas S; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Protein kinase CK2 plays a critical role in cell growth, proliferation, and suppression of cell death. CK2 is overexpressed, especially in the nuclear compartment, in the majority of cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). CK2-mediated activation of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 is a key step in cellular proliferation, resulting in translocation of NF-κB p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. As CK2 expression and activity are also elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), we sought to increase the knowledge of CK2 function in benign and malignant prostate by examination of the relationships between nuclear CK2 and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein expression. The expression level and localization of CK2α and NF-κB p65 proteins in PCa and BPH tissue specimens was determined. Nuclear CK2α and NF-κB p65 protein levels are significantly higher in PCa compared with BPH, and these proteins are positively correlated with each other in both diseases. Nuclear NF-κB p65 levels correlated with Ki-67 or with cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 expression in BPH, but not in PCa. The findings provide information that combined analysis of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in prostate specimens relates to the disease status. Increased nuclear NF-κB p65 expression levels in PCa specifically related to nuclear CK2α levels, indicating a possible CK2-dependent relationship in malignancy. In contrast, nuclear NF-κB p65 protein levels related to both Ki-67 and cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 levels exclusively in BPH, suggesting a potential separate impact for NF-κB p65 function in proliferation for benign disease as opposed to malignant disease. PMID:27435858

  4. Inhibition of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V enhances sensitivity of radiotherapy in human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Huiyi; Chen, Wenxia; Liu, Qiulian; Wei, Ting; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • We first evaluated the effect of GnT-V on radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer. • Higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the PCa advanced tumors. • Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis. • Knockdown of GnT-V could decrease radiation-induced G2/M arrest and NF-κB activity. • Inhibition of GnT-V may be involved in increasing radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer (PCa) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, the GnT-V expression was studied in 84 cases of PCa tissues, in which higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the advanced tumors. Secondly, the GnT-V stably suppressed cell lines PCa/1079 (Lncap/1079 and PC3/1079) were constructed from PCa cell lines (Lncap and PC3) in vitro. Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis, which resulted in enhanced radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. The underlying mechanism may be relevant to the increasing ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, the blocking transcription of NF-κB and the reduction of cell cycle G2-M arrest. Finally, in in vivo study, compared with control groups, the irradiated PCa xenograft nude mice of PCa/1079 indicated to reduce tumor-growth rate and enhance survival time. Summary, our studies showed that inhibition of GnT-V probably improved PCa cells’ radiation sensitivity.

  5. Therapeutic efficiency of rhenium-188-HEDP in human prostate cancer skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Liepe, K; Kropp, J; Runge, R; Kotzerke, J

    2003-08-18

    Rhenium-188-HEDP ((188)Re-HEDP) is a new and attractive radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of metastatic bone pain. As a product of (188)W/(188)Re generator, it is convenient for clinical therapeutic use with a short physical half-life of 16.9 h and a maximal beta-energy of 2.1 MeV. We investigated the effect of (188)Re-HEDP on pain relief, analgesic intake and impairment of bone marrow function in 27 patients with bone metastases induced from prostate cancer. All patients were interviewed using a standardised set of questions before, and after therapy for 12 weeks. The patients were treated with 2700-3459 MBq of (188)Re-HEDP. Blood samples were taken weekly for 12 weeks, and a blood count was performed. Patients described an improvement on the Karnofsky performance scale from 74+/-7 to 85+/-9% 12 weeks after therapy (P=0.001). The pain score showed a maximum decrease from 44+/-18 to 27+/-20% in the third to the eight week after therapy (P=0.009). Seventy-six percent of the patients described a pain relief without increase of analgesic intake. Twenty percent of the patients could discontinue their analgesics and were pain free. Mean platelet count decreased from (286+/-75)*10(3) microl(-1) to (215+/-92)*10(3) microl(-1), and mean leucocyte count from (7.7+/-1.5)*10(3) microl(-1) to (6.0+/-1.9)*10(3) microl(-1) in the second to the fourth week after therapy. The maximal differences between the values of platelets and leucocytes before and after therapy were not statistically significant (P=0.021 and 0.094). In conclusion, (188)Re-HEDP is an effective radiopharmaceutical used in the palliative treatment of metastatic bone pain in prostate cancer and shows minimal bone marrow toxicity. PMID:12915868

  6. A Preliminary Analysis of Calcifying Particles in the Serum and Prostates of Patients with Prostatic Inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Carlson, Grant; Kajander, E. Olavi; Warmflash, David; Taylor, Karen; Ayala, Gustavo; Shoskes, Daniel; Everett, Meg; Feedback, Dan; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2006-01-01

    of prostatitis. Preliminary immunohistologic studies, suggest that NB may be found within the gland itself at a higher rate in patients with BPH relative to patients with adenocarcinoma, however confirmatory studies with a more specific ELISA technique, primary cultures, & with larger numbers of patients in a prospective design are required to determine if 1) NB are a causative organism for clinical hyperplastic and inflammatory disease, & if 2) serological testing can be used to discriminate patients with nanobacterial-associated prostatic disease.

  7. LINE-1 ORF-1p functions as a novel androgen receptor co-activator and promotes the growth of human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinying; Feng, Fan; Yang, Yutao; Gao, Xudong; Cui, Jiajun; Zhang, Chuanfu; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Zhongxian; Qv, Jianhui; Wang, Chunping; Zeng, Zhen; Zhu, Yunfeng; Yang, Yongping

    2013-02-01

    Widespread interest in the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by the androgen receptor (AR) has been stimulated by the finding that AR signaling is critically important in the progression of human prostate cancers. Co-factors, the co-repressors, or the co-activators are responsible for the regulation of AR activation. The pro-oncogene human Long Interspersed Nucleotide acid Element-1 (LINE-1) encodes LINE-1 ORF-1p and plays important roles in the development and progression of several human carcinomas. In this study, the results showed that LINE-1 ORF-1p increased the AR transcriptional activity and in turn enhanced the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the presence of R1881. A physical protein-protein interaction between the AR signaling and the LINE-1 ORF-1p was identified by the immunoprecipitation assays and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, LINE-1 ORF-1p would function as a novel AR positive co-regulator through modulating its cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to the androgen response element in the PSA gene promoter. Our date also showed that the LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP (ligand dependent) and PC-3 (ligand independent) human prostatic carcinoma cells. By investigating a novel role of the LINE-1 ORF-1p in the androgen/androgen receptor signaling pathway regulation, our study identifies that LINE-1 ORF-1p may be a novel AR co-regulator and molecular target for human prostate carcinoma therapy.

  8. Selenium level in benign and cancerous prostate.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Wolski, Zbigniew; Tyloch, Janusz; Skok, Zdzislaw; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-03-01

    The dietary microelement selenium (Se) has been proposed as a potential chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer. This element is present in various amounts in all tissues. Little information is available on Se level in patients with prostate gland disorders. The levels of Se in prostatic gland of patients with prostate cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, and healthy controls were examined. The Se level for benign prostate hyperplasia (156 +/- 30.6 ng/g) was the same as in the control group (157 +/- 26.0 ng/g), but in the gland of prostate cancer patients (182 +/- 34.1 ng/g wet weight), the Se level was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than in both healthy controls and benign prostate hyperplasia. Thus, the Se level in human healthy controls is lower than in kidney and liver but higher compared with other tissues. PMID:15784953

  9. Juglone, isolated from Juglans mandshurica Maxim, induces apoptosis via down-regulation of AR expression in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huali; Yu, Xiaofeng; Qu, Shaochun; Sui, Dayun

    2013-06-15

    Juglone is a natural compound which has been isolated from Juglans mandshurica Maxim. Recent studies have shown that juglone had various pharmacological effects such as anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-cancer. However, its anti-cancer activity on human prostate cancer LNCaP cell has not been examined. Thus, the current study was designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by juglone in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer LNCaP cells. MTT assay was performed to examine the anti-proliferative effect of juglone. Occurrence of apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33342 staining and flow cytometry in LNCaP cells treated with juglone for 24h. The result shown that juglone inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological changes of apoptotic body formation after juglone treatment were observed by Hoechst 33342 staining. This apoptotic induction was associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase-3, -9 activation. Moreover, we found that juglone significantly inhibited the expression levels of androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a dose-dependent manner, as well as abrogated up-regulation of AR and PSA genes with and/or without dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Take together, our results demonstrated that juglone might induce the apoptosis in LNCaP cell via down-regulation of AR expression. Therefore, our results indicated that juglone may be a potential candidate of drug for androgen-sensitive prostate cancer.

  10. p38MAPK activation is involved in androgen-independent proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by regulating IL-6 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shida, Yohei; Igawa, Tsukasa . E-mail: tigawa@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hakariya, Tomoaki; Sakai, Hideki; Kanetake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) are frequently observed in patients with advanced, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 regulation is still largely unknown. Since prostate cancer gradually progresses to an androgen-independent state despite the stress caused by various therapeutic agents, we hypothesized the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) involvement in androgen-independent growth or IL-6 secretion of prostate cancer cells. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells, we analyzed the role of SAPKs in IL-6 mediated cell growth and found that the p38MAPK and JNK are involved in androgen-independent cancer cell growth. Furthermore, IL-6 secretion by PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly suppressed by SAPKs inhibitor, especially by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK inhibitor, PD98059. These results raised the possibility that the IL-6 mediated androgen-independent proliferation of PC-3 and DU145 cells is regulated at least partly via SAPKs signaling pathway especially through p38MAPK activation.

  11. The mechanism of sertraline-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise in human PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jong-Khing; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Shu, Su-Shung; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Tsai, Jeng-Yu; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Jue-Long; Lin, Ko-Long; Lu, Yi-Chau; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shuih-Inn; Ho, Chin-Man; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2011-08-01

    The effect of sertraline, an antidepressant, on cytosolic-free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+) ](i) ) in human cancer cells is unclear. This study examined whether sertraline altered basal [Ca(2+) ](i) levels in suspended PC3 human prostate cancer cells by using fura-2 as a Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent probe. At concentrations of 10-150 μM, sertraline induced a [Ca(2+) ](i) rise in a concentration-dependent fashion. The Ca(2+) signal was reduced partly by removing extracellular Ca(2+) indicating that Ca(2+) entry and release both contributed to the [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. Sertraline induced Mn(2+) influx, leading to quench of fura-2 fluorescence suggesting Ca(2+) influx. This Ca(2+) influx was inhibited by the suppression of store-operated Ca(2+) channels or by the modulation of protein kinase C activity. In Ca(2+) -free medium, pre-treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone nearly abolished sertraline-induced Ca(2+) release. Conversely, pre-treatment with sertraline greatly reduced the inhibitor-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise, suggesting that sertraline released Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Inhibition of phospholipase C inhibited sertraline-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. At 20-30 μM, sertraline killed cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxic effect of sertraline was enhanced by chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/AM. Annexin V-FITC data suggest that sertraline (20 and 30 μM) evoked apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Together, in PC3 human prostate cancer cells, sertraline induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rises by causing phospholipase C-dependent Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and via multiple Ca(2+) influx pathways that involve store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Sertraline also induced apoptosis that was not triggered by [Ca(2+) ](i) rise.

  12. A serrated colorectal cancer pathway predominates over the classic WNT pathway in patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boparai, Karam S; Dekker, Evelien; Polak, Mirjam M; Musler, Alex R; van Eeden, Susanne; van Noesel, Carel J M

    2011-06-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is characterized by the presence of multiple colorectal serrated polyps and is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The mixture of distinct precursor lesion types and malignancies in HPS provides a unique model to study the canonical pathway and a proposed serrated CRC pathway in humans. To establish which CRC pathways play a role in HPS and to obtain new support for the serrated CRC pathway, we assessed the molecular characteristics of polyps (n = 84) and CRCs (n = 19) in 17 patients with HPS versus control groups of various sporadic polyps (n = 59) and sporadic microsatellite-stable CRCs (n = 16). In HPS and sporadic polyps, APC mutations were exclusively identified in adenomas, whereas BRAF mutations were confined to serrated polyps. Six of 19 HPS CRCs (32%) were identified in a serrated polyp. Mutation analysis performed in the CRC and the serrated component of these lesions showed identical BRAF mutations. One HPS CRC was located in an adenoma, both components harboring an identical APC mutation. Overall, 10 of 19 HPS CRCs (53%) carried a BRAF mutation versus none in control group CRCs (P = 0.001). Six BRAF-mutated HPS CRCs (60%) were microsatellite unstable owing to MLH1 methylation. These findings provide novel supporting evidence for the existence of a predominant serrated CRC pathway in HPS, generating microsatellite-stable and microsatellite-instable CRCs.

  13. Effect of a standardized extract of red orange juice on proliferation of human prostate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Federica; Pennisi, Claudia; Tomaino, Antonio; Bonina, Francesco; De Pasquale, Anna; Saija, Antonella; Tita, Beatrice

    2006-04-01

    A standardized extract of red orange juice (ROE) was shown to inhibit proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial prostate cells. These data suggest that the antiproliferative properties of ROE cannot be ascribed to cytotoxic effect and highlight its potential usefulness in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. NSK-01105, a Novel Sorafenib Derivative, Inhibits Human Prostate Tumor Growth via Suppression of VEGFR2/EGFR-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Ye, Liang; Wang, Hongbo; Du, Guangying; Zhang, Jianzhao; Zuo, Yanhua; Zhang, Jinghai; Tian, Jingwei

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-angiogenic activities of NSK-01105, a novel sorafenib derivative, in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models, and explore the potential mechanisms. NSK-01105 significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells at non-cytotoxic concentrations as shown by wound-healing, transwell migration and endothelial cell tube formation assays, respectively. Cell viability and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 cells were significantly inhibited by cytotoxicity assay and matrigel invasion assay. Furthermore, NSK-01105 also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis in matrigel plug assay. Western blot analysis showed that NSK-01105 down-regulated VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Tumor volumes were significantly reduced by NSK-01105 at 60 mg/kg/day in both xenograft models. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a close association between inhibition of tumor growth and neovascularization. Collectively, our results suggest a role of NSK-01105 in treatment for human prostate tumors, and one of the potential mechanisms may be attributed to anti-angiogenic activities. PMID:25551444

  15. Hyperplastic/serrated polyposis in inflammatory bowel disease: a case series of a previously undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Redston, Mark; Farraye, Francis A; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Odze, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    Herein, we describe the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 3 unique patients with long standing inflammatory bowel disease, all of whom developed numerous discrete hyperplastic/serrated colonic polyps similar to those described in the hyperplastic/serrated polyposis syndrome. The 3 patients (2 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with Crohn ileo-colitis) were evaluated for a variety of clinical, histologic (including the type, location and number of polyps in the colon), and immunohistochemical features [MLH-1, MSH-2, MGMT (O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase), beta-catenin, and p53]. KRAS and BRAF mutation analysis was also performed on a subset of polyps from 2 patients. All patients had moderate-severe pancolitis of more than 10 years duration and had >20 colonic polyps. None had polyps in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Pathologically, a combination of conventional hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated polyps (adenomas) were present in the 3 cases. In addition, serrated adenomas were present in 2 and conventional adenomas in 1. Two patients also had synchronous adenocarcinoma. All 3 cases showed retention of MLH-1 and MSH-2, and a membranous beta-catenin staining pattern. However, 2 cases showed loss of MGMT in several serrated polyps, and one also in adjacent colitic mucosa. KRAS mutations were detected in 5/11 serrated polyps. However, BRAF mutations were not present in any of the polyps tested. These findings suggest the possibility of a serrated pathway of carcinogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease characterized by silencing of MGMT, most likely by gene promoter methylation, KRAS mutations, and possibly other, as yet, uncharacterized molecular alterations, resulting eventually in progression to adenocarcinoma.

  16. Proteomic-based identification of multiple pathways underlying n-butylidenephthalide-induced apoptosis in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Chiu, Sheng-Chun; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Zhai, Wei-Jun; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Yang, Hsueh-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the cancer-preventive properties of butylidenephthalide (BP), there is little report of BP affecting human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, proteomic-based approaches were used to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of BP in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. BP treatment decreased the viability of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was correlated with G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Increased cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in the level of CCND1, CDK2, and PCNA proteins and an increase in the level of CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and SFN proteins. Proteomic studies revealed that among 48 differentially expressed proteins, 25 proteins were down-regulated and 23 proteins were up-regulated and these proteins fall into one large protein protein interaction network. Among these proteins, FAS, AIFM1, BIK, CYCS, SFN, PPP2R1A, CALR, HSPA5, DDIT3, and ERN1 are apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated proteins. Proteomic data suggested that multiple signaling pathways including FAS-dependent pathway, mitochondrial pathway, and ER stress pathway are involved in the apoptosis induced by BP. PMID:23770345

  17. Antiproliferative effects of Dangyuja (Citrus grandis Osbeck) leaves through suppression of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shu Yuan; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kim, Chulwon; Um, Jae-Young; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Seong Won; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Nam, Dongwoo; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Na, Yun-Cheol; Jeong, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-02-01

    Although Dangyuja (Citrus grandis Osbeck) exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, its molecular targets and pathways, especially in human prostate cancer cells, are not fully understood. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of Dangyuja leaves through the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 signaling pathway was investigated in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells. The solvent fractions (n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol) were obtained from a crude extract (80% methanol extract) of Dangyuja leaves. We first found that the chloroform fraction of Dangyuja leaves (DCF) was the most cytotoxic against DU145 cells. DCF inhibited constitutive STAT3 activation through blocking upstream Janus-like kinase 2 and c-Src. Consistent with STAT3 inactivation, DCF down-regulated the expression of STAT3 target genes, including bcl-2, bcl-xl, and cyclin D1; this correlated with the suppression of proliferation, the accumulation of cell cycle at the sub-G(1) phase, and the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, DCF exerted a relatively minor effect on the growth of human prostate noncancerous RWPE-1 cells. Nobiletin, a major active constituent of DCF, could induce apoptosis via the suppression of constitutive STAT3 activation. Overall, our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities previously assigned to DCF may be mediated partially through the suppression of the STAT3 signaling. PMID:22273151

  18. A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin induces apoptosis by activating AP-1 and upregulating p21/waf1 in human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    PubMed Central

    DU, LIANLIAN; WU, WEI

    2012-01-01

    A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin (S179D PRL) has been demonstrated to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. In this study, we identified that a four-day treatment of S179D PRL (1 μg/ml) in human prostate PC3 cancer cells activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and led to apoptosis. We also demonstrated that p21/waf1 was upregulated in cells transfected with the human PRL receptor (S1b) following a four-day incubation with S179D PRL (1 μg/ml). Once the cells were cotransfected with S1b and either c-fos, c-jun or the c-fos/c-jun constructs for 24 h, S17D PRL activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and induced apoptosis in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. Additionally, S179D PRL upregulated p21 luciferase activity in the cells transfected with the S1b, activating protein-1 (AP-1) (7x) Luc or p21 Luc constructs. SP600125 (25 μM), a JNK blocker, inhibited the upregulation of AP-1 Luc and p21 Luc in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. These results demonstrate that S179D PRL activates JNK and AP-1, which leads to p21 upregulation and apoptosis in human prostate PC3 cancer cells. PMID:23162652

  19. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  20. Changes in the contralateral eye in uncomplicated persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous in adults.

    PubMed

    Awan, K J; Humayun, M

    1985-02-15

    In two adults (a 62-year-old man and a 71-year-old woman) uncomplicated full-blown unilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous was diagnosed on the basis of characteristic clinical features and ultrasonography. In the contralateral uninvolved eyes, we found open-angle glaucoma, anomalous blood vessels along the entire circumference of the anterior chamber angle, band keratopathy, and heterochromia iridis. The axial length of one involved eye was about 0.85 mm larger than that of the uninvolved eye.

  1. Pseudoepitheliomatous, keratotic, micaceous balanitis. A clinical lesion with two histologic subsets: hyperplastic dystrophy and verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D; Jakubovic, H R

    1988-02-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of a slowly enlarging, hyperkeratotic plaque on his glans penis that was compatible with a clinical diagnosis of pseudoepitheliomatous, keratotic, micaceous balanitis. The lesion had been treated unsuccessfully on three occasions with superficial shave excisional biopsies. Complete surgical excision produced excellent cosmetic and functional results with no evidence of recurrence at 3- and 6-month follow-up. A diagnosis of verrucous carcinoma was made on histologic examination of the excised material. Pseudoepitheliomatous, keratotic, micaceous balanitis is a distinctive clinical entity that represents a histologic spectrum ranging from hypertrophic-hyperplastic penile dystrophy to verrucous carcinoma. PMID:3343410

  2. The In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Cancer Activities of a Standardized Quassinoids Composition from Eurycoma longifolia on LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kind Leng; Chan, Kit Lam; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Low, Bin Seng; Ma, Hai Qiu; Wong, Pooi Fong

    2015-01-01

    Quassinoids are a group of diterpenoids found in plants from the Simaroubaceae family. They are also the major bioactive compounds found in Eurycoma longifolia which is commonly used as traditional medicine in South East Asia to treat various ailments including sexual dysfunction and infertility. These uses are attributed to its ability to improve testosterone level in men. Chronic consumption of E. longifolia extracts has been reported to increase testosterone level in men and animal model but its effect on prostate growth remains unknown. Therefore, the present study investigates the effects of a standardized total quassinoids composition (SQ40) containing 40% of the total quassinoids found in E. longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. SQ40 inhibited LNCaP cell growth at IC50 value of 5.97 μg/mL while the IC50 on RWPE-1 human prostate normal cells was 59.26 μg/mL. SQ40 also inhibited 5α-dihydrotestosterone-stimulated growth in LNCaP cells dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of SQ40 in anchorage-independent growth of LNCaP cells was also demonstrated using soft agar assay. SQ40 suppressed LNCaP cell growth via G0/G1 phase arrest which was accompanied by the down-regulation of CDK4, CDK2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3 and up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 protein levels. SQ40 at higher concentrations or longer treatment duration can cause G2M growth arrest leading to apoptotic cell death as demonstrated by the detection of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in LNCaP cells. Moreover, SQ40 also inhibited androgen receptor translocation to nucleus which is important for the transactivation of its target gene, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and resulted in a significant reduction of PSA secretion after the treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal injection of 5 and 10 mg/kg of SQ40 also significantly suppressed the LNCaP tumor growth on mouse xenograft model. Results from the present study suggest that the standardized total quassinoids composition from E

  3. Simvastatin blocks TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, FENG; LIU, JIE; LI, CHENGWEN; ZHAO, YAORUI

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the use of statins has been reported to be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer (PCa), particularly metastatic PCa. The mechanisms underlying these epidemiological observations are poorly understood. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical initial step and a hallmark for cancer metastasis. In the present study, the relationship between simvastatin and EMT in PCa and the mechanism involved was investigated. It was demonstrated that simvastatin inhibited the EMT as assessed by reduced expression of N-cadherin and vimentin, and increased E-cadherin in TGF-β1 treated DU145 PCa cells. Furthermore, simvastatin inhibited TGF-β1-induced migration and invasion of DU145 cells. The TGF-β1/Smad pathway and non-Smad pathway were investigated in simvastatin-treated DU145 cells. Simvastatin had no effect on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3. In the non-Smad pathway, simvastatin reduced TGF-β1-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but had no effect on TGF-β1-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Simvastatin attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT, cell migration and invasion in DU145 cells. These effects may have been mediated by the inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, not through the canonical Smad pathway. Therefore simvastatin may be a promising therapeutic agent for treating PCa. PMID:27123120

  4. Eosinophilic prostatitis and prostatic specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Miller, P D; Holmes, S A; Christmas, T J; Kirby, R S

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic prostatitis is a rare form of abacterial prostatitis with uncertain aetiology. Its clinical presentation, like other types of abacterial prostatitis, commonly mimics carcinoma of the prostate. Transrectal ultrasound may be helpful in the diagnosis of prostatitis but histological confirmation is necessary. Prostatic specific antigen has been widely used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostatic carcinoma. High levels of this antigen (greater than 30 micrograms/l) have been claimed to be highly specific for prostate cancer, although lesser elevations may also occur in patients with large benign prostate glands and in bacterial prostatitis. We report 3 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic prostatitis and high levels of prostatic specific antigen. This diagnosis may closely mimic carcinoma of the prostate and must be excluded by histological examination of biopsy material before treatment for presumed prostate carcinoma is initiated.

  5. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26567111

  6. American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) extract affects human prostate cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest by modulating expression of cell cycle regulators.

    PubMed

    Déziel, Bob; MacPhee, James; Patel, Kunal; Catalli, Adriana; Kulka, Marianna; Neto, Catherine; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Hurta, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, and its prevalence is expected to increase appreciably in the coming decades. As such, more research is necessary to understand the etiology, progression and possible preventative measures to delay or to stop the development of this disease. Recently, there has been interest in examining the effects of whole extracts from commonly harvested crops on the behaviour and progression of cancer. Here, we describe the effects of whole cranberry extract (WCE) on the behaviour of DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Following treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells with 10, 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ of WCE, respectively for 6 h, WCE significantly decreased the cellular viability of DU145 cells. WCE also decreased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle following treatment of cells with 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ treatment of WCE for 6 h. These alterations in cell cycle were associated with changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins and other cell cycle associated proteins. WCE decreased the expression of CDK4, cyclin A, cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and increased the expression of p27. Changes in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels also were evident, however, the changes noted in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels were not statistically significant. These findings demonstrate that phytochemical extracts from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) can affect the behaviour of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and further support the potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

  7. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  8. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy.

  9. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  10. STAT5A/B Gene Locus Undergoes Amplification during Human Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Bassem R.; Gu, Lei; Mirtti, Tuomas; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Hoang, David T.; Bajaj, Renu; Leiby, Benjamin; Ellsworth, Elyse; Blackmon, Shauna; Ruiz, Christian; Curtis, Mark; Fortina, Paolo; Ertel, Adam; Liu, Chengbao; Rui, Hallgeir; Visakorpi, Tapio; Bubendorf, Lukas; Lallas, Costas D.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; McCue, Peter; Gomella, Leonard; Nevalainen, Marja T.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castrate-resistant (CR) and metastatic disease are poorly understood. Our previous mechanistic work shows that inhibition of transcription factor Stat5 by multiple alternative methods induces extensive rapid apoptotic death of Stat5-positive PCa cells in vitro and inhibits PCa xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, STAT5A/B induces invasive behavior of PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting involvement of STAT5A/B in PCa progression. Nuclear STAT5A/B protein levels are increased in high-grade PCas, CR PCas, and distant metastases, and high nuclear STAT5A/B expression predicts early disease recurrence and PCa-specific death in clinical PCas. Based on these findings, STAT5A/B represents a therapeutic target protein for advanced PCa. The mechanisms underlying increased Stat5 protein levels in PCa are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate amplification at the STAT5A/B gene locus in a significant fraction of clinical PCa specimens. STAT5A/B gene amplification was more frequently found in PCas of high histologic grades and in CR distant metastases. Quantitative in situ analysis revealed that STAT5A/B gene amplification was associated with increased STAT5A/B protein expression in PCa. Functional studies showed that increased STAT5A/B copy numbers conferred growth advantage in PCa cells in vitro and as xenograft tumors in vivo. The work presented herein provides the first evidence of somatic STAT5A/B gene amplification in clinical PCas. PMID:23660011

  11. STAT5A/B gene locus undergoes amplification during human prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Bassem R; Gu, Lei; Mirtti, Tuomas; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Hoang, David T; Bajaj, Renu; Leiby, Benjamin; Ellsworth, Elyse; Blackmon, Shauna; Ruiz, Christian; Curtis, Mark; Fortina, Paolo; Ertel, Adam; Liu, Chengbao; Rui, Hallgeir; Visakorpi, Tapio; Bubendorf, Lukas; Lallas, Costas D; Trabulsi, Edouard J; McCue, Peter; Gomella, Leonard; Nevalainen, Marja T

    2013-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castrate-resistant (CR) and metastatic disease are poorly understood. Our previous mechanistic work shows that inhibition of transcription factor Stat5 by multiple alternative methods induces extensive rapid apoptotic death of Stat5-positive PCa cells in vitro and inhibits PCa xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, STAT5A/B induces invasive behavior of PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting involvement of STAT5A/B in PCa progression. Nuclear STAT5A/B protein levels are increased in high-grade PCas, CR PCas, and distant metastases, and high nuclear STAT5A/B expression predicts early disease recurrence and PCa-specific death in clinical PCas. Based on these findings, STAT5A/B represents a therapeutic target protein for advanced PCa. The mechanisms underlying increased Stat5 protein levels in PCa are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate amplification at the STAT5A/B gene locus in a significant fraction of clinical PCa specimens. STAT5A/B gene amplification was more frequently found in PCas of high histologic grades and in CR distant metastases. Quantitative in situ analysis revealed that STAT5A/B gene amplification was associated with increased STAT5A/B protein expression in PCa. Functional studies showed that increased STAT5A/B copy numbers conferred growth advantage in PCa cells in vitro and as xenograft tumors in vivo. The work presented herein provides the first evidence of somatic STAT5A/B gene amplification in clinical PCas.

  12. Fangchinoline induced G1/S arrest by modulating expression of p27, PCNA, and cyclin D in human prostate carcinoma cancer PC3 cells and tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Dong; Huang, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xuan; Li, Yi; Zhou, Shi-Yi; Yan, Xu; Zou, An; Chang, Jun-Li; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Xiao; He, Guang-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males. The present study investigated the effects of fangchinoline (Fan), an important compound in Stephania Tetradra S. Moore (Fenfangji) with pain-relieving, blood pressure-depressing, and antibiotic activities, on human PCA. It was found that Fan inhibited human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3) cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Studies of cell-cycle progression showed that the anti-proliferative effect of Fan was associated with an increase in the G1/S phase of PC3 cells. Western blot results indicated that Fan-induced G1/S phase arrest was mediated through inhibition of cyclin-regulated signaling pathways. Fan induced p27 expression and inhibited cyclin D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in PC3 cells. Increased exposure time to Fan caused apoptosis of PC3 cells, which was associated with up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase 3, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Furthermore, Fan had anti-tumorigenic activity in vivo, including reduction of tumor volume and pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in a PC3 nude mouse xenograft. Taking all this together, it can be concluded that Fan is an effective anti-proliferative agent that modulates cell growth regulators in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20208355

  13. Angiostatin directly inhibits human prostate tumor cell invasion by blocking plasminogen binding to its cellular receptor, CD26

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario . E-mail: gonza002@mc.duke.edu; Grenett, Hernan E.; Gawdi, Govind; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that one of the six plasminogen type 2 glycoforms, plasminogen 2{epsilon}, enhances invasiveness of the 1-LN human prostate tumor cell line in an in vitro model. Binding of plasminogen 2{epsilon} to CD26 on the cell surface induces a Ca{sup 2+} signaling cascade which stimulates the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9, required by these cells to invade Matrigel registered . We now report that angiostatin, a fragment derived from plasminogen which prevents endothelial cell proliferation, is also a potent, direct inhibitor of 1-LN tumor cell invasiveness. We studied the effect of individual plasminogen 2 glycoform-derived angiostatins and found that only angiostatin 2{epsilon} binds to CD26 on the surface of 1-LN cells at a site also recognized by plasminogen 2{epsilon}. As a result, the plasminogen 2{epsilon}-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling cascade is inhibited, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 is suppressed, and invasion of Matrigel registered by 1-LN cells is blocked. Angiostatin 2{epsilon} is also the only angiostatin glycoform which is able to inhibit in vitro endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. These studies suggest that, in addition to its ability to inhibit tumor vascularization, angiostatin 2{epsilon} may also directly block tumor metastasis.

  14. Benzoxazinoids from Scoparia dulcis (sweet broomweed) with antiproliferative activity against the DU-145 human prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Hsun; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Rui-Wen; Chen, Shui-Tein; Chang, Chia-Chuan

    2012-11-01

    Sweet broomweed (Scoparia dulcis) is an edible perennial medicinal herb widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Four compounds, (2R)-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one 2-O-β-galactopyranoside [(2R)-HMBOA-2-O-Gal], 3,6-dimethoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (3,6-M2BOA), 3-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (3-OH-MBOA), and scutellarein 7-O-β-glucuronamide, along with eight known compounds, including two 7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3(2H)-one 3-O-hexopyranosides [(2R)-HMBOA-2-O-Glc and (2R)-HDMBOA-2-O-Glc], 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (MBOA), acteoside, sodium scutellarin, p-coumaric acid, and two monosaccharides (fructose and glucose), were isolated from the aqueous extract of S. dulcis. Antiproliferative activities of the six benzoxazinoid compounds against the DU-145 human prostate cancer cell line were assayed, and one of these displayed an IC₅₀ of 65.8 μg/mL. PMID:22944352

  15. Severe hemophilia in a girl infant with mosaic Turner syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Moghadam, Mohamad; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    A 6-month-old girl was referred by an ophthalmologist because of postoperative bleeding. She was scheduled for operation because of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Workups were done and prolonged partial thromboplastin time with normal platelet count, normal bleeding time, and prothrombin time were detected. There was negative family history of bleeding tendency in both maternal and paternal family, so at the first step, Factor XI assay was requested which was normal. Then, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII were assayed which was 127% and less than 1%, respectively. Severe factor VIII deficiency was not suspected in a girl unless in siblings of a hemophilic patient who gets married with her carrier cousin. Chromosomal study and genetic testing were requested and mosaic Turner syndrome (45 XO) with ring X (p22, 2q13) along with inversion 22 (hemizygote) was detected. Abdominal and pelvic sonography showed absence of both ovaries with presence of infantile uterus. Maternal genetic study was in favor of carrier of hemophilia (heterozygote inversion 22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of association of Turner syndrome with severe hemophilia A and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  16. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  17. Synergistic cytotoxicity of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract with doxorubicin in human pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Rao, G Subba; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Iida, Akira; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Tokuda, Harukuni

    2013-06-26

    Although a wide variety of cytotoxic plant extracts and phytochemicals are known to act synergistically with anticancer drug doxorubicin (D), their clinical application is hindered by safety concerns of such combination therapy. Our earlier studies showed that red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract (B), approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Union as red food color E162, reduced multi-organ tumor formations in various animal models when administered in drinking water. This led us to postulate that a long-term daily exposure to low doses of B through diet might be safe and sufficient to produce cancer chemopreventive effect in humans. Further, our recent comparative cytotoxic investigation with B and D in several human cancer cell lines indicated their potential for synergistic activity. Since B is considered safe for human use with no known toxicity, we conducted the present study to evaluate its synergistic antiproliferative activity with D against pancreatic (PaCa), breast (MCF-7) and prostate (PC-3) tumor cells of human origin. Different concentrations of B and D (0.29-290 μg/ml) and in various combinations (B:D ratio = 1:0, 1:1, 5:1, 1:5 and 0:1) were tested for cytotoxic effects against the three cancer cells. The viability of cells was assessed after 72 h incubation with various combinations of B and D using the trypan-blue staining method. The cytotoxic data were analyzed by the combination index method of Chou and Talalay to establish synergy between B and D. The results indicated that an overall positive reduction in drug concentration was achieved by D when combined with B in its cytotoxicity profile in the three human cancer cells tested. The synergistic cytotoxicity was best when the B:D ratio of 1:5 was used in PaCa cells at IC50, IC75 and IC90 dose levels and in MCF-7 cells at IC90 dose level. These results warrant further studies on the potential of red beetroot extract-doxorubicin combination in treating human cancers.

  18. Synergistic cytotoxicity of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract with doxorubicin in human pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Rao, G Subba; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Iida, Akira; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Tokuda, Harukuni

    2013-01-01

    Although a wide variety of cytotoxic plant extracts and phytochemicals are known to act synergistically with anticancer drug doxorubicin (D), their clinical application is hindered by safety concerns of such combination therapy. Our earlier studies showed that red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract (B), approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Union as red food color E162, reduced multi-organ tumor formations in various animal models when administered in drinking water. This led us to postulate that a long-term daily exposure to low doses of B through diet might be safe and sufficient to produce cancer chemopreventive effect in humans. Further, our recent comparative cytotoxic investigation with B and D in several human cancer cell lines indicated their potential for synergistic activity. Since B is considered safe for human use with no known toxicity, we conducted the present study to evaluate its synergistic antiproliferative activity with D against pancreatic (PaCa), breast (MCF-7) and prostate (PC-3) tumor cells of human origin. Different concentrations of B and D (0.29-290 μg/ml) and in various combinations (B:D ratio = 1:0, 1:1, 5:1, 1:5 and 0:1) were tested for cytotoxic effects against the three cancer cells. The viability of cells was assessed after 72 h incubation with various combinations of B and D using the trypan-blue staining method. The cytotoxic data were analyzed by the combination index method of Chou and Talalay to establish synergy between B and D. The results indicated that an overall positive reduction in drug concentration was achieved by D when combined with B in its cytotoxicity profile in the three human cancer cells tested. The synergistic cytotoxicity was best when the B:D ratio of 1:5 was used in PaCa cells at IC50, IC75 and IC90 dose levels and in MCF-7 cells at IC90 dose level. These results warrant further studies on the potential of red beetroot extract-doxorubicin combination in treating human cancers. PMID

  19. Selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate stromal proliferation in human benign prostatic hyperplasia by multiple beneficial mechanisms--action of two new agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, J P; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Sharma, V L; Dalela, Diwakar; Gupta, Gopal

    2012-04-01

    The existing drugs for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are partially effective with undesirable side-effects; hence new agents acting by different mechanism(s) are required as supplements. Modulation of estrogen receptor signaling using selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) offers an alternative approach for BPH management. Using human BPH-derived stromal cells and tissue explants in culture we evaluated two SERMs, DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2 H-1-benzopyran (BP) and Ormeloxifene (Orm) in comparison to Tamoxifen (Tam) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). BP, OHT and Tam were more effective than Orm in reducing stromal cell proliferation of human BPH. BP was either equipotent or more effective than OHT and Tam in increasing estrogen receptor(ER)-ß, TGFß1, Fas and FasL, and in decreasing ER-α, AR, EGF-R and IGF-I expressions in BPH stromal cells. BP, Tam and Orm (1.0 mg/Kg) reduced rat prostate weights by almost same extent as Finasteride (Fin, 5.0 mg/Kg); however combination treatment (SERM+Fin) was more effective. BP was exceptionally efficient in reducing IGF-1 and cleaving PARP while combination treatments more effectively increased bax:bcl-2 ratio. Fin reduced acinar diameter and prostatic DHT level but increased testosterone, estradiol (E(2)) and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. SERMs, especially BP, reduced epithelial cell height drastically without significantly altering steroid hormone levels and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. Combination treatment reduced both acinar diameter and epithelial cell height with modest increase in E(2), T and E(2)/T+DHT. The study reveals the potential of SERMs per se for BPH management, and more effectively in combination with a 5α-reductase inhibitor. BP appears promising for further evaluation as a drug candidate for BPH and prostate cancer.

  20. Modulation of TGFβ-inducible hypermotility by EGF and other factors in human prostate epithelial cells and keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Barron, Patricia D.; Rheinwald, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Keratinocytes migrating from a wound edge or initiating malignant invasion greatly increase their expression of the basement membrane protein Laminin-322 (Lam332). In culture, keratinocytes initiate sustained directional hypermotility when plated onto an incompletely processed form of Lam332 (Lam332′) or when treated with TGFβ, an inducer of Lam332 expression. The development and tissue architecture of stratified squamous and prostate epithelia are very different, yet the basal cells of both express p63, α6β4 integrin, and Lam332. Keratinocytes and prostate epithelial cells grow well in nutritionally-optimized culture media with pituitary extract and certain mitogens. We report that prostate epithelial cells display hypermotility responses indistinguishable from those of keratinocytes. Several culture medium variables attenuated TGFβ-induced hypermotility, including Ca++, serum, and some pituitary extract preparations, without impairing growth, TGFβ growth-inhibition, or hypermotility on Lam322′. Distinct from its role as a mitogen, EGF proved to be a required cofactor for TGFβ-induced hypermotility and could not be replaced by HGF or KGF. Prostate epithelial cells have a short replicative lifespan, restricted both by p16INK4A and telomere-related mechanisms. We immortalized the normal prostate epithelial cell line HPrE-1 by transduction to express bmi1 and TERT. Prostate epithelial cells lose expression of p63, β4 integrin, and Lam332 when they transform to invasive carcinoma. In contrast, HPrE-1/bmi1/TERT cells retained expression of these proteins and normal TGFβ signaling and hypermotility for >100 doublings. Thus, keratinocytes and prostate epithelial cells possess common hypermotility and senescence mechanisms and immortalized prostate cell lines can be engineered using defined methods to yield cells retaining normal properties. PMID:21042878

  1. Induction of steroid sulfatase expression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells by insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chul-Hoon; Im, Hee-Jung; Park, Nahee; Kwon, Yeojung; Shin, Sangyun; Ye, Dong-Jin; Cho, Nam-Hyeon; Park, Young-Shin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin

    2013-11-25

    Human steroid sulfatase (STS) plays an important role in regulating the formation of biologically active estrogens and may be a promising target for treating estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanism of STS gene expression, however, is still not clear. Growth factors are known to increase STS activity but the changes in STS expression have not been completely understood. To determine whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II can induce STS gene expression, the effects of IGF-II on STS expression were studied in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that IGF-II treatment significantly increased the expression of STS mRNA and protein in concentration- and time-dependent manners. To understand the signaling pathway by which IGF-II induces STS gene expression, the effects of specific PI3-kinase/Akt and NF-κB inhibitors were determined. When the cells were treated with IGF-II and PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors, such as LY294002, wortmannin, or Akt inhibitor IV, STS expression induced by IGF-II was significantly blocked. Moreover, we found that NF-κB inhibitors, such as MG-132, bortezomib, Bay 11-7082 or Nemo binding domain (NBD) binding peptide, also strongly prevented IGF-II from inducing STS gene expression. We assessed whether IGF-II activates STS promoter activity using transient transfection with a luciferase reporter. IGF-II significantly stimulated STS reporter activity. Furthermore, IGF-II induced expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) 1 and 3, whereas it reduced estrone sulfotransferase (EST) gene expression, causing enhanced estrone and β-estradiol production. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that IGF-II induces STS expression via a PI3-kinase/Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway in PC-3 cells and may induce estrogen production and estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:24055520

  2. Induction of steroid sulfatase expression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells by insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chul-Hoon; Im, Hee-Jung; Park, Nahee; Kwon, Yeojung; Shin, Sangyun; Ye, Dong-Jin; Cho, Nam-Hyeon; Park, Young-Shin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin

    2013-11-25

    Human steroid sulfatase (STS) plays an important role in regulating the formation of biologically active estrogens and may be a promising target for treating estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanism of STS gene expression, however, is still not clear. Growth factors are known to increase STS activity but the changes in STS expression have not been completely understood. To determine whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II can induce STS gene expression, the effects of IGF-II on STS expression were studied in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that IGF-II treatment significantly increased the expression of STS mRNA and protein in concentration- and time-dependent manners. To understand the signaling pathway by which IGF-II induces STS gene expression, the effects of specific PI3-kinase/Akt and NF-κB inhibitors were determined. When the cells were treated with IGF-II and PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors, such as LY294002, wortmannin, or Akt inhibitor IV, STS expression induced by IGF-II was significantly blocked. Moreover, we found that NF-κB inhibitors, such as MG-132, bortezomib, Bay 11-7082 or Nemo binding domain (NBD) binding peptide, also strongly prevented IGF-II from inducing STS gene expression. We assessed whether IGF-II activates STS promoter activity using transient transfection with a luciferase reporter. IGF-II significantly stimulated STS reporter activity. Furthermore, IGF-II induced expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) 1 and 3, whereas it reduced estrone sulfotransferase (EST) gene expression, causing enhanced estrone and β-estradiol production. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that IGF-II induces STS expression via a PI3-kinase/Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway in PC-3 cells and may induce estrogen production and estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  4. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  5. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  6. Combination of Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol Enhances Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP and PC-3 Cells Xenograft Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feiya; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) are promising anti-cancer substances. Our previous in vitro study showed that quercetin synergized with 2-Methoxyestradiol exhibiting increased antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines. In the present study, we determined whether their combination could inhibit LNCaP and PC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo and explored the underlying mechanism. Human prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in male BALB/c nude mice. When xenograft tumors reached about 100 mm3, mice were randomly allocated to vehicle control, quercetin or 2-Methoxyestradiol singly treated and combination treatment groups. After therapeutic intervention for 4 weeks, combination treatment of quercetin and 2-ME i) significantly inhibited prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% for LNCaP and 51.3% for PC-3 as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than quercetin (28.4% for LNCaP, 24.8% for PC3) or 2-ME (32.1% for LNCaP, 28.9% for PC3) alone; ii) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; iii) led to higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and apoptosis rate; and iv) resulted in lower phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) protein level, vascular endothelial growth factor protein and mRNA expression, microvascular density and proliferation rate than single drug treatment. These effects were more remarkable compared to vehicle group. Therefore, combination of quercetin and 2-ME can serve as a novel clinical treatment regimen owning the potential of enhancing antitumor effect on prostate cancer in vivo and lessening the dose and side effects of either quercetin or 2-ME alone. These in vivo results will lay a further solid basis for subsequent researches on this novel therapeutic regimen in human prostate cancer. PMID:26011145

  7. The effects of SB 216469, an antagonist which discriminates between the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor and the human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chess-Williams, R.; Chapple, C. R.; Verfurth, F.; Noble, A. J.; Couldwell, C. J.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The affinity of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist SB 216469 (also known as REC 15/2739) has been determined at native and cloned alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes by radioligand binding and at functional alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in isolated tissues. 2. In radioligand binding studies with [3H]-prazosin, SB 216469 had a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat cerebral cortex and kidney (9.5-9.8) but a lower affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen and liver (7.7-8.2). 3. At cloned rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes transiently expressed in COS-1 cells and also at cloned human alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes stably transfected in Rat-1 cells, SB 216469 exhibited a high affinity at the alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (9.6-10.4) with a significantly lower affinity at the alpha 1b-adrenoceptor (8.0-8.4) and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1d-adrenoceptor (8.7-9.2). 4. At functional alpha 1-adrenoceptors, SB 216469 had a similar pharmacological profile, with a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat vas deferens and anococcygeus muscle (pA2 = 9.5-10.0), a low affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen (6.7) and guinea-pig aorta (8.0), and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1D-adrenoceptors of the rat aorta (8.8). 5. Several recent studies have concluded that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor present in the human prostate has the pharmacological characteristics of the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype. However, the affinity of SB 216469 at human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pA2 = 8.1) determined in isolated tissue strips, was significantly lower than the values obtained at either the cloned alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (human, rat, bovine) or the native alpha 1A-adrenoceptors in radioligand binding and functional studies in the rat. 6. Our results with SB 216469, therefore, suggest that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractile responses of the human prostate has properties which distinguish it from the cloned alpha 1a

  8. Occurrence of urolithins, gut microbiota ellagic acid metabolites and proliferation markers expression response in the human prostate gland upon consumption of walnuts and pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, María T; Gómez-Sánchez, María B; García-Talavera, Noelia V; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Sánchez-Alvarez, Carmen; Fontana-Compiano, Luis O; Morga-Egea, Juan P; Pastor-Quirante, Francisco A; Martínez-Díaz, Francisco; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiology supports the important role of nutrition in prostate cancer (PCa) prevention. Pomegranate juice (PJ) exerts protective effects against PCa, mainly attributed to PJ ellagitannins (ETs). Our aim was to assess whether ETs or their metabolites ellagic acid and urolithins reach the human prostate upon consumption of ET-rich foods and to evaluate the effect on the expression of three proliferation biomarkers. Sixty-three patients with BPH or PCa were divided into controls and consumers of walnuts (35 g walnuts/day) or pomegranate (200 mL PJ/day) for 3 days before surgery. Independently of the ETs source, the main metabolite detected was urolithin A glucuronide, (3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide) (up to 2 ng/g) together with the traces of urolithin B glucuronide, (3-hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide) and dimethyl ellagic acid. The small number of prostates containing metabolites was likely caused by clearance of the compounds during the fasting. This was corroborated in a parallel rat study and thus the presence of higher quantities of metabolites at earlier time points cannot be discarded. No apparent changes in the expression of CDKN1A, MKi-67 or c-Myc were found after consumption of the walnuts or PJ. Our results suggest that urolithin glucuronides and dimethyl ellagic acid may be the molecules responsible for the beneficial effects of PJ against PCa.

  9. Antiproliferative effect of a polysaccharide fraction of a 20% methanolic extract of stinging nettle roots upon epithelial cells of the human prostate (LNCaP).

    PubMed

    Lichius, J J; Lenz, C; Lindemann, P; Müller, H H; Aumüller, G; Konrad, L

    1999-10-01

    In Germany, plant extracts are often used in the treatment of early stages of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). The effects of different concentrations of the polysaccharide fraction of the 20% methanolic extract of stinging nettle roots (POLY-M) on the cellular proliferation of lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells were determined by measurement of the genomic DNA content of the samples. All concentrations of POLY-M showed an inhibitory effect on the growth of the LNCaP cells during 7 days except the two lowest concentrations. The reduced proliferation of POLY-M treated LNCaP cells was significantly (p < 0.05) different from the untreated control. The inhibition was time- and concentration-dependent with the maximum suppression (50%) on day 6 and at concentrations of 1.0E-9 and 1.0E-11 mg/ml. No cytotoxic effect of POLY-M on cell proliferation was observed. The in vitro results show for the first time an antiproliferative effect of Urtica compounds on human prostatic epithelium and confirm our previous in vivo findings. PMID:10563375

  10. Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic and Estrogen on Epigenetic Regulatory Genes Expression and Epigenetic Code in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Treas, Justin N.; Tyagi, Tulika; Singh, Kamaleshwar P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exposures to arsenic and estrogen are known risk factors for prostate cancer. Though the evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic or estrogens can disrupt normal DNA methylation patterns and histone modifications, the mechanisms by which these chemicals induce epigenetic changes are not fully understood. Moreover, the epigenetic effects of co-exposure to these two chemicals are not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to arsenic and estrogen, both alone and in combination, on the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, their consequences on DNA methylation, and histone modifications. Human prostate epithelial cells, RWPE-1, chronically exposed to arsenic and estrogen alone and in combination were used for analysis of epigenetic regulatory genes expression, global DNA methylation changes, and histone modifications at protein level. The result of this study revealed that exposure to arsenic, estrogen, and their combination alters the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and changes global DNA methylation and histone modification patterns in RWPE-1 cells. These changes were significantly greater in arsenic and estrogen combination treated group than individually treated group. The findings of this study will help explain the epigenetic mechanism of arsenic- and/or estrogen-induced prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22952798

  11. p66Shc--a longevity redox protein in human prostate cancer progression and metastasis : p66Shc in cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Thomes, Paul; Zhang, Li; Veeramani, Suresh; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2010-03-01

    p66Shc, a 66 kDa proto-oncogene Src homologous-collagen homologue (Shc) adaptor protein, is classically known in mediating receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and recently identified as a sensor to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and as a longevity protein in mammals. The expression of p66Shc is decreased in mice and increased in human fibroblasts upon aging and in aging-related diseases, including prostate cancer. p66Shc protein level correlates with the proliferation of several carcinoma cells and can be regulated by steroid hormones. Recent advances point that p66Shc protein plays a role in mediating cross-talk between steroid hormones and redox signals by serving as a common convergence point in signaling pathways on cell proliferation and apoptosis. This article first reviews the unique function of p66Shc protein in regulating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Subsequently, we discuss its novel role in androgen-regulated prostate cancer cell proliferation and metastasis and the mechanism by which it mediates androgen action via the redox signaling pathway. The data together indicate that p66Shc might be a useful biomarker for the prognosis of prostate cancer and serve as an effective target for its cancer treatment. PMID:20111892

  12. Androgen- and Estrogen-Receptor Content in Spontaneous and Experimentally Induced Canine Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, John; Hicks, L. Louise; Walsh, Patrick C.

    1980-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which steroidal hormones influence the development of canine prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear and cytosolic androgen- and estrogen-receptor content, as measured under exchange conditions by the binding of [3H]R1881 (methyltrienolone) and [3H]estradiol, respectively, were quantitated in the prostates of purebred beagles of known age. In young dogs with spontaneously arising and experimentally induced (androstanediol plus estradiol treatment) prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear, but not cytosolic, prostatic androgen-receptor content was significantly greater than that determined in the normal prostates of age-matched dogs (3,452±222 and 4,035±274 fmol/mg DNA vs. 2,096±364 fmol/mg DNA, respectively). No differences were observed between the androgen-receptor content of the normal prostates of young dogs and the hyperplastic prostates of old dogs. The cytosolic and nuclear estrogen-receptor content of spontaneously arising prostatic hyperplasia in both young and old animals was similar to that found in normal prostates. The administration of estradiol plus androstanediol to castrate dogs significantly increased the prostatic nuclear androgen-receptor content over that found in dogs treated only with androstanediol. This estradiol-associated increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content was accompanied by the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Estradiol treatment of castrate dogs resulted in an increase in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, in the appearance of a putative prostatic cytosolic progesterone receptor, and in an alteration of the epithelium of the prostate to one characterized by squamous metaplasia. Treatment of castrate dogs with both estradiol and androstanediol resulted in a reduction in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, disappearance of the progesterone receptor, and loss of squamous metaplasia. An increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content, thus, appears to be an important event in the

  13. New concepts in tissue specificity for prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    De Marzo, A M; Coffey, D S; Nelson, W G

    1999-03-01

    Of the hundreds of species of mammals, all of which have prostate glands, only humans and dogs are known to suffer from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. In humans, prostate carcinoma is common, yet carcinomas of other sex accessory tissues are rare. In addition, different anatomic regions within the prostate gland have very different rates of BPH and carcinoma. In this article, we explore ideas and potential mechanisms relating to these paradoxical findings that may help explain the species, organ, and zone specificity of BPH and prostate cancer. We present an evolutionary argument that attempts to relate a high-fat diet, with its potential for generating oxidative DNA damage, to the species selectivity of prostate cancer. In addition, we outline an argument based on our preliminary studies indicating that chronic inflammation and the associated increase in cell turnover in the setting of increased oxidative stress may help to account for the organ selectivity of genitourinary carcinomas.

  14. In vitro anti-oxidant, cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects of Achillea teretifolia Willd extracts on human prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Elif Burcu; Açık, Leyla; Elçi, Pınar; Sarper, Meral; Avcu, Ferit; Vural, Mecit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The majority of Achillea species are the most important native economic plants of Anatolia. They include highly bioactive compounds, so they have therapeutic applications. Objective: In the present study, the aim was to investigate in vitro anti-oxidant, cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects of Achillea teretifolia Willd extracts (Turkish name: Beyaz civanperÇemi). Materials and Methods: The anti-oxidant potential of the extracts was analyzed by the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and total phenolic content methods. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to detect cytotoxicity of the extracts onhuman prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC-3) and human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. mRNA expression levels of pro-apoptotic (bax, caspase-3) and anti-apoptotic (bcl-2) genes were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: The results showed that extracts exhibited a remarkable DPPH scavenging activity, and total phenolic content of the methanol extract was higher than that of the water extract. As time and concentration were increased, the methanol extract exhibited a more powerful cytotoxic effect on prostate cancer cells. In prostate cancer cells, the levels of mRNA expression of the bax and caspase-3 genes were significantly up-regulated (P < 0.05), whereas the expression of bcl-2 was down-regulated (P < 0.05). In HGF cells, there were no cytotoxic effect and apoptosis induction triggered by the extracts. Conclusion: The methanol extract had more powerful anti-oxidant, cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects than the water extract. The extracts could be good anti-oxidant sources, and they might include anti-cancer compounds triggering the cytotoxicity and the apoptosis on prostate cancer cells. PMID:26664020

  15. STAT3 is required but not sufficient for EGF receptor-mediated migration and invasion of human prostate carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Grandis, J R; Wells, A

    2006-01-01

    Growth factor-induced migration is a rate-limiting step in tumour invasiveness. The molecules that regulate this cellular behaviour would represent novel targets for limiting tumour cell progression. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-mediated motility, present in both autocrine and paracrine modes in prostate carcinomas, requires de novo transcription to persist over times greater than a few hours. Therefore, we sought to define specific signalling pathways that directly alter cellular transcription. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is activated, as determined by electrophoretic motility shift assays, by EGFR in DU145 and PC3 human prostate carcinoma cells in addition to the motility model NR6 fibroblast cell line. Inhibition of STAT3 activity by antisense or siRNA downregulation or expression of a dominant-negative construct limited cell motility as determined by an in vitro wound healing assay and invasiveness through a extracellular matrix barrier. The expression of constitutively activated STAT3 did not increase the migration, which indicates that STAT3 is necessary but not sufficient for EGFR-mediated migration. These findings suggest that STAT3 signalling may be a new target for limiting prostate tumour cell invasion. In a microarray gene analysis of what transcription units are altered by EGF in a STAT3-dependent manner we found that the expression of motility-limiting VASP protein and the apoptosis nexus caspase 3 were both downregulated upon EGF exposure. These findings suggest a molecular basis for the STAT3 dependence of EGFR-mediated prostate tumour progression. PMID:16804520

  16. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  17. Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two groundbreaking trials have this year reported conflicting results as to the benefit of screening for prostate cancer. Careful interpretation in the light of contemporary data might, however, reveal the true value of this intervention. PMID:19498406

  18. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Possible side effects include decreased sex drive and impotence . Antibiotics may be prescribed to treat chronic prostatitis ( ... less-invasive procedures carry a lower risk for impotence and incontinence than TURP, although the risk with ...

  19. Prostatitis - bacterial

    MedlinePlus

    ... emptying the bladder Foul-smelling urine Weak urine stream Other symptoms that may occur with this condition: ... the risk of spreading bacteria into the blood stream. The exam may reveal that the prostate is: ...

  20. Comparative in vitro and in vivo evaluation of two 64Cu-labeled bombesin analogs in a mouse model of human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Xianzhong; Xiong, Zhengming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2006-04-01

    Bombesin (BBN), an analog of human gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), binds to the GRP receptor (GRPR) with high affinity and specificity. Overexpression of GRPR has been discovered in mostly androgen-independent human prostate tissues and, thus, provides a potential target for prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 64Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-[Lys3]BBN to detect GRPR-positive prostate cancer. In this study, we compared the receptor affinity, metabolic stability, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of a truncated BBN analog 64Cu-DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14) with 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN. Binding of each DOTA conjugate to GRPR on PC-3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells was evaluated with competitive binding assay using 125I-[Tyr4]BBN as radioligand. In vivo pharmacokinetics was determined on male nude mice subcutaneously implanted with PC-3 cells. Dynamic microPET imaging was performed to evaluate the systemic distribution of the tracers. Metabolic stability of the tracers in blood, urine, tumor, liver and kidney was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that 125I-[Tyr4]BBN has a K(d) of 14.8+/-0.4 nM against PC-3 cells, and the receptor concentration on PC-3 cell surface is approximately 2.7+/-0.1 x 10(6) receptors per cell. The 50% inhibitory concentration value for DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14) is 18.4 +/- 0.2 nM, and that for DOTA-[Lys3]BBN is 2.2 +/- 0.5 nM. DOTA-[Lys3]BBN shows a better tumor contrast and absolute tumor activity accumulation compared to DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14). Studies on metabolic stability for both tracers on organ homogenates showed that 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN is relatively stable. This study demonstrated that both tracers are suitable for targeted PET imaging to detect the expression of GRPR in prostate cancer, while 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN may have a better potential for clinical translation.

  1. Discovery of Novel N-alkyl 4-anilinofuro[2,3-b]quinoline Derivatives (CIL-102 Derivatives) Against Castration-resistant Human Prostate Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lo, We-Fen; Chou, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chih-Hua; Shiu, Yia-Huei; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Chen, Yeh-Long; Lin, Ming-Fong; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A number of N-alkylated 4-anilinofuro[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives were synthesized and evaluated in vitro against PC-3, A549, and MCF-7 cancer cells and M-10 normal human mammary epithelial cells. The known antimitotic CIL-102 was moderately active against the growth of PC-3 prostate cancer cells with an IC50 value of 2.69 μM while it was more potent against the growth of A549, MCF-7 and M-10 cells with IC50 values of 0.61, 0.31 and 0.95 μM, respectively. However, the cytotoxic profiles of its N-alkylated derivatives, 6a - 6c, were reversed and strongly inhibited PC-3 cell growth with IC50 values of less than 1.0 μM but only weakly against the growth of A549, MCF-7 and M-10 cells. These results indicated that N-alkylation of CIL-102 increased not only selectivity but also the antiproliferative potency against PC-3 cell growth. Among these derivatives synthesized, N-(4-acetylphenyl)-N-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin- 4-yl)methylamine (6a) and its N-ethyl counterpart 6b are the two most active CIL-102 derivatives against PC-3 cell growth with IC50 value of 0.22 and 0.20 μM, respectively. Compound 6a is less cytotoxic to normal human M-10 cells than 6b and therefore was selected for further mechanism studies. The flow cytometry studies clearly indicated that compound 6a induced cell accumulation in G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h-treatment. While the proliferation of LNCaP C-81 prostate cancer cells was also strongly suppressed by compound 6a; compound 11a exhibited better selective activity toward LNCaP C-81 prostate cancer cells over RWPE-1 non-cancerous prostate epithelia. Thus, this group of compounds has a potential of serving as therapeutic agents toward advanced castration-resistant prostate cancers.

  2. Antitumor effects of 32P-chromic-poly (L-lactide) brachytherapy in nude mice with human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIUJING; ZHU, XISHAN; XU, LONGBAO; WANG, ZIZHENG; SHAO, GUOQIANG; ZHAO, JUN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and tissue distribution of 32P-chromic-poly (L-lactide) (32P-CP-PLLA) in nude mice with human prostate cancer. Tumor models were obtained by transplantation of PC-3M tumor cells into male BALB/c nude mice. Animals were randomly divided into control, 32P-chromic phosphate (32P-CP) colloid and 32P-CP-PLLA groups (all n=20). A series of indices were investigated, including apoptosis of tumor cells, rate of apoptosis, expression of caspase 3 and 8, biodistribution and intratumoral concentration of 32P-CP-PLLA, intensity of radioactivity, tumor volume and microvessel density (MVD). Highly concentrated radioactivity of 32P-CP-PLLA in the tumor mass was detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning. The residual activities of the 32P-CP-PLLA and 32P-CP colloid groups were 3.02±0.32 and 1.76±0.31 MBq, respectively, on day 14 following treatment. The tumor inhibition rates were 67.24±3.55 and 55.92±7.65%, respectively (P<0.01). Necrotic changes, in conjunction with apoptosis, were observed in the treatment group. MVD values for the 32P-CP-PLLA and 32P-CP colloid groups were 28.24±10.07 and 36.15±11.06, respectively. 32P-CP-PLLA showed an excellent capacity for killing tumor cells, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:24137391

  3. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  4. Molecular Imaging, Pharmacokinetics, and Dosimetry of 111In-AMBA in Human Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Li; Liu, I-Hsiang; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lee, Wan-Chi; Chuang, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Te-Wei; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Shen, Lie-Hang; Chang, Chih-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging with promise of personalized medicine can provide patient-specific information noninvasively, thus enabling treatment to be tailored to the specific biological attributes of both the disease and the patient. This study was to investigate the characterization of DO3A-CH2CO-G-4-aminobenzoyl-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-NH2 (AMBA) in vitro, MicroSPECT/CT imaging, and biological activities of 111In-AMBA in PC-3 prostate tumor-bearing SCID mice. The uptake of 111In-AMBA reached highest with 3.87 ± 0.65% ID/g at 8 h. MicroSPECT/CT imaging studies suggested that the uptake of 111In-AMBA was clearly visualized between 8 and 48 h postinjection. The distribution half-life (t1/2α) and the elimination half-life (t1/2β) of 111In-AMBA in mice were 1.53 h and 30.7 h, respectively. The Cmax and AUC of 111In-AMBA were 7.57% ID/g and 66.39 h∗% ID/g, respectively. The effective dose appeared to be 0.11 mSv/MBq−1. We demonstrated a good uptake of 111In-AMBA in the GRPR-overexpressed PC-3 tumor-bearing SCID mice. 111In-AMBA is a safe, potential molecular image-guided diagnostic agent for human GRPR-positive tumors, ranging from simple and straightforward biodistribution studies to improve the efficacy of combined modality anticancer therapy. PMID:21660132

  5. Evaluation of the PDT effect of Foscan and Fospeg in the LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A.; Kyriazi, M.; Alexandratou, E.; Rallis, M.; Gräfe, S.; Yova, D.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the cytotoxic effect of m-THPC, Foscan®, as well as of the liposomal formulation of m-THPC, Fospeg®,(kind offer of Biolitec) were studied post PDT in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The cells were incubated for 24h with 0.15 μg/ml and 1.2 μg/ml Foscan® and Fospeg®. Irradiation was performed with a 652nm laser and energy doses 180, 360 and 540mJ/cm2. The effect was assessed by the MTT viability test 24h after irradiation. Also the intracellular localization of Foscan® and Fospeg® was monitored by using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy Imaging. The results showed no dark toxicity either with Foscan® or Fospeg® at any concentration. Also irradiation at each energy dose in the absence of any photosensitizer, did not affect cellular viability. The cellular death caused after Photodynamic Treatment was dependent on m-THPC concentration and formulation, as well as the delivered energy dose. Fospeg® was more effective as LD50 was achieved with 0.15μg/ml at 180mJ/cm2 while for the same cytotoxic result 1.2μg/ml Foscan® was needed. Images from confocal microscopy revealed higher fluorescence intensity in the cytoplasm after incubation with Fospeg®, than upon incubation with Foscan® under the same experimental conditions.

  6. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  7. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  8. Incising the thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue with a hooked sclerotome in persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, K; Moriwaki, M; Kohno, T; Yanagihara, N; Miki, T

    1999-01-01

    A technique for incising thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue and extensive cyclitic membrane is reported in a case of anterior persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. A membranectomy was performed in a 1-month-old post-lensectomy baby via a limbal approach. A sclerotome tip was hooked to cut through an extremely thick fibrovascular tissue by rotating the sclerotome by its grip. Sutherland microscissors (Grieshaber, Switzerland) and a vitrectomy cutter were used for further membranectomy. The baby was followed-up until age 18 months. A total of 3 membranectomy sessions were required because of rapid cyclitic membrane formation, severe centripetal retraction of the membrane on the ciliary processes, and posterior synechia. Thorough membranectomy and cutting the iris edge maintained a clear pupillary area during the 13-month postoperative period. Extremely thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue is a challenging condition that can be dealt with by delicate instrumentation. PMID:10574499

  9. Differential Expression of Cell Cycle Regulators During Hyperplastic and Hypertrophic Growth of Broiler Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Suh, Y; Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Davis, M E; Lee, K

    2015-10-01

    Hyperplastic growth and hypertrophic growth within adipose tissue is tightly associated with cell cycle activity. In this study, CCNG2 and CDKN2C were found to be correlated with cell cycle inhibition during fat cell differentiation, whereas CCND3, CCNA1, and ANAPC5 were positively associated with cell cycle activity during fat cell proliferation after selection based on GEO datasets available on the NCBI website. The findings were validated through comparison of expressions of these genes among different tissues/fractions in broiler chickens and time points during primary cell culture using quantitative real-time PCR. Development of broiler subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated on embryonic days 15 and 17 and on post-hatch days 0, 5, 11, and 33 using H&E staining and PCNA immunostaining with DAPI counter stain. In addition, mRNA expressions of five cell cycle regulators as well as precursor cell and adipocyte markers were measured at those time points. The results suggest that cellular proliferation activity decreased as the fat pad grows, but a population of precursor cells seemed to be maintained until post-hatch day 5 despite increasing differentiation activity. Hypertrophic growth gradually intensified despite a slight cessation on post-hatch day 0 due to increased energy expenditure during hatching and delayed food access. From post-hatch day 5 to day 11, most of the precursor cells may become differentiated. After post-hatch day 11, hyperplastic growth seemed to slow, while hypertrophic growth may become dominant. This study provides further understanding about broiler fat tissue development which is imperative for effective control of fat deposition.

  10. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:12773039

  11. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads.

  12. Tubeimoside-1 induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest in human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-bo; Khan, Muhammad; He, Yang-yang; Yao, Min; Li, Yong-ming; Gao, Hong-wen; Ma, Tong-hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1), a triterpenoid saponin extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Bolbostemma paniculatum (Maxim) Franquet (Cucurbitaceae), has shown anticancer activities in various cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticancer activity and molecular targets of TBMS1 in human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Methods: DU145 and P3 human prostate cancer cells were treated with TBMS1. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected. ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle profile were examined. Western blotting was used to measure the expression of relevant proteins in the cells. Results: TBMS1 (5–100 μmol/L) significantly suppressed the viability of DU145 and P3 cells with IC50 values of approximately 10 and 20 μmol/L, respectively. Furthermore, TBMS1 dose-dependently induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in DU145 and P3 cells. In DU145 cells, TBMS1 induced mitochondrial apoptosis, evidenced by ROS generation, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, modulated Bcl-2 family protein and cleaved caspase-3, and activated ASK-1 and its downstream targets p38 and JNK. The G0/G1 phase arrest was linked to increased expression of p53 and p21 and decreased expression of cyclin E and cdk2. Co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK (pan-caspase inhibitor) could attenuate TBMS1-induced apoptosis but did not prevent G0/G1 arrest. Moreover, co-treatment with NAC (ROS scavenger), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) or salubrinal (ER stress inhibitor) significantly attenuated TBMS1-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: TBMS1 induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro via the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:27292614

  13. Isolation of three new annonaceous acetogenins from Graviola fruit (Annona muricata) and their anti-proliferation on human prostate cancer cell PC-3.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi; Liu, Jingchun; Zhou, Ninghui; Zhu, Wenjun; Dou, Q Ping; Zhou, Kequan

    2016-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the fruit powder of Graviola (Annona muricata) was continued to be conducted and yielded three more novel bioactive compounds: C-35 annonaceous acetogenins, muricins M and N, and C-37 annonaceous acetogenins, muricenin. They all contain a mono-tetrahydrofuran ring and four hydroxyl groups. The structures were elucidated by spectral methods and chemical modification after isolation via open column chromatographic separation and HPLC purification. Especially, murices M and N demonstrated more potent anti-proliferative activities against human prostate cancer PC-3 cells.

  14. Increasing discordant antioxidant protein levels and enzymatic activities contribute to increasing redox imbalance observed during human prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Chaiswing, Luksana; Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D.

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomics study demonstrated a decrease in glutathione and an increase in cysteine (Cys) levels in human prostate cancer (PCa) tissues as Gleason scores increased, indicating redox imbalance with PCa progression. These results were extended in the present study by analyzing redox state of the protein thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and sulfinylation (SO3) of peroxiredoxins (Prxs) (PrxsSO3) in PCa tissues and cell lines. Lysates of paired human PCa tissues with varying degree of aggressiveness and adjacent benign (BN) tissues were used for analysis. Redox western blot analysis of Trx1 demonstrated low levels of reduced and high levels of oxidized Trx1 (functional and non-functional, respectively) in high grade PCa (Gleason scores 4+4 to 4+5) in comparison to intermediate grade PCa (Gleason scores 3+3 to 3+4) or BN tissues. PrxsSO3 were increased in high grade PCa. Oxidized Trx1 and PrxsSO3 are indicators of oxidative stress. To study whether redox imbalance may potentially affect enzyme activities of antioxidant proteins (AP), we determined levels of selected AP in PCa tissues by western blot analysis and found that mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Prx 3, and Trx1 were increased in high grade PCa tissues when compared with BN tissues. Enzyme activities of MnSOD in high grade PCa tissues were significantly increased but at a lower magnitude when compared with the levels of MnSOD protein (0.5 folds vs. 2 folds increase). Trx1 activity was not changed in high grade PCa tissues despite a large increase in Trx1 protein expression. Further studies demonstrated a significant increase in posttranslational modifications of tyrosine and lysine residues in MnSOD protein and oxidation of Cys at active site (Cys 32 and Cys 35) and regulatory site (Cys 62 and Cys 69) of Trx1 in high grade PCa compared to BN tissues. These discordant changes between protein levels and enzyme activities are consistent with protein inactivation by redox imbalance and

  15. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Q.; Jirasek, A.; Lum, J. J.; Brolo, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the regulated

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Other FFA4 Agonists Inhibit Growth Factor Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B.; Fix, Louise C.; Galvan, Brianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4′-methyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor–induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891–induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor–induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25491146

  17. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level. PMID:18477205

  18. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level.

  19. Difference in Protein Expression Profile and Chemotherapy Drugs Response of Different Progression Stages of LNCaP Sublines and Other Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Lin, Ching-Yu; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Wang, Horng-Dar; Sheng Jiang, Shih; Hsu, Jong-Ming; Jim, Wai-Tim; Chen, Marcelo; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2013-01-01

    Androgen ablation therapy is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. However, 80-90% of the patients who receive androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent tumors in 12-33 months after treatment with a median overall survival time of 1-2 years after relapse. LNCaP is a commonly used cell line established from a human lymph node metastatic lesion of prostatic adenocarcinoma. We previously established two relapsed androgen receptor (AR)-rich androgen-independent LNCaP sublines 104-R1 (androgen depleted for 12 months) and 104-R2 cells (androgen depleted for 24 months) from AR-positive androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells. LNCaP 104-R1 and 104-R2 mimics the AR-positive hormone-refractory relapsed tumors in patients receiving androgen ablation therapy. Androgen treatment stimulates proliferation of 104-S cells, but causes growth inhibition and G1 cell cycle arrest in 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells. We investigated the protein expression profile difference between LNCaP 104-S vs. LNCaP 104-R1, 104-R2, PC-3, and DU-145 cells as well as examined the sensitivity of these prostate cancer cells to different chemotherapy drugs and small molecule inhibitors. Compared to 104-S cells, 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells express higher protein levels of AR, PSA, c-Myc, Skp2, BCL-2, P53, p-MDM2 S166, Rb, and p-Rb S807/811. The 104-R1 and 104-R2 cells express higher ratio of p-Akt S473/Akt, p-EGFR/EGFR, and p-Src/Src, but lower ratio of p-ERK/ERK than 104-S cells. PC-3 and DU-145 cells express higher c-Myc, Skp2, Akt, Akt1, and phospho-EGFR but less phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK. Overexpression of Skp2 increased resistance of LNCaP cells to chemotherapy drugs. Paclitaxel, androgen, and inhibitors for PI3K/Akt, EGFR, Src, or Bcl-2 seem to be potential choices for treatment of advanced prostate cancers. Our study provides rationale for targeting Akt, EGFR, Src, Bcl-2, and AR signaling as a treatment for AR-positive relapsed prostate tumors after hormone therapy. PMID:24349321

  20. VIP induces NF-κB1-nuclear localisation through different signalling pathways in human tumour and non-tumour prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Carmena, María J; Bajo, Ana M; Vacas, Eva; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a powerful activator of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Transactivation and nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an index of recurrence in prostate cancer. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exerts similar effects in prostate cancer models involving increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which are related to NF-κB transactivation. Here we studied differential mechanisms of VIP-induced NF-κB transactivation in non-tumour RWPE-1 and tumour LNCaP and PC3 human prostate epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence studies showed that VIP increases translocation of the p50 subunit of NF-κB1 to the nucleus, an effect that was inhibited by curcumin. The signalling transduction pathways involved are different depending on cell transformation degree. In control cells (RWPE1), the effect is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA) activation and does not implicate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathways whereas the opposite is true in tumour LNCaP and PC3 cells. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) pathway is involved in transformed cells but not in control cells. Curcumin blocks the activating effect of VIP on COX-2 promoter/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and VEGF expression and secretion. The study incorporates direct observation on COX-2 promoter and suggests that VIP effect on VEGF may be indirectly mediated by PGE2 after being synthesised by COX-2, thus amplifying the initial signal. We show that the signalling involved in VIP effects on VEGF is cAMP/PKA in non-tumour cells and cAMP/EPAC/ERK/PI3K in tumour cells which coincides with pathways mediating p50 nuclear translocation. Thus, VIP appears to use different pathways for NF-κB1 (p50) transactivation in prostate epithelial cells depending on whether they are transformed or not. Transformed cells depend on pro-survival and pro-proliferative signalling pathways

  1. Potent increased risk of the initiation of DNA replication in human prostate cancer with the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takeo; Yasumizu, Yota; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Miyajima, Akira; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have raised the clinically important question of the relationship between dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and prostate cancer (PCa) progression. The significance of DHT or 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARI) in PCa development and progression has not yet been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to determine whether the initiation of DNA replication was influenced by DHT in PCa. Three cell lines were used. LNCaP: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-dependent proliferation, C4-2: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-independent proliferation, and C4-2AT6: a castration resistant prostate cancer cell line. Two 5ARIs, finasteride and dutasteride, were used. We examined the mRNA expression of the components of pre-replication complex (Pre-RC), CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. DHT induced cell proliferation of LNCaP accompanied by significantly increased CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7 expression. In contrast to LNCaP, DHT inhibited cell proliferation in C4-2AT6 cells accompanied by decreased expression of CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. These reverse effects resemble the effects of 5ARIs in Pre-RC. Treatment with finasteride or dutasteride inhibited CDC6 expression in LNCaP, but both 5ARIs induced CDC6 expression in C4-2 and C4-2AT6 cells.These results indicate that DHT showed reversal effects on PCa cell proliferation among prostate cancer cells based on androgen-dependence, accompanied by regulation of the initiation of DNA replication. 5ARIs may modulate the DNA replication system in someaggressive PCa through up-regulation of CDC6 expression. PMID:25374915

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor increases the invasive potential of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells via an ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    HAN, YILI; LUO, YONG; WANG, YONGXING; CHEN, YATONG; LI, MINGCHUAN; JIANG, YONGGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in numerous types of cancer. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous evidence that HGF has a role in prostate cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of HGF on EMT and invasive potential, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms, in a human prostate cancer cell line. Therefore, PC-3 cells were treated with various concentrations of HGF for varying durations. EMT-associated proteins, including E-cadherin and vimentin, were examined by western blot analysis. The effects of HGF on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity were assessed using MTT, wound-healing, Transwell and soft-agar assays. Subsequently, the role of c-Met in the mediation of EMT-like changes was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and gene knockdown by small interfering RNA. Finally, western blot analysis was used to quantify the expression of a downstream transcription factor and extracellular signal-related kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling pathway proteins. The results indicated that treatment with HGF induced EMT-like changes and enhanced the invasive potential of PC-3 cells. There was an increase in the expression of ERK, phosphorylated-ERK and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox-1 (Zeb-1), suggesting that EMT-like changes may be mediated through the ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, HGF-mediated EMT-like changes were associated with c-Met activation, and these changes were able to be blocked by c-Met knockdown. The present study demonstrated that HGF-induced EMT increased the invasive potential of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells through activating the ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway. PMID:26870279

  3. beta-Sitosterol activates the sphingomyelin cycle and induces apoptosis in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    von Holtz, R L; Fink, C S; Awad, A B

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that men consuming a low-fat, high-fiber diet containing high amounts of plant products have a lower risk of prostate cancer than men consuming a Western diet. One of the main differences between these two diets is the type of dietary fat, including dietary sterols. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of two dietary sterols on prostate cancer cells in vitro. beta-Sitosterol (SIT), the most common plant sterol, and cholesterol, an animal sterol, were compared for effect on LNCaP cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and sphingomyelin cycle intermediates. Cells were treated for up to seven days with sterols delivered by a cyclodextrin vehicle. Compared with cholesterol, SIT (16 microM) decreased growth by 24% and induced apoptosis fourfold, which was accompanied by cell rounding and a 50% increase in ceramide production. No effect was observed on differentiation as measured by prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase, although total acid phosphatase increased with SIT treatment for up to seven days. The results suggest that the decrease in cell number and increase in apoptosis associated with SIT treatment are mediated by activating the sphingomyelin cycle.

  4. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongli; He, Yan; Li, Yu; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun; DiPaola, Robert; Goodin, Susan; Zheng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer. PMID:26630272

  5. Antiproliferative activity of the dietary isothiocyanate erucin, a bioactive compound from cruciferous vegetables, on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Melchini, Antonietta; Traka, Maria H; Catania, Stefania; Miceli, Natalizia; Taviano, Maria Fernanda; Maimone, Patrizia; Francisco, Marta; Mithen, Richard F; Costa, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many dietary agents, such as isothiocyanates (ITCs) from cruciferous vegetables, can retard or prevent the process of prostate carcinogenesis. Erucin (ER) is a dietary ITC, which has been recently considered a promising cancer chemopreventive phytochemical. The potential protective activity of ER against prostate cancer was investigated using prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC3), to analyze its effects on pathways involved in cell growth regulation, such as the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs) inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) (p21), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/AKT, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 signaling pathways. We have shown for the first time that ER increases significantly p21 protein expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner to inhibit PC3 cell proliferation (P ≤ 0.01). Compared to the structurally related sulforaphane, a well-studied broccoli-derived ITC, ER showed lower potency in inhibiting proliferation of PC3 cells, as well as in modulating p21 and pERK1/2 protein levels. Neither of the naturally occurring ITCs was able to affect significantly pAKT protein levels in prostate cells at all concentrations tested (0-25 μM). It is clearly important for the translation of laboratory findings to clinical approaches to investigate in animal and cell studies the molecular mechanisms by which ITCs may exert health promoting effects.

  6. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Xuan; Li, Dongli; He, Yan; Li, Yu; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun; DiPaola, Robert; Goodin, Susan; Zheng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer. PMID:26630272

  7. Lycopene and apo-12'-lycopenal reduce cell proliferation and alter cell cycle progression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nikki A; Elsen, Amy C; Zuniga, Krystle; Lindshield, Brian L; Erdman, John W

    2011-01-01

    Lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. However, lycopene may not be wholly responsible for the effects seen in vivo or in cell culture systems. Apo-lycopenals or other lycopene metabolites, whether produced by cleavage enzymes within the body or consumed with tomato products, can be found in tissues at concentrations equivalent to physiological retinoid concentrations. Therefore, it is plausible that lycopenoids, like retinoids, are bioactive within tissues. Androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer cells were treated with lycopene, apo-8'-lycopenal, or apo-12'-lycopenal. DU145 cell proliferation was significantly reduced by supra-physiological levels of lycopene and apo-12'-lycopenal, in part, through alteration of the normal cell cycle. Levels of the gap junction protein, connexin 43, were unaltered by lycopene or apo-lycopenal treatment while cell apoptosis rates significantly decreased. We further confirmed that connexin 43 protein levels were unaltered by lycopene treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, or in Dunning R3327-H rat prostate tumor. The present data indicate that lycopene and apo-12'-lycopenal reduce the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, in part, by inhibiting normal cell cycle progression. PMID:21207319

  8. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells. PMID:27681649

  9. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells.

  10. New steroidal 17β-carboxy derivatives present anti-5α-reductase activity and anti-proliferative effects in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristina; Varela, Carla; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Tavares da Silva, Elisiário; Carvalho, Rui A; Costa, Saul C P; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Teixeira, Natércia; Roleira, Fernanda M F

    2013-11-01

    The androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), besides playing an important role in prostate development and growth, are also responsible for the development and progression of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Therefore, the actions of these hormones can be antagonized by preventing the irreversible conversion of T into DHT by inhibiting 5α-reductase (5α-R). This has been a useful therapeutic approach for the referred diseases and can be achieved by using 5α-reductase inhibitors (RIs). Steroidal RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, are used in clinic for BPH treatment and were also proposed for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, due to the increase in bone and muscle loss, impotency and occurrence of high-grade prostate tumours, it is important to seek for other potent and specific molecules with lower side effects. In the present work, we designed and synthesized steroids with the 3-keto-Δ(4) moiety in the A-ring, as in the 5α-R substrate T, and with carboxamide, carboxyester or carboxylic acid functions at the C-17β position. The inhibitory 5α-R activity, in human prostate microsomes, as well as the anti-proliferative effects of the most potent compounds, in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP cells), were investigated. Our results showed that steroids 3, 4 and 5 are good RIs, which suggest that C-17β lipophylic amides favour 5α-R inhibition. Moreover, these steroids induce a decrease in cell viability of stimulated LNCaP cells, in a 5α-R dependent-manner, similarly to finasteride. PMID:23933094

  11. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) enhances the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Sontum, Per Christian; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeffrey; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-08-28

    Acoustic cluster therapy (ACT) is a novel approach for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery. In the current study, we have investigated ACT in combination with paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of a subcutaneous human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3) in mice. In combination with paclitaxel (12mg/kg given i.p.), ACT induced a strong increase in therapeutic efficacy; 120days after study start, 42% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the paclitaxel only group and the median survival was increased by 86%. In combination with Abraxane® (12mg paclitaxel/kg given i.v.), ACT induced a strong increase in the therapeutic efficacy; 60days after study start 100% of the animals were in stable, remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group, 120days after study start 67% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. For the ACT+Abraxane group 100% of the animals were alive after 120days vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. Proof of concept for Acoustic Cluster Therapy has been demonstrated; ACT markedly increases the therapeutic efficacy of both paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. PMID:27297780

  12. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell-cell interaction with integrins-based cell-matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells' interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50-200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and cleaved caspase 3), EMT (E-cadherin and β-catenin), and cell survival (survivin and Akt) related signaling molecules in PC3 cells. Furthermore, PC3-xenograft tissue analyses confirmed the inhibitory effect of silibinin on fibronectin and integrins expression. Together, these

  13. Reduced 64Cu Uptake and Tumor Growth Inhibition by Knockdown of Human Copper Transporter 1 in Xenograft Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J.; Peng, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased 64Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using 64CuCl2 as a radiotracer (64CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor 64Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of 64Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic 64CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. Methods A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular 64Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of 64Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. Results RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of 64Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer 64CuCl2, the 64Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the 64Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 % ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P < 0.001) by PET quantification. Moreover, the volumes of prostate cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm3 for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3

  14. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  15. PKCα activation down-regulates ATM and radio-sensitizes androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Lerman, Gabriel; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard; Marquez, Victor E.; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and CWR22-Rv1 with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a known protein kinase C (PKC) activator, decreases ATM protein levels, thus de-repressing the enzyme ceramide synthase (CS) and promoting apoptosis as well as radio-sensitizing these cells.1 Here we show that PKCα mediates the TPA effect on ATM expression, since ATM suppression and apoptosis induced by either TPA or diacylglycerol-lactone (DAG-lactone), both inducing PKCα activation,2 are abrogated in LNCaP cells following transfection of a kinase-dead PKCα mutant (KD-PKCα). Similarly, KD-PKCα blocks the apoptotic response elicited by combination of TPA and radiation, whereas expression of constitutively active PKCα is sufficient to sensitize cells to radiation alone, without a need to pre-treat the cells with TPA. These findings identify CS activation as a downstream event of PKCα activity in LNCaP cells. Similar results were obtained in CWR22-Rv1 cells with DAG-lactone treatment. Using the LNCaP orthotopic prostate model it is shown that treatment with TPA or DAG-lactone induces significant reduction in tumor ATM levels coupled with tumor growth delay. Furthermore, while fractionated radiation alone produces significant tumor growth delay, pretreatment with TPA or DAG-lactone significantly potentiates tumor cure. These findings support a model in which activation of PKCα downregulates ATM, thus relieving CS repression by ATM and enhancing apoptosis via ceramide generation. This model may provide a basis for the design of new therapies in prostate cancer. PMID:19029835

  16. Citrate enhances in vitro metastatic behaviours of PC-3M human prostate cancer cells: status of endogenous citrate and dependence on aconitase and fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Mycielska, Maria E; Broke-Smith, Timothy P; Palmer, Christopher P; Beckerman, Rachel; Nastos, Theodoros; Erguler, Kamil; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2006-01-01

    Prostate is a unique organ that produces and releases large amounts of citrate. This is reduced significantly in cancer and it is possible that citrate is (re)taken up and used as a metabolite to enhance cellular activity. The main purpose of this study was to determine how cytosolic citrate might affect in vitro metastatic cell behaviours (lateral motility, endocytosis and adhesion). Normal (PNT2-C2) and metastatic (PC-3M) human prostate cancer cells were used in a comparative approach. As regards intermediary metabolic enzymes, aconitase and fatty acid synthase, already implicated in prostate cancer, were evaluated. The level of intracellular citrate was significantly higher in PNT2-C2 cells under both control conditions and following preincubation in extracellular citrate. Supply of exogenous citrate enhanced endocytosis, lateral motility, decreased cell adhesion of PC-3M cells but failed to produce any effect on normal cells. Real-time PCR measurements showed that the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and fatty acid synthase were significantly higher in PC-3M cells. Correspondingly, aconitase activity was also higher in PC-3M cells. Using cerulenin (an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase), oxalomalate and fluorocitrate (inhibiting aconitases), we investigated the dependence of citrate-induced down-regulation of cellular adhesion on aconitase and fatty acid synthase activities. It was concluded: (1) that strongly metastatic PC-3M cells stored less/utilised more cytosolic citrate than the normal PNT2-C2 cells and (2) that cancer cells could metabolise cytoplasmic citrate via aconitase and fatty acid synthase to enhance their metastatic behaviour. PMID:16798056

  17. Induction of apoptosis and autophagy via sirtuin1- and PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathways by plumbagin in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Li, Xing-Xiao; He, Zhi-Xu; Pan, Shu-Ting; Yang, Yinxue; Zhang, Xueji; Chow, Kevin; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Qingyu; Tan, Jun; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Plumbagin (PLB) has been shown to have anticancer activities in animal models, but the role of PLB in prostate cancer treatment is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PLB on apoptosis and autophagy and the underlying mechanisms in human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145. Our study has shown that PLB had potent pro-apoptotic and pro-autophagic effects on PC-3 and DU145 cells. PLB induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in concentration- and time-dependent manners in both PC-3 and DU145 cells. PLB induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and activation of 5′-AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the pro-autophagic activity of PLB. Modulation of autophagy altered basal and PLB-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. Furthermore, PLB downregulated sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), and inhibition of Sirt1 enhanced autophagy, whereas the induction of Sirt1 abolished PLB-induced autophagy in PC-3 and DU145 cells. In addition, PLB downregulated pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin, and the inhibition of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin significantly enhanced basal and PLB-induced apoptosis and autophagy in both cell lines. Moreover, reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level attenuated the apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing effects of PLB on both PC-3 and DU145 cells. These findings indicate that PLB promotes apoptosis and autophagy in prostate cancer cells via Sirt1- and PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathways with contribution from AMPK-, p38 MAPK-, visfatin-, and ROS-associated pathways. PMID:25834399

  18. Clinical features and hyperplastic patterns of parathyroid glands in hemodialysis patients with advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism refractory to maxacalcitol treatment and required parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Susumu; Sato, Tetsuhiko; Uno, Nobuyuki; Goto, Norihiko; Katayama, Akio; Haba, Toshihito

    2007-08-01

    We have previously suggested that when parathyroid glands progress to nodular hyperplasia, secondary hyperparathyroidism (2HPT) may be refractory to medical treatments, including treatment with Maxacalcitol (OCT). In the present study we evaluated the clinical features and hyperplastic patterns of parathyroid glands in patients who underwent parathyroidectomy (PTx) after being withdrawn from OCT. One hundred and eighty-seven advanced 2HPT patients who had been withdrawn from OCT and required PTx were enrolled. At the start of OCT treatment, the patients had a mean age of 55.3 years and had been receiving hemodialysis (HD) for a mean period of 149 months. At the start of OCT treatment and at PTx, the mean intact PTH (i-PTH) levels were 772.8 +/- 446.0 and 855.5 +/- 420.5 pg/mL, respectively. The main reasons for withdrawal of OCT treatment were persistently high PTH (n = 148), hypercalcemia (n = 79), hyperphosphatemia (n = 65), and progressive symptoms (n = 60). We classified the parathyroid glands by hyperplastic pattern into four categories: diffuse hyperplastic gland (D), early nodularity in diffuse hyperplastic gland (EN), nodular hyperplastic gland (N), and single nodular gland (SN). The mean total excised gland weight was 2592.6 mg. Out of a total of 706 glands, 118 were classified as D, 66 as EN, 436 as N, and 86 as SN. All patients had at least one nodular hyperplastic gland or single nodular gland. The mean number of nodular hyperplastic glands and/or single nodular glands was 2.9. All hemodialysis patients with advanced OCT-refractory 2HPT who underwent PTx had at least one nodular hyperplastic gland or single nodular gland.

  19. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  20. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... finasteride who did have prostate cancer had more aggressive tumors . The number of deaths from prostate cancer ... men that did not. The number of less aggressive prostate cancers was lower, but the number of ...

  1. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  2. Synergistic anticancer activity of biologicals from green and black tea on DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobalka, Andrew J.; Keck, Rick W.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the potential of botanicals in preventing and/or alleviating chronic ailments. Among the most studied botanicals are compounds present in green and black teas. Nontoxic tea polyphenols are potent antioxidants, and they also modulate several signalling pathways and inhibit proteins such as MMP-9 or protein plasminogen activator system, making them very attractive potential therapeutics. One criticism of the prophylactic or therapeutic use of green or black tea polyphenols was presumably the poor bioavailability of these chemicals when ingested. However, studies have shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and theaflavin (TF) can be detected in the small and large intestine, liver, and prostate of experimental animals after consumption of tea extracts. In particular, a study was carried out on 20 men scheduled for prostatectomy, who were assigned to consume teas for five days before surgery. Tea polyphenols were detected in the prostate. This fact contradicts the common misconception of poor bioavailability of TF and EGCG and makes feasible the application of green or black tea polyphenols as prophylactic and therapeutic agents. Theaflavins and catechins seem to act on cancer cells largely through different pathways, so utilisation of both could offer synergistic anticancer effects, but so far no work has been done on the cumulative effects of EGCG and TF on prostate cancer. Therefore, in this study we have investigated if EGCG in combination with TF can reduce the rate of prostate cancer growth, and we have observed greater cell death compared to application of either TF or EGCG alone. PMID:26155176

  3. Predicting microRNA modulation in human prostate cancer using a simple String IDentifier (SID1.0).

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria C; Olivieri, Fabiola; Lazzarini, Raffaella; Pilolli, Francesca; Galli, Francesco; Spada, Giorgio; Accorsi, Augusto; Rippo, Maria R; Procopio, Antonio D

    2011-08-01

    To make faster and efficient the identification of mRNA targets common to more than one miRNA, and to identify new miRNAs modulated in specific pathways, a computer program identified as SID1.0 (simple String IDentifier) was developed and successfully applied in the identification of deregulated miRNAs in prostate cancer cells. This computationally inexpensive Fortran program is based on the strategy of exhaustive search and specifically designed to screen shared data (target genes, miRNAs and pathways) available from PicTar and DIANA-MicroT 3.0 databases. As far as we know this is the first software designed to filter data retrieved from available miRNA databases. SID1.0 takes advantage of the standard Fortran intrinsic functions for manipulating text strings and requires ASCII input files. In order to demonstrate SID1.0 applicability, some miRNAs expected from the literature to associate with cancerogenesis (miR-125b, miR-148a and miR-141), were randomly identified as main entries for SID1.0 to explore matching sequences of mRNA targets and also to explore KEGG pathways for the presence of ID codes of targeted genes. Besides genes and pathways already described in the literature, SID1.0 has proven to useful for predicting other genes involved in prostate carcinoma. These latter were used to identify new deregulated miRNAs: miR-141, miR-148a, miR-19a and miR-19b. Prediction data were preliminary confirmed by expression analysis of the identified miRNAs in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and independent (PC3) prostate carcinoma cell lines and in normal prostatic epithelial cells (PrEC). PMID:21334455

  4. Low Temperature Plasma Causes Double-Strand Break DNA Damage in Primary Epithelial Cells Cultured from a Human Prostate Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Adam M.; Frame, Fiona M.; Maitland, Norman J.; O’Connell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Research in the new field of plasma medicine continues to demonstrate the efficacy of low temperature plasmas for numerous biomedical applications. Responses such as reduction in cell viability and cell death for cancer therapy, cell proliferation for wound healing, and bacterial inactivation have been observed as a result of plasma treatment. In this study we applied low temperature plasma to prostate cancer primary cells and tissue to inflict irreparable DNA damage. PMID:26819484

  5. Immunocytochemical detection of androgen receptor in human temporal cortex characterization and application of polyclonal androgen receptor antibodies in frozen and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Puy, L; MacLusky, N J; Becker, L; Karsan, N; Trachtenberg, J; Brown, T J

    1995-11-01

    Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies have demonstrated the presence of androgen receptor protein in various regions of the rodent and non-human primate cortex. Localization of androgen receptor in the human brain has, however, not been studied as extensively, because of difficulties in obtaining suitable tissue samples. In the present study, we have localized androgen receptors in both frozen and paraffin-embedded temporal cortex from epileptic patients undergoing resection. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against fusion proteins containing fragments of the human androgen receptor protein. The antibodies were affinity-purified against the corresponding fusion protein. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting using extracts from human cell lines demonstrated the specificity of the antibodies for the human androgen receptor and lack of cross-reactivity with other steroid hormone receptors. Immunocytochemistry was performed on frozen and paraffin sections of human temporal cortex and in paraffin-embedded benign hyperplastic prostates (BPH), as well as prostate and breast carcinomas, by the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method. Antigen-retrieval was performed in paraffin-embedded sections using microwave irradiation. Specific nuclear and cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for androgen receptor was detected in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells of the temporal cortex. In contrast, only nuclear staining was observed in BPH, prostate and breast carcinomas. Immunoprecipitation of human temporal cortex lysate and subsequent Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of a 98 kDa immunoreactive protein, slightly smaller than the reported molecular weight of the wild-type androgen receptor. These results provide further evidence for the expression of androgen receptor in the human temporal cortex. The use of these immunocytochemical techniques should enable the retrospective determination of possible changes in androgen receptor expression in

  6. Inhibition of chemomigration of a human prostatic carcinoma cell (TSU-pr1) line by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor function.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, A; Djakiew, D

    1996-04-01

    Chemoattractants expressed at bony sites and pelvic lymph nodes are thought to promote the preferential metastasis of human prostate tumor cells to these organs. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent chemoattractant for several human metastatic prostate tumor cell lines, including the TSU-pr1 cell line, and EGF has been localized to the stroma of both bony sites and pelvic lymph nodes in humans. Hence, we investigated whether the TSU-pr1 cell line expresses a functional EGF receptor (EGFR), which when antagonized reduces EGF-mediated chemomigration of this cell line. In this context, the EGFR immunoprecipitated from cell lysates of TSU-pr1 cells comigrated with the EGFR from A431 cells at a molecular weight of 170 kD. Addition of human EGF (hEGF) to the TSU-pr1 cells for 5 min stimulated the dose-dependent biphasic phosphorylation of the EGFR, with maximal stimulation of EGFR phosphorylation occurring at 2 ng/ml hEGF. In addition, treatment of hEGF-stimulated (2 ng/ml) TSU-pr1 cells with 0.5 microgram/ml anti-hEGF monoclonal antibody or 100 nM staurosporine inhibited EGFR phosph