Science.gov

Sample records for hyperpolarized mri image

  1. Functional lung imaging using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Fain, Sean B; Korosec, Frank R; Holmes, James H; O'Halloran, Rafael; Sorkness, Ronald L; Grist, Thomas M

    2007-05-01

    The noninvasive assessment of lung function using imaging is increasingly of interest for the study of lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Hyperpolarized gas MRI (HP MRI) has demonstrated the ability to detect changes in ventilation, perfusion, and lung microstructure that appear to be associated with both normal lung development and disease progression. The physical characteristics of HP gases and their application to MRI are presented with an emphasis on current applications. Clinical investigations using HP MRI to study asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, pediatric chronic lung disease, and lung transplant are reviewed. Recent advances in polarization, pulse sequence development for imaging with Xe-129, and prototype low magnetic field systems dedicated to lung imaging are highlighted as areas of future development for this rapidly evolving technology.

  2. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J. -B.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ∼20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications. PMID:28262691

  3. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2017-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ~20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications.

  4. Hyperpolarized and inert gas MRI: the future.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Blasiak, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Fox, Matthew S; Dowhos, Krista M; Albert, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potentially ideal imaging modality for noninvasive, nonionizing, and longitudinal assessment of disease. Hyperpolarized (HP) agents have been developed in the past 20 years for MR imaging, and they have the potential to vastly improve MRI sensitivity for the diagnosis and management of various diseases. The polarization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-sensitive nuclei other than (1)H (e.g., (3)He, (129)Xe) can be enhanced by a factor of up to 100,000 times above thermal equilibrium levels, which enables direct detection of the HP agent with no background signal. In this review, a number of HP media applications in MR imaging are discussed, including HP (3)He and (129)Xe lung imaging, HP (129)Xe brain imaging, and HP (129)Xe biosensors. Inert fluorinated gas MRI, which is a new lung imaging technique that does not require hyperpolarization, is also briefly discussed. This technique will likely be an important future direction for the HP gas lung imaging community.

  5. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  6. MO-G-18C-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Lung Motion Estimation Using Hyperpolarized Gas Tagging MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q; Zhang, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, L; Yin, F; Cai, J; Miller, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperpolarized gas (HP) tagging MRI is a novel imaging technique for direct measurement of lung motion during breathing. This study aims to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) in lung motion estimation using HP tagging MRI as references. Methods: Three healthy subjects were imaged using the HP MR tagging, as well as a high-resolution 3D proton MR sequence (TrueFISP) at the end-of-inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE). Ground truth of lung motion and corresponding displacement vector field (tDVF) was derived from HP tagging MRI by manually tracking the displacement of tagging grids between EOI and EOE. Seven different DIR methods were applied to the high-resolution TrueFISP MR images (EOI and EOE) to generate the DIR-based DVFs (dDVF). The DIR methods include Velocity (VEL), MIM, Mirada, multi-grid B-spline from Elastix (MGB) and 3 other algorithms from DIRART toolbox (Double Force Demons (DFD), Improved Lucas-Kanade (ILK), and Iterative Optical Flow (IOF)). All registrations were performed by independent experts. Target registration error (TRE) was calculated as tDVF – dDVF. Analysis was performed for the entire lungs, and separately for the upper and lower lungs. Results: Significant differences between tDVF and dDVF were observed. Besides the DFD and IOF algorithms, all other dDVFs showed similarity in deformation magnitude distribution but away from the ground truth. The average TRE for entire lung ranged 2.5−23.7mm (mean=8.8mm), depending on the DIR method and subject's breathing amplitude. Larger TRE (13.3–23.7mm) was found in subject with larger breathing amplitude of 45.6mm. TRE was greater in lower lung (2.5−33.9 mm, mean=12.4mm) than that in upper lung (2.5−11.9 mm, mean=5.8mm). Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in lung motion estimation between the HP gas tagging MRI method and the DIR methods, especially when lung motion is large. Large variation among different DIR

  7. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  8. Hyperpolarized Gas MRI: Technique and Applications

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Holman P.; Kaushik, S. Sivaram; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Functional imaging today offers a rich world of information that is more sensitive to changes in lung structure and function than traditionally obtained pulmonary function tests. Hyperpolarized helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) MR imaging of the lungs provided new sensitive contrast mechanisms to probe changes in pulmonary ventilation, microstructure and gas exchange. With the recent scarcity in the supply of 3He the field of hyperpolarized gas imaging shifted to the use of cheaper and naturally available 129Xe. Xenon is well tolerated and recent technical advances have ensured that the 129Xe image quality is on par with that of 3He. The added advantage of 129Xe is its solubility in pulmonary tissue, which allows exploring specific lung function characteristics involved in gas exchange and alveolar oxygenation. With a plethora of contrast mechanisms, hyperpolarized gases and 129Xe in particular, stands to be an excellent probe of pulmonary structure and function, and provide sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers for a wide variety of pulmonary diseases. PMID:25952516

  9. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Constant-variable flip angles for hyperpolarized media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Chen, Xian; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal magnetization of hyperpolarized media, such as hyperpolarized 129Xe, 3He, etc., is nonrenewable. When the MRI data acquisition begins at the k-domain center, a constant flip angle (CFA) results in an image of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but sacrifices the accuracy of spatial information. On the other hand, a variable flip angle (VFA) strategy results in high accuracy but suffers from a low SNR. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to optimize both the SNR and accuracy, called constant-variable flip angles (CVFA). The proposed scheme suggests that hyperpolarized magnetic resonance signals are firstly acquired through a train of n∗ CFA excitation pulses, followed by a train of N-n∗ VFA excitation pulses. We simulate and optimize the flip angle used in the CFA section, the number of CFA excitation pulses, the number of VFA excitation pulses, and the initial and final variable flip angles adopted in the VFA section. Phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate the good performance of the CVFA designs and their ability to maintain both high SNR and spatial resolution.

  11. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  12. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  13. EPR oxygen imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRI of pyruvate metabolism as noninvasive biomarkers of tumor treatment response to a glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Yasui, Hironobu; Morris, H Douglas; Munasinghe, Jeeva P; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koretsky, Alan P; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2013-05-01

    The hypoxic nature of tumors results in treatment resistance and poor prognosis. To spare limited oxygen for more crucial pathways, hypoxic cancerous cells suppress mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and promote glycolysis for energy production. Thereby, inhibition of glycolysis has the potential to overcome treatment resistance of hypoxic tumors. Here, EPR imaging was used to evaluate oxygen dependent efficacy on hypoxia-sensitive drug. The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate blocks glycolysis pathway by inhibiting hypoxia inducible enzymes and enhanced cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate under hypoxic conditions has been reported in vitro. However, the efficacy of 3-bromopyruvate was substantially attenuated in hypoxic tumor regions (pO2<10 mmHg) in vivo using squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII)-bearing mouse model. Metabolic MRI studies using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled pyruvate showed that monocarboxylate transporter-1 is the major transporter for pyruvate and the analog 3-bromopyruvate in SCCVII tumor. The discrepant results between in vitro and in vivo data were attributed to biphasic oxygen dependent expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 in vivo. Expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 was enhanced in moderately hypoxic (8-15 mmHg) tumor regions but down regulated in severely hypoxic (<5 mmHg) tumor regions. These results emphasize the importance of noninvasive imaging biomarkers to confirm the action of hypoxia-activated drugs.

  14. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  15. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and 18F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in an increase of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-CO2 (13C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of 13C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of 13C-pyruvate to 13C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with 18F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq 18F-FDG. 13C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate. Peak heights of 13C-pyruvate and 13C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic 1H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased 13C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high 18F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high 18F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high 13C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly demonstrates how the Warburg Effect directly

  16. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of (13)C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of (13)C-pyruvate to (13)C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with (18)F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Peak heights of (13)C-pyruvate and (13)C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic (1)H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased (13)C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high (18)F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high (18)F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high (13)C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly

  17. Hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI and histology in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jason C; Choong, Cliff K; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Bentley, John; Wong, Jonathan; Pierce, John A; Cooper, Joel D; Macklem, Peter T; Conradi, Mark S; Hogg, James C

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion MRI of hyperpolarized (3)He shows that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of (3)He gas is highly restricted in the normal lung and becomes nearly unrestricted in severe emphysema. The nature of this restricted diffusion provides information about lung structure; however, no direct comparison with histology in human lungs has been reported. The purpose of this study is to provide information about (3)He gas diffusivity in explanted human lungs, and describe the relationship between (3)He diffusivity and the surface area to lung volume ratio (SA/V) and mean linear intercept (L(m)) measurements--the gold standard for diagnosis of emphysema. Explanted lungs from patients who were undergoing lung transplantation for advanced COPD, and donor lungs that were not used for transplantation were imaged via (3)He diffusion MRI. Histological measurements were made on the same specimens after they were frozen in the position of study. There is an inverse correlation between diffusivity and SA/V (and a positive correlation between diffusivity and L(m)). An important result is that restricted (3)He diffusivity separated normal from emphysematous lung tissue more clearly than the morphometric analyses. This effect may be due to the smaller histologic sampling size compared to the MRI voxel sizes.

  18. In Vivo Lung Morphometry with Accelerated Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusion MRI: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yulin V.; Quirk, James D.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Parallel imaging can be used to reduce imaging time and to increase the spatial coverage in hyperpolarized gas MRI of the lung. In this proof-of-concept study we investigate the effects of parallel imaging on the morphometric measurement of lung microstructure using diffusion MRI with hyperpolarized 3He. Methods Fully sampled and under-sampled multi-b diffusion data were acquired from human subjects using an 8-channel 3He receive coil. A parallel imaging reconstruction technique (GRAPPA) was used to reconstruct under-sampled k-space data. The morphometric results of the GRAPPA-reconstructed data were compared with the results of fully sampled data for three types of subjects: healthy volunteers, mild, and moderate COPD patients. Results Morphometric measurements varied only slightly at mild acceleration factors. The results were largely well preserved compared to fully sampled data for different lung conditions. Conclusion Parallel imaging, given sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, provides a reliable means to accelerate hyperpolarized-gas MRI with no significant difference in the measurement of lung morphometry from the fully sampled images. GRAPPA is a promising technique to significantly reduce imaging time and/or to improve the spatial coverage for the morphometric measurement with hyperpolarized gases. PMID:24799044

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of dissolved hyperpolarized 129Xe using a membrane-based continuous flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, N.; Zänker, P. P.; Blümler, P.; Meise, F. M.; Schreiber, L. M.; Scholz, A.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Spiess, H. W.; Münnemann, K.

    2009-11-01

    A technique for continuous production of solutions containing hyperpolarized 129Xe is explored for MRI applications. The method is based on hollow fiber membranes which inhibit the formation of foams and bubbles. A systematic analysis of various carrier agents for hyperpolarized 129Xe has been carried out, which are applicable as contrast agents for in vivo MRI. The image quality of different hyperpolarized Xe solutions is compared and MRI results obtained in a clinical as well as in a nonclinical MRI setting are provided. Moreover, we demonstrate the application of 129Xe contrast agents produced with our dissolution method for lung MRI by imaging hyperpolarized 129Xe that has been both dissolved in and outgassed from a carrier liquid in a lung phantom, illustrating its potential for the measurement of lung perfusion and ventilation.

  20. Genetically encoded reporters for hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Ramirez, R. Matthew; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Sun, George; Sun, Jinny; Pines, Alexander; Schaffer, David V.; Bajaj, Vikram S.

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables high-resolution non-invasive observation of the anatomy and function of intact organisms. However, previous MRI reporters of key biological processes tied to gene expression have been limited by the inherently low molecular sensitivity of conventional 1H MRI. This limitation could be overcome through the use of hyperpolarized nuclei, such as in the noble gas xenon, but previous reporters acting on such nuclei have been synthetic. Here, we introduce the first genetically encoded reporters for hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI. These expressible reporters are based on gas vesicles (GVs), gas-binding protein nanostructures expressed by certain buoyant microorganisms. We show that GVs are capable of chemical exchange saturation transfer interactions with xenon, which enables chemically amplified GV detection at picomolar concentrations (a 100- to 10,000-fold improvement over comparable constructs for 1H MRI). We demonstrate the use of GVs as heterologously expressed indicators of gene expression and chemically targeted exogenous labels in MRI experiments performed on living cells.

  1. Large Production of Hyperpolarized 129-Xe for MRI Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruset, Iulian; Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, Jan; Ketel, Stephen; Covrig, Silviu; Muradian, Iga; Sindile, Adrian

    2007-03-01

    Although 129-Xe was the first hyperpolarized gas to be used in MRI studies, the research community has focused on 3-He, mainly because of the larger quantities of hyperpolarized gas available. Xenon has advantages over helium, such as natural abundance, lower diffusion, and high solubility in blood. It presents a large frequency chemical shift when dissolved in blood, tissue, brain, or trapped in molecular cages. A new design of a high-flow low-pressure spin-exchange optical pumping Rb-Xe polarizer was recently demonstrated by our group. The concept of counterflowing the gas mixture against laser light and dividing the polarizing cell in three operational zones has resulted in an increase with over an order of magnitude in the output magnetization compared with previously reported polarizers. We were able to produce hyperpolarized xenon at 64% polarization for 0.3 liters/hour flow rate and 22% polarization at 6 liters/hour. We also demonstrated a new design of freezing and thawing hyperpolarized xenon with minimum losses. We will present the concept of the high-flow low-pressure counterflowing xenon polarizer, its performance, as well as new optical pumping laser technologies. We will discuss optimization plans for xenon polarizing systems based on experimental observed limitations and theoretical modeling.

  2. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  3. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  4. Detection of brown adipose tissue and thermogenic activity in mice by hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Rosa Tamara; He, Ting; Zhang, Le; Floyd, Carlos S.; Freeman, Matthew; White, Christian; Burant, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The study of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human weight regulation has been constrained by the lack of a noninvasive tool for measuring this tissue and its function in vivo. Existing imaging modalities are nonspecific and intrinsically insensitive to the less active, lipid-rich BAT of obese subjects, the target population for BAT studies. We demonstrate noninvasive imaging of BAT in mice by hyperpolarized xenon gas MRI. We detect a greater than 15-fold increase in xenon uptake by BAT during stimulation of BAT thermogenesis, which enables us to acquire background-free maps of the tissue in both lean and obese mouse phenotypes. We also demonstrate in vivo MR thermometry of BAT by hyperpolarized xenon gas. Finally, we use the linear temperature dependence of the chemical shift of xenon dissolved in adipose tissue to directly measure BAT temperature and to track thermogenic activity in vivo. PMID:25453088

  5. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Justin Y.C.; Chen, Albert P.; Geraghty, Benjamin J.; Perks, William J.; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A.; Connelly, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. Objective: To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Methods and Results: Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by 13C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1-13C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed 13C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1-13C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean 13C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1-13C]pyruvate, 56 for 13C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1-13C]lactate. Conclusions: These results represent the first 13C images of the human heart. The appearance of 13C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. PMID:27635086

  6. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  7. High-resolution low-field molecular magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized liquids.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Koptyug, Igor V; Shchepin, Roman V; Waddell, Kevin W; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A; Best, Quinn A; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-09-16

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm(2) spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm(2) in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4-8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and (13)C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm(2). (13)C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P(13C) = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P(13C) = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using (1)H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %P(H) = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-(13)C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth's magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (~1 mM) metabolite concentrations.

  8. Detection of tobacco smoke deposition by hyperpolarized krypton-83 MRI.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Stupic, Karl F; Wooten, Jan B; Repine, John E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Despite the importance of the tobacco smoke particulate matter in the lungs to the etiology of pulmonary disease in cigarette smokers, little is currently known about the spatial distribution of particle deposition or the persistence of the resulting deposits in humans, and no satisfactory technique currently exists to directly observe tobacco smoke condensate in airways. In this proof-of-principle work, hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr MRI and NMR spectroscopy are introduced as probes for tobacco smoke deposition in porous media. A reduction in the hp-83Kr longitudinal (T1) relaxation of up to 95% under near-ambient humidity, pressure and temperature conditions was observed when the krypton gas was brought into contact with surfaces that had been exposed to cigarette smoke. This smoke-induced acceleration of the 83Kr self-relaxation was observed for model glass surfaces that, in some experiments, were coated with bovine lung surfactant extract. However, a similar effect was not observed with hp-(129)Xe indicating that the 83Kr sensitivity to smoke deposition was not caused by paramagnetic species but rather by quadrupolar relaxation due to high adsorption affinity for the smoke deposits. The 83Kr T1 differences between smoke-treated and untreated surfaces were sufficient to produce a strong contrast in variable flip angle FLASH hp-83Kr MRI, suggesting that hp-83Kr may be a promising contrast agent for in vivo pulmonary MRI.

  9. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  10. Silicon Nanoparticles as Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Johnson, Alexander C.; Barton, Robert A.; Lee, Menyoung; Ogier, Alexander C.; Vo, Chinh; Anahtar, Melis N.; Ren, Yin; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Cory, David G.; Hill, Alison L.; Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei provides high image contrast with little or no background signal. To date, in-vivo applications of pre-hyperpolarized materials have been limited by relatively short nuclear spin relaxation times. Here, we investigate silicon nanoparticles as a new type of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent. Nuclear spin relaxation times for a variety of Si nanoparticles are found to be remarkably long, ranging from many minutes to hours at room temperature, allowing hyperpolarized nanoparticles to be transported, administered, and imaged on practical time scales. Additionally, we demonstrate that Si nanoparticles can be surface functionalized using techniques common to other biologically targeted nanoparticle systems. These results suggest that Si nanoparticles can be used as a targetable, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent with a large range of potential applications. PMID:19950973

  11. Pulmonary MRI contrast using Surface Quadrupolar Relaxation (SQUARE) of hyperpolarized (83)Kr.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Lilburn, David M L; Dorkes, Alan C; Stupic, Karl F; Shaw, Dominick E; Morris, Peter G; Hall, Ian P; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr has previously been demonstrated to enable MRI contrast that is sensitive to the chemical composition of the surface in a porous model system. Methodological advances have lead to a substantial increase in the (83)Kr hyperpolarization and the resulting signal intensity. Using the improved methodology for spin exchange optical pumping of isotopically enriched (83)Kr, internal anatomical details of ex vivo rodent lung were resolved with hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI after krypton inhalation. Different (83)Kr relaxation times were found between the main bronchi and the parenchymal regions in ex vivo rat lungs. The T1 weighted hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI provided a first demonstration of surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) pulmonary MRI contrast.

  12. Molecular MRI in the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Continuous Hyperpolarization of a Biomolecule in Water.

    PubMed

    Rovedo, Philipp; Knecht, Stephan; Bäumlisberger, Tim; Cremer, Anna Lena; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Gary G R; Burns, Michael; Rayner, Peter J; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; Pütz, Gerhard; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we illustrate a method to continuously hyperpolarize a biomolecule, nicotinamide, in water using parahydrogen and signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE). Building on the preparation procedure described recently by Truong et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. B , 2014 , 118 , 13882 - 13889 ], aqueous solutions of nicotinamide and an Ir-IMes catalyst were prepared for low-field NMR and MRI. The (1)H-polarization was continuously renewed and monitored by NMR experiments at 5.9 mT for more than 1000 s. The polarization achieved corresponds to that induced by a 46 T magnet (P = 1.6 × 10(-4)) or an enhancement of 10(4). The polarization persisted, although reduced, if cell culture medium (DPBS with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or human cells (HL-60) were added, but was no longer observable after the addition of human blood. Using a portable MRI unit, fast (1)H-MRI was enabled by cycling the magnetic field between 5 mT and the Earth's field for hyperpolarization and imaging, respectively. A model describing the underlying spin physics was developed that revealed a polarization pattern depending on both contact time and magnetic field. Furthermore, the model predicts an opposite phase of the dihydrogen and substrate signal after one exchange, which is likely to result in the cancelation of some signal at low field.

  13. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  15. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  16. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  17. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude.

  18. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Erin; Ludwig, Kai; Mummy, David; Fain, Sean B

    2017-04-06

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP 129Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of 129Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP 129Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP 13C and 15N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-13C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP 13C and 15N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into 1) a brief introduction, 2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, 3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, 4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed

  20. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  1. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  2. In vivo single-shot 13C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco-Rius, Irene; Brindle, Kevin M.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized 13C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based on spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) principles, to derive chemical-shift images within a sub-second period. By contrast to EPSI, SPEN does not require oscillating acquisition gradients to deliver chemical-shift information: its signal encodes both spatial as well as chemical shift information, at no extra cost in experimental complexity. SPEN MRI sequences with slice-selection and arbitrary excitation pulses can also be devised, endowing SPEN with the potential to deliver single-shot multi-slice chemical shift images, with a temporal resolution required for hyperpolarized dynamic metabolic imaging. The present work demonstrates this with initial in vivo results obtained from SPEN-based imaging of pyruvate and its metabolic products, after injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Multi-slice chemical-shift images of healthy rats were obtained at 4.7 T in the region of the kidney, and 4D (2D spatial, 1D spectral, 1D temporal) data sets were obtained at 7 T from a murine lymphoma tumor model.

  3. Development and testing of hyperpolarized 13C MR calibrationless parallel imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yesu; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Shin, Peter J.; von Morze, Cornelius; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Carvajal, Lucas; Tropp, James; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    A calibrationless parallel imaging technique developed previously for 1H MRI was modified and tested for hyperpolarized 13C MRI for applications requiring large FOV and high spatial resolution. The technique was demonstrated with both retrospective and prospective under-sampled data acquired in phantom and in vivo rat studies. A 2-fold acceleration was achieved using a 2D symmetric EPI readout equipped with random blips on the phase encode dimension. Reconstructed images showed excellent qualitative agreement with fully sampled data. Further acceleration can be achieved using acquisition schemes that incorporate multi-dimensional under-sampling. PMID:26679288

  4. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  5. Hyperpolarized Gas Diffusion MRI for the Study of Atelectasis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of CT, PET, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI)—a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces—is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of 3He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces; (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces; and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. PMID:24920074

  6. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  7. Regional fractional ventilation mapping in spontaneously breathing mice using hyperpolarized ¹²⁹Xe MRI.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hirohiko; Matsumoto, Hironobu; Miyakoshi, Erika; Okumura, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Kimura, Atsuomi

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of ventilation imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) (129) Xe MRI has been investigated for quantitative and regional assessment of ventilation in spontaneously breathing mice. The multiple breath ventilation imaging technique was modified to the protocol of spontaneous inhalation of HP (129) Xe delivered continuously from a (129) Xe polarizer. A series of (129) Xe ventilation images was obtained by varying the number of breaths before the (129) Xe lung imaging. The fractional ventilation, r, was successfully evaluated for spontaneously breathing mice. An attempt was made to detect ventilation dysfunction in the emphysematous mouse lung induced by intratracheal administration of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). As a result, the distribution of fractional ventilation could be visualized by the r map. Significant dysfunction of ventilation was quantitatively identified in the PPE-treated group. The whole-lung r value of 0.34 ± 0.01 for control mice (N = 4) was significantly reduced, to 0.25 ± 0.07, in PPE-treated mice (N = 4) (p = 0.038). This study is the first application of multiple breath ventilation imaging to spontaneously breathing mice, and shows that this methodology is sensitive to differences in the pulmonary ventilation. This methodology is expected to improve simplicity as well as noninvasiveness when assessing regional ventilation in small rodents.

  8. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation. PMID:26239953

  9. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation.

  10. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S; Lilburn, David M L; Stupic, Karl F; Dorkes, Alan C; Shaw, Dominick E; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp (129)Xe or hp (83)Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp (129)Xe handling, while (83)Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The (83)Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of (129)Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated (129)Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs.

  11. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Lilburn, David M. L.; Stupic, Karl F.; Dorkes, Alan C.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp 129Xe or hp 83Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp 129Xe handling, while 83Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The 83Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of 129Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated 129Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs.

  12. Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bastan, Birgul; Reno, Austin; Mansour, Joey; Sun, Yanping; Zhou, Xin; Mazzani, Mary; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2009-02-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

  13. Imaging pH with hyperpolarized 13C.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    pH is a fundamental physiological parameter that is tightly controlled by endogenous buffers. The acid-base balance is altered in many disease states, such as inflammation, ischemia and cancer. Despite the importance of pH, there are currently no routine methods for imaging the spatial distribution of pH in humans. The enormous gain in sensitivity afforded by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has provided a novel way in which to image tissue pH using MR, which has the potential to be translated into the clinic. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of current pH imaging techniques and how they compare with DNP-based approaches for the measurement and imaging of pH with hyperpolarized (13)C. Intravenous injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled bicarbonate results in the rapid production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) in the reaction catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. As this reaction is close to equilibrium in the body and is pH dependent, the ratio of the (13)C signal intensities from H(13)CO(3)(-) and (13)CO(2), measured using MRS, can be used to calculate pH in vivo. The application of this technique to a murine tumor model demonstrated that it measured predominantly extracellular pH and could be mapped in the animal using spectroscopic imaging techniques. A second approach has been to use the production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) from hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate to measure predominantly intracellular pH. In tissues with a high aerobic capacity, such as the heart, the hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate undergoes rapid oxidative decarboxylation, catalyzed by intramitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. Provided that there is sufficient carbonic anhydrase present to catalyze the rapid equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between CO(2) and bicarbonate, the ratio of their resonance intensities may again be used to estimate pH, which, in this case, is predominantly intracellular. As both pyruvate and bicarbonate are endogenous molecules they

  14. Nuclear spin imaging with hyperpolarized nuclei created by brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Kunimatsu, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Kohri, Hideki; Ohta, Takeshi; Utsuro, Masahiko; Yosoi, Masaru; Ono, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kohji; Takamatsu, Kunihiko; Ueda, Kunihiro; Didelez, Jean-P.; Prossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette

    2011-05-01

    We have been developing a polarized HD target for particle physics at the SPring-8 under the leadership of the RCNP, Osaka University for the past 5 years. Nuclear polarizaton is created by means of the brute force method which uses a high magnetic field (~17 T) and a low temperature (~ 10 mK). As one of the promising applications of the brute force method to life sciences we started a new project, "NSI" (Nuclear Spin Imaging), where hyperpolarized nuclei are used for the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The candidate nuclei with spin ½hslash are 3He, 13C, 15N, 19F, 29Si, and 31P, which are important elements for the composition of the biomolecules. Since the NMR signals from these isotopes are enhanced by orders of magnitudes, the spacial resolution in the imaging would be much more improved compared to the practical MRI used so far. Another advantage of hyperpolarized MRI is that the MRI is basically free from the radiation, while the problems of radiation exposure caused by the X-ray CT or PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cannot be neglected. In fact, the risk of cancer for Japanese due to the radiation exposure through these diagnoses is exceptionally high among the advanced countries. As the first step of the NSI project, we are developing a system to produce hyperpolarized 3He gas for the diagnosis of serious lung diseases, for example, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). The system employs the same 3He/4He dilution refrigerator and superconducting solenoidal coil as those used for the polarized HD target with some modification allowing the 3He Pomeranchuk cooling and the following rapid melting of the polarized solid 3He to avoid the depolarization. In this report, the present and future steps of our project will be outlined with some latest experimental results.

  15. Single shot three‐dimensional pulse sequence for hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiazheng; Wright, Alan J.; Hu, De‐en; Hesketh, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 13C‐labeled cell substrates is a promising technique for imaging tissue metabolism in vivo. However, the transient nature of the hyperpolarization, and its depletion following excitation, limits the imaging time and the number of excitation pulses that can be used. We describe here a single‐shot three‐dimensional (3D) imaging sequence and demonstrate its capability to generate 13C MR images in tumor‐bearing mice injected with hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate. Methods The pulse sequence acquires a stack‐of‐spirals at two spin echoes after a single excitation pulse and encodes the kz‐dimension in an interleaved manner to enhance robustness to B0 inhomogeneity. Spectral‐spatial pulses are used to acquire dynamic 3D images from selected hyperpolarized 13C‐labeled metabolites. Results A nominal spatial/temporal resolution of 1.25 × 1.25 × 2.5 mm3 × 2 s was achieved in tumor images of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate and [1‐13C]lactate acquired in vivo. Higher resolution in the z‐direction, with a different k‐space trajectory, was demonstrated in measurements on a thermally polarized [1‐13C]lactate phantom. Conclusion The pulse sequence is capable of imaging hyperpolarized 13C‐labeled substrates at relatively high spatial and temporal resolutions and is robust to moderate system imperfections. Magn Reson Med 77:740–752, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26916384

  16. On the Use of Hyperpolarized Helium MRI for Conformal Avoidance Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, C.W.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Fain, S.B.; Bentzen, S.M.; Mehta, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to illustrate the feasibility of using hyperpolarized helium magnetic resonance imaging (HPH-MRI) to obtain functional information that may assist in improving conformal avoidance of ventilating lung tissue during thoracic radiotherapy. HPH-MRI images were obtained from a volunteer patient and were first fused with a proton density-weighted (PD{sub w}) MRI to provide corresponding anatomic detail; they were then fused with the treatment planning computed tomography scan of a patient from our treatment planning database who possessed equivalent thoracic dimensions. An optimized treatment plan was then generated using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system, designating the HPH-enhancing regions as ventilation volume (VV). A dose-volume histogram compares the dosimetry of the lungs as a paired organ, the VV, and the lungs minus the VV. The clinical consequences of these changes was estimated using a bio-effect model, the parallel architecture model, or the local damage (f{sub dam}) model. Model parameters were chosen from published studies linking the incidence of grade 3+ pneumonitis, with the dose and volume irradiated. For two hypothetical treatment plans of 60 Gy in 30 fractions delivered to a right upper-lobe lung mass, one using and one ignoring the VV as an avoidance structure, the mean normalized total dose (NTD{sub mean}) values for the lung subvolumes were: lungs = 12.5 Gy{sub 3}vs. 13.52 Gy{sub 3}, VV = 9.94 Gy{sub 3}vs. 13.95 Gy{sub 3}, and lungs minus VV = 16.69 Gy{sub 3}vs. 19.16 Gy{sub 3}. Using the f{sub dam} values generated from these plans, one would predict a reduction of the incidence of grade 3+ radiation pneumonitis from 12%-4% when compared with a conventionally optimized plan. The use of HPH-MRI to identify ventilated lung subvolumes is feasible and has the potential to be incorporated into conformal avoidance treatment planning paradigms. A prospective clinical study evaluating this imaging technique is being developed.

  17. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; Deboef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality.

  18. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Kühn, H.; Häsing, F. W.; Münnemann, K.; Blümich, B.; Appelt, S.

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol.

  20. Hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Cleveland, Zackary I; Stupic, Karl F; Basaraba, Randall J; Meersmann, Thomas

    2005-12-20

    For the first time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized (hp) krypton-83 (83Kr) has become available. The relaxation of the nuclear spin of 83Kr atoms (I = 9/2) is driven by quadrupolar interactions during brief adsorption periods on surrounding material interfaces. Experiments in model systems reveal that the longitudinal relaxation of hp 83Kr gas strongly depends on the chemical composition of the materials. The relaxation-weighted contrast in hp 83Kr MRI allows for the distinction between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The feasibility of hp 83Kr MRI of airways is tested in canine lung tissue by using krypton gas with natural abundance isotopic distribution. Additionally, the influence of magnetic field strength and the presence of a breathable concentration of molecular oxygen on longitudinal relaxation are investigated.

  1. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: theoretical background.

    PubMed

    Sukstanskii, A L; Yablonskiy, D A

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of (3)He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the (3)He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients-longitudinal (D(L)) and transverse (D(T)) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D(L) and D(T) and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D(L) and D(T) on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry-evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized (3)He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of (3)He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Delta. If Delta is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  2. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of 3He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the 3He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients—longitudinal (D) and transverse (D) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D and D and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D and D on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry—evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of 3He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Δ. If Δ is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  3. NMR and MRI of blood-dissolved hyperpolarized Xe-129 in different hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Amor, Nadia; Hamilton, Kathrin; Küppers, Markus; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Appelt, Stephan; Blümich, Bernhard; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2011-11-18

    Magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has found a wide field of applications in the analysis of biologically relevant fluids. Recently, it has been shown that the dissolution of hyperpolarized gas into the fluid via hollow-fiber membranes leads to bubble-free (129)Xe augmentation, and thus to an enhanced signal. In addition, hollow-fiber membranes permit a continuous operation mode. Herein, a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis of a customized hollow-fiber membrane module is presented. Different commercial hollow-fiber membrane types are compared with regard to their (129)Xe dissolution efficiency into porcine blood, its constituents, and other fluids. The presented study gives new insight into the suitability of these hollow-fiber membrane types for hyperpolarized gas dissolution setups.

  4. Screening and Monitoring Response to Treatment Using Subsecond Molecular Imaging and Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    3 Table of Contents Page INTRODUCTION ...35 4 Introduction We are developing hyperpolarized MRI allowing for ultrafast (potentially sub...Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 United States Introduction : One of the main bottlenecks for preclinical and clinical application of

  5. Evaluation of carrier agents for hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, A. K.; Zhao, L.; Balamore, D.; Jolesz, F. A.; Albert, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    Several biocompatible carrier agents, in which xenon is highly soluble and has a long T(1), were tested, and injected in living rats. These included saline, Intralipid suspension, perfluorocarbon emulsion and (129)Xe gas-filled liposomes. The T(1) of (129)Xe in these compounds ranged from 47 to 116 s. Vascular injection of these carrier agents was tolerated well, encouraging their use for further experiments in live animals. In vivo spectra, obtained from gas-filled liposomes and perfluorocarbon solutions, suggest that these carrier agents have potential for use in angiography and perfusion imaging. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  7. High-Resolution 3D Proton MRI of Hyperpolarized Gas Enabled by Parahydrogen and Rh/TiO2 Heterogeneous Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Khudorozhkov, Alexander K.; Inozemtseva, Elizaveta A.; Prosvirin, Igor P.; Bukhtiyarov, Valery I.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    Several supported metal catalysts were synthesized, characterized, and tested in heterogeneous hydrogenation of propene with parahydrogen to maximize nuclear spin hyperpolarization of propane gas using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). The Rh/TiO2 catalyst with a metal particle size of 1.6 nm was found to be the most active and effective in the pairwise hydrogen addition and robust, demonstrating reproducible results with multiple hydrogenation experiments and stability for ≥1.5 years. 3D 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1 % hyperpolarized flowing gas with microscale spatial resolution (625 × 625 × 625 μm3) and large imaging matrix (128 × 128 × 32) was demonstrated by using a preclinical 4.7 T scanner and 17.4 s imaging scan time. PMID:24961814

  8. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI.

  9. A robust protocol for regional evaluation of methacholine challenge in mouse models of allergic asthma using hyperpolarized 3He MRI.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abraham C; Potts, Erin N; Chen, Ben T; Slipetz, Deborah M; Foster, W Michael; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2009-06-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He magnetic resonance imaging has been recently used to produce high-resolution images of pulmonary ventilation after methacholine (MCh) challenge in mouse models of allergic inflammation. This capability presents an opportunity to gain new insights about these models and to more sensitively evaluate new drug treatments in the pre-clinical setting. In the current study, we present our initial experience using two-dimensional (2D), time-resolved (3)He MRI of MCh challenge-induced airways hyperreactivity (AHR) to compare ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged (N = 8) mice to controls (N = 8). Imaging demonstrated that ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged animals exhibited many large ventilation defects even prior to MCh challenge (four out of eight) compared to no defects in the control animals. Additionally, the ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged animals experienced a greater number of ventilation defects (4.5 +/- 0.4) following MCh infusion than did controls (3.3 +/- 0.6). However, due to variability in MCh delivery that was specific to the small animal MRI environment, the difference in mean defect number was not statistically significant. These findings are reviewed in detail and a comprehensive solution to the variability problem is presented that has greatly enhanced the magnitude and reproducibility of the MCh response. This has permitted us to develop a new imaging protocol consisting of a baseline 3D image, a time-resolved 2D series during MCh challenge, and a post-MCh 3D image that reveals persistent ventilation defects.

  10. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  11. Inert fluorinated gas MRI: a new pulmonary imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Ball, Iain K; Li, Tao; Fox, Matthew S; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Biman, Birubi; Albert, Mitchell S

    2014-12-01

    Fluorine-19 ((19)F) MRI of the lungs using inhaled inert fluorinated gases can potentially provide high quality images of the lungs that are similar in quality to those from hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. Inert fluorinated gases have the advantages of being nontoxic, abundant, and inexpensive compared with HP gases. Due to the high gyromagnetic ratio of (19)F, there is sufficient thermally polarized signal for imaging, and averaging within a single breath-hold is possible due to short longitudinal relaxation times. Therefore, the gases do not need to be hyperpolarized prior to their use in MRI. This eliminates the need for an expensive polarizer and expensive isotopes. Inert fluorinated gas MRI of the lungs has been previously demonstrated in animals, and more recently in healthy volunteers and patients with lung diseases. The ongoing improvements in image quality demonstrate the potential of (19)F MRI for visualizing the distribution of ventilation in human lungs and detecting functional biomarkers. In this brief review, the development of inert fluorinated gas MRI, current progress, and future prospects are discussed. The current state of HP noble gas MRI is also briefly discussed in order to provide context to the development of this new imaging modality. Overall, this may be a viable clinical imaging modality that can provide useful information for the diagnosis and management of chronic respiratory diseases.

  12. Real-time tracking of dissociation of hyperpolarized 89Y-DTPA: a model for degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Sarah; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Gadolinium (Gd) complexes are widely used relaxation-based clinical contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gd-based MRI contrast agents with open-chain ligand such as Gd-DTPA, commercially known as magnevist, are less stable compared to Gd complexes with macrocyclic ligands such as GdDOTA (Dotarem). The dissociation of Gd-DPTA into Gd ion and DTPA ligand under certain biological conditions such as high zinc levels can potentially cause kidney damage. Since Gd is paramagnetic, direct NMR detection of the Gd-DTPA dissociation is quite challenging due to ultra-short relaxation times. In this work, we have investigated Y-DTPA as a model for Gd-DPTA dissociation under high zinc content solutions. Using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), the 89Y NMR signal is amplified by several thousand-fold. Due to the the relatively long T1 relaxation time of 89Y which translates to hyperpolarization lifetime of several minutes, the dissociation of Y-DTPA can be tracked in real-time by hyperpolarized 89Y NMR spectroscopy. Dissociation kinetic rates and implications on the degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents will be discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Defense Award Number W81XWH-14-1-0048 and by the Robert A. Welch Foundation research Grant Number AT-1877.

  13. Concentric Rings K-Space Trajectory for Hyperpolarized 13C MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenwen; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust and rapid imaging technique for hyperpolarized 13C MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) and investigate its performance. Methods A concentric rings readout trajectory with constant angular velocity is proposed for hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic imaging and its properties are analyzed. Quantitative analyses of design tradeoffs are presented for several imaging scenarios. The first application of concentric rings on 13C phantoms and in vivo animal hyperpolarized 13C MRSI studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Finally, a parallel imaging accelerated concentric rings study is presented. Results The concentric rings MRSI trajectory has the advantages of acquisition timesaving compared to echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI). It provides sufficient spectral bandwidth with relatively high SNR efficiency compared to EPSI and spiral techniques. Phantom and in vivo animal studies showed good image quality with half the scan time and reduced pulsatile flow artifacts compared to EPSI. Parallel imaging accelerated concentric rings showed advantages over Cartesian sampling in g-factor simulations and demonstrated aliasing-free image quality in a hyperpolarized 13C in vivo study. Conclusion The concentric rings trajectory is a robust and rapid imaging technique that fits very well with the speed, bandwidth, and resolution requirements of hyperpolarized 13C MRSI. PMID:25533653

  14. 32-channel phased-array receive with asymmetric birdcage transmit coil for hyperpolarized xenon-129 lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Dregely, Isabel; Ruset, Iulian C; Wiggins, Graham; Mareyam, Azma; Mugler, John P; Altes, Talissa A; Meyer, Craig; Ruppert, Kai; Wald, Lawrence L; Hersman, F William

    2013-08-01

    Hyperpolarized xenon-129 has the potential to become a noninvasive contrast agent for lung MRI. In addition to its utility for imaging of ventilated airspaces, the property of xenon to dissolve in lung tissue and blood upon inhalation provides the opportunity to study gas exchange. Implementations of imaging protocols for obtaining regional parameters that exploit the dissolved phase are limited by the available signal-to-noise ratio, excitation homogeneity, and length of acquisition times. To address these challenges, a 32-channel receive-array coil complemented by an asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the hyperpolarized xenon-129 resonance at 3 T was developed. First results of spin-density imaging in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive lung disease demonstrated the improvements in image quality by high-resolution ventilation images with high signal-to-noise ratio. Parallel imaging performance of the phased-array coil was demonstrated by acceleration factors up to three in 2D acquisitions and up to six in 3D acquisitions. Transmit-field maps showed a regional variation of only 8% across the whole lung. The newly developed phased-array receive coil with the birdcage transmit coil will lead to an improvement in existing imaging protocols, but moreover enable the development of new, functional lung imaging protocols based on the improvements in excitation homogeneity, signal-to-noise ratio, and acquisition speed.

  15. Development and application of methods to quantify spatial and temporal hyperpolarized 3He MRI ventilation dynamics: preliminary results in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2010-03-01

    Hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a non-invasive research method for quantifying lung structural and functional changes, enabling direct visualization in vivo at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here we described the development of methods for quantifying ventilation dynamics in response to salbutamol in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whole body 3.0 Tesla Excite 12.0 MRI system was used to obtain multi-slice coronal images acquired immediately after subjects inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas. Ventilated volume (VV), ventilation defect volume (VDV) and thoracic cavity volume (TCV) were recorded following segmentation of 3He and 1H images respectively, and used to calculate percent ventilated volume (PVV) and ventilation defect percent (VDP). Manual segmentation and Otsu thresholding were significantly correlated for VV (r=.82, p=.001), VDV (r=.87 p=.0002), PVV (r=.85, p=.0005), and VDP (r=.85, p=.0005). The level of agreement between these segmentation methods was also evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis and this showed that manual segmentation was consistently higher for VV (Mean=.22 L, SD=.05) and consistently lower for VDV (Mean=-.13, SD=.05) measurements than Otsu thresholding. To automate the quantification of newly ventilated pixels (NVp) post-bronchodilator, we used translation, rotation, and scaling transformations to register pre-and post-salbutamol images. There was a significant correlation between NVp and VDV (r=-.94 p=.005) and between percent newly ventilated pixels (PNVp) and VDP (r=- .89, p=.02), but not for VV or PVV. Evaluation of 3He MRI ventilation dynamics using Otsu thresholding and landmark-based image registration provides a way to regionally quantify functional changes in COPD subjects after treatment with beta-agonist bronchodilators, a common COPD and asthma therapy.

  16. Near-unity nuclear polarization with an open-source 129Xe hyperpolarizer for NMR and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M.; Walkup, Laura L.; Gust, Brogan M.; Whiting, Nicholas; Newton, Hayley; Barcus, Scott; Muradyan, Iga; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Moroz, Gregory D.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Patz, Samuel; Barlow, Michael J.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite NMR spectral sensitivity and negligible reactivity of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (HP129Xe) make it attractive for a number of magnetic resonance applications; moreover, HP129Xe embodies an alternative to rare and nonrenewable 3He. However, the ability to reliably and inexpensively produce large quantities of HP129Xe with sufficiently high 129Xe nuclear spin polarization (PXe) remains a significant challenge—particularly at high Xe densities. We present results from our “open-source” large-scale (∼1 L/h) 129Xe polarizer for clinical, preclinical, and materials NMR and MRI research. Automated and composed mostly of off-the-shelf components, this “hyperpolarizer” is designed to be readily implementable in other laboratories. The device runs with high resonant photon flux (up to 200 W at the Rb D1 line) in the xenon-rich regime (up to 1,800 torr Xe in 500 cc) in either single-batch or stopped-flow mode, negating in part the usual requirement of Xe cryocollection. Excellent agreement is observed among four independent methods used to measure spin polarization. In-cell PXe values of ∼90%, ∼57%, ∼50%, and ∼30% have been measured for Xe loadings of ∼300, ∼500, ∼760, and ∼1,570 torr, respectively. PXe values of ∼41% and ∼28% (with ∼760 and ∼1,545 torr Xe loadings) have been measured after transfer to Tedlar bags and transport to a clinical 3 T scanner for MR imaging, including demonstration of lung MRI with a healthy human subject. Long “in-bag” 129Xe polarization decay times have been measured (T1 ∼38 min and ∼5.9 h at ∼1.5 mT and 3 T, respectively)—more than sufficient for a variety of applications. PMID:23946420

  17. Optimizing Flip Angles for Metabolic Rate Estimation in Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 MRI.

    PubMed

    Maidens, John; Gordon, Jeremy W; Arcak, Murat; Larson, Peder E Z

    2016-11-01

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance imaging has enabled the real-time observation of perfusion and metabolism in vivo. These experiments typically aim to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues based on the rate at which they metabolize an injected substrate. However, existing approaches to optimizing flip angle sequences for these experiments have focused on indirect metrics of the reliability of metabolic rate estimates, such as signal variation and signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we present an optimization procedure that focuses on maximizing the Fisher information about the metabolic rate. We demonstrate through numerical simulation experiments that flip angles optimized based on the Fisher information lead to lower variance in metabolic rate estimates than previous flip angle sequences. In particular, we demonstrate a 20% decrease in metabolic rate uncertainty when compared with the best competing sequence. We then demonstrate appropriateness of the mathematical model used in the simulation experiments with in vivo experiments in a prostate cancer mouse model. While there is no ground truth against which to compare the parameter estimates generated in the in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that our model used can reproduce consistent parameter estimates for a number of flip angle sequences.

  18. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe. PMID:26961001

  19. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F; Six, Joseph S; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of (83)Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp (83)Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp (83)Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp (129)Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P =29% for(83)Kr and P= 63% for (129)Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either (83)Kr or (129)Xe. Highly spin-polarized (83)Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp (83)Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp(129)Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp (129)Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized (129)Xe.

  20. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe.

  1. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  2. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  3. The Efficiency Limits of Spin Exchange Optical Pumping Methods of 129Xe Hyperpolarization: Implications for in vivo MRI Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.

    Since the inception of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI, the field has yearned for more efficient production of more highly polarized 129Xe. For nearly all polarizers built to date, both peak 129Xe polarization and production rate fall far below theoretical predictions. This thesis sought to develop a fundamental understanding of why the observed performance of large-scale 129Xe hyperpolarization lagged so badly behind theoretical predictions. This is done by thoroughly characterizing a high-volume, continuous-flow polarizer using optical cells having three different internal volumes, and employing two different laser sources. For each of these 6 combinations, 129Xe polarization was carefully measured as a function of production rate across a range of laser absorption levels. The resultant peak polarizations were consistently a factor of 2-3 lower than predicted across a range of absorption levels, and scaling of production rates deviated badly from predictions based on spin exchange efficiency. To bridge this gap, we propose that paramagnetic, activated Rb clusters form during spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP), and depolarize Rb and 129Xe, while unproductively scattering optical pumping light. When a model was built that incorporated the effects of clusters, its predictions matched observations for both polarization and production rate for all 6 systems studied. This permits us to place a limit on cluster number density of <2 x 109 cm-3. The work culminates with deploying this framework to identify methods to improve polarization to above 50%, leaving the SEOP cell. Combined with additional methods of preserving polarization, the polarization of a 300-mL batch of 129Xe increased from an average of 9%, before this work began, to a recent value of 34%. We anticipate that these developments will lay the groundwork for continued advancement and scaling up of SEOP-based hyperpolarization methods that may one day permit real-time, on-demand 129Xe MRI to become a reality.

  4. Two and three-dimensional segmentation of hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydarian, Mohammadreza; Kirby, Miranda; Wheatley, Andrew; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    A semi-automated method for generating hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) measurements of individual slice (2D) or whole lung (3D) gas distribution was developed. 3He MRI functional images were segmented using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical K-means clustering of the 3He MRI signal and in addition a seeded region-growing algorithm was employed for segmentation of the 1H MRI thoracic cavity volume. 3He MRI pulmonary function measurements were generated following two-dimensional landmark-based non-rigid registration of the 3He and 1H pulmonary images. We applied this method to MRI of healthy subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The results of hierarchical K-means 2D and 3D segmentation were compared to an expert observer's manual segmentation results using linear regression, Pearson correlations and the Dice similarity coefficient. 2D hierarchical K-means segmentation of ventilation volume (VV) and ventilation defect volume (VDV) was strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.97, p<.0001) and mean Dice coefficients were greater than 92% for all subjects. 3D hierarchical K-means segmentation of VV and VDV was also strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.64, p<.0001) and the mean Dice coefficients were greater than 91% for all subjects. Both 2D and 3D semi-automated segmentation of 3He MRI gas distribution provides a way to generate novel pulmonary function measurements.

  5. Optimized production of hyperpolarized 129Xe at 2 bars for in vivo lung magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norquay, Graham; Parnell, Steven R.; Xu, Xiaojun; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the production rate of a spin-exchange optical pumping 129Xe gas polarizer was optimized for routine generation of hyperpolarized 129Xe for in vivo lung MRI. This system uses a narrow (˜ 0.1 nm linewidth), tuneable external cavity laser (operating at ˜25 W) for SEOP of 3% gas mixtures of Xe inside a mid-pressure (2 bars) cell of 491 cm3 volume. Under this regime, theoretical and experimentally measured 129Xe polarizations were calculated to be 24% and 12%, respectively, for a gas flow rate of 300 sccm and a cell temperature of 373 K. The photon efficiency was evaluated, yielding theoretical and experimental values of 0.039 and 0.046, respectively. The theoretical efficiency was calculated from spin-exchange and spin-destruction cross sections and the experimental photon efficiency was measured under flow for a gas-cell residency time equal to an empirically determined spin-exchange time of 45 s. In addition, details of the Xe freeze-out process were analyzed with a model of polarization decay during Xe accumulation in the frozen phase, where a T1 of 87 ± 2 min was observed. To demonstrate the system's application, in vivo lung magnetic resonance images (signal-to-noise ratio ˜ 50 from a voxel of 15 mm× 4 mm× 4 mm) were acquired using modest volumes (<400 ml) of isotopically enriched (86% 129Xe) Xe gas polarized to >10%. Despite the experimental polarization being a factor of 2 lower than the predicted polarization for typical operating parameters, the system is close to the theoretical photon efficiency and the system has so far produced polarized gas for more than 100 in vivo 129Xe lung imaging studies.

  6. Hyperpolarized 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging of alveolar degradation in a rat model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Lesbats, Clémentine; Six, Joseph S; Dubuis, Eric; Yew-Booth, Liang; Shaw, Dominick E; Belvisi, Maria G; Birrell, Mark A; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2015-06-06

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) generates MRI contrast that was previously shown to correlate with surface-to-volume ratios in porous model surface systems. The underlying physics of SQUARE contrast is conceptually different from any other current MRI methodology as the method uses the nuclear electric properties of the spin I = 9/2 isotope (83)Kr. To explore the usage of this non-radioactive isotope for pulmonary pathophysiology, MRI SQUARE contrast was acquired in excised rat lungs obtained from an elastase-induced model of emphysema. A significant (83)Kr T1 relaxation time increase in the SQUARE contrast was found in the elastase-treated lungs compared with the baseline data from control lungs. The SQUARE contrast suggests a reduction in pulmonary surface-to-volume ratio in the emphysema model that was validated by histology. The finding supports usage of (83)Kr SQUARE as a new biomarker for surface-to-volume ratio changes in emphysema.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of pH in vivo using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Zandt, René in 't; Jensen, Pernille R; Karlsson, Magnus; Golman, Klaes; Lerche, Mathilde H; Brindle, Kevin M

    2008-06-12

    As alterations in tissue pH underlie many pathological processes, the capability to image tissue pH in the clinic could offer new ways of detecting disease and response to treatment. Dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique for substantially increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here we show that tissue pH can be imaged in vivo from the ratio of the signal intensities of hyperpolarized bicarbonate (H(13)CO(3)(-)) and (13)CO(2) following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO(3)(-). The technique was demonstrated in a mouse tumour model, which showed that the average tumour interstitial pH was significantly lower than the surrounding tissue. Given that bicarbonate is an endogenous molecule that can be infused in relatively high concentrations into patients, we propose that this technique could be used clinically to image pathological processes that are associated with alterations in tissue pH, such as cancer, ischaemia and inflammation.

  8. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  9. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  10. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems (in men)Path to improved healthIf your primary care doctor determines that you should have an MRI, ... may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to ...

  12. Hyperpolarized 13C dehydroascorbate as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M

    2011-11-15

    Reduction and oxidation (redox) chemistry is involved in both normal and abnormal cellular function, in processes as diverse as circadian rhythms and neurotransmission. Intracellular redox is maintained by coupled reactions involving NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and vitamin C, as well as their corresponding oxidized counterparts. In addition to functioning as enzyme cofactors, these reducing agents have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the toxic products of oxidative metabolism seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Despite this strong relationship between redox and human disease, methods to interrogate a redox pair in vivo are limited. Here we report the development of [1-(13)C] dehydroascorbate [DHA], the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy. In murine models, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-(13)C] vitamin C within the liver, kidneys, and brain, as well as within tumor in a transgenic prostate cancer mouse. This result is consistent with what has been previously described for the DHA/Vitamin C redox pair, and points to a role for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA in characterizing the concentrations of key intracellular reducing agents, including GSH. More broadly, these findings suggest a prognostic role for this new redox sensor in determining vulnerability of both normal and abnormal tissues to ROS.

  13. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  14. Hyperpolarized 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging of alveolar degradation in a rat model of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Six, Joseph S.; Dubuis, Eric; Yew-Booth, Liang; Shaw, Dominick E.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Birrell, Mark A.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 83Kr surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) generates MRI contrast that was previously shown to correlate with surface-to-volume ratios in porous model surface systems. The underlying physics of SQUARE contrast is conceptually different from any other current MRI methodology as the method uses the nuclear electric properties of the spin I = 9/2 isotope 83Kr. To explore the usage of this non-radioactive isotope for pulmonary pathophysiology, MRI SQUARE contrast was acquired in excised rat lungs obtained from an elastase-induced model of emphysema. A significant 83Kr T1 relaxation time increase in the SQUARE contrast was found in the elastase-treated lungs compared with the baseline data from control lungs. The SQUARE contrast suggests a reduction in pulmonary surface-to-volume ratio in the emphysema model that was validated by histology. The finding supports usage of 83Kr SQUARE as a new biomarker for surface-to-volume ratio changes in emphysema. PMID:25994296

  15. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized 13c urea using flow sensitizing gradients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized 13C urea through the rodent heart using flow‐sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. Methods A flow‐sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral 13C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia (n = 3). Results A two‐fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. Conclusion The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized 13C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized 13C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1474–1483, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991580

  17. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  20. Regional Mapping of Gas Uptake by Blood and Tissue in the Human Lung using Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Ruppert, Kai; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Shim, Y. Michael; Wang, Chengbo; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Altes, Talissa A.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a breath-hold acquisition for regional mapping of ventilation and the fractions of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (Xe129) dissolved in tissue (lung parenchyma and plasma) and red blood cells (RBCs), and to perform an exploratory study to characterize data obtained in human subjects. Materials and Methods A three-dimensional, multi-echo, radial-trajectory pulse sequence was developed to obtain ventilation (gaseous Xe129), tissue and RBC images in healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. Signal ratios (total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, RBC-to-gas and RBC-to-tissue) were calculated from the images for quantitative comparison. Results Healthy subjects demonstrated generally uniform values within coronal slices, and a gradient in values along the anterior-to-posterior direction. In contrast, images and associated ratio maps in smokers and asthmatics were generally heterogeneous and exhibited values mostly lower than those in healthy subjects. Whole-lung values of total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, and RBC-to-gas ratios in healthy subjects were significantly larger than those in diseased subjects. Conclusion Regional maps of tissue and RBC fractions of dissolved Xe129 were obtained from a short breath-hold acquisition, well tolerated by healthy volunteers and subjects with obstructive lung disease. Marked differences were observed in spatial distributions and overall amounts of Xe129 dissolved in tissue and RBCs among healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. PMID:23681559

  1. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate: a metabolic imaging biomarker of IDH1 mutational status in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Woods, Sarah M.; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron E.; Lupo, Janine M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pieper, Russell O.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event, and are associated with epigenetically-driven modulations of metabolism. Of particular interest is the recently uncovered relationship between the IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme. Non-invasive imaging methods that can assess BCAT1 activity could therefore improve detection of mutant IDH1 tumors and aid in developing and monitoring new targeted therapies. BCAT1 catalyzes the transamination of branched-chain amino acids while converting α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to glutamate. Our goal was to use 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG to hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate as a readout of BCAT1 activity. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG, hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, in our cells the observed drop in hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate could thus inform on multiple mutant IDH1-associated metabolic events that mediate reduced glutamate production. PMID:24876103

  2. Toward Biocompatible Nuclear Hyperpolarization Using Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange: Quantitative in Situ Spectroscopy and High-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of a substrate and parahydrogen at a catalytic center promises to overcome the inherent insensitivity of magnetic resonance. In order to apply the new approach to biomedical applications, there is a need to develop experimental equipment, in situ quantification methods, and a biocompatible solvent. We present results detailing a low-field SABRE polarizer which provides well-controlled experimental conditions, defined spins manipulations, and which allows in situ detection of thermally polarized and hyperpolarized samples. We introduce a method for absolute quantification of hyperpolarization yield in situ by means of a thermally polarized reference. A maximum signal-to-noise ratio of ∼103 for 148 μmol of substance, a signal enhancement of 106 with respect to polarization transfer field of SABRE, or an absolute 1H-polarization level of ≈10–2 is achieved. In an important step toward biomedical application, we demonstrate 1H in situ NMR as well as 1H and 13C high-field MRI using hyperpolarized pyridine (d3) and 13C nicotinamide in pure and 11% ethanol in aqueous solution. Further increase of hyperpolarization yield, implications of in situ detection, and in vivo application are discussed. PMID:24397559

  3. SU-E-QI-11: Measurement of Renal Pyruvate-To-Lactate Exchange with Hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E; Johnson, K; Fain, S; Gordon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Previous work [1] modeling the metabolic flux between hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]lactate in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) experiments failed to account for vascular signal artifacts. Here, we investigate a method to minimize the vascular signal and its impact on the fidelity of metabolic modeling. Methods: MRSI was simulated for renal metabolism in MATLAB both with and without bipolar gradients. The resulting data were fit to a two-site exchange model [1], and the effects of vascular partial volume artifacts on kinetic modeling were assessed. Bipolar gradients were then incorporated into a gradient echo sequence to validate the simulations experimentally. The degree of diffusion weighting (b = 32 s/mm{sup 2}) was determined empirically from 1H imaging of murine renal vascular signal. The method was then tested in vivo using MRSI with bipolar gradients following injection of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate (∼80 mM at 20% polarization). Results: In simulations, vascular signal contaminated the renal metabolic signal at resolutions as high as 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} due to partial volume effects. The apparent exchange rate from pyruvate to lactate (k{sub p}) was underestimated in the presence of these artifacts due to contaminating pyruvate signal. Incorporation of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved the accuracy of kp estimation. Experimentally, the in vivo results supported the ability of bipolar gradients to suppress vascular signal. The in vivo exchange rate increased, as predicted in simulations, from k{sub p} = 0.012 s-{sup 1} to k{sub p} = 0.020-{sup 1} after vascular signal suppression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the limited accuracy of the two-site exchange model in the presence of vascular partial volume artifacts. The addition of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved model accuracy in simulations. Bipolar gradients largely affected kp estimation in vivo. Currently

  4. Switchable resonant hyperpolarization transfer to 29Si spins in natural silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluhy, Phillip; Salvail, Jeff Z.; Saeedi, Kamyar; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Simmons, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    Silicon nano- and microparticles containing polarized 29Si spins are promising inexpensive and biocompatible medical imaging agents, particularly for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Maximizing out-of-equilibrium polarization (i.e., hyperpolarization) of the 29Si nuclear spins as efficiently as possible is critical for such an application. Here we identify and exploit a frequency-matched resonant transfer process between easily hyperpolarized bulk 31P and otherwise insensitive 29Si nuclear spins in natural silicon, boosting the 29Si signal to over 200 times its thermal equilibrium signal. This technique could be used in tandem with microwave-based hyperpolarization schemes for even higher efficiencies. Lastly, this hyperpolarization buildup process does not necessarily introduce an additional source of decoherence; after hyperpolarization the resonant transfer process can be switched off to recover the ultralong lifetimes of 29Si spins for in vivo imaging.

  5. BI-07HYPERPOLARIZED [1-13C] GLUTAMATE: A METABOLIC IMAGING BIOMARKER OF IDH1 MUTATIONAL STATUS IN GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam; Larson, Peder; Woods, Sarah; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron; Lupo, Janine; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Pieper, Russell; Phillips, Joanna; Ronen, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event and are being considered a promising therapeutic target. Consequently, non-invasive imaging methods are needed to monitor IDH1 status. Amongst these, we previously demonstrated the use of 13C MR spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to non-invasively assess IDH1 status through the detection of the conversion of hyperpolarized α-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) catalyzed by mutant IDH1. Importantly, in addition to its oncogenic role, IDH1 mutation is also associated with global modulations in metabolism. Interestingly, a study recently uncovered a relationship between presence of IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched chained amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme, which transaminates amino acids while converting α-KG to glutamate. Given this new study, we decided to expand on our previous findings and investigated the potential of hyperpolarized α-KG as an imaging probe to monitor BCAT1-driven α-KG-to-glutamate conversion and its modulation in the presence of IDH1 mutation. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized α-KG, hyperpolarized glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, the observed drop in hyperpolarized glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized glutamate could thus inform on multiple

  6. Fast Volumetric Spatial-Spectral MR Imaging of Hyperpolarized 13C-Labeled Compounds using Multiple Echo 3D bSSFP

    PubMed Central

    Perman, William H.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Leupold, Jochen; Lin, Alexander P.; Harris, Kent C.; Norton, Valerie A.; Hovener, Jan B.; Ross, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The goal of this work was to develop a fast 3D chemical shift imaging technique for the non-invasive measurement of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled substrates and metabolic products at low concentration. MATERIALS AND METHODS Multiple echo 3D balanced steady state MR imaging (ME-3DbSSFP) was performed in vitro on a syringe containing hyperpolarized [1,3,3-2H3; 1-13C]2-hydroxyethylpropionate (HEP) adjacent to a 13C-enriched acetate phantom, and in vivo on a rat before and after IV injection of hyperpolarized HEP at 1.5 T. Chemical shift images of the hyperpolarized HEP were derived from the multiple echo data by Fourier transformation along the echoes on a voxel by voxel basis for each slice of the 3D data set. RESULTS ME-3DbSSFP imaging was able to provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized HEP in vivo, and in a rat with isotropic 7 mm spatial resolution, 93 Hz spectral resolution and 16 second temporal resolution for a period greater than 45 seconds. CONCLUSION Multiple echo 3D bSSFP imaging can provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled compounds in vivo with relatively high spatial resolution and moderate spectral resolution. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this 3D technique will enable the detection of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled metabolites at lower concentrations as compared to a 2D technique. PMID:20171034

  7. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society’s most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. PMID:27899435

  8. Hyperpolarized [1,4-13C]-Diethylsuccinate: A Potential DNP Substrate for In Vivo Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Josan, Sonal; Park, Jae Mo; Tee, Sui Seng; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) performs an essential role in the regulation of energy and metabolism, and deficiencies in this pathway are commonly correlated with various diseases. However, the development of non-invasive techniques for the assessment of the cycle in vivo has remained challenging. In this work, the applicability of a novel imaging agent, [1,4-13C]-diethylsuccinate, for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging of the TCA cycle was explored. In vivo spectroscopic studies were conducted in conjunction with in vitro analyses to determine the metabolic fate of the imaging agent. Contrary to previous reports (Zacharias, N. M. et. al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 934-943), [13C]-labeled diethylsuccinate was primarily metabolized to succinate-derived products not originating from TCA cycle metabolism. These results illustrate potential issues of utilizing dialkyl ester analogs of TCA cycle intermediates as molecular probes for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging. PMID:24421249

  9. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies. PMID:22332133

  10. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies.

  11. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  12. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor optimized in year 1 to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness. To...accomplish this goal my group finished the engineering of a 5 mm bioreactor and acquired hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate data indicating that similar signal...to noise and quality data can be achieved with 4 to 5 prostate tissue slices in the 5 mm bioreactor as was acquired from 30-40 tissue slices in the

  13. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    bioreactor optimized in year 1 to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness. To accomplish this goal my...group finished the engineering of a 5 mm bioreactor and acquired hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate data indicating that similar signal to noise and...quality data can be achieved with 4 to 5 prostate tissue slices in the 5 mm bioreactor as was acquired from 30-40 tissue slices in the prior 10 mm

  14. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor and that hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy could be employed to study real-time metabolism of normal and malignant tissues. The...function of prostate tissue slice cultures (TCSs) in an nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-compatible, 3-dimensional tissue culture bioreactor , (2) to use...the TSC/NMR bioreactor model to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness, and (3) to use the TSC

  15. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Ronen’s report) above the rotor and pushing the tissues out the sample tube into the rotor using a small plastic rod. Following the insertion of each...for pathology and LDH enzyme activity. Two pathologists used a five-point scale (1= excellent, 5 = poor) to quantify the quality of the pathology of...AUC), time to maximum hyperpolarized lactate, maximum hyperpolarized lactate peak, and LDH activity were statistically compared between benign and

  16. Quantitative in vivo assessment of lung microstructure at the alveolar level with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Leawoods, Jason C.; Gierada, David S.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Lefrak, Stephen S.; Cooper, Joel D.; Conradi, Mark S.

    2002-03-01

    The study of lung emphysema dates back to the beginning of the 17th century. Nevertheless, a number of important questions remain unanswered because a quantitative localized characterization of emphysema requires knowledge of lung structure at the alveolar level in the intact living lung. This information is not available from traditional imaging modalities and pulmonary function tests. Herein, we report the first in vivo measurements of lung geometrical parameters at the alveolar level obtained with 3He diffusion MRI in healthy human subjects and patients with severe emphysema. We also provide the first experimental data demonstrating that 3He gas diffusivity in the acinus of human lung is highly anisotropic. A theory of anisotropic diffusion is presented. Our results clearly demonstrate substantial differences between healthy and emphysematous lung at the acinar level and may provide new insights into emphysema progression. The technique offers promise as a clinical tool for early diagnosis of emphysema.

  17. Functional MRI using regularized parallel imaging acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Belliveau, John W; Wald, Lawrence L; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2005-08-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions.

  18. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Belliveau, John W.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. PMID:16032694

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Instead, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, rapidly changing magnetic fields, and a computer to ... in most of the body's tissues. The applied radio waves then cause these protons to produce signals that ...

  2. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  3. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  4. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  5. Dynamic and High-Resolution Metabolic Imaging of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate in the Rat Brain Using a High-Performance Gradient Insert

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Takahashi, Atsushi; Josan, Sonal; Tropp, James; Rutt, B.K.; Hurd, Ralph E.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Fast chemical shift imaging techniques are advantageous in metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized compounds due to the limited duration of the signal amplification. At the same time, reducing the acquisition time in hyperpolarized imaging does not necessarily lead to the conventional penalty in signal-to-noise ratio that occurs in imaging at thermal equilibrium polarization levels. Here a high-performance gradient insert was used in combination with undersampled spiral chemical shift imaging to increase either the imaging speed or the spatial resolution of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging on a clinical 3T MR scanner. Both a single-shot sequence with a total acquisition time of 125 ms and a 3-shot sequence with a nominal in-plane resolution of 1.5 mm were implemented. The k-space trajectories were measured and then used during image reconstruction. The technique was applied to metabolic imaging of the rat brain in vivo after the injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. Dynamic imaging afforded the measurement of region-of-interest-specific time courses of pyruvate and its metabolic products, while imaging at high spatial resolution was used to better characterize the spatial distribution of the metabolite signals. PMID:21500253

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... If You Have Questions en español Resonancia magnética: columna lumbar What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Cervical Spine Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  7. [Microstructure of the lung: diffusion measurement of hyperpolarized 3Helium].

    PubMed

    Morbach, Andreas E; Gast, Klaus K; Schmiedeskamp, Jörg; Herweling, Annette; Windirsch, Michael; Dahmen, Anja; Ley, Sebastian; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Heil, Werner; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2006-01-01

    Imaging methods to study the lung are traditionally based on x-ray or on radioactive contrast agents. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has only limited applications for lung imaging because of the low tissue density of protons concentration of hydrogen atoms, which are usually the basis for the imaging. The introduction of hyperpolarized noble gases as a contrast agent in MRI has opened new possibilities for lung diagnosis. The present paper describes this new technique. Diffusion-weighted MRI for assessment of the lung microstructure is presented here as an example of the new possibilities of functional imaging. Studies to determine the sensitivity of the diffusion measurement and regarding the correlation with traditionally established methods are also presented, along with results of the measurement of the reproducibility determined in a clinical pilot study on healthy volunteers and patients. Furthermore, a pilot measurement of the 3He diffusion tensor in the lung is presented.

  8. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a receiver within the MR scanner. The signals are specially characterized using the rapidly changing magnetic field, and, with the help of computer processing, images of tissues are created as "slices" that ...

  10. Development of spatial-temporal ventilation heterogeneity and probability analysis tools for hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, S.; Ahmed, H.; Wheatley, A.; McCormack, D. G.; Parraga, G.

    2010-03-01

    We developed image analysis tools to evaluate spatial and temporal 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation in asthma and cystic fibrosis. We also developed temporal ventilation probability maps to provide a way to describe and quantify ventilation heterogeneity over time, as a way to test respiratory exacerbations or treatment predictions and to provide a discrete probability measurement of 3He ventilation defect persistence.

  11. Saturation-recovery metabolic-exchange rate imaging with hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate using spectral-spatial excitation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Rolf F; Sperl, Jonathan I; Weidl, Eliane; Menzel, Marion I; Janich, Martin A; Khegai, Oleksandr; Durst, Markus; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Glaser, Steffen J; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian

    2013-05-01

    Within the last decade hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate chemical-shift imaging has demonstrated impressive potential for metabolic MR imaging for a wide range of applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. In this work, a highly efficient pulse sequence is described for time-resolved, multislice chemical shift imaging of the injected substrate and obtained downstream metabolites. Using spectral-spatial excitation in combination with single-shot spiral data acquisition, the overall encoding is evenly distributed between excitation and signal reception, allowing the encoding of one full two-dimensional metabolite image per excitation. The signal-to-noise ratio can be flexibly adjusted and optimized using lower flip angles for the pyruvate substrate and larger ones for the downstream metabolites. Selectively adjusting the excitation of the down-stream metabolites to 90° leads to a so-called "saturation-recovery" scheme with the detected signal content being determined by forward conversion of the available pyruvate. In case of repetitive excitations, the polarization is preserved using smaller flip angles for pyruvate. Metabolic exchange rates are determined spatially resolved from the metabolite images using a simplified two-site exchange model. This novel contrast is an important step toward more quantitative metabolic imaging. Goal of this work was to derive, analyze, and implement this "saturation-recovery metabolic exchange rate imaging" and demonstrate its capabilities in four rats bearing subcutaneous tumors.

  12. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging ventilation defects in asthma: relationship to airway mechanics.

    PubMed

    Leary, Del; Svenningsen, Sarah; Guo, Fumin; Bhatawadekar, Swati; Parraga, Grace; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2016-04-01

    In patients with asthma, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides direct measurements of regional ventilation heterogeneity, the etiology of which is not well-understood, nor is the relationship of ventilation abnormalities with lung mechanics. In addition, respiratory resistance and reactance are often abnormal in asthmatics and the frequency dependence of respiratory resistance is thought to reflect ventilation heterogeneity. We acquiredMRIventilation defect maps, forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1), and airways resistance (Raw) measurements, and used a computational airway model to explore the relationship of ventilation defect percent (VDP) with simulated measurements of respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs).MRIventilation defect maps were experimentally acquired in 25 asthmatics before, during, and after methacholine challenge and these were nonrigidly coregistered to the airway tree model. Using the model coregistered to ventilation defect maps, we narrowed proximal (9th) and distal (14th) generation airways that were spatially related to theMRIventilation defects. The relationships forVDPwith Raw measured using plethysmography (r = 0.79), and model predictions of Rrs>14(r = 0.91,P < 0.0001) and Rrs>9(r = 0.88,P < 0.0001) were significantly stronger (P = 0.005;P = 0.03, respectively) than withFEV1(r = -0.68,P = 0.0001). The slopes for the relationship ofVDPwith simulated lung mechanics measurements were different (P < 0.0001); among these, the slope for theVDP-Xrs0.2relationship was largest, suggesting thatVDPwas dominated by peripheral airway heterogeneity in these patients. In conclusion, as a first step toward understanding potential links between lung mechanics and ventilation defects, impedance predictions were made using a computational airway tree model with simulated constriction of airways related to ventilation defects measured in mild-moderate asthmatics.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MRI table. A specially trained technician (or "tech") operates the MRI machine. He or she may ... can't stay still during MRI. Sometimes MRI techs sedate teens who have trouble relaxing inside the ...

  14. Micro-imaging of the Mouse Lung via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    inflammation, particularly in the lung periphery, indicating airspace enlargement after virus infection. Another important application of the imaging technique is the study of lung regeneration in a pneumonectomy (PNX) model. Partial resection of the lung by unilateral PNX is a robust model of compensatory lung growth. It is typically studied by postmortem morphometry in which longitudinal assessment in the same animal cannot be achieved. Here we successfully assess the microstructural changes and quantify the compensatory lung growth in vivo in the PNX mouse model via 1H and hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI. Our results show complete restoration in lung volume and total alveolar number with enlargement of alveolar size, which is consistent with prior histological studies conducted in different animals at various time points. This dissertation demonstrates that 3He lung morphometry has good sensitivity in quantifying small microstructural changes in the mouse lung and can be applied to a variety of mouse pulmonary models. Particularly, it has great potential to become a valuable tool in understanding the time course and the mechanism of lung growth in individual animals and may provide insight into post-natal lung growth and lung regeneration.

  15. Target image search using fMRI signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shi; Song, Sutao; Zhan, Yu; Zhang, Jiacai

    2014-03-01

    Recent neural signal decoding studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified the specific image presenting to the subject from a set of potential images, and some studies extend neural decoding into image reconstruction, i.e. image contents that the subject perceived were decoded from the fMRI signals recorded during the subject looking at images. In this paper, we decoded the target images using fMRI signals and described a target image searching method based on the relationship between target image stimuli and fMRI activity. We recorded fMRI data during a serial visual stimuli image presentation task, some of the stimuli images were target images and the rest images were non-target ones. Our fMRI data analysis results showed that in the serial visual presentation task, target images elicited a stereotypical response in the fMRI, which can be detected by multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA). Classifiers designed with support vector machine (SVM) used this response to decipher target images from non-target images. The leave-one-run-out cross-validation showed that we can pick out the target images with a possibility far above the chance level, which indicate that there's a neural signatures correlated with the target image recognition process in the human systems.

  16. Application of Double Spin-Echo Spiral Chemical Shift Imaging to Rapid Metabolic Mapping of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Spielman, Daniel; Mayer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Undersampled spiral CSI (spCSI) using a free induction decay (FID) acquisition allows sub-second metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C. Phase correction of the FID acquisition can be difficult, especially with contributions from aliased out-of-phase peaks. This work extends the spCSI sequence by incorporating double spin-echo radiofrequency (RF) pulses to eliminate the need for phase correction and obtain high quality spectra in magnitude mode. The sequence also provides an added benefit of attenuating signal from flowing spins, which can otherwise contaminate signal in the organ of interest. The refocusing pulses can potentially lead to a loss of hyperpolarized magnetization in dynamic imaging due to flow of spins through the fringe field of the RF coil, where the refocusing pulses fail to provide complete refocusing. Care must be taken for dynamic imaging to ensure that the spins remain within the B1-homogeneous sensitive volume of the RF coil. PMID:21316280

  17. Pomeranchuk cell for hyperpolarized 3He based on the brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Seiji; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Ueda, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Fujimura, Hisako; Yosoi, Masaru; Ohta, Takeshi; Frossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette; Rouille, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) has been used for the medical diagnosis as a radiation-free imaging equipment. Since the proton has been mainly used for medical MRI, usefulness has been rather restrictive. As an example for expanding the range of applicability, MRI with hyperpolarized 3He gas has been used for the lung disease. Here, ``hyperpolarized'' means ``polarized higher than the thermal equilibrium polarization.'' For producing a large amount of hyperpolarized 3He gas at a time, we have been developing a hyperpolarization technique based on the brute force method which uses an ultralow temperature of a few mK and a strong magnetic field around 17 T in combination with the principle of the Pomeranchuk cooling. The Pomeranchuk cell made with non-metallic materials of small heat capacity is attached to the 3He/4He dilution refrigerator using a sintered silver allowing large heat conduction. After the sensors to monitor the temperature and pressure of 3He are calibrated and the Pomeranchuk cell is constructed, the system is tested. Then, the solidification of 3He and the measurement of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of 3He under the magnetic field of 17 T are carried out. The current status is reported in this talk.

  18. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  1. Magnetic Field Strength Dependence of Transverse Relaxation and Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 and Helium-3 Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Viqueira, William

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases (HNG), 3He or 129Xe, has become a promising approach for studying lung anatomy and function. Unlike conventional MR imaging, the magnetization in HNG MR is independent of the magnetic field strength. This means that no improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is expected with increasing clinical field strength above ˜0.25T. Furthermore, it has been predicted that the SNR may decline at clinical field strength due to decreases in the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*), caused by the increased magnetic susceptibility induced field gradients at the air-tissue interface. In this thesis the magnetic field strength dependence of T2* and SNR in HNG MR is investigated experimentally in rodent and human lungs. For rodent imaging, a novel broad-band (0.1-100MHz) variable field strength MR imaging system for rodents was built. This system permitted imaging of 129Xe, 3He and 1H at low magnetic field strengths (3-73.5mT) to experimentally investigate the field dependence of HNG imaging SNR in rodent lungs. In vivo 129Xe and 3He signals were acquired at 73.5mT and T 2* was estimated to be approximately 180+/-8 ms, in good agreement with previously reported values. At 73.5mT, image noise is dominated by losses originated from the radiofrequency (RF) coils. To address this issue, RF coils were built using different types of copper wire and compared in phantoms and in vivo in rat lungs using hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe gas. An SNR improvement of up to 200% was obtained with Litz wire compared to conventional copper wire. This improvement demonstrated the feasibility of HNG lung imaging in rodents at 73.5mT with SNR comparable to that obtained at clinical field strengths. To verify the SNR field dependence in humans, hyperpolarized 3He lung imaging at two commonly used clinical field strengths (1.5T and 3T) was performed in the same volunteers and compared. No significant differences in SNR were obtained

  2. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. An open-access, very-low-field MRI system for posture-dependent 3He human lung imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, L. L.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of an open-access, very-low-field, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for in vivo hyperpolarized 3He imaging of the human lungs. This system permits the study of lung function in both horizontal and upright postures, a capability with important implications in pulmonary physiology and clinical medicine, including asthma and obesity. The imager uses a bi-planar B0 coil design that produces an optimized 65 G (6.5 mT) magnetic field for 3He MRI at 210 kHz. Three sets of bi-planar coils produce the x, y, and z magnetic field gradients while providing a 79-cm inter-coil gap for the imaging subject. We use solenoidal Q-spoiled RF coils for operation at low frequencies, and are able to exploit insignificant sample loading to allow for pre-tuning/matching schemes and for accurate pre-calibration of flip angles. We obtain sufficient SNR to acquire 2D 3He images with up to 2.8 mm resolution, and present initial 2D and 3D 3He images of human lungs in both supine and upright orientations. 1H MRI can also be performed for diagnostic and calibration reasons.

  4. An Open-Access, Very-Low-Field MRI System for Posture-Dependent 3He Human Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, L. L.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of an open-access, very-low-field, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for in-vivo hyperpolarized 3He imaging of the human lungs. This system permits the study of lung function in both horizontal and upright postures, a capability with important implications in pulmonary physiology and clinical medicine, including asthma and obesity. The imager uses a bi-planar B0 coil design that produces an optimized 65 G (6.5 mT) magnetic field for 3He MRI at 210 kHz. Three sets of bi-planar coils produce the x, y, and z magnetic field gradients while providing a 79-cm inter-coil gap for the imaging subject. We use solenoidal Q-spoiled RF coils for operation at low frequencies, and are able to exploit insignificant sample loading to allow for pre-tuning/matching schemes and for accurate pre-calibration of flip angles. We obtain sufficient SNR to acquire 2D 3He images with up to 2.8 mm resolution, and present initial 2D and 3D 3He images of human lungs in both supine and upright orientations. 1H MRI can also be performed for diagnostic and calibration reasons. PMID:18550402

  5. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  6. Band-selective chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging with hyperpolarized xenon-based molecular sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Tyler; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging based on saturation transfer in exchanging systems is a tool for amplified and chemically specific magnetic resonance imaging. Xenon-based molecular sensors are a promising category of molecular imaging agents in which chemical exchange of dissolved xenon between its bulk and agent-bound phases has been use to achieve sub-picomolar detection sensitivity. Control over the saturation transfer dynamics, particularly when multiple exchanging resonances are present in the spectra, requires saturation fields of limited bandwidth and is generally accomplished by continuous wave irradiation. We demonstrate instead how band-selective saturation sequences based on multiple pulse inversion elements can yield saturation bandwidth tuneable over a wide range, while depositing less RF power in the sample. We show how these sequences can be used in imaging experiments that require spatial-spectral and multispectral saturation. The results should be applicable to all CEST experiments and, in particular, will provide the spectroscopic control required for applications of arrays of xenon chemical sensors in microfluidic chemical analysis devices.

  7. Band-selective chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging with hyperpolarized xenon-based molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Tyler; Bajaj, Vikram S; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging based on saturation transfer in exchanging systems is a tool for amplified and chemically specific magnetic resonance imaging. Xenon-based molecular sensors are a promising category of molecular imaging agents in which chemical exchange of dissolved xenon between its bulk and agent-bound phases has been use to achieve sub-picomolar detection sensitivity. Control over the saturation transfer dynamics, particularly when multiple exchanging resonances are present in the spectra, requires saturation fields of limited bandwidth and is generally accomplished by continuous wave irradiation. We demonstrate instead how band-selective saturation sequences based on multiple pulse inversion elements can yield saturation bandwidth tuneable over a wide range, while depositing less RF power in the sample. We show how these sequences can be used in imaging experiments that require spatial-spectral and multispectral saturation. The results should be applicable to all CEST experiments and, in particular, will provide the spectroscopic control required for applications of arrays of xenon chemical sensors in microfluidic chemical analysis devices.

  8. Improving the Hyperpolarization of 31P Nuclei by Synthetic Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traditional 31P NMR or MRI measurements suffer from low sensitivity relative to 1H detection and consequently require longer scan times. We show here that hyperpolarization of 31P nuclei through reversible interactions with parahydrogen can deliver substantial signal enhancements in a range of regioisomeric phosphonate esters containing a heteroaromatic motif which were synthesized in order to identify the optimum molecular scaffold for polarization transfer. A 3588-fold 31P signal enhancement (2.34% polarization) was returned for a partially deuterated pyridyl substituted phosphonate ester. This hyperpolarization level is sufficient to allow single scan 31P MR images of a phantom to be recorded at a 9.4 T observation field in seconds that have signal-to-noise ratios of up to 94.4 when the analyte concentration is 10 mM. In contrast, a 12 h 2048 scan measurement under standard conditions yields a signal-to-noise ratio of just 11.4. 31P-hyperpolarized images are also reported from a 7 T preclinical scanner. PMID:25811635

  9. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  10. Multi-channel metabolic imaging, with SENSE reconstruction, of hyperpolarized [1- 13C] pyruvate in a live rat at 3.0 tesla on a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James; Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert; Calderon, Paul; McCune, Don; Grafendorfer, Thomas; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Yen, Yi-Fen; Robb, Fraser; Bok, Robert; Schulte, Rolf; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We report metabolic images of 13C, following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate in a live rat. The data were acquired on a clinical scanner, using custom coils for volume transmission and array reception. Proton blocking of all carbon resonators enabled proton anatomic imaging with the system body coil, to allow for registration of anatomic and metabolic images, for which good correlation was achieved, with some anatomic features (kidney and heart) clearly visible in a carbon image, without reference to the corresponding proton image. Parallel imaging with sensitivity encoding was used to increase the spatial resolution in the SI direction of the rat. The signal to noise ratio in was in some instances unexpectedly high in the parallel images; variability of the polarization among different trials, plus partial volume effects, are noted as a possible cause of this.

  11. Detecting response of rat C6 glioma tumors to radiotherapy using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Day, Sam E; Kettunen, Mikko I; Cherukuri, Murali Krishna; Mitchell, James B; Lizak, Martin J; Morris, H Douglas; Matsumoto, Shingo; Koretsky, Alan P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    We show here that hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate can be used to detect treatment response in a glioma tumor model; a tumor type where detection of response with (18) fluoro-2-deoxyglucose, using positron emission tomography, is limited by the high background signals from normal brain tissue. (13) C chemical shift images acquired following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate into rats with implanted C6 gliomas showed significant labeling of lactate within the tumors but comparatively low levels in surrounding brain.Labeled pyruvate was observed at high levels in blood vessels above the brain and from other major vessels elsewhere but was detected at only low levels in tumor and brain.The ratio of hyperpolarized (13) C label in tumor lactate compared to the maximum pyruvate signal in the blood vessels was decreased from 0.38 ± 0.16 to 0.23 ± 0.13, (a reduction of 34%) by 72 h following whole brain irradiation with 15 Gy.

  12. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  13. A Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to explore accuracy and reproducibility in the measurement of hyperpolarized pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hyperpolarized (HP) agents has the potential to probe in-vivo metabolism with sensitivity and specificity that was not previously possible. Biological conversion of HP agents specifically for cancer has been shown to correlate to presence of disease, stage and response to therapy. For such metabolic biomarkers derived from MRI of hyperpolarized agents to be clinically impactful, they need to be validated and well characterized. However, imaging of HP substrates is distinct from conventional MRI, due to the non-renewable nature of transient HP magnetization. Moreover, due to current practical limitations in generation and evolution of hyperpolarized agents, it is not feasible to fully experimentally characterize measurement and processing strategies. In this work we use a custom Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize the performance of specific magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences over a range of biological conditions. We performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect of sequence parameters over a range of chemical conversion rates. Each simulation was analyzed repeatedly with the addition of noise in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements. Results indicate that under both closed and perfused conditions, acquisition parameters can affect measurements in a tissue dependent manner, suggesting that great care needs to be taken when designing studies involving hyperpolarized agents. More modeling studies will be needed to determine what effect sequence parameters have on more advanced acquisitions and processing methods.

  14. [MRI of the prostate: optimization of imaging protocols].

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2006-02-01

    This article details the imaging protocols for prostate MRI and the influence on image quality of each particular setting: type of coils to be used (endorectal or external phased-array coils?), patient preparation, type of sequences, spatial resolution parameters. The principle and technical constraints of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are also presented, as well as the predictable changes due to the introduction of high-field strength (3T) scanners.

  15. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  16. Effects of Image Contrast on Functional MRI Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Duthie, Kristen N.; Saad, Ziad S.; Chu, Carlton; Bandettini, Peter A.; Luh, Wen-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lack of tissue contrast and existing inhomogeneous bias fields from multi-channel coils have the potential to degrade the output of registration algorithms; and consequently degrade group analysis and any attempt to accurately localize brain function. Non-invasive ways to improve tissue contrast in fMRI images include the use of low flip angles (FAs) well below the Ernst angle and longer repetition times (TR). Techniques to correct intensity inhomogeneity are also available in most mainstream fMRI data analysis packages; but are not used as part of the pre-processing pipeline in many studies. In this work, we use a combination of real data and simulations to show that simple-to-implement acquisition/pre-processing techniques can significantly improve the outcome of both functional-to-functional and anatomical-to-functional image registrations. We also emphasize the need of tissue contrast on EPI images to be able to appropriately evaluate the quality of the alignment. In particular, we show that the use of low FAs (e.g., θ≤40°), when physiological noise considerations permit such an approach, significantly improves accuracy, consistency and stability of registration for data acquired at relatively short TRs (TR≤2s). Moreover, we also show that the application of bias correction techniques significantly improves alignment both for array-coil data (known to contain high intensity inhomogeneity) as well as birdcage-coil data. Finally, improvements in alignment derived from the use of the first infinite-TR volumes (ITVs) as targets for registration are also demonstrated. For the purpose of quantitatively evaluating the different scenarios, two novel metrics were developed: Mean Voxel Distance (MVD) to evaluate registration consistency, and Deviation of Mean Voxel Distance (dMVD) to evaluate registration stability across successive alignment attempts. PMID:23128074

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause a problem near a strong magnetic field. Electronic devices aren't permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as eyeglasses, jewelry, belts, or credit cards. Electronic devices are not permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise and will ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    MedlinePlus

    ... noninvasive test that uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  20. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well.

  1. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  2. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI...reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is... cancer and normal tissues were obtained from nephrectomy specimens and sliced using Krumdieck slicer. With a precision gauge micrometer, the slice

  4. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; White, Nathan S.; Best, Shaun R.; Marks, Robert M.; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; Liss, Michael A.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Methods Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. Results MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P < 0.001 and 0.85 vs. 0.79 at the hemigland level; P = 0.04). RSI and T2WI alone achieved AUCs similar to MP-MRI for high-grade PCa (0.71 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Conclusion Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI. PMID:26910114

  5. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  6. Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wu, Chang Qiang; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Meng Yue; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of approaches that have been improved to achieve a good understanding of pancreatic cancer (PC), the prognosis of PC remains poor, and the survival rates are dismal. The lack of early detection and effective interventions is the main reason. Therefore, considerable ongoing efforts aimed at identifying early PC are currently being pursued using a variety of methods. In recent years, the development of molecular imaging has made the specific targeting of PC in the early stage possible. Molecular imaging seeks to directly visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. Among different imaging technologies, the magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging has potential in this regard because it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of PC. This topic is reviewed in terms of the contrast agents for MR molecular imaging, the biomarkers related to PC, targeted molecular probes for MRI, and the application of MRI in the diagnosis of PC. PMID:26579537

  7. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Westcott, J.L.; Steiner, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The rapid progress of MRI has been remarkable, and it is clear that it will become an important method for cardiac imaging. Its major advantages are the lack of ionizing radiation and the ability to obtain excellent global images of the cardiac walls and chambers without the need for contrast injection or cardiac catheterization. High resolution surface coil imaging, tissue spectroscopy, and other improvements and applications should be rapidly forthcoming.

  8. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology. PMID:24006360

  9. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation. PMID:28266629

  10. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation.

  11. MRI and PET image fusion using fuzzy logic and image local features.

    PubMed

    Javed, Umer; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul; Ali, Syed Sohaib; Cheema, Tanveer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An image fusion technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using local features and fuzzy logic is presented. The aim of proposed technique is to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  12. Prostate MRI for brachytherapists: Diagnosis, imaging pitfalls, and post-therapy assessment.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, A M; Stafford, R J; Duran, C; Soni, P D; Berlin, A; McLaughlin, P W

    2017-01-27

    Optimal integration of multiparametric MRI (mp MRI) into prostate brachytherapy practice necessitates an understanding of imaging findings pertinent to prostate cancer detection and staging. This review will summarize prostate cancer imaging findings and tumor staging on mp MRI, including an overview of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS)-structured reporting schema, mp MRI findings observed in the post-therapy setting including cases of post-treatment recurrence, and MRI concepts integral to successful salvage brachytherapy.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A review of genetic damage investigations.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Fatahi, Mahsa; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful, non-invasive diagnostic medical imaging technique widely used to acquire detailed information about anatomy and function of different organs in the body, in both health and disease. It utilizes electromagnetic fields of three different frequency bands: static magnetic field (SMF), time-varying gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in the kHz range and pulsed radiofrequency fields (RF) in the MHz range. There have been some investigations examining the extent of genetic damage following exposure of bacterial and human cells to all three frequency bands of electromagnetic fields, as used during MRI: the rationale for these studies is the well documented evidence of positive correlation between significantly increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis. Overall, the published data were not sufficiently informative and useful because of the small sample size, inappropriate comparison of experimental groups, etc. Besides, when an increased damage was observed in MRI-exposed cells, the fate of such lesions was not further explored from multiple 'down-stream' events. This review provides: (i) information on the basic principles used in MRI technology, (ii) detailed experimental protocols, results and critical comments on the genetic damage investigations thus far conducted using MRI equipment and, (iii) a discussion on several gaps in knowledge in the current scientific literature on MRI. Comprehensive, international, multi-centered collaborative studies, using a common and widely used MRI exposure protocol (cardiac or brain scan) incorporating several genetic/epigenetic damage end-points as well as epidemiological investigations, in large number of individuals/patients are warranted to reduce and perhaps, eliminate uncertainties raised in genetic damage investigations in cells exposed in vitro and in vivo to MRI.

  14. Breast imaging with ultrasound tomography: a comparative study with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter; Duric, Neb; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica; Myc, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Amy; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for imaging overall breast anatomy and accentuating tumors relative to background tissue. The study was HIPAA compliant, approved by the Institutional Review Board, and performed after obtaining the requisite informed consent. Twenty-three patients were imaged with MR and the UST prototype. T1 weighted images with fat saturation, with and without gadolinium enhancement, were used to examine anatomical structures and tumors, while T2 weighted images were used to identify cysts. The UST scans generated sound speed, attenuation, and reflection images. A qualitative visual comparison of the MRI and UST images was then used to identify anatomical similarities. A more focused approach that involved a comparison of reported masses, lesion volumes, and breast density was used to quantify the findings from the visual assessment. Our acoustic tomography prototype imaged distributions of fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and lesions in patterns similar to those seen in the MR images. The range of thresholds required to establish tumor volume equivalency between MRI and UST suggested that a universal threshold for isolating masses relative to background tissue is feasible with UST. UST has demonstrated the ability to visualize and characterize breast tissues in a manner comparable to MRI. Thresholding techniques accentuate masses relative to background anatomy, which may prove clinically useful for early cancer detection.

  15. Opening the black box: imaging nanoparticle transport with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, V.; Holmes, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    While most renown for its use in medicine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has tremendous potential in the study of environmental processes. Its ability to non-invasively image inside materials that are opaque to other imaging methods (in particular light based techniques) is a particular strength. MRI has already been used, for example, to study fluid flow in rocks and image mass transport and biogeochemical processes in biofilms [1-4]. Here, we report of the use of MRI to image nanoparticle transport through porous geologic media (in this case packed gravel columns). Packed column experiments are key to understanding nanoparticulate transport in porous geologic media. Whilst highly informative, the data obtained can be a bulk average of a complex and heterogeneous array of interactions within the column. Natural environmental systems are often complex, displaying heterogeneity in geometry, hydrodynamics, geochemistry and microbiology throughout. MRI enables us to quantify better how this heterogeneity may influence nanoparticle transport and fate by enabling us to look inside the column and image the movement of nanoparticles within. To make the nanoparticle readily visible to MRI, it is labelled with a paramagnetic tag (commonly gadolinium). Indeed, a wide variety of off-the-shelf paramagnetically tagged nanoparticles and macromolecules are available, each with different properties enabling us to explore the impact of particle charge, size etc on their transport behaviour. In this preliminary study, packed columns of quartz or marble based gravels (approx 5 mm diameter) were first imaged to check their suitability for MR imaging. This was done as geologic material can contain sufficiently high concentrations of ferro- and paramagnetic ions to induce unwanted artefacts in the MR image. All gravels imaged (Rose quartz, Creswick quartz gravel and Ben Deulin white marble) produced minimal or no artefacts. A solution of the nanoparticle GadoCELLTrack (BioPAL), was

  16. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  17. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for NMR and MRI researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin J.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the “black blood” contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2∗ dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, “bright blood” contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field.

  18. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  19. Imaging industry expectations for compressed sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kevin F.; Kanwischer, Adriana; Peters, Rob

    2015-09-01

    Compressed sensing requires compressible data, incoherent acquisition and a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm to force creation of a compressible image consistent with the acquired data. MRI images are compressible using various transforms (commonly total variation or wavelets). Incoherent acquisition of MRI data by appropriate selection of pseudo-random or non-Cartesian locations in k-space is straightforward. Increasingly, commercial scanners are sold with enough computing power to enable iterative reconstruction in reasonable times. Therefore integration of compressed sensing into commercial MRI products and clinical practice is beginning. MRI frequently requires the tradeoff of spatial resolution, temporal resolution and volume of spatial coverage to obtain reasonable scan times. Compressed sensing improves scan efficiency and reduces the need for this tradeoff. Benefits to the user will include shorter scans, greater patient comfort, better image quality, more contrast types per patient slot, the enabling of previously impractical applications, and higher throughput. Challenges to vendors include deciding which applications to prioritize, guaranteeing diagnostic image quality, maintaining acceptable usability and workflow, and acquisition and reconstruction algorithm details. Application choice depends on which customer needs the vendor wants to address. The changing healthcare environment is putting cost and productivity pressure on healthcare providers. The improved scan efficiency of compressed sensing can help alleviate some of this pressure. Image quality is strongly influenced by image compressibility and acceleration factor, which must be appropriately limited. Usability and workflow concerns include reconstruction time and user interface friendliness and response. Reconstruction times are limited to about one minute for acceptable workflow. The user interface should be designed to optimize workflow and minimize additional customer training. Algorithm

  20. MRI Image Processing Based on Fractal Analysis

    PubMed

    Marusina, Mariya Y; Mochalina, Alexandra P; Frolova, Ekaterina P; Satikov, Valentin I; Barchuk, Anton A; Kuznetcov, Vladimir I; Gaidukov, Vadim S; Tarakanov, Segrey A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer is one of the most common causes of human mortality, with about 14 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths reported in in 2012. Early diagnosis of cancer through screening allows interventions to reduce mortality. Fractal analysis of medical images may be useful for this purpose. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy livers and livers containing metastases from colorectal cancer. The fractal dimension and the Hurst exponent were chosen as diagnostic features for tomographic imaging using Image J software package for image processings FracLac for applied for fractal analysis with a 120x150 pixel area. Calculations of the fractal dimensions of pathological and healthy tissue samples were performed using the box-counting method. Results: In pathological cases (foci formation), the Hurst exponent was less than 0.5 (the region of unstable statistical characteristics). For healthy tissue, the Hurst index is greater than 0.5 (the zone of stable characteristics). Conclusions: The study indicated the possibility of employing fractal rapid analysis for the detection of focal lesions of the liver. The Hurst exponent can be used as an important diagnostic characteristic for analysis of medical images.

  1. Imaging tumour motion for radiotherapy planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Plathow, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Novel technology has made dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung motion and lung tumour mobility during continuous respiration feasible. This might be beneficial for planning of radiotherapy of lung tumours, especially when using high precision techniques. This paper describes the recent developments to analyze and visualize pulmonary nodules during continuous respiration using MRI. Besides recent dynamic two-dimensional approaches to quantify motion of pulmonary nodules during respiration novel three-dimensional techniques are presented. Beyond good correlation to pulmonary function tests MRI also provides regional information about differences between tumour-bearing and non-tumour bearing lung and the restrictive effects of radiotherapy as well as the compensation by the contralateral lung. PMID:17114068

  2. The role of susceptibility weighted imaging in functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Haacke, E Mark; Ye, Yongquan

    2012-08-15

    The development of functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a boon for neuroscientists and radiologists alike. It provides for fundamental information on brain function and better diagnostic tools to study disease. In this paper, we will review some of the early concepts in high resolution gradient echo imaging with a particular emphasis on susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) and MR angiography (MRA). We begin with the history of our own experience in this area, followed by a discussion of the role of high resolution in studying the vasculature of the brain and how this relates to the BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) signal. We introduce the role of SWI and susceptibility mapping (SWIM) in fMRI and close with recommendations for future high resolution experiments.

  3. [Brain development of infant and MRI by diffusion tensor imaging].

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Mangin, J-F; Le Bihan, D; Hüppi, P S; Hertz-Pannier, L

    2012-01-01

    Studying how the brain develops and becomes functional is important to understand how the man has been able to develop specific cognitive abilities, and to comprehend the complexity of some developmental pathologies. Thanks to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it is now possible to image the baby's immature brain and to consider subtle correlations between the brain anatomical development and the early acquisition of cognitive functions. Dedicated methodologies for image acquisition and post-treatment must then be used because the size of cerebral structures and the image contrast are very different in comparison with the adult brain, and because the examination length is a major constraint. Two recent studies have evaluated the developing brain under an original perspective. The first one has focused on cortical folding in preterm newborns, from 6 to 8 months of gestational age, assessed with T2-weighted conventional MRI. The second study has mapped the organization and maturation of white matter fiber bundles in 1- to 4-month-old healthy infants with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both studies have enabled to highlight spatio-temporal differences in the brain regions' maturation, as well as early anatomical asymmetries between cerebral hemispheres. These studies emphasize the potential of MRI to evaluate brain development compared with the infant's psychomotor acquisitions after birth.

  4. LIGHT-SABRE enables efficient in-magnet catalytic hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas; Truong, Milton; Coffey, Aaron M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization overcomes the sensitivity limitations of traditional NMR and MRI, but the most general method demonstrated to date (dynamic nuclear polarization) has significant limitations in scalability, cost, and complex apparatus design. As an alternative, signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of parahydrogen on transition metal catalysts can hyperpolarize a variety of substrates, but to date this scheme has required transfer of the sample to low magnetic field or very strong RF irradiation. Here we demonstrate "Low-Irradiation Generation of High Tesla-SABRE" (LIGHT-SABRE) which works with simple pulse sequences and low power deposition; it should be usable at any magnetic field and for hyperpolarization of many different nuclei. This approach could drastically reduce the cost and complexity of producing hyperpolarized molecules.

  5. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  6. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  7. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  8. Linking MRI Postprocessing with Magnetic Source Imaging in MRI-negative Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong I.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Jones, Stephen E.; Najm, Imad M.; Ristic, Aleksandar; Wong, Chong; Prayson, Richard; Schneider, Felix; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Wang, Shuang; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective MRI-negative (MRI–) pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy (PFE) patients are most challenging for epilepsy surgical management. This study utilizes a voxel-based MRI postprocessing technique, implemented using a morphometric analysis program (MAP), aiming to facilitate detection of subtle focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in MRI– patients. Furthermore, the study examines the concordance between MAP-identified regions and localization from magnetic source imaging (MSI). Methods Included in this retrospective study were 25 MRI– surgical patients. MAP was performed on T1-weighted MRI, with comparison to a normal database. The pertinence of MAP+ areas was confirmed by MSI, surgical outcome and pathology. Analyses of MAP and MSI were performed blindly from patients' clinical information and independently from each other. Results The detection rate of subtle changes by MAP was 48% (12/25). Once MAP+ areas were resected, patients were more likely to be seizure-free (p = 0.02). There were no false positives in the 25 age-matched normal controls. Seven patients had a concordant MSI correlate. Patients in whom a concordant area was identified by both MAP and MSI had a significantly higher chance of achieving a seizure-free outcome following complete resection of this area (p = 0.008). In the 9 resected MAP+ areas, pathology revealed FCD type IA in 7 and type IIB in 2. Interpretation MAP shows promise in identifying subtle FCD abnormalities and increasing the diagnostic yield of conventional MRI visual analysis in presurgical evaluation of PFE. Concordant MRI postprocessing and MSI analyses may lead to the noninvasive identification of a structurally and electrically abnormal subtle lesion that can be surgically targeted. PMID:24777960

  9. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  10. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-MRI images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Le Minh, Hung; Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting; Sung, Kyung Hyun; Liu, Wenyu

    2016-08-01

    Renal compartment segmentation from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images is an important task for functional kidney evaluation. Despite advancement in segmentation methods, most of them focus on segmenting an entire kidney on CT images, there still lacks effective and automatic solutions for accurate segmentation of internal renal structures (i.e. cortex, medulla and renal pelvis) from DCE-MRI images. In this paper, we introduce a method for renal compartment segmentation which can robustly achieve high segmentation accuracy for a wide range of DCE-MRI data, and meanwhile requires little manual operations and parameter settings. The proposed method consists of five main steps. First, we pre-process the image time series to reduce the motion artifacts caused by the movement of the patients during the scans and enhance the kidney regions. Second, the kidney is segmented as a whole based on the concept of Maximally Stable Temporal Volume (MSTV). The proposed MSTV detects anatomical structures that are homogeneous in the spatial domain and stable in terms of temporal dynamics. MSTV-based kidney segmentation is robust to noises and does not require a training phase. It can well adapt to kidney shape variations caused by renal dysfunction. Third, voxels in the segmented kidney are described by principal components (PCs) to remove temporal redundancy and noises. And then k-means clustering of PCs is applied to separate voxels into multiple clusters. Fourth, the clusters are automatically labeled as cortex, medulla and pelvis based on voxels' geometric locations and intensity distribution. Finally, an iterative refinement method is introduced to further remove noises in each segmented compartment. Experiments on 14 real clinical kidney datasets and 12 synthetic dataset demonstrate that results produced by our method match very well with those segmented manually and the performance of our method is superior to the other five existing methods.

  11. Complete fourier direct magnetic resonance imaging (CFD-MRI) for diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2013-01-01

    The foundation for an accurate and unifying Fourier-based theory of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW–MRI) is constructed by carefully re-examining the first principles of DW–MRI signal formation and deriving its mathematical model from scratch. The derivations are specifically obtained for DW–MRI signal by including all of its elements (e.g., imaging gradients) using complex values. Particle methods are utilized in contrast to conventional partial differential equations approach. The signal is shown to be the Fourier transform of the joint distribution of number of the magnetic moments (at a given location at the initial time) and magnetic moment displacement integrals. In effect, the k-space is augmented by three more dimensions, corresponding to the frequency variables dual to displacement integral vectors. The joint distribution function is recovered by applying the Fourier transform to the complete high-dimensional data set. In the process, to obtain a physically meaningful real valued distribution function, phase corrections are applied for the re-establishment of Hermitian symmetry in the signal. Consequently, the method is fully unconstrained and directly presents the distribution of displacement integrals without any assumptions such as symmetry or Markovian property. The joint distribution function is visualized with isosurfaces, which describe the displacement integrals, overlaid on the distribution map of the number of magnetic moments with low mobility. The model provides an accurate description of the molecular motion measurements via DW–MRI. The improvement of the characterization of tissue microstructure leads to a better localization, detection and assessment of biological properties such as white matter integrity. The results are demonstrated on the experimental data obtained from an ex vivo baboon brain. PMID:23596401

  12. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium is recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentration are also recovered successfully. PMID:23640084

  13. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-09-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  14. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C. ); Sanders, J.; Maclin, E. ); Belliveau, J.W. ); Caprihan, A. )

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  15. Adaptive image guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A combined MRI-/CT-planning technique with MRI only at first fraction

    PubMed Central

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Pötter, Richard; Sturdza, Alina; Hegazy, Neamat; Federico, Mario; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate and test the feasibility of adaptive 3D image based BT planning for cervix cancer patients in settings with limited access to MRI, using a combination of MRI for the first BT fraction and planning of subsequent fractions on CT. Material and methods For 20 patients treated with EBRT and HDR BT with tandem/ring applicators two sets of treatment plans were compared. Scenario one is based on the “gold standard” with individual MRI-based treatment plans (applicator reconstruction, target contouring and dose optimization) for two BT applications with two fractions each. Scenario two is based on one initial MRI acquisition with an applicator in place for the planning of the two fractions of the first BT application and reuse of the target contour delineated on MRI for subsequent planning of the second application on CT. Transfer of the target from MRI of the first application to the CT of the second one was accomplished by use of an automatic applicator-based image registration procedure. Individual dose optimization of the second BT application was based on the transferred MRI target volume and OAR structures delineated on CT. DVH parameters were calculated for transferred target structures (virtual dose from MRI/CT plan) and CT-based OAR. The quality of the MRI/CT combination method was investigated by evaluating the CT-based dose distributions on MRI-based target and OAR contours of the same application (real dose from MRI/CT plan). Results The mean difference between the MRI based target volumes (HR CTVMRI2) and the structures transferred from MRI to CT (HR CTVCT2) was −1.7 ± 6.6 cm3 (−2.9 ± 20.4%) with a median of −0.7 cm3. The mean difference between the virtual and the real total D90, based on the MRI/CT combination technique was −1.5 ± 4.3 Gy EQD2. This indicates a small systematic underestimation of the real D90. Conclusions A combination of MRI for first fraction and subsequent CT based planning is feasible and easy

  16. In vivo prostate cancer detection and grading using restriction spectrum imaging-MRI

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, KC; Kane, CJ; Parsons, JK; White, NS; Schenker-Ahmed, NM; Kuperman, JM; Bartsch, H; Desikan, RS; Rakow-Penner, RA; Adams, D; Liss, MA; Mattrey, RF; Bradley, WG; Margolis, DJA; Raman, SS; Shabaik, A; Dale, AM; Karow, DS

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a robust, noninvasive method for detecting and characterizing prostate cancer (PCa), but limitations remain in its ability to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous tissue. We evaluated the performance of a novel MRI technique, restriction spectrum imaging (RSI-MRI), to quantitatively detect and grade PCa compared with current standard-of-care MRI. METHODS In a retrospective evaluation of 33 patients with biopsy-proven PCa who underwent RSI-MRI and standard MRI before radical prostatectomy, receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for RSI-MRI and each quantitative MRI term, with area under the ROC curve (AUC) used to compare each term’s ability to differentiate between PCa and normal prostate. Spearman rank-order correlations were performed to assess each term’s ability to predict PCa grade in the radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS RSI-MRI demonstrated superior differentiation of PCa from normal tissue, with AUC of 0.94 and 0.85 for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively (P = 0.04). RSI-MRI also demonstrated superior performance in predicting PCa aggressiveness, with Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients of 0.53 (P = 0.002) and − 0.42 (P = 0.01) for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively, with tumor grade. CONCLUSIONS RSI-MRI significantly improves upon current noninvasive PCa imaging and may potentially enhance its diagnosis and characterization. PMID:26754261

  17. A new paramagnetically shifted imaging probe for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, P. Kanthi; Rogers, Nicola J.; Finney, Katie‐Louise N.A.; Harvey, Peter; Funk, Alexander M.; Wilson, J. Ian; O'Hogain, Dara; Maxwell, Ross; Parker, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and characterize a new paramagnetic contrast agent for molecular imaging by MRI. Methods A contrast agent was developed for direct MRI detection through the paramagnetically shifted proton magnetic resonances of two chemically equivalent tert‐butyl reporter groups within a dysprosium(III) complex. The complex was characterized in phantoms and imaged in physiologically intact mice at 7 Tesla (T) using three‐dimensional (3D) gradient echo and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequences to measure spatial distribution and signal frequency. Results The reporter protons reside ∼6.5 Å from the paramagnetic center, resulting in fast T 1 relaxation (T 1 = 8 ms) and a large paramagnetic frequency shift exceeding 60 ppm. Fast relaxation allowed short scan repetition times with high excitation flip angle, resulting in high sensitivity. The large dipolar shift allowed direct frequency selective excitation and acquisition of the dysprosium(III) complex, independent of the tissue water signal. The biokinetics of the complex were followed in vivo with a temporal resolution of 62 s following a single, low‐dose intravenous injection. The lower concentration limit for detection was ∼23 μM. Through MRSI, the temperature dependence of the paramagnetic shift (0.28 ppm.K−1) was exploited to examine tissue temperature variation. Conclusions These data demonstrate a new MRI agent with the potential for physiological monitoring by MRI. Magn Reson Med 77:1307–1317, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26922918

  18. Diffeomorphic Image Registration of Diffusion MRI Using Spherical Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiujuan; Ross, Thomas J.; Gu, Hong; Shin, Wanyong; Zhan, Wang; Chao, Yi-Ping; Lin, Ching-Po; Schuff, Norbert; Yang, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    Non-rigid registration of diffusion MRI is crucial for group analyses and building white matter and fiber tract atlases. Most current diffusion MRI registration techniques are limited to the alignment of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. We propose a novel diffeomorphic registration method for high angular resolution diffusion images by mapping their orientation distribution functions (ODFs). ODFs can be reconstructed using q-ball imaging (QBI) techniques and represented by spherical harmonics (SHs) to resolve intra-voxel fiber crossings. The registration is based on optimizing a diffeomorphic demons cost function. Unlike scalar images, deforming ODF maps requires ODF reorientation to maintain its consistency with the local fiber orientations. Our method simultaneously reorients the ODFs by computing a Wigner rotation matrix at each voxel, and applies it to the SH coefficients during registration. Rotation of the coefficients avoids the estimation of principal directions, which has no analytical solution and is time consuming. The proposed method was validated on both simulated and real data sets with various metrics, which include the distance between the estimated and simulated transformation fields, the standard deviation of the general fractional anisotropy and the directional consistency of the deformed and reference images. The registration performance using SHs with different maximum orders were compared using these metrics. Results show that the diffeomorphic registration improved the affine alignment, and registration using SHs with higher order SHs further improved the registration accuracy by reducing the shape difference and improving the directional consistency of the registered and reference ODF maps. PMID:21134814

  19. Whole-Body MRI in Children: Current Imaging Techniques and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in children to evaluate the extent and distribution of various neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Not using ionizing radiation is a major advantage of pediatric whole-body MRI. Coronal and sagittal short tau inversion recovery imaging is most commonly used as the fundamental whole-body MRI protocol. Diffusion-weighted imaging and Dixon-based imaging, which has been recently incorporated into whole-body MRI, are promising pulse sequences, particularly for pediatric oncology. Other pulse sequences may be added to increase diagnostic capability of whole-body MRI. Of importance, the overall whole-body MRI examination time should be less than 30-60 minutes in children, regardless of the imaging protocol. Established and potentially useful clinical applications of pediatric whole-body MRI are described. PMID:26355493

  20. Validation of the hypercapnic calibrated fMRI method using DOT-fMRI fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Evans, Karleyton C.; Selb, Juliette; Huppert, Theodore J.; Boas, David A.; Gagnon, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Calibrated functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a widely used method to investigate brain function in terms of physiological quantities such as the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). The first and one of the most common methods of fMRI calibration is hypercapnic calibration. This is achieved via simultaneous measures of blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) and the arterial spin labeling (ASL) signals during a functional task that evokes regional changes in CMRO2. A subsequent acquisition is then required during which the subject inhales carbon dioxide for short periods of time. A calibration constant, typically labeled M, is then estimated from the hypercapnic data and is subsequently used together with the BOLD-ASL recordings to compute evoked changes in CMRO2 during the functional task. The computation of M assumes a constant CMRO2 during the CO2 inhalation, an assumption that has been questioned since the origin of calibrated fMRI. In this study we used Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) together with BOLD and ASL – an alternative calibration method that does not require any gas manipulation and therefore no constant CMRO2 assumption - to cross-validate the estimation of M obtained from a traditional hypercapnic calibration. We found a high correlation between the M values (R=0.87, p<0.01) estimated using these two approaches. The findings serve to validate the hypercapnic fMRI calibration technique and suggest that the inter-subject variability routinely obtained for M is reproducible with an alternative method and might therefore reflect inter-subject physiological variability. PMID:25196509

  1. Current status of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography fusion software platforms for guidance of prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jennifer K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; Gomella, Andrew; Amalou, Hayet; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Prostate MRI is currently the best diagnostic imaging method for detecting PCa. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasonography (US) fusion allows the sensitivity and specificity of MRI to be combined with the real-time capabilities of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). Multiple approaches and techniques exist for MRI/US fusion and include direct 'in bore' MRI biopsies, cognitive fusion, and MRI/US fusion via software-based image coregistration platforms.

  2. Ultrafast inverse imaging techniques for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin W K; Chu, Ying-Hua; Witzel, Thomas; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Raij, Tommi; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Belliveau, John W

    2012-08-15

    Inverse imaging (InI) supercharges the sampling rate of traditional functional MRI 10-100 fold at a cost of a moderate reduction in spatial resolution. The technique is inspired by similarities between multi-sensor magnetoencephalography (MEG) and highly parallel radio-frequency (RF) MRI detector arrays. Using presently available 32-channel head coils at 3T, InI can be sampled at 10 Hz and provides about 5-mm cortical spatial resolution with whole-brain coverage. Here we discuss the present applications of InI, as well as potential future challenges and opportunities in further improving its spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. InI may become a helpful tool for clinicians and neuroscientists for revealing the complex dynamics of brain functions during task-related and resting states.

  3. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Daniel C; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Tanno, Ryutaro; Wottschel, Viktor; Zhang, Jiaying; Kaden, Enrico; Dyrby, Tim B; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Zhang, Hui; Criminisi, Antonio

    2017-03-03

    This paper introduces a new computational imaging technique called image quality transfer (IQT). IQT uses machine learning to transfer the rich information available from one-off experimental medical imaging devices to the abundant but lower-quality data from routine acquisitions. The procedure uses matched pairs to learn mappings from low-quality to corresponding high-quality images. Once learned, these mappings then augment unseen low quality images, for example by enhancing image resolution or information content. Here, we demonstrate IQT using a simple patch-regression implementation and the uniquely rich diffusion MRI data set from the human connectome project (HCP). Results highlight potential benefits of IQT in both brain connectivity mapping and microstructure imaging. In brain connectivity mapping, IQT reveals, from standard data sets, thin connection pathways that tractography normally requires specialised data to reconstruct. In microstructure imaging, IQT shows potential in estimating, from standard "single-shell" data (one non-zero b-value), maps of microstructural parameters that normally require specialised multi-shell data. Further experiments show strong generalisability, highlighting IQT's benefits even when the training set does not directly represent the application domain. The concept extends naturally to many other imaging modalities and reconstruction problems.

  4. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation.

  5. A paramagnetic CEST agent for imaging glucose by MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanrong; Trokowski, Robert; Sherry, A Dean

    2003-12-17

    The europium(III) complex of a DOTA-tetraamide ligand (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N' ',N' ''-tetraacetic acids) containing two phenyl boronate pendent arms binds glucose reversibly with an association constant of 383 M-1 at pH 7. Glucose binding results in slowing of water exchange between a single Eu(III)-bound water molecule and bulk water, and this can be imaged by MRI using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging sequence. This metabolite-responsive paramagnetic CEST agent responds to changes in glucose over the physiologically important range (0-20 mM), and thus it offers the possibility of high-sensitivity MR imaging glucose in tissues using bulk water protons as antenna.

  6. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  7. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 3 ×3 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0.88, 0.83, 0.77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0.78, 0.65, and 0.75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  8. Brain Tumor Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-03-04

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 33 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0:88, 0:83, 0:77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0:78, 0:65, and 0:75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  9. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  10. The Efficiency of Diffusion Weighted MRI and MR Spectroscopy On Breast MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Canan; Balcı, Pınar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiologically routine is to establish an imaging protocol that will create high quality images with a short period of time. Fort this purpose, an imaging protocol should include a conventional breast MRI and contrast enhanced sequences. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are important MR techniques for evaluation to complicated breast lesions. In this article, we will evaluate that technical properties of the MRS and DWI as additional MR imaging.

  11. MRI Biomarkers in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori; Dula, Adrienne; Quarles, C. Chad; Stokes, Ashley; Weis, Jared; Whisenant, Jennifer; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Zhukov, Igor; Williams, Jason; Yankeelov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have the ability to quantitatively report various pathophysiological processes associated with cancer. These measures have been shown to provide complementary information to that typically obtained from standard morphologically based criteria (e.g., size) and, furthermore, have been shown to outperform sized based measures in certain applications. In this review, we discuss eight areas of quantitative MRI that are either currently employed in clinical trials, or are emerging as promising techniques for both diagnosing cancer as well as assessing—or even predicting—the response of cancer to various therapies. The currently employed methods include the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). The emerging techniques covered are chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI (CEST-MRI), elastography, hyperpolarized MRI, and multi-parameter MRI. After a brief introduction to each technique, we present a small number of illustrative applications before noting the existing limitations of each method and what must be done to move each to more routine clinical application. PMID:26613873

  12. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  13. Elasticity reconstructive imaging by means of stimulated echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Skovoroda, A R; O'Donnell, M; Emelianov, S Y

    1998-03-01

    A method is introduced to measure internal mechanical displacement and strain by means of MRI. Such measurements are needed to reconstruct an image of the elastic Young's modulus. A stimulated echo acquisition sequence with additional gradient pulses encodes internal displacements in response to an externally applied differential deformation. The sequence provides an accurate measure of static displacement by limiting the mechanical transitions to the mixing period of the simulated echo. Elasticity reconstruction involves definition of a region of interest having uniform Young's modulus along its boundary and subsequent solution of the discretized elasticity equilibrium equations. Data acquisition and reconstruction were performed on a urethane rubber phantom of known elastic properties and an ex vivo canine kidney phantom using <2% differential deformation. Regional elastic properties are well represented on Young's modulus images. The long-term objective of this work is to provide a means for remote palpation and elasticity quantitation in deep tissues otherwise inaccessible to manual palpation.

  14. Imaging Modality of Choice for Pre-Operative Cochlear Imaging: HRCT vs. MRI Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Rajendra N.; Shah, Dipali C.; Vishwakarma, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital inner ear malformations occur as a result of the arrest or aberrance of inner ear development due to the heredity, gene mutation or other factors. Ever since the availability of cochlear implants, pre-operative evaluation by imaging of temporal bone has gained much attention. Precise selection of the candidate for cochlear implant dependent on preoperative radiological investigations. Only CT (Computed Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) can provide a better picture of anatomy and pathology. Aim To compare pre-operative imaging findings of both MRI and High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) temporal bone and to find the best modality of choice in patients with bilateral profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SNHL). Materials and Methods This was a prospective, longitudinal, observational study conducted between June 2010 to November 2012. A total of 144 temporal bones were evaluated in 72 children with bilateral profound SNHL with congenital inner ear malformations. Each temporal bone was considered as a single case (144 cases). All the patients underwent HRCT and high field MRI study. MRI study included T2 W axial 3D FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition) sequence. Anatomic abnormalities in each temporal bone were described and noted. For complete and better evaluation of Vestibulo-Cochlear Nerve (VCN) additional 3D oblique parasagittal view was taken perpendicular to the internal auditory canal with a small Field Of View (FOV). Results HRCT and MRI allowed accurate detection of inner ear malformations in children with bilateral SNHL. Majority of the patients presented with multiple structural abnormalities of inner ear. The common pathologies detected in the study were semicircular canal abnormality (89/144) followed by cochlear abnormalities (39/144). Most common cochlear abnormality was Mondini’s deformity (14/144). MRI demonstrated absent of vestibulo-cochlear nerve in 15 cases. Conclusion Few

  15. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  16. A novel approach to image neural activity directly by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manbir; Sungkarat, Witaya

    2005-04-01

    Though an approach to image the electrical activity of neurons directly by detecting phase shifts in MRI was first reported in 1991, results to-date remain equivocal due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. The objective of this work was to develop a stimulus-presentation and data acquisition strategy specially geared to detect phase-dispersion effects of neuronal currents within 10-100 ms following stimulation. The key feature is to set the repeated MR data acquisition time TR and the stimulus presentation interval (TI) slightly different from each other so that the time at which images are acquired shifts gradually from one acquisition to the next with respect to stimulus onset. For example, at TR=275ms and 4 Hz stimulus presentation (TI=250ms), initial synchronization of the stimulus onset and MR acquisition would result in the first image being acquired at a latency of 0+/- (temporal width of data acquisition window), second image at a latency of 25ms, third image at a latency of 50ms and so on up to a latency of 250ms, at which time the stimulus and data acquisition times would become re-synchronized to once again acquire an image at latency=0. Human data were acquired on a 1.5T GE EXCITE scanner from two 8mm thick contiguous slices bracketing the calcarine fissure during a checkerboard flashing at 4 Hz. Preliminary results show activity in the visual cortex at latencies consistent with EEG studies, suggesting the potential of this methodology to image neural activity directly.

  17. TH-A-BRF-08: Deformable Registration of MRI and CT Images for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, H; Wen, N; Gordon, J; Movsas, B; Chetty, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of a commercially available MRI-CT image registration algorithm and then develop a method to improve the performance of this algorithm for MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy. Methods: Prostate contours were delineated on ten pairs of MRI and CT images using Eclipse. Each pair of MRI and CT images was registered with an intensity-based B-spline algorithm implemented in Velocity. A rectangular prism that contains the prostate volume was partitioned into a tetrahedral mesh which was aligned to the CT image. A finite element method (FEM) was developed on the mesh with the boundary constraints assigned from the Velocity generated displacement vector field (DVF). The resultant FEM displacements were used to adjust the Velocity DVF within the prism. Point correspondences between the CT and MR images identified within the prism could be used as additional boundary constraints to enforce the model deformation. The FEM deformation field is smooth in the interior of the prism, and equal to the Velocity displacements at the boundary of the prism. To evaluate the Velocity and FEM registration results, three criteria were used: prostate volume conservation and center consistence under contour mapping, and unbalanced energy of their deformation maps. Results: With the DVFs generated by the Velocity and FEM simulations, the prostate contours were warped from MRI to CT images. With the Velocity DVFs, the prostate volumes changed 10.2% on average, in contrast to 1.8% induced by the FEM DVFs. The average of the center deviations was 0.36 and 0.27 cm, and the unbalance energy was 2.65 and 0.38 mJ/cc3 for the Velocity and FEM registrations, respectively. Conclusion: The adaptive FEM method developed can be used to reduce the error of the MIbased registration algorithm implemented in Velocity in the prostate region, and consequently may help improve the quality of MRI-guided radiation therapy.

  18. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  19. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  20. Framework for 2D-3D image fusion of infrared thermography with preoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nico; Weidner, Florian; Urban, Peter; Meyer, Tobias; Schnabel, Christian; Radev, Yordan; Schackert, Gabriele; Petersohn, Uwe; Koch, Edmund; Gumhold, Stefan; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    Multimodal medical image fusion combines information of one or more images in order to improve the diagnostic value. While previous applications mainly focus on merging images from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic and single-photon emission computed tomography, we propose a novel approach for the registration and fusion of preoperative 3D MRI with intraoperative 2D infrared thermography. Image-guided neurosurgeries are based on neuronavigation systems, which further allow us track the position and orientation of arbitrary cameras. Hereby, we are able to relate the 2D coordinate system of the infrared camera with the 3D MRI coordinate system. The registered image data are now combined by calibration-based image fusion in order to map our intraoperative 2D thermographic images onto the respective brain surface recovered from preoperative MRI. In extensive accuracy measurements, we found that the proposed framework achieves a mean accuracy of 2.46 mm.

  1. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  2. Design of a Novel MRI Compatible Manipulator for Image Guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Susil, Robert C.; Ménard, Cynthia; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Atalar, Ergin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a novel remotely actuated manipulator for access to prostate tissue under magnetic resonance imaging guidance (APT-MRI) device, designed for use in a standard high-field MRI scanner. The device provides three-dimensional MRI guided needle placement with millimeter accuracy under physician control. Procedures enabled by this device include MRI guided needle biopsy, fiducial marker placements, and therapy delivery. Its compact size allows for use in both standard cylindrical and open configuration MRI scanners. Preliminary in vivo canine experiments and first clinical trials are reported. PMID:15709668

  3. Single-Step Assembly of Multimodal Imaging Nanocarriers: MRI and Long-Wavelength Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Nathalie M; Gindy, Marian E; Calero-DdelC, Victoria L; Wolfson, Theodore; Pagels, Robert F; Adler, Derek; Gao, Dayuan; Li, Shike; Wang, Ruobing; Zevon, Margot; Yao, Nan; Pacheco, Carlos; Therien, Michael J; Rinaldi, Carlos; Sinko, Patrick J; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- and near-infrared (NIR)-active, multimodal composite nanocarriers (CNCs) are prepared using a simple one-step process, flash nanoprecipitation (FNP). The FNP process allows for the independent control of the hydrodynamic diameter, co-core excipient and NIR dye loading, and iron oxide-based nanocrystal (IONC) content of the CNCs. In the controlled precipitation process, 10 nm IONCs are encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) stabilized CNCs to make biocompatible T2 contrast agents. By adjusting the formulation, CNC size is tuned between 80 and 360 nm. Holding the CNC size constant at an intensity weighted average diameter of 99 ± 3 nm (PDI width 28 nm), the particle relaxivity varies linearly with encapsulated IONC content ranging from 66 to 533 × 10(-3) m(-1) s(-1) for CNCs formulated with 4-16 wt% IONC. To demonstrate the use of CNCs as in vivo MRI contrast agents, CNCs are surface functionalized with liver-targeting hydroxyl groups. The CNCs enable the detection of 0.8 mm(3) non-small cell lung cancer metastases in mice livers via MRI. Incorporating the hydrophobic, NIR dye tris-(porphyrinato)zinc(II) into CNCs enables complementary visualization with long-wavelength fluorescence at 800 nm. In vivo imaging demonstrates the ability of CNCs to act both as MRI and fluorescent imaging agents.

  4. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  5. Image Registration for Targeted MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Andriy; Tuncali, Kemal; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Wells, William M.; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate image registration methodology for automated re-identification of tumor-suspicious foci from pre-procedural MR exams during MR-guided transperineal prostate core biopsy. Materials and Methods A hierarchical approach for automated registration between planning and intra-procedural T2-weighted prostate MRI was developed and evaluated on the images acquired during 10 consecutive MR-guided biopsies. Registration accuracy was quantified at image-based landmarks and by evaluating spatial overlap for the manually segmented prostate and sub-structures. Registration reliability was evaluated by simulating initial mis-registration and analyzing the convergence behavior. Registration precision was characterized at the planned biopsy targets. Results The total computation time was compatible with a clinical setting, being at most 2 minutes. Deformable registration led to a significant improvement in spatial overlap of the prostate and peripheral zone contours compared to both rigid and affine registration. Average in-slice landmark registration error was 1.3±0.5 mm. Experiments simulating initial mis-registration resulted in an estimated average capture range of 6 mm and an average in-slice registration precision of ±0.3 mm. Conclusion Our registration approach requires minimum user interaction and is compatible with the time constraints of our interventional clinical workflow. The initial evaluation shows acceptable accuracy, reliability and consistency of the method. PMID:22645031

  6. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  7. Propane-d6 Heterogeneously Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived spin states of hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas were demonstrated following pairwise addition of parahydrogen gas to propene-d6 using heterogeneous parahydrogen-induced polarization (HET-PHIP). Hyperpolarized molecules were synthesized using Rh/TiO2 solid catalyst with 1.6 nm Rh nanoparticles. Hyperpolarized (PH ∼ 1%) propane-d6 was detected at high magnetic field (9.4 T) spectroscopically and by high-resolution 3D gradient-echo MRI (4.7 T) as the gas flowed through the radiofrequency coil with a spatial and temporal resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 and 17.7 s, respectively. Stopped-flow hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas was also detected at 0.0475 T with an observed nuclear spin polarization of PH ∼ 0.1% and a relatively long lifetime with T1,eff = 6.0 ± 0.3 s. Importantly, it was shown that the hyperpolarized protons of the deuterated product obtained via pairwise parahydrogen addition could be detected directly at low magnetic field. Importantly, the relatively long low-field T1,eff of HP propane-d6 gas is not susceptible to paramagnetic impurities as tested by exposure to ∼0.2 atm oxygen. This long lifetime and nontoxic nature of propane gas could be useful for bioimaging applications including potentially pulmonary low-field MRI. The feasibility of high-resolution low-field 2D gradient-echo MRI was demonstrated with 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 spatial and ∼0.7 s temporal resolution, respectively, at 0.0475 T. PMID:25506406

  8. Molecular characterization of rheumatoid arthritis with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jeffrey T; Nguyen, Linda; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; MacKenzie, John D

    2011-04-01

    Several recent advances in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may transform the detection and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These advances depict both anatomic and molecular alterations from RA. Previous techniques could detect specific end products of metabolism in vitro or were limited to providing anatomic information. This review focuses on the novel molecular imaging techniques of hyperpolarized carbon-13 MRI, MRI with iron-labeled probes, and fusion of MRI with positron emission tomography. These new imaging approaches go beyond the anatomic description of RA and lend new information into the status of this disease by giving molecular information.

  9. PASADENA hyperpolarization of 13C biomolecules: equipment design and installation

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Robertson, Larry W.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object The PASADENA method has achieved hyperpolarization of 16–20% (exceeding 40,000-fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T), in liquid samples of biological molecules relevant to in vivo MRI and MRS. However, there exists no commercial apparatus to perform this experiment conveniently and reproducibly on the routine basis necessary for translation of PASADENA to questions of biomedical importance. The present paper describes equipment designed for rapid production of six to eight liquid samples per hour with high reproducibility of hyperpolarization. Materials and methods Drawing on an earlier, but unpublished, prototype, we provide diagrams of a delivery circuit, a laminar-flow reaction chamber within a low field NMR contained in a compact, movable housing. Assembly instructions are provided from which a computer driven, semiautomated PASADENA polarizer can be constructed. Results Together with an available parahydrogen generator, the polarizer, which can be operated by a single investigator, completes one cycle of hyperpolarization each 52 s. Evidence of efficacy is presented. In contrast to competing, commercially available devices for dynamic nuclear polarization which characteristically require 90 min per cycle, PASADENA provides a low-cost alternative for high throughput. Conclusions This equipment is suited to investigators who have an established small animal NMR and wish to explore the potential of heteronuclear (13C and 15N) MRI, MRS, which harnesses the enormous sensitivity gain offered by hyperpolarization. PMID:19067008

  10. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI--Next chapter of multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Kalra, Mannudeep; Murugan, Venkatesh; Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called "omnitomography" defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  11. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ge Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  12. Association of multiparametric MRI quantitative imaging features with prostate cancer gene expression in MRI-targeted prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Pollack, Alan; Takhar, Mandeep; Lynne, Charles; Parra, Nestor; Lam, Lucia L.C.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Buerki, Christine; Castillo, Rosa; Jorda, Merce; Ashab, Hussam Al-deen; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Punnen, Sanoj; Parekh, Dipen J.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Gillies, Robert J.; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Ishkanian, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Standard clinicopathological variables are inadequate for optimal management of prostate cancer patients. While genomic classifiers have improved patient risk classification, the multifocality and heterogeneity of prostate cancer can confound pre-treatment assessment. The objective was to investigate the association of multiparametric (mp)MRI quantitative features with prostate cancer risk gene expression profiles in mpMRI-guided biopsies tissues. Global gene expression profiles were generated from 17 mpMRI-directed diagnostic prostate biopsies using an Affimetrix platform. Spatially distinct imaging areas (‘habitats’) were identified on MRI/3D-Ultrasound fusion. Radiomic features were extracted from biopsy regions and normal appearing tissues. We correlated 49 radiomic features with three clinically available gene signatures associated with adverse outcome. The signatures contain genes that are over-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers and genes that are under-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers. There were significant correlations between these genes and quantitative imaging features, indicating the presence of prostate cancer prognostic signal in the radiomic features. Strong associations were also found between the radiomic features and significantly expressed genes. Gene ontology analysis identified specific radiomic features associated with immune/inflammatory response, metabolism, cell and biological adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate radiogenomic parameters with prostate cancer in men with MRI-guided biopsy. PMID:27438142

  13. Interhemispheric neuroplasticity following limb deafferentation detected by resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hyde, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) studies in rat brain show brain reorganization following peripheral nerve injury. Subacute neuroplasticity was observed two weeks following transection of the four major nerves of the brachial plexus. Direct functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stimulation of the intact radial nerve reveals an activation pattern in the forelimb regions of the sensory and motor cortices that is significantly different from that observed in normal rats. Results of this fMRI experiment were used to determine seed voxel regions for fcMRI analysis. Intrahemispheric connectivities in the sensorimotor forelimb representations in both hemispheres are largely unaffected by deafferentation, whereas substantial disruption of interhemispheric sensorimotor cortical connectivity occurs. In addition, significant intra- and interhemispheric changes in connectivities of thalamic nuclei were found. These are the central findings of the study. They could not have been obtained from fMRI studies alone—both fMRI and fcMRI are needed. The combination provides a general marker for brain plasticity. The rat visual system was studied in the same animals as a control. No neuroplastic changes in connectivities were found in the primary visual cortex upon forelimb deafferentation. Differences were noted in regions responsible for processing multisensory visual-motor information. This incidental discovery is considered to be significant. It may provide insight into phantom limb epiphenomena. PMID:19796693

  14. Echo Planar Imaging before and after fMRI: A personal history

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Schmitt, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) plays a crucial role in functional MRI. Focusing especially on the period from 1988 to 1992, the authors offer personal recollections, on the development of practical means of deploying EPI, the people that participated, and its impact on MRI in general. PMID:22266173

  15. DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and MRS in Cancer: Challenges and Advantages of Implementing Qualitative and Quantitative Multi-parametric Imaging in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Jessica M.; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Weller, Alex; deSouza, Nandita M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) offers a unique insight into tumor biology by combining functional MRI techniques that inform on cellularity (diffusion-weighted MRI), vascular properties (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), and metabolites (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and has scope to provide valuable information for prognostication and response assessment. Challenges in the application of mpMRI in the clinic include the technical considerations in acquiring good quality functional MRI data, development of robust techniques for analysis, and clinical interpretation of the results. This article summarizes the technical challenges in acquisition and analysis of multi-parametric MRI data before reviewing the key applications of multi-parametric MRI in clinical research and practice. PMID:27748710

  16. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network.

  17. A study on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based radiation treatment planning of intracranial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, T.; Jans, H.-S.; Pervez, N.; Stavrev, P.; Fallone, B. G.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The method relies on (a) distortion correction of raw magnetic resonance (MR) images by using an adaptive thresholding and iterative technique, (b) autosegmentation of head structures relevant to dosimetric calculations (scalp, bone and brain) using an atlas-based software and (c) conversion of MR images into computed tomography (CT)-like images by assigning bulk CT values to organ contours and dose calculations performed in Eclipse (Philips Medical Systems). Standard CT + MRI-based and MRI-only plans were compared by means of isodose distributions, dose volume histograms and several dosimetric parameters. The plans were also ranked by using a tumor control probability (TCP)-based technique for heterogeneous irradiation, which is independent of radiobiological parameters. For our 3 T Intera MRI scanner (Philips Medical Systems), we determined that the total maximum image distortion corresponding to a typical brain study was about 4 mm. The CT + MRI and MRI-only plans were found to be in good agreement for all patients investigated. Following our clinical criteria, the TCP-based ranking tool shows no significant difference between the two types of plans. This indicates that the proposed MRI-based treatment planning procedure is suitable for the radiotherapy of intracranial lesions.

  18. Continuous flow Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of water in the fringe field of a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for authentic image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Siaw, Ting Ann; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a system to generate hyperpolarized water in the 0.35 T fringe field of a clinical 1.5 T whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Once generated, the hyperpolarized water is quickly and continuously transferred from the 0.35 T fringe to the 1.5 T center field of the same magnet for image acquisition using standard MRI equipment. The hyperpolarization is based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which effectively and quickly transfers the higher spin polarization of free radicals to nuclear spins at ambient temperatures. We visualize the dispersion of hyperpolarized water as it flows through water-saturated systems by utilizing an observed −15 fold DNP signal enhancement with respect to the unenhanced 1H MRI signal of water at 1.5 T. The experimental DNP apparatus presented here is readily portable and can be brought to and used with any conventional unshielded MRI system. A new method of immobilizing radicals to gel beads via polyelectrolyte linker arms is described, which led to superior flow Overhauser DNP performance compared to previously presented gels. We discuss the general applicability of Overhauser DNP hyperpolarization of water and aqueous solutions in the fringe field of commercially available magnets with central fields up to 4.7 Tesla. PMID:20541445

  19. Imaging in arthritis: quantifying effects of therapeutic intervention using MRI and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Marco A; Barbieri, Francesca; Zampogna, Giuseppe; Camellino, Dario; Paparo, Francesco; Parodi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-05

    Modern imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in assessing the course of arthritis and in permitting measurement of response to treatment as part of the follow-up of patients. They include ultrasonography (US), MRI, PET/CT, and biofluorescence. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, clinical evaluation is significantly less sensitive than either US or MRI in detecting synovitis. As a result, imaging is a useful alternative to achieving proper assessment of disease activity. The different areas in which the new imaging techniques could help practicing rheumatologists and internal physicians include the following: early and differential diagnosis of arthritis, evaluation of disease activity, prognosis, assessment of treatment efficacy, assessment of remission, and evaluation of subclinical disease. MRI is probably the best imaging method to study disease activity in RA, because it can study all the joints with similar efficacy, has been sufficiently standardised, and yields data on inflammation that can be quantified. Different methods, developed to score synovitis activity, are increasingly used in clinical trials. The main application of PET/CT in rheumatology is the diagnosis and follow-up of large vessel vasculitis. More recently, also RA disease activity has been evaluated, allowing a panoramic view of the patient. Molecular imaging studies molecular and cellular processes in intact living organisms in a non-invasive fashion. In fluorescence, dyes, that emit light upon excitation by a light source and are read by a camera, can be used to show inflamed areas where neoangiogenesis, vasodilatation, and increased vessel permeability are present. These dyes can be coupled with different compounds including antibodies and drugs.

  20. Rapid ex vivo imaging of PAIII prostate to bone tumor with SWIFT-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Luhach, Ihor; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Lynch, Conor C.; Corum, Curt; Martinez, Gary V.; Garwood, Michael; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The limiting factor for MRI of skeletal/mineralized tissue is fast transverse relaxation. A recent advancement in MRI technology, SWIFT (Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform), is emerging as a new approach to overcome this difficulty. Among other techniques like UTE, ZTE and WASPI, the application of SWIFT technology has the strong potential to impact preclinical and clinical imaging, particularly in the context of primary or metastatic bone cancers since it has the added advantage of imaging water in mineralized tissues of bone allowing MRI images to be obtained of tissues previously visible only with modalities such as CT. The goal of the current study is to examine the feasibility of SWIFT for the assessment of the prostate cancer induced changes in bone formation (osteogenesis) and destruction (osteolysis) in ex vivo specimens. Methods A luciferase expressing prostate cancer cell line (PAIII) or saline control was inoculated directly into the tibia of 6-week old immunocompromised male mice. Tumor growth was assessed weekly for three weeks prior to euthanasia and dissection of the tumor bearing and sham tibias. The ex vivo mouse tibia specimens were imaged with a 9.4T and 7T MRI systems. SWIFT images are compared with traditional gradient-echo and spin-echo MRI images as well as CT and histological sections. Results SWIFT images with nominal resolution of 78 μm are obtained with the tumor and different bone structures identified. Prostate cancer induced changes in the bone microstructure are visible in SWIFT images, which is supported by spin-echo, high resolution CT and histological analysis. Conclusions SWIFT MRI is capable of high-quality high-resolution ex vivo imaging of bone tumor and surrounding bone and soft tissues. Furthermore, SWIFT MRI shows promise for in vivo bone tumor imaging, with the added benefits of non-exposure to ionizing radiation, quietness and speed. PMID:24155275

  1. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  2. [The Diagnostic Value of Pre-Biopsy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Detecting Prostate Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yoneyama, Shuko; Ishida, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Kondo, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the value of pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting prostate cancer. We analyzed 267 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3-10 ng/ml who underwent systematic prostate needle biopsy. From April 2009 to March 2011, a total of 98 male patients underwent 16-core prostatic biopsies without pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (nonenforcement group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 169 men underwent pre-biopsy MRI [T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] (enforcement group). When MRI findings indicated cancer in the latter group, in addition to the systematic 16-core biopsy one or two targeted biopsies were performed. Patients without suspicious MRI findings underwent only systematic 16-core biopsy. Cancer detection rates in the nonenforcement and enforcement groups were 42.9% (48/92) and 46. 2% (78/169), respectively. The difference did not reach significance (p=0.612). Although the cancer detection rates were 39.4% (41/104) in the MRI-negative group and 56. 9% (37/65) in the MRI-positive group (p=0.039), the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection by MRI were relatively low: 47.4% and 69.2%, respectively. By receiver-operating curve analysis, the area under the curve for cancer detection by MRI was only 0.583. There were two study limitations. First, the patient sample size was small. Second, it is unclear whether an adequate sample of the suspicious lesion was obtained by biopsy. We thus demonstrated that it might be improper to base a diagnosis solely on pre-biopsy MRI (T2WI and DWI) findings in men with serum PSA levels of 3-10 ng/ml.

  3. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  4. MRI-SPECT image registration using multiple MR pulse sequences to examine osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John A.; Peterfy, Charles G.; White, David L.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    We have examined whether automated image registration can be used to combine metabolic information from SPECT knee scans with anatomical information from MRI. Ten patients, at risk of developing OA due to meniscal surgery, were examined. 99mTc methyldiphosphonate SPECT, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) MRI, and T1-weighted, 3D fat-suppressed gradient recalled echo (SPGR) MRI images were obtained. Registration was performed using normalized mutual information. For each patient, FSE data was registered to SPGR data, providing a composite MRI image with each voxel represented by two intensities (ISPGR, IFSE). Modifications to the registration algorithm were made to allow registration of SPECT data (one intensity per voxel) to composite MRI data (2 intensities per voxel). Registration sources was assessed by visual inspection of uptake localization over expected anatomical locations, and the absence of uptake over unlikely sites. Three patients were discarded from SPECT-MRI registration tests since they had metallic artifacts that prevented co-registration of MR data. Registration of SPECT to SPGR or FSE data alone proved unreliable, with less than 50% of attempts succeeding. The modified algorithm, treating co-registered SPGR and FSE data as a two-value-per-voxel image, proved most reliable, allowing registration of all patients with no metallic artifacts on MRI.

  5. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause a problem near a strong magnetic field. Electronic devices aren't permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  7. Reliability of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Necessity of Repeating MRI in Noncooled and Cooled Infants With Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Miller, Steven P; Zwicker, Jill G; Xu, Qi; Wong, Darren S T; Roland, Elke H; Hill, Alan; Chau, Vann

    2016-04-01

    In cooled newborns with encephalopathy, although late magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (10-14 days of age) is reliable in predicting long-term outcome, it is unknown whether early scan (3-6 days of life) is. We compared the predominant pattern and extent of lesion between early and late MRI in 89 term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-three neonates (48%) were cooled. The predominant pattern of lesions and the extent of lesion in the watershed region agreed near perfectly in noncooled (kappa = 0.94; k = 0.88) and cooled (k = 0.89; k = 0.87) infants respectively. There was perfect agreement in the extent of lesion in the basal nuclei in noncooled infants (k = 0.83) and excellent agreement in cooled infants (k = 0.67). Changes in extent of lesions on late MRI occurred in 19 of 89 infants, with higher risk in infants with hypoglycemia and moderate-severe lesions in basal nuclei. In most term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy, early MRI (relative to late scan) robustly predicts the predominant pattern and extent of injury.

  8. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-05-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method.

  9. The Rightful Role of MRI after Negative Conventional Imaging in the Management of Bloody Nipple Discharge.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Linda M; Daigle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Nipple discharge is a frequent presenting complaint at breast clinics. Bloody nipple discharge (BND) has the highest risk of malignancy, albeit low. If mammogram and ultrasound are unrevealing, central duct excision (CDE) has been considered the gold standard in its management. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely confirmed as a highly sensitive test for detection of breast cancer, with an accompanying high negative predictive value. This article presents a retrospective review of patients with BND and negative conventional imaging, comparing outcome of patients who went directly to CDE without MRI to those patients who underwent preoperative MRI. Of 115 patients who underwent mammography and US alone prior to CDE, eight cancers were detected (seven ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS] and 1 IDC, 7 mm [T1b]; incidence: 7%). Of 85 patients who underwent conventional imaging followed by MRI prior to surgery, eight cancers were detected (all DCIS; incidence: 9.4%), seven of which were identified by MRI. The one false-negative MRI had subtle findings which, in retrospect, were misinterpreted; however, a clinically apparent nipple lesion prompted surgical biopsy. Of 56 patients with a negative or benign MRI, CDE was negative for malignancy in all but that one patient. Sensitivity and specificity were 87.5%/71.4%. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV) were 24.1%/98.2%. MRI should be performed in all patients with BND and negative conventional imaging. The extremely high NPV of MRI suggests that a negative study could obviate CDE in most patients unless overriding clinical factors prevail.

  10. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    PubMed

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  11. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, I.; Cornelissen, S. A. P.; Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van; Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M.; Peeters, S. T. H.; Hoebers, F. J. P.; Kaanders, J. H. A. M.; Nowak, P. J. C. M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  12. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  13. Cell tracking with caged xenon: using cryptophanes as MRI reporters upon cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Stefan; Döpfert, Jörg; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Kunth, Martin; Rossella, Federica; Schnurr, Matthias; Witte, Christopher; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-01-07

    Caged xenon has great potential in overcoming sensitivity limitations for solution-state NMR detection of dilute molecules. However, no application of such a system as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent has yet been performed with live cells. We demonstrate MRI localization of cells labeled with caged xenon in a packed-bed bioreactor working under perfusion with hyperpolarized-xenon-saturated medium. Xenon hosts enable NMR/MRI experiments with switchable contrast and selectivity for cell-associated versus unbound cages. We present MR images with 10(3) -fold sensitivity enhancement for cell-internalized, dual-mode (fluorescence/MRI) xenon hosts at low micromolar concentrations. Our results illustrate the capability of functionalized xenon to act as a highly sensitive cell tracer for MRI detection even without signal averaging. The method will bridge the challenging gap for translation to in vivo studies for the optimization of targeted biosensors and their multiplexing applications.

  14. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... sweatpants and a t-shirt). Certain types of metal can cause blurry images. You will lie on ... placed artificial joints Vascular stents Worked with sheet metal in the past (you may need tests to ...

  15. Functional MRI techniques in oncology in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Matthias R.; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS DW and DCE MRI already contribute significantly to several aspects of personalized cancer medicine, namely diagnosis, treatment planning, response assessment, and prognosis. Nevertheless, the need for further standardization of theses imaging techniques is beyond question, and needs to be addressed. Whole body DW MRI is an exciting field, however future studies need to investigate in more depth the biologic significance of the findings depicted, their prognostic relevance and cost effectiveness in comparison to MDCT and PET/CT. New MR imaging probes such as targeted or activatable contrast agents and dynamic nuclear hyperpolarization show great promise to further improve the care of cancer patients in the near future. PMID:26613872

  16. PET-MRI: a review of challenges and solutions in the development of integrated multimodality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Marsden, Paul K.

    2015-02-01

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been an ongoing research topic for the last 20 years. This paper gives an overview of the different developments and the technical problems associated with combining PET and MRI in one system. After explaining the different detector concepts for integrating PET-MRI and minimising interference the limitations and advantages of different solutions for the detector and system are described for preclinical and clinical imaging systems. The different integrated PET-MRI systems are described in detail. Besides detector concepts and system integration the challenges and proposed solutions for attenuation correction and the potential for motion correction and resolution recovery are also discussed in this topical review.

  17. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  18. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging of brain reorganization after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuizen, Rick M; van der Marel, Kajo; Otte, Willem M; Hoff, Erik I; van der Zijden, Jet P; van der Toorn, Annette; van Meer, Maurits P A

    2012-03-01

    The potential of the adult brain to reorganize after ischemic injury is critical for functional recovery and provides a significant target for therapeutic strategies to promote brain repair. Despite the accumulating evidence of brain plasticity, the interaction and significance of morphological and physiological modifications in post-stroke brain tissue remain mostly unclear. Neuroimaging techniques such as functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable in vivo assessment of the spatial and temporal pattern of functional and structural changes inside and outside ischemic lesion areas. This can contribute to the elucidation of critical aspects in post-stroke brain remodeling. Task/stimulus-related fMRI, resting-state fMRI, or pharmacological MRI enables direct or indirect measurement of neuronal activation, functional connectivity, or neurotransmitter system responses, respectively. DTI allows estimation of the structural integrity and connectivity of white matter tracts. Together, these MRI methods provide an unprecedented means to (a) measure longitudinal changes in tissue structure and function close by and remote from ischemic lesion areas, (b) evaluate the organizational profile of neural networks after stroke, and (c) identify degenerative and restorative processes that affect post-stroke functional outcome. Besides, the availability of MRI in clinical institutions as well as research laboratories provides an optimal basis for translational research on stroke recovery. This review gives an overview of the current status and perspectives of fMRI and DTI applications to study brain reorganization in experimental stroke models.

  19. Interpreting Intervention Induced Neuroplasticity with fMRI: The Case for Multimodal Imaging Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Lee B.; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Cunnington, Ross; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurement of recovery from brain injury is an important goal in neurorehabilitation, and requires reliable, objective, and interpretable measures of changes in brain function, referred to generally as “neuroplasticity.” One popular imaging modality for measuring neuroplasticity is task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (t-fMRI). In the field of neurorehabilitation, however, assessing neuroplasticity using t-fMRI presents a significant challenge. This commentary reviews t-fMRI changes commonly reported in patients with cerebral palsy or acquired brain injuries, with a focus on studies of motor rehabilitation, and discusses complexities surrounding their interpretations. Specifically, we discuss the difficulties in interpreting t-fMRI changes in terms of their underlying causes, that is, differentiating whether they reflect genuine reorganisation, neurological restoration, compensation, use of preexisting redundancies, changes in strategy, or maladaptive processes. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of heterogeneous disease states and essential t-fMRI processing steps on the interpretability of activation patterns. To better understand therapy-induced neuroplastic changes, we suggest that researchers utilising t-fMRI consider concurrently acquiring information from an additional modality, to quantify, for example, haemodynamic differences or microstructural changes. We outline a variety of such supplementary measures for investigating brain reorganisation and discuss situations in which they may prove beneficial to the interpretation of t-fMRI data. PMID:26839711

  20. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  1. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the formation of mouse dentin and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong-Hing, A.; Sandhu, H.S.; Prato, F.S.; Frappier, J.R.; Kavaliers, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on dentin and bone formation in mice were examined using standard autoradiographic and liquid scintillation procedures. It was observed that exposure to a standard 23.2 min clinical multislice MRI (0.15T) procedure caused a significant increase in the synthesis of the collagenous matrix of dentin in the incisors of mice. There were no significant effects on alveolar and tibial bone matrix synthesis. These results suggest that the magnetic fields associated with MRI can affect the activity of cells and/or tissues that are involved in rapid synthetic activity.

  2. Isolated sixth cranial nerve aplasia visualized with Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition (FIESTA) MRI.

    PubMed

    Pilyugina, Svetlana A; Fischbein, Nancy J; Liao, Y Joyce; McCulley, Timothy J

    2007-06-01

    An otherwise healthy 12-month-old girl presented for evaluation of reduced abduction of the left eye detected at 6 months of age. The remainder of the examination was unremarkable. A special MRI sequence-fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA)-visualized the right but not the left sixth nerve cisternal segment. This is the first reported use of the MRI FIESTA sequence to diagnose aplasia of the sixth cranial nerve.

  3. Ratiometric MRI sensors based on core-shell nanoparticles for quantitative pH imaging.

    PubMed

    Okada, Satoshi; Mizukami, Shin; Sakata, Takao; Matsumura, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2014-05-21

    Ratiometric MRI sensors consist of paramagnetic cores and pH-sensitive polymer shells. The core-shell nanostructure enables the coexistence of two incompatible NMR relaxation properties in one particle. The sensors show pH sensitivity in transverse relaxivity (r2 ), but not in longitudinal relaxivity (r1 ). Quantitative pH imaging is achieved by measuring the r2 /r1 value with a clinical 3 T MRI scanner.

  4. Optimizing the imaging of the monkey auditory cortex: sparse vs. continuous fMRI.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Christopher I; Kayser, Christoph; Augath, Mark; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2009-10-01

    The noninvasive imaging of the monkey auditory system with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can bridge the gap between electrophysiological studies in monkeys and imaging studies in humans. Some of the recent imaging of monkey auditory cortical and subcortical structures relies on a technique of "sparse imaging," which was developed in human studies to sidestep the negative influence of scanner noise by adding periods of silence in between volume acquisition. Among the various aspects that have gone into the ongoing optimization of fMRI of the monkey auditory cortex, replacing the more common continuous-imaging paradigm with sparse imaging seemed to us to make the most obvious difference in the amount of activity that we could reliably obtain from awake or anesthetized animals. Here, we directly compare the sparse- and continuous-imaging paradigms in anesthetized animals. We document a strikingly greater auditory response with sparse imaging, both quantitatively and qualitatively, which includes a more expansive and robust tonotopic organization. There were instances where continuous imaging could better reveal organizational properties that sparse imaging missed, such as aspects of the hierarchical organization of auditory cortex. We consider the choice of imaging paradigm as a key component in optimizing the fMRI of the monkey auditory cortex.

  5. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianhua; Lim, Jason Chu-Shern; Townsend, David W

    2015-02-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and (18)F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  6. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  7. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  8. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  9. Three-dimensional, in vivo MRI with self-gating and image coregistration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Brian J; Szulc, Kamila U; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2009-05-01

    Motion during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans routinely results in undesirable image artifact or blurring. Since high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the mouse requires long scan times for satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality, motion-related artifacts are likely over much of the body and limit applications of mouse MRI. In this investigation, we explored the use of self-gated imaging methods and image coregistration for improving image quality in the presence of motion. Self-gated signal results from a modified 3D gradient-echo sequence showed detection of periodic respiratory and cardiac motion in the adult mouse-with excellent comparison to traditional measurements, sensitivity to respiration-induced tissue changes in the brain, and even detection of embryonic cardiac motion in utero. Serial image coregistration with rapidly-acquired, low-SNR volumes further enabled detection and correction of bulk changes in embryo location during in utero imaging sessions and subsequent reconstruction of high-quality images. These methods, in combination, are shown to expand the range of applications for 3D mouse MRI, enabling late-stage embryonic heart imaging and introducing the possibility of longitudinal developmental studies from embryonic stages through adulthood.

  10. Comparison of Echo and MRI in the Imaging Evaluation of Intracardiac Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, G. Sharma, S.; Kothari, S.S.; Juneja, R.; Saxena, A.; Talwar, K.K.

    2004-09-15

    We compared the efficacy of echocardiography (ECHO) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating intracardiac masses. Over an 8-yr period, 28 patients, 21 males, 7 females, 16 days-60 years of age (mean 25 years) with a suspected intracardiac mass on ECHO (transthoracic in all; transesophageal in 9) underwent an MRI examination. Five patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI. ECHO and MRI were compared with respect to their technical adequacy, ability to detect and suggest the likely etiology of the mass, and provide additional information (masses not seen with the other technique, inflow or outflow obstruction, and intramural component of an intracavitary mass). With MRI, the image morphology (including signal intensity changes on the various sequences) and extracardiac manifestations were also evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in 18, surgical inspection in 4, by follow- up imaging on conservative management in 5, and by typical extracardiac manifestations of the disease in 1 patient.Fifteen (54%) patients had tumors (benign 12, malignant 3), 5 had a thrombus or hematoma, and 4 each had infective or vascular lesions. Thirty-four masses (13 in ventricle, 11 septal, 7 atrial, 2 on valve and 1 in pulmonary artery) were seen on MRI, 28 of which were detected by ECHO. Transthoracic ECHO (TTE) and MRI were technically optimal in 82% and 100% of cases, respectively. Nine patients needed an additional transesophageal ECHO (TEE). Overall, MRI showed a mass in all patients, whereas ECHO missed it in 2 cases. In cases with a mass on both modalities, MRI detected 4 additional masses not seen on ECHO. MRI suggested the etiology in 21 (75%) cases, while the same was possible with ECHO (TTE and TEE) in 8 (29%) cases. Intramural component, extension into the inflow or outflow, outflow tract obstruction, and associated pericardial or extracardiac masses were better depicted on MRI. We conclude that MRI is advantageous over a combination of TTE and TEE for

  11. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselwander, Christopher J.; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5 Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately 2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500 kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  12. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios.

    PubMed

    Hasselwander, Christopher J; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately $2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  13. Single element ultrasonic imaging of limb geometry: an in-vivo study with comparison to MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Fincke, Jonathan R.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Despite advancements in medical imaging, current prosthetic fitting methods remain subjective, operator dependent, and non-repeatable. The standard plaster casting method relies on prosthetist experience and tactile feel of the limb to design the prosthetic socket. Often times, many fitting iterations are required to achieve an acceptable fit. Use of improper socket fittings can lead to painful pathologies including neuromas, inflammation, soft tissue calcification, and pressure sores, often forcing the wearer to into a wheelchair and reducing mobility and quality of life. Computer software along with MRI/CT imaging has already been explored to aid the socket design process. In this paper, we explore the use of ultrasound instead of MRI/CT to accurately obtain the underlying limb geometry to assist the prosthetic socket design process. Using a single element ultrasound system, multiple subjects' proximal limbs were imaged using 1, 2.25, and 5 MHz single element transducers. Each ultrasound transducer was calibrated to ensure acoustic exposure within the limits defined by the FDA. To validate image quality, each patient was also imaged in an MRI. Fiducial markers visible in both MRI and ultrasound were used to compare the same limb cross-sectional image for each patient. After applying a migration algorithm, B-mode ultrasound cross-sections showed sufficiently high image resolution to characterize the skin and bone boundaries along with the underlying tissue structures.

  14. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  15. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  16. Strain Rate Tensor Estimation in Cine Cardiac MRI Based on Elastic Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo Vegas; Vega, Antonio Tristán; Grande, Lucilio Cordero; de La Higuera, Pablo Casaseca; Fernández, Santiago Aja; Fernández, Marcos Martín; López, Carlos Alberola

    In this work we propose an alternative method to estimate and visualize the Strain Rate Tensor (SRT) in Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) when Phase Contrast MRI (PCMRI) and Tagged MRI (TMRI) are not available. This alternative is based on image processing techniques. Concretely, image registration algorithms are used to estimate the movement of the myocardium at each point. Additionally, a consistency checking method is presented to validate the accuracy of the estimates when no golden standard is available. Results prove that the consistency checking method provides an upper bound of the mean squared error of the estimate. Our experiments with real data show that the registration algorithm provides a useful deformation field to estimate the SRT fields. A classification between regional normal and dysfunctional contraction patterns, as compared with experts diagnosis, points out that the parameters extracted from the estimated SRT can represent these patterns. Additionally, a scheme for visualizing and analyzing the local behavior of the SRT field is presented.

  17. Identification and description of the axillary web syndrome (AWS) by clinical signs, MRI and US imaging.

    PubMed

    Leduc, O; Fumière, E; Banse, S; Vandervorst, C; Clément, A; Parijs, T; Wilputte, F; Maquerlot, F; Ezquer Echandia, M; Tinlot, A; Leduc, A

    2014-12-01

    The Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS) follows surgery for breast neoplasia and consists of one, or more frequently two or three, cords of subcutaneous tissue. Cords originate from the axilla, spread to the antero-medial surface of the arm down to the elbow and then move into the antero-medial aspect of the forearm and sometimes into the root of the thumb. The purpose of this study was to compare two techniques, ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for their sensitivity and accuracy in identifying AWS cords and to provide insights to the origin of this pathology. US examinations were performed on fifteen patients using a high frequency probe (17 MHz). We first palpated and marked the cord with location aided by maximum abduction. To identify the cord with MRI (1.5 Tesla), a catheter filled with a gel detectable under MRI was placed on the skin at the site of the cord. We found that in some US cases, the dynamic abduction maneuver was essential to facilitate detection of the cord. This dynamic method on ultrasound confirmed the precise location of the cord even if it was located deeper in the hypodermis fascia junction. US and MRI images revealed features of the cords and surrounding tissues. Imaging the cords was difficult with either of the imaging modalities. However, US seemed to be more efficient than MRI and allowed dynamic evaluation. Overall analysis of our study results supports a lymphatic origin of the AWS cord.

  18. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  19. Evaluation of image quality of MRI data for brain tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckel, Frank; Arlt, Felix; Geisler, Benjamin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    3D medical images are important components of modern medicine. Their usefulness for the physician depends on their quality, though. Only high-quality images allow accurate and reproducible diagnosis and appropriate support during treatment. We have analyzed 202 MRI images for brain tumor surgery in a retrospective study. Both an experienced neurosurgeon and an experienced neuroradiologist rated each available image with respect to its role in the clinical workflow, its suitability for this specific role, various image quality characteristics, and imaging artifacts. Our results show that MRI data acquired for brain tumor surgery does not always fulfill the required quality standards and that there is a significant disagreement between the surgeon and the radiologist, with the surgeon being more critical. Noise, resolution, as well as the coverage of anatomical structures were the most important criteria for the surgeon, while the radiologist was mainly disturbed by motion artifacts.

  20. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature.

  1. MRI reporter genes: applications for imaging of cell survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandsburger, Moriel H; Radoul, Marina; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Molecular imaging strives to detect molecular events at the level of the whole organism. In some cases, the molecule of interest can be detected either directly or with targeted contrast media. However many genes and proteins and particularly those located in intracellular compartments are not accessible for targeted agents. The transcriptional regulation of these genes can nevertheless be detected, although indirectly, using reporter gene encoding for readily detectable proteins. Such reporter proteins can be expressed in the tissue of interest by genetically introducing the reporter gene in the target cells. Imaging of reporter genes has become a powerful tool in modern biomedical research. Typically, expression of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins and the reaction product of expressed enzymes and exogenous substrates were examined using in vitro histological methods and in vivo whole body imaging methods. Recent advances in MRI reporter gene methods raised the possibility that MRI could become a powerful tool for concomitant high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging and for imaging of reporter gene activity. An immediate application of MRI reporter gene methods was by monitoring gene expression patterns in gene therapy and in vivo imaging of the survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent cells used in cell-based regenerative therapies for cancer, myocardial infarction and neural degeneration. In this review, we characterized a variety of MRI reporter gene methods based on their applicability to report cell survival/proliferation, migration and differentiation. In particular, we discussed which methods were best suited for translation to clinical use in regenerative therapies.

  2. Carotid plaque characterization using CT and MRI scans for synergistic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzin, Matthew; Xu, Yiqin; Rao, Arhant; Madi, Saaussan; Bahadur, Ali; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive determination of plaque vulnerability has been a holy grail of medical imaging. Despite advances in tomographic technologies , there is currently no effective way to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used, but neither provides sufficient information of plaque properties. Thus, we are motivated to combine CT and MRI imaging to determine if the composite information can better reflect the histological determination of plaque vulnerability. Two human endarterectomy specimens (1 symptomatic carotid and 1 stable femoral) were imaged using Scanco Medical Viva CT40 and Bruker Pharmascan 16cm 7T Horizontal MRI / MRS systems. μCT scans were done at 55 kVp and tube current of 70 mA. Samples underwent RARE-VTR and MSME pulse sequences to measure T1, T2 values, and proton density. The specimens were processed for histology and scored for vulnerability using the American Heart Association criteria. Single modality-based analyses were performed through segmentation of key imaging biomarkers (i.e. calcification and lumen), image registration, measurement of fibrous capsule, and multi-component T1 and T2 decay modeling. Feature differences were analyzed between the unstable and stable controls, symptomatic carotid and femoral plaque, respectively. By building on the techniques used in this study, synergistic CT+MRI analysis may provide a promising solution for plaque characterization in vivo.

  3. Midbrain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Anita; Sharma, Suvasini; Sankhyan, Naveen; Gulati, Sheffali; Kalra, Veena; Banerjee, Bidisha; Kumar, Atin

    2010-04-01

    Poliomyelitis, though eradicated from most parts of the world, continues to occur in India. There is paucity of data on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in poliomyelitis. We report a 3(1/2)-year-old boy who presented with subacute onset flaccid paralysis and altered sensorium. Stool culture was positive for wild polio virus type 3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal changes in bilateral substantia nigra and anterior horns of the spinal cord. These MRI changes may be of potential diagnostic significance in a child with poliomyelitis.

  4. Imaging artifacts induced by electrical stimulation during conventional fMRI of the brain.

    PubMed

    Antal, Andrea; Bikson, Marom; Datta, Abhishek; Lafon, Belen; Dechent, Peter; Parra, Lucas C; Paulus, Walter

    2014-01-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain activation during transcranial electrical stimulation is used to provide insight into the mechanisms of neuromodulation and targeting of particular brain structures. However, the passage of current through the body may interfere with the concurrent detection of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which is sensitive to local magnetic fields. To test whether these currents can affect concurrent fMRI recordings we performed conventional gradient echo-planar imaging (EPI) during transcranial direct current (tDCS) and alternating current stimulation (tACS) on two post-mortem subjects. tDCS induced signals in both superficial and deep structures. The signal was specific to the electrode montage, with the strongest signal near cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and scalp. The direction of change relative to non-stimulation reversed with tDCS stimulation polarity. For tACS there was no net effect of the MRI signal. High-resolution individualized modeling of current flow and induced static magnetic fields suggested a strong coincidence of the change EPI signal with regions of large current density and magnetic fields. These initial results indicate that (1) fMRI studies of tDCS must consider this potentially confounding interference from current flow and (2) conventional MRI imaging protocols can be potentially used to measure current flow during transcranial electrical stimulation. The optimization of current measurement and artifact correction techniques, including consideration of the underlying physics, remains to be addressed.

  5. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  6. Image manifold revealing for breast lesion segmentation in DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Cheng, Zhaoning; Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is widely used for breast lesion differentiation. Manual segmentation in DCE-MRI is difficult and open to viewer interpretation. In this paper, an automatic segmentation method based on image manifold revealing was introduced to overcome the problems of the currently used method. First, high dimensional datasets were constructed from a dynamic image series. Next, an embedded image manifold was revealed in the feature image by nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique. In the last stage, k-means clustering was performed to obtain final segmentation results. The proposed method was applied in actual clinical cases and compared with the gold standard. Statistical analysis showed that the proposed method achieved an acceptable accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity rates.

  7. Various Imaging Manifestations of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajesh; Devaramane, Radhika; Jagadish, Geetha Mukunda; Chowdaiah, Sanjana

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), also called the acute hypertensive encephalopathy and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), is a neurotoxic syndrome of cerebral vasoregulation classically characterized by bilaterally symmetrical parieto-occipital edema. However, the imaging findings are variable and may occur in other locations such as the frontal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia and brainstem. Most commonly, PRES presents with hyperintense signals on T2 and FLAIR sequences. Restricted diffusion and hemorrhage are rare. This study presents the typical and atypical manifestations of PRES on 3T MR images. Material/Methods It is a retrospective study analyzing a radiology report database and MR images of 92 patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of PRES. The brain MRI images of these patients were evaluated. The regions involved and the signal intensity of the affected areas on T1, T2, FLAIR and DW sequences were recorded. The location of the abnormal signal intensity as well as the presence or absence of atypical features such as diffusion restriction and hemorrhage were also recorded. Results The most commonly affected region was the parieto-occipital lobes (100%), however, other atypical regions involved were the frontal lobes (30.4%), temporal lobes (8.69%), basal ganglia (22%), cerebellum(17.39%), brainstem(9%) and thalamus(4%). Some of the cases showed restricted diffusion (43%) and hemorrhage (9%). Conclusions The involvement of the parieto-occipital, frontal and temporal lobes is common in PRES. Occasionally, there may be an involvement of the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem, with or without hemorrhage and restricted diffusion. Radiologists should be aware of the typical and atypical imaging manifestations of PRES in order to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:28243339

  8. Motion Compensated Abdominal Diffusion Weighted MRI by Simultaneous Image Registration and Model Estimation (SIR-ME).

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Domachevsky, Liran; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of water molecule's mobility variations by quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) signal decay in the abdomen has the potential to serve as a biomarker in gastrointestinal and oncological applications. Accurate and reproducible estimation of the signal decay model parameters is challenging due to the presence of respiratory, cardiac, and peristalsis motion. Independent registration of each b-value image to the b-value=0 s/mm(2) image prior to parameter estimation might be sub-optimal because of the low SNR and contrast difference between images of varying b-value. In this work, we introduce a motion-compensated parameter estimation framework that simultaneously solves image registration and model estimation (SIR-ME) problems by utilizing the interdependence of acquired volumes along the diffusion weighting dimension. We evaluated the improvement in model parameters estimation accuracy using 16 in-vivo DW-MRI data sets of Crohn's disease patients by comparing parameter estimates obtained using the SIR-ME model to the parameter estimates obtained by fitting the signal decay model to the acquired DW-MRI images. The proposed SIR-ME model reduced the average root-mean-square error between the observed signal and the fitted model by more than 50%. Moreover, the SIR-ME model estimates discriminate between normal and abnormal bowel loops better than the standard parameter estimates.

  9. Synchronized detection of minute electrical currents with MRI using Lorentz effect imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Wilbur, Jennifer L.; Song, Allen W.

    2006-03-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is the most commonly used contrast mechanism in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), due to its relatively high spatial resolution and sensitivity. However, the ability of BOLD fMRI to accurately localize neuronal activation in space and time is limited by the inherent hemodynamic modulation. There is hence a need to develop alternative MRI methods that can directly image neuroelectric activity, thereby achieving both a high temporal resolution and spatial specificity as compared to conventional BOLD fMRI. In this paper, we extend the Lorentz effect imaging technique, which can detect spatially incoherent yet temporally synchronized minute electrical activity in a strong magnetic field, and demonstrate its feasibility for imaging randomly oriented electrical currents on the order of microamperes with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds in gel phantoms. This constitutes a promising step towards its application to direct imaging of neuroelectric activity in vivo, which has the same order of current density and temporal synchrony.

  10. Potential of PET-MRI for imaging of non-oncologic musculoskeletal disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Audrey P.; Gold, Garry E.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of musculoskeletal disease leads to improved therapies and patient outcomes, and would benefit greatly from imaging at the cellular and molecular level. As it becomes clear that assessment of multiple tissues and functional processes are often necessary to study the complex pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders, the role of multi-modality molecular imaging becomes increasingly important. New positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) systems offer to combine high-resolution MRI with simultaneous molecular information from PET to study the multifaceted processes involved in numerous musculoskeletal disorders. In this article, we aim to outline the potential clinical utility of hybrid PET-MRI to these non-oncologic musculoskeletal diseases. We summarize current applications of PET molecular imaging in osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), metabolic bone diseases and neuropathic peripheral pain. Advanced MRI approaches that reveal biochemical and functional information offer complementary assessment in soft tissues. Additionally, we discuss technical considerations for hybrid PET-MR imaging including MR attenuation correction, workflow, radiation dose, and quantification. PMID:28090451

  11. Oxygen-dependent hyperpolarized (129) Xe brain MR.

    PubMed

    Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) (129) Xe MR offers unique advantages for brain functional imaging (fMRI) because of its extremely high sensitivity to different chemical environments and the total absence of background noise in biological tissues. However, its advancement and applications are currently plagued by issues of signal strength. Generally, xenon atoms found in the brain after inhalation are transferred from the lung via the bloodstream. The longitudinal relaxation time (T1 ) of HP (129) Xe is inversely proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the lung because oxygen molecules are paramagnetic. However, the T1 of (129) Xe is proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the blood, because the higher pulmonary oxygen concentration will result in a higher concentration of diamagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Accordingly, there should be an optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration for a given quantity of HP (129) Xe in the brain. In this study, the relationship between pulmonary oxygen concentration and HP (129) Xe signal in the brain was analyzed using a theoretical model and measured through in vivo experiments. The results from the theoretical model and experiments in rats are found to be in good agreement with each other. The optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration predicted by the theoretical model was 21%, and the in vivo experiments confirmed the presence of such an optimal ratio by reporting measurements between 25% and 35%. These findings are helpful for improving the (129) Xe signal in the brain and make the most of the limited spin polarization available for brain experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Imaging techniques: MRI illuminated by γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowtell, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A technique that combines magnetic resonance with nuclear medicine has been used to image the distribution of a radioactive tracer, potentially opening up a powerful and innovative approach to medical imaging. See Letter p.652

  13. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  14. MR spectroscopy, functional MRI, and diffusion-tensor imaging in the aging brain: a conceptual review.

    PubMed

    Minati, L; Grisoli, M; Bruzzone, M G

    2007-03-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) have recently opened new possibilities for noninvasively assessing the metabolic, functional, and connectivity correlates of aging in research and clinical settings. The purpose of this article is to provide a conceptual review intended for a multidisciplinary audience, covering physical principles and main findings related to normal aging and senile cognitive impairment. This article is divided into 3 sections, dedicated to MRS, to fMRI, and to DTI. The spectroscopy section surveys physiological function of the observable metabolites, concentration changes in normal aging and their interpretation, and correlation with cognitive performance. The functional MRI section surveys the hemispheric asymmetry reduction model from compensation and de-differentiation viewpoints, memory encoding, retrieval and consolidation, inhibitory control, perception and action, resting-state networks, and functional deactivations. The DTI section surveys age-related changes, correlation with behavioral scores, and transition to cognitive impairment.

  15. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Barb, A.W.; Hekmatyar, S.K.; Glushka, J.N.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H–D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed. PMID:23357427

  16. Joint Segmentation of Anatomical and Functional Images: Applications in Quantification of Lesions from PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and MRI-PET-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the joint segmentation of anatomical and functional images. Our proposed methodology unifies the domains of anatomical and functional images, represents them in a product lattice, and performs simultaneous delineation of regions based on random walk image segmentation. Furthermore, we also propose a simple yet effective object/background seed localization method to make the proposed segmentation process fully automatic. Our study uses PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and fused MRI-PET-CT scans (77 studies in all) from 56 patients who had various lesions in different body regions. We validated the effectiveness of the proposed method on different PET phantoms as well as on clinical images with respect to the ground truth segmentation provided by clinicians. Experimental results indicate that the presented method is superior to threshold and Bayesian methods commonly used in PET image segmentation, is more accurate and robust compared to the other PET-CT segmentation methods recently published in the literature, and also it is general in the sense of simultaneously segmenting multiple scans in real-time with high accuracy needed in routine clinical use. PMID:23837967

  17. Philips 3T Intera Magnetic Resonance Imaging System and Upgrade of existing MRI equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Evanochko, William T

    2004-05-14

    The objective of this proposal was twofold. First, upgrade existing MRI equipment, specifically a research 4.1T whole-body system. Second, purchase a clinical, state-of-the-art 3T MRI system tailored specifically to cardiovascular and neurological applications. This project was within the guidelines of ''Medical Applications and Measurement Science''. The goals were: [1] to develop beneficial applications of magnetic resonance imaging; [2] discover new applications of MR strategies for medical research; and [2] apply them for clinical diagnosis. Much of this proposal searched for breakthroughs in this noninvasive and nondestructive imaging technology. Finally, this proposal's activities focused on research in the basic science of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, and engineering as applied to bioengineering. The centerpiece of this grant was our 4.1T ultra-high field whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance system and the newly acquired state-of-the-art, heart and head dedicated 3T clinical MRI system. We have successfully upgraded the equipment for the 4.1T system so that it is now state-of-the-art with new gradient and radio frequency amplifiers. We also purchase a unique In Vivo EKG monitoring unit that will permit tracking clinical quality EKG signals while the patient is in a high field MR scanner. Important upgrades of a peripheral vascular coil and a state-of-the-art clinical workstation for processing complex heart images were implemented. The most recent acquisition was the purchase of a state-of-the-art Philips 3T Intera clinical MRI system. This system is unique in that the magnet is only 5 1/2 feet long compare to over 12 feet long magnet of our 4.1T MRI system. The 3T MRI system is fully functional and its use and applications are already greatly benefiting the UAB with 200-300 micron resolution brain images and diagnostic quality MR angiography of coronary arteries in less than 5 minutes.

  18. The Iowa Gambling Task in fMRI Images

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangrui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Ng, Marie; Bechara, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is a sensitive test for the detection of decision-making impairments in several neurologic and psychiatric populations. Very few studies have employed the IGT in fMRI investigations, in part, because the task is cognitively complex. Here we report a method for exploring brain activity using fMRI during performance of the IGT. Decision-making during the IGT was associated with activity in several brain regions in a group of healthy individuals. The activated regions were consistent with the neural circuitry hypothesized to underlie somatic marker activation and decision-making. Specifically, a neural circuitry involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (for working memory), the insula and posterior cingulate cortex (for representations of emotional states), the mesial orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (for coupling the two previous processes), the ventral striatum and anterior cingulate/SMA (supplementary motor area) for implementing behavioral decisions was engaged. These results have implications for using the IGT to study abnormal mechanisms of decision making in a variety of clinical populations. PMID:19777556

  19. Optimal sampling with prior information of the image geometry in microfluidic MRI.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Cho, H; Paulsen, J L

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in MRI acquisition for microscopic flows enable unprecedented sensitivity and speed in a portable NMR/MRI microfluidic analysis platform. However, the application of MRI to microfluidics usually suffers from prolonged acquisition times owing to the combination of the required high resolution and wide field of view necessary to resolve details within microfluidic channels. When prior knowledge of the image geometry is available as a binarized image, such as for microfluidic MRI, it is possible to reduce sampling requirements by incorporating this information into the reconstruction algorithm. The current approach to the design of the partial weighted random sampling schemes is to bias toward the high signal energy portions of the binarized image geometry after Fourier transformation (i.e. in its k-space representation). Although this sampling prescription is frequently effective, it can be far from optimal in certain limiting cases, such as for a 1D channel, or more generally yield inefficient sampling schemes at low degrees of sub-sampling. This work explores the tradeoff between signal acquisition and incoherent sampling on image reconstruction quality given prior knowledge of the image geometry for weighted random sampling schemes, finding that optimal distribution is not robustly determined by maximizing the acquired signal but from interpreting its marginal change with respect to the sub-sampling rate. We develop a corresponding sampling design methodology that deterministically yields a near optimal sampling distribution for image reconstructions incorporating knowledge of the image geometry. The technique robustly identifies optimal weighted random sampling schemes and provides improved reconstruction fidelity for multiple 1D and 2D images, when compared to prior techniques for sampling optimization given knowledge of the image geometry.

  20. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  1. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  2. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  3. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  4. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  5. [Application of pharmacologic functional magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in the research of affective disorders].

    PubMed

    Édes, Andrea Edit; Gonda, Xénia; Bagdy, György; Juhász, Gabriella

    2014-06-01

    Many common psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety disorders are associated with dysfunction in the monoamine neurotransmission in the central nervous system. However, the investigation of these pathophysiological processes in the human living brain is difficult. In case of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a non-invasive method for the examination of brain activity, the activity-inducing stimulus is generally a cognitive psychological test, while during pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) the activation is triggered by a specific pharmacon. In the present work we review the available scientific literature related to this method using literature search in PubMed. Through application of a selective pharmacon like the selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram or escitalopram in a challenge phMRI study, the serotonergic neurotransmitter system can be examined specifically, the functioning brain areas involved in its effect become observable.. With modulation phMRI we can monitor the long-term effect of an antidepressant or we can examine the immediate effect of a single dose of the medication on congitive psychological functions like emotional processing. Thus, the application of phMRI methods may help deepen our understanding of serotonergic function in the living human brain as well as of diseases related to serotonergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction.

  6. Advantage of Adding Diffusion Weighted Imaging to Routine MRI Examinations in the Diagnostics of Scrotal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Tantawy, Hazim Ibrahim; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Darweesh, Adham

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study is to identify the diagnostic value of adding diffusion weighted images (DWI) to routine MRI examinations of the scrotum. Material/Methods The study included 100 testes of 50 patients with a unilateral testicular disease. Fifty normal contralateral testes were used as a control group. All patients underwent conventional MRI and DWI examinations of the scrotum. The results of MRI and DWI of the group of patients treated surgically were correlated with histopathological findings. The MRI and DWI results of non-surgical cases were correlated with the results of clinical, laboratory and other imaging studies. Comparison of the ADC value of normal and pathological tissues was carried out followed by a statistical analysis. Results There was a significant difference between ADC values of malignant testicular lesions and normal testicular tissues as well as benign testicular lesions (P=0.000). At a cut-off ADC value of ≤0.99, it had a sensitivity of 93.3%, specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 87.5%, and negative predictive value of 94.7% in the characterization of intratesticular masses. Conclusions Inclusion of DWI to routine MRI has a substantial value in improving diagnosis in patients with scrotal lesions and consequently can reduce unnecessary radical surgical procedures in these patients. PMID:26491491

  7. Neonatal brain image segmentation in longitudinal MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Fan, Yong; Tang, Songyuan; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2010-01-01

    In the study of early brain development, tissue segmentation of neonatal brain MR images remains challenging because of the insufficient image quality due to the properties of developing tissues. Among various brain tissue segmentation algorithms, atlas-based brain image segmentation can potentially achieve good segmentation results on neonatal brain images. However, their performances rely on both the quality of the atlas and the spatial correspondence between the atlas and the to-be-segmented image. Moreover, it is difficult to build a population atlas for neonates due to the requirement of a large set of tissue-segmented neonatal brain images. To combat these obstacles, we present a longitudinal neonatal brain image segmentation framework by taking advantage of the longitudinal data acquired at late time-point to build a subject-specific tissue probabilistic atlas. Specifically, tissue segmentation of the neonatal brain is formulated as two iterative steps of bias correction and probabilistic-atlas-based tissue segmentation, along with the longitudinal atlas reconstructed by the late time image of the same subject. The proposed method has been evaluated qualitatively through visual inspection and quantitatively by comparing with manual delineations and two population-atlas-based segmentation methods. Experimental results show that the utilization of a subject-specific probabilistic atlas can substantially improve tissue segmentation of neonatal brain images.

  8. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  9. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  10. MRI image characteristics of materials implanted at sellar region after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bladowska, Joanna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sokolska, Violetta; Badowski, Roman; Moroń, Krzysztof; Bonicki, Wiesław; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change in anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of the tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of implanted materials and time of its resorption. The purpose was to demonstrate the characteristics of the implanted materials on MRI performed after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours and to identify imaging criteria helpful in differential diagnosis of masses within the sellar region. Material/Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours were included in the study. In general, 469 MRI examinations were performed with a 1.5T scanner. We obtained T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images. In 102 cases, additional T2-weighted coronal, unenhanced images with 1.5 T unit were obtained as well. Results: The implanted materials appeared in 95 patient: fat in 86 and muscle with fascia in 3 patients. We could recognise implanted muscle and fascia in T2-weighted images, because of high signal intensity of the degenerating muscle and the line of low signal representing fascia. The implanted titanium mesh was found in 4 patients. Haemostatic materials were visible only in 2 patients in examinations performed at an early postoperative stage (1 month after the procedure). Conclusions: The knowledge of MRI characteristics of the materials implanted at the sellar region is very important in postoperative diagnosis of pituitary tumours and may help discriminate between tumorous and non-tumorous involvement of the sellar region. Some implanted materials, like fat, could be seen on MRI for as long as 10 years after the operation, others, like haemostatic materials, for only 1 month after surgery. T2-weighted imaging is a useful assessment method of the implanted muscle and fascia for a long time after surgery. PMID

  11. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe.

  12. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Jason A.; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  13. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected.

  14. Synergistic role of simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS in soft tissue sarcoma metabolism imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Lim, Ruth; Huang, Chuan; Chebib, Ivan A; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop and validate simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS as a novel biological image-guided approach to neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemoradiation (chemoRT) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). A patient with sarcoma of the right thigh underwent PET/MRI scan before and after neoadjuvant (preoperative) radiotherapy. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-D-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) scans were performed simultaneously. In the post-radiation scan, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was subsequently acquired with volume of interest positioned in a residual hyper-metabolic region detected by PET. Post-radiation PET/MRI showed a residual T2-hyperintense mass with significantly reduced (18)F-FDG-uptake, compatible with near complete response to radiotherapy. However, a small region of residual high (18)F-FDG uptake was detected at the tumor margin. MRS of this region had similar metabolite profile as normal tissue, and was thus considered false positive on PET scan. Pathology results were obtained after surgery for confirmation of imaging findings.

  15. Real-time 3D imaging of microstructure growth in battery cells using indirect MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ilott, Andrew J.; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Chang, Hee Jung; Grey, Clare P.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-01-01

    Lithium metal is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity and low potential. The growth of dendrites is a major barrier to the development of high capacity, rechargeable Li batteries with lithium metal anodes, and hence, significant efforts have been undertaken to develop new electrolytes and separator materials that can prevent this process or promote smooth deposits at the anode. Central to these goals, and to the task of understanding the conditions that initiate and propagate dendrite growth, is the development of analytical and nondestructive techniques that can be applied in situ to functioning batteries. MRI has recently been demonstrated to provide noninvasive imaging methodology that can detect and localize microstructure buildup. However, until now, monitoring dendrite growth by MRI has been limited to observing the relatively insensitive metal nucleus directly, thus restricting the temporal and spatial resolution and requiring special hardware and acquisition modes. Here, we present an alternative approach to detect a broad class of metallic dendrite growth via the dendrites’ indirect effects on the surrounding electrolyte, allowing for the application of fast 3D 1H MRI experiments with high resolution. We use these experiments to reconstruct 3D images of growing Li dendrites from MRI, revealing details about the growth rate and fractal behavior. Radiofrequency and static magnetic field calculations are used alongside the images to quantify the amount of the growing structures. PMID:27621444

  16. MRI in Dentistry- A Future Towards Radiation Free Imaging – Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Gupta, Ritu; Ali, Irfan; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Prasad, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), being a technique with huge potential, has become the primary diagnostic investigation for many clinical problems. Its application now has been successfully used in dentistry to maximize the diagnostic certainty. Aim The present review aims to analyze the applicability, feasibility and efficacy of MRI in the field of dentistry. Materials and Methods A literature search was performed in main databases like Pub Med Central, Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar from 1970 up to December 2015. The 2672 titles that appeared, 25 fulfilled the criteria and were included in the review. Two articles were hand searched and three articles through e-mail were also included. Results The review highlights the increasing role of MRI in dentistry. In the available literature, it was found that T1 and T2 weighted images were the acceptable diagnostic images for detection of dental related diseases. Conclusion MRI can be used in diagnosis and treatment planning of implants, jaw lesions, diseases of Temporomandibular Joints (TMJ), orthodontic treatment, endodontic treatment etc., to achieve better prognosis. PMID:27891491

  17. Visualization of human prenatal development by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kohei; Yamada, Shigehito; Nakatsu-Komatsu, Tomoko; Uwabe, Chigako; Kose, Katsumi; Matsuda, Yoshimasa; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Mizuta, Shinobu; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2007-12-15

    It is essential to visualize the structures of embryos and their internal organs three-dimensionally to analyze morphogenesis; this used to rely solely on serial histological sectioning and solid reconstruction, which were tedious and time-consuming. We have applied imaging with a magnetic resonance (MR) microscope equipped with a 2.35 T superconducting magnet to visualize human embryos; we were successful in acquiring high-resolution sectional images and in identifying the detailed structures of major organs. The imaging process was facilitated by using a super-parallel MR microscope. A dataset of MR images of more than 1,000 human embryos, now collected, will be important for future biomedical research and for education.

  18. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  19. A magnetic tunnel to shelter hyperpolarized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, Jonas Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Miéville, Pascal; Mottier, Roger; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2015-02-15

    To shield solutions carrying hyperpolarized nuclear magnetization from rapid relaxation during transfer through low fields, the transfer duct can be threaded through an array of permanent magnets. The advantages are illustrated for solutions containing hyperpolarized {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclei in a variety of molecules.

  20. Image homogenization using pre-emphasis method for high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2013-08-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) field (B 1) inhomogeneity due to shortened wavelength at high field is a major cause of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nonuniformity in high dielectric biological samples (e.g., human body). In this work, we propose a method to improve the B 1 and MRI homogeneity by using pre-emphasized non-uniform B 1 distribution. The intrinsic B 1 distribution that could be generated by a RF volume coil, specifically a microstrip transmission line (MTL) coil used in this work, was pre-emphasized in the sample's periphery region of interest to compensate for the central brightness induced by high frequency interference effect due to shortened wave length. This pre-emphasized non-uniform B 1 can be realized by varying the parameters of microstrip elements, such as the substrate thickness of MTL volume coil. Both numerical simulation and phantom MR imaging studies were carried out to investigate the feasibility and merit of the proposed method in achieving homogeneous MR images. The simulation results demonstrate that by using a pre-emphasized B 1 distribution generated by the MTL volume coil, relatively uniform B 1 distribution and homogeneous MR image (98% homogeneity) within the spherical phantom (15 cm diameter) were achieved with 4.5 mm thickness. The B 1 and MRI intensity distributions of a 16-element MTL volume coil with fixed substrate thickness and five varied saline loads were modeled and experimentally tested. Similar results from both simulation and experiments were obtained, suggesting substantial improvements of B 1 and MRI homogeneities within the phantom containing 125 mM saline. The overall results demonstrate an efficient B 1 shimming approach for improving high field MRI.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future

  2. Reprint of "Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging".

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future

  3. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children.

  4. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  5. Segmentation of MRI Brain Images with an Improved Harmony Searching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhang; Li, Guo; Weifeng, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The harmony searching (HS) algorithm is a kind of optimization search algorithm currently applied in many practical problems. The HS algorithm constantly revises variables in the harmony database and the probability of different values that can be used to complete iteration convergence to achieve the optimal effect. Accordingly, this study proposed a modified algorithm to improve the efficiency of the algorithm. First, a rough set algorithm was employed to improve the convergence and accuracy of the HS algorithm. Then, the optimal value was obtained using the improved HS algorithm. The optimal value of convergence was employed as the initial value of the fuzzy clustering algorithm for segmenting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images. Experimental results showed that the improved HS algorithm attained better convergence and more accurate results than those of the original HS algorithm. In our study, the MRI image segmentation effect of the improved algorithm was superior to that of the original fuzzy clustering method. PMID:27403428

  6. Segmentation of MRI Brain Images with an Improved Harmony Searching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Shufan, Ye; Li, Guo; Weifeng, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The harmony searching (HS) algorithm is a kind of optimization search algorithm currently applied in many practical problems. The HS algorithm constantly revises variables in the harmony database and the probability of different values that can be used to complete iteration convergence to achieve the optimal effect. Accordingly, this study proposed a modified algorithm to improve the efficiency of the algorithm. First, a rough set algorithm was employed to improve the convergence and accuracy of the HS algorithm. Then, the optimal value was obtained using the improved HS algorithm. The optimal value of convergence was employed as the initial value of the fuzzy clustering algorithm for segmenting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images. Experimental results showed that the improved HS algorithm attained better convergence and more accurate results than those of the original HS algorithm. In our study, the MRI image segmentation effect of the improved algorithm was superior to that of the original fuzzy clustering method.

  7. Normalization of T2W-MRI prostate images using Rician a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Guillaume; Rastgoo, Mojdeh; Massich, Joan; Vilanova, Joan C.; Walker, Paul M.; Freixenet, Jordi; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Martí, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is reported to be the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men in the world. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors which reduces the chance to detect the potential lesions. In the last decades, new imaging techniques mainly based on MRI are developed in conjunction with Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems to help radiologists for such diagnosis. CAD systems are usually designed as a sequential process consisting of four stages: pre-processing, segmentation, registration and classification. As a pre-processing, image normalization is a critical and important step of the chain in order to design a robust classifier and overcome the inter-patients intensity variations. However, little attention has been dedicated to the normalization of T2W-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) prostate images. In this paper, we propose two methods to normalize T2W-MRI prostate images: (i) based on a Rician a priori and (ii) based on a Square-Root Slope Function (SRSF) representation which does not make any assumption regarding the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the data. A comparison with the state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The normalization of the data is assessed by comparing the alignment of the patient PDFs in both qualitative and quantitative manners. In both evaluation, the normalization using Rician a priori outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods.

  8. Repeated BOLD-fMRI Imaging of Deep Brain Stimulation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tzu-Hao Harry; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a picture of the global spatial activation pattern of the brain. Interest is growing regarding the application of fMRI to rodent models to investigate adult brain plasticity. To date, most rodent studies used an electrical forepaw stimulation model to acquire fMRI data, with α-chloralose as the anesthetic. However, α-chloralose is harmful to animals, and not suitable for longitudinal studies. Moreover, peripheral stimulation models enable only a limited number of brain regions to be studied. Processing between peripheral regions and the brain is multisynaptic, and renders interpretation difficult and uncertain. In the present study, we combined the medetomidine-based fMRI protocol (a noninvasive rodent fMRI protocol) with chronic implantation of an MRI-compatible stimulation electrode in the ventroposterior (VP) thalamus to repetitively sample thalamocortical responses in the rat brain. Using this model, we scanned the forebrain responses evoked by the VP stimulation repeatedly of individual rats over 1 week. Cortical BOLD responses were compared between the 2 profiles obtained at day1 and day8. We discovered reproducible frequency- and amplitude-dependent BOLD responses in the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1). The S1 BOLD responses during the 2 sessions were conserved in maximal response amplitude, area size (size ratio from 0.88 to 0.91), and location (overlap ratio from 0.61 to 0.67). The present study provides a long-term chronic brain stimulation protocol for studying the plasticity of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain by BOLD-fMRI. PMID:24825464

  9. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  10. MRI-PET image fusion based on NSCT transform using local energy and local variance fusion rules.

    PubMed

    Amini, Nasrin; Fatemizadeh, E; Behnam, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Image fusion means to integrate information from one image to another image. Medical images according to the nature of the images are divided into structural (such as CT and MRI) and functional (such as SPECT, PET). This article fused MRI and PET images and the purpose is adding structural information from MRI to functional information of PET images. The images decomposed with Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform and then two images were fused with applying fusion rules. The coefficients of the low frequency band are combined by a maximal energy rule and coefficients of the high frequency bands are combined by a maximal variance rule. Finally, visual and quantitative criteria were used to evaluate the fusion result. In visual evaluation the opinion of two radiologists was used and in quantitative evaluation the proposed fusion method was compared with six existing methods and used criteria were entropy, mutual information, discrepancy and overall performance.

  11. Calibration standard of body tissue with magnetic nanocomposites for MRI and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Woodward, Robert; House, Michael; Engineer, Diana; Feindel, Kirk; Dutz, Silvio; Odenbach, Stefan; StPierre, Tim

    2016-05-01

    We present a first study of a long-term phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging of biological tissues with magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) suitable for 3-dimensional and quantitative imaging of tissues after, e.g. magnetically assisted cancer treatments. We performed a cross-calibration of X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and MRI with a joint calibration standard for both imaging techniques. For this, we have designed a phantom for MRI and X-ray computed tomography which represents biological tissue enriched with MNC. The developed phantoms consist of an elastomer with different concentrations of multi-core MNC. The matrix material is a synthetic thermoplastic gel, PermaGel (PG). The developed phantoms have been analyzed with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxometry (Bruker minispec mq 60) at 1.4 T to obtain R2 transverse relaxation rates, with SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to verify the magnetite concentration, and with XμCT and 9.4 T MRI to visualize the phantoms 3-dimensionally and also to obtain T2 relaxation times. A specification of a sensitivity range is determined for standard imaging techniques X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and MRI as well as with NMR. These novel phantoms show a long-term stability over several months up to years. It was possible to suspend a particular MNC within the PG reaching a concentration range from 0 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The R2 relaxation rates from 1.4 T NMR-relaxometry show a clear connection (R2=0.994) with MNC concentrations between 0 mg/ml and 4.5 mg/ml. The MRI experiments have shown a linear correlation of R2 relaxation and MNC concentrations as well but in a range between MNC concentrations of 0 mg/ml and 1.435 mg/ml. It could be shown that XμCT displays best moderate and high MNC concentrations. The sensitivity range for this particular XμCT apparatus yields from 0.569 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The

  12. Image guidance based on MRI for spinal interstitial laser thermotherapy: technical aspects and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tatsui, Claudio E; Nascimento, Clarissa N G; Suki, Dima; Amini, Behrang; Li, Jing; Ghia, Amol J; Thomas, Jonathan G; Stafford, R Jason; Rhines, Laurence D; Cata, Juan P; Kumar, Ashok J; Rao, Ganesh

    2017-02-10

    OBJECTIVE Image guidance for spinal procedures is based on 3D-fluoroscopy or CT, which provide poor visualization of soft tissues, including the spinal cord. To overcome this limitation, the authors developed a method to register intraoperative MRI (iMRI) of the spine into a neuronavigation system, allowing excellent visualization of the spinal cord. This novel technique improved the accuracy in the deployment of laser interstitial thermal therapy probes for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. METHODS Patients were positioned prone on the MRI table under general anesthesia. Fiducial markers were applied on the skin of the back, and a plastic cradle was used to support the MRI coil. T2-weighted MRI sequences of the region of interest were exported to a standard navigation system. A reference array was sutured to the skin, and surface matching of the fiducial markers was performed. A navigated Jamshidi needle was advanced until contact was made with the dorsal elements; its position was confirmed with intraoperative fluoroscopy prior to advancement into a target in the epidural space. A screenshot of its final position was saved, and then the Jamshidi needle was exchanged for an MRI-compatible access cannula. MRI of the exact axial plane of each access cannula was obtained and compared with the corresponding screenshot saved during positioning. The discrepancy in millimeters between the trajectories was measured to evaluate accuracy of the image guidance RESULTS Thirteen individuals underwent implantation of 47 laser probes. The median absolute value of the discrepancy between the location predicted by the navigation system and the actual position of the access cannulas was 0.7 mm (range 0-3.2 mm). No injury or adverse event occurred during the procedures. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of image guidance based on MRI to perform laser interstitial thermotherapy of spinal metastasis. The authors' method permits excellent

  13. Simultaneous imaging of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra with a quantitative neuromelanin MRI approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangchuan; Huddleston, Daniel E; Langley, Jason; Ahn, Sinyeob; Barnum, Christopher J; Factor, Stewart A; Levey, Allan I; Hu, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative MRI of neuromelanin (NM) containing structures (referred to as NM-MRI) in the brainstem, namely the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra (SN), may assist with the early detection of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as differential diagnosis in the early disease stages. In this study, two gradient echo (GRE) sequences with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulses were developed to simultaneously image the LC and SN. This has been a challenge with NM-MRI techniques used in previous studies due to the relatively high specific absorption rate (SAR) induced by these techniques. In addition, a semi-automated quantitative analysis scheme was applied to estimate volumes and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the LC and SN based on segmentation of both structures. Compared to a T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence typically used for simultaneous imaging of the LC and SN, the two GRE-MTC sequences exhibited improved performance in terms of higher sensitivity (in CNR) in imaging the SN and lower SAR during the scans. A multiple-measurement protocol was adopted as well so that motion degraded measurements could be removed and artifacts associated with motion could be corrected. The present approach has demonstrated advantages in image acquisition (lower SAR and higher sensitivity), image pre-processing (with motion correction) and quantitative image analysis (segmentation-based estimation of volume and CNR) when compared with existing NM-MRI approaches. This approach has potential for detection and monitoring of neurodegeneration in LC and SN in disease states including AD and PD.

  14. MRI Reporter Genes: Application to Imaging of Cell Survival, Proliferation, Migration, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vandsburger, Moriel H; Radoul, Marina; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging strives to detect molecular events at the level of the whole organism. In some cases, the molecule of interest can be detected either directly, or through the use of targeted contrast media. However many genes and proteins, and particularly those located in intracellular compartments, are not accessible for targeted agents. The transcriptional regulation of these genes can never the less be detected, though indirectly, through the use of reporter genes encoding for readily detectable proteins. Such reporter proteins can be expressed in the tissue of interest by genetically introducing the reporter gene in the target cells. Imaging of reporter genes has become a powerful tool in modern biomedical research. Typically, expression of fluorescent or bioluminescent proteins, or the reaction product of expressed enzymes and exogenous substrates, are examined using in vitro histological methods, or in vivo whole body imaging methods. Recent advances in MRI reporter gene methods raise the possibility that MRI could become a powerful tool for concomitant high resolution anatomical and functional imaging and for imaging of reporter gene activity. An immediate application of MRI reporter gene methods is for monitoring gene expression patterns in gene therapy and for in vivo imaging of the survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of pluripotent or multipotent cells used in cell based regenerative therapies for cancer, myocardial infarction, and neural degeneration. In this review, we characterize the variety of MRI reporter gene methods based on their applicability to report cell survival/proliferation, cell migration, and cell differentiation. In particular, we discuss which methods are best suited for translation to clinical use in regenerative therapies. PMID:23225197

  15. Measuring Pain for Patients Seeking Physical Therapy: Can Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Help?

    PubMed

    Elliott, James M; Owen, Meriel; Bishop, Mark D; Sparks, Cheryl; Tsao, Henry; Walton, David M; Weber, Kenneth A; Wideman, Timothy H

    2016-07-28

    In the multidisciplinary fields of pain medicine and rehabilitation, advancing techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are used to enhance our understanding of the pain experience. Given that such measures, in some circles, are expected to help us understand the brain in pain, future research in pain measurement is undeniably rich with possibility. However, pain remains intensely personal and represents a multifaceted experience, unique to each individual; no single measure in isolation, fMRI included, can prove or quantify its magnitude beyond the patient self-report. Physical therapists should be aware of cutting-edge advances in measuring the patient's pain experience, and they should work closely with professionals in other disciplines (eg, magnetic resonance physicists, biomedical engineers, radiologists, psychologists) to guide the exploration and development of multimodal pain measurement and management on a patient-by-patient basis. The primary purpose of this perspective article is to provide a brief overview of fMRI and inform physical therapist clinicians of the pros and cons when utilized as a measure of the patient's perception of pain. A secondary purpose is to describe current known factors that influence the quality of fMRI data and its analyses, as well as the potential for future clinical applications relevant to physical therapist practice. Lastly, the interested reader is introduced and referred to existing guidelines and recommendations for reporting fMRI research.

  16. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  17. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  18. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  19. Imaging of pulmonary pathologies: focus on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian

    2009-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung has shown tremendous progress in recent years. This includes parallel imaging, new contrast agents and mechanisms, ultrafast imaging, and respiratory gating. With these improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use. The main advantage for MRI of the lung is its unique combination of structural and functional assessment within a single imaging examination. This comprehensive imaging assessment is an asset when compared with computed tomography, which is complemented by the fact that MRI does not carry any exposure to ionizing radiation, making it especially advantageous in children, young adults, and for follow-up examinations either in disease surveillance or therapy monitoring. Clinical indications for MRI are: pulmonary vascular disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, airway diseases, especially cystic fibrosis; neoplastic disease, including staging of lung cancer as an alternative imaging modality; all pediatric indications (e.g., congenital anomalies); as well as follow-up examinations. Under investigation is the application of MRI for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as asthma. In this regard the additional benefit from MRI using hyperpolarized gases has to be determined.

  20. Prioritization of brain MRI volumes using medical image perception model and tumor region segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Irfan; Ejaz, Naveed; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore prioritization methods in diagnostic imaging modalities to automatically determine the contents of medical images. In this paper, we propose an efficient prioritization of brain MRI. First, the visual perception of the radiologists is adapted to identify salient regions. Then this saliency information is used as an automatic label for accurate segmentation of brain lesion to determine the scientific value of that image. The qualitative and quantitative results prove that the rankings generated by the proposed method are closer to the rankings created by radiologists.

  1. Ultra-Fast MRI of the Human Brain with Simultaneous Multi-Slice Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, David A.; Setsompop, Kawin

    2013-01-01

    The recent advancement of simultaneous multi-slice imaging using multiband excitation has dramatically reduced the scan time of the brain. The evolution of this parallel imaging technique began over a decade ago and through recent sequence improvements has reduced the acquisition time of multi-slice EPI by over ten fold. This technique has recently become extremely useful for i) functional MRI studies for improving the statistical definition of neuronal networks, and ii) diffusion based fiber tractography for improving the ability to visualize structural connections in the human brain. Several applications and evaluations are underway which show promise for this family of fast imaging sequences. PMID:23473893

  2. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans: II. Expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, John C. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Ho, Wai-Chin

    1991-06-01

    A microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning.

  3. Segmentation and length measurement of the abdominal blood vessels in 3-D MRI images.

    PubMed

    Babin, Danilo; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    In diagnosing diseases and planning surgeries the structure and length of blood vessels is of great importance. In this research we develop a novel method for the segmentation of 2-D and 3-D images with an application to blood vessel length measurements in 3-D abdominal MRI images. Our approach is robust to noise and does not require contrast-enhanced images for segmentation. We use an effective algorithm for skeletonization, graph construction and shortest path estimation to measure the length of blood vessels of interest.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam; Pigge, F. Christopher; Anderson, James; Kim, Yusung

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  5. Gray matter myelination of 1555 human brains using partial volume corrected MRI images

    PubMed Central

    Shafee, Rebecca; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The myelin content of the cortex changes over the human lifetime and aberrant cortical myelination is associated with diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential in differentiating between myeloarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in vivo. Here we introduce a new algorithm for correcting partial volume effects present in mm-scale MRI images which was used to investigate the myelination pattern of the cerebral cortex in 1555 clinically normal subjects using the ratio of T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI images. A significant linear cross-sectional age increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin was detected across an 18 to 35 year age span (highest value of ~ 1%/year compared to mean T1w/T2w myelin value at 18 years). The cortex was divided at mid-thickness and the value of T1w/T2w myelin calculated for the inner and the outer layers separately. The increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin occurs predominantly in the inner layer for most cortical regions. The ratio of the inner and outer layer T1w/T12w myelin was further validated using high-resolution in vivo MRI scans and also a high-resolution MRI scan of a postmortem brain. Additionally, the relationships between cortical thickness, curvature and T1w/T2w estimated myelin were found to be significant, although the relationships varied across the cortex. We discuss these observations as well as limitations of using the T1w/T2w ratio as an estimate of cortical myelin. PMID:25449739

  6. Review of MRI technique and imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and the "sports hernia".

    PubMed

    Mullens, Frank E; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2012-12-01

    The clinical syndrome of athletic pubalgia has prematurely ended many promising athletic careers, has made many active, fitness conscious adults more sedentary, and has served as a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum for innumerable trainers and physicians worldwide for decades. This diagnosis actually arises from one or more lesions within a spectrum of musculoskeletal and visceral injuries. In recent years, MRI has helped define many of these syndromes, and has proven to be both sensitive and specific for numerous potential causes of athletic pubalgia. This text will provide a comprehensive, up to date review of expected and sometimes unexpected MRI findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, and will delineate an imaging algorithm and MRI protocol to help guide radiologists and other clinicians dealing with refractory, activity related groin pain in an otherwise young, healthy patient. There is still more to be learned about prevention and treatment plans for athletic pubalgia lesions, but accurate diagnosis should be much less nebulous and difficult with the use of MRI as a primary imaging modality.

  7. Single-Step Assembly of Multi-Modal Imaging Nanocarriers: MRI and Long-Wavelength Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Nathalie M.; Gindy, Marian E.; Calero-DdelC, Victoria L.; Wolfson, Theodore; Pagels, Robert F.; Adler, Derek; Gao, Dayuan; Li, Shike; Wang, Ruobing; Zevon, Margot; Yao, Nan; Pacheco, Carlos; Therien, Michael J.; Rinaldi, Carlos; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    MRI and NIR-active, multi-modal Composite NanoCarriers (CNCs) are prepared using a simple, one-step process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP). The FNP process allows for the independent control of the hydrodynamic diameter, co-core excipient and NIR dye loading, and iron oxide-based nanocrystal (IONC) content of the CNCs. In the controlled precipitation process, 10 nm IONCs are encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol) stabilized CNCs to make biocompatible T2 contrast agents. By adjusting the formulation, CNC size is tuned between 80 and 360 nm. Holding the CNC size constant at an intensity weighted average diameter of 99 ± 3 nm (PDI width 28 nm), the particle relaxivity varies linearly with encapsulated IONC content ranging from 66 to 533 mM-1s-1 for CNCs formulated with 4 to 16 wt% IONC. To demonstrate the use of CNCs as in vivo MRI contrast agents, CNCs are surface functionalized with liver targeting hydroxyl groups. The CNCs enable the detection of 0.8 mm3 non-small cell lung cancer metastases in mice livers via MRI. Incorporating the hydrophobic, NIR dye PZn3 into CNCs enables complementary visualization with long-wavelength fluorescence at 800 nm. In vivo imaging demonstrates the ability of CNCs to act both as MRI and fluorescent imaging agents. PMID:25925128

  8. Clinical cell therapy imaging using a perfluorocarbon tracer and fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T; Helfer, Brooke M; O'Hanlon, Charles F; Schirda, Claudiu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cellular therapeutics are emerging as a treatment option for a host of serious human diseases. To accelerate clinical translation, noninvasive imaging of cell grafts in clinical trials can potentially be used to assess the initial delivery and behavior of cells. Methods The use of a perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer agent for clinical fluorine-19 (19F) MRI cell detection is described. This technology was used to detect immunotherapeutic dendritic cells (DCs) delivered to colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. Autologous DC vaccines were labeled with a PFC MRI agent ex vivo. Patients received DCs intradermally, and 19F spin-density-weighted MRI at 3 Tesla (T) was used to observe cells. Results Spin-density-weighted 19F images at the injection site displayed DCs as background-free “hot-spot” images. 19F images were acquired in clinically relevant scan times (<10 min). Apparent DC numbers could be quantified in two patients from the 19F hot-spots and were observed to decrease by ∼50% at injection site by 24 h. From 3T phantom studies, the sensitivity limit for DC detection is estimated to be on the order of ∼105 cells/voxel in this study. Conclusion These results help to establish a clinically applicable means to track a broad range of cell types used in cell therapy. Magn Reson Med 72:1696–1701, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25241945

  9. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRimaging of the atrial septum than does conventional MRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  10. 2D Imaging in a Lightweight Portable MRI Scanner without Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Stockmann, Jason P.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lev, Michael H.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as Intensive Care Units, physician offices, surgical suites, ambulances, emergency rooms, sports facilities, or rural healthcare sites. Methods We construct and validate a truly portable (<100kg) and silent proof-of-concept MRI scanner which replaces conventional gradient encoding with a rotating lightweight cryogen-free, low-field magnet. When rotated about the object, the inhomogeneous field pattern is used as a rotating Spatial Encoding Magnetic field (rSEM) to create generalized projections which encode the iteratively reconstructed 2D image. Multiple receive channels are used to disambiguate the non-bijective encoding field. Results The system is validated with experimental images of 2D test phantoms. Similar to other non-linear field encoding schemes, the spatial resolution is position dependent with blurring in the center, but is shown to be likely sufficient for many medical applications. Conclusion The presented MRI scanner demonstrates the potential for portability by simultaneously relaxing the magnet homogeneity criteria and eliminating the gradient coil. This new architecture and encoding scheme shows convincing proof of concept images that are expected to be further improved with refinement of the calibration and methodology. PMID:24668520

  11. Validation of radiocarpal joint contact models based on images from a clinical MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; McIff, Terence E; Lee, Phil; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based radiocarpal surface contact models of functional loading in a clinical MRI scanner for future in vivo studies, by comparison with experimental measures from three cadaver forearm specimens. Experimental data were acquired using a Tekscan sensor during simulated light grasp. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to obtain model geometry and kinematics (image registration). Peak contact pressures (PPs) and average contact pressures (APs), contact forces and contact areas were determined in the radiolunate and radioscaphoid joints. Contact area was also measured directly from MR images acquired with load and compared with model data. Based on the validation criteria (within 25% of experimental data), out of the six articulations (three specimens with two articulations each), two met the criterion for AP (0%, 14%); one for peak pressure (20%); one for contact force (5%); four for contact area with respect to experiment (8%, 13%, 19% and 23%), and three contact areas met the criterion with respect to direct measurements (14%, 21% and 21%). Absolute differences between model and experimental PPs were reasonably low (within 2.5 MPa). Overall, the results indicate that MRI-based models generated from 3T clinical MR scanner appear sufficient to obtain clinically relevant data.

  12. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Aramburu Núñez, David; del Olmo Claudio, José Luis; Salvador Gómez, Francisco; Driscoll, Brandon; Coolens, Catherine; Alba Castro, José L.; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets. PMID:25788972

  13. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively.

  14. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    López-González, I.; Torres-Rodríguez, P.; Sánchez-Carranza, O.; Solís-López, A.; Santi, C.M.; Darszon, A.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K+ concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K+ channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K+ channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K+ channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K+ channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K+ currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 μM). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main contributors to the

  15. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  17. Local experience in cervical cancer imaging: Comparison in tumour assessment between TRUS and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ordeanu, Claudia; Pop, Diana Cristina; Badea, Radu; Csutak, Csaba; Todor, Nicolae; Ordeanu, Calin; Kerekes, Reka; Coza, Ovidiu; Nagy, Viorica; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Irimie, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to analyze the accuracy of TRUS (transrectal ultrasound) vs. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and clinical gynecological examination estimation in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. Methods The patients inclusion criterion included primarily pathologically squamous cell carcinoma, but excluded were patients who had not undergone BT (brachytherapy) and treated with palliative intent. We offer two types of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer: (a) radiochemotherapy followed by surgery and (b) exclusive radiochemotherapy. Imaging tests follow the presence of tumor and tumor size (width and thickness). Each examination was performed by a different physician who had no knowledge of the others’ findings. All patients underwent MRI prior to EBRT (external beam radiation therapy) while 18 of them also at the time of the first brachytherapy application. For the analysis we used the r-Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In 2013, 26 patients with cervical cancer were included. A total of 44 gynecological examinations were performed, 44 MRIs and 18 TRUSs. For the comparisons prior to EBRT the correlation coefficient between TRUS vs. MRI was r = 0.79 for AP and r = 0.83 for LL, for GYN vs. MRI was r = 0.6 for AP and r = 0.75 for LL. Prior to BT for GYN vs. MRI, r values were 0.60 and 0.63 for AP and LL, respectively; for GYN vs. TRUS, r values were 0.56 and 0.78 for AP and LL, respectively. Conclusions A high correlation between the three examinations was obtained. As such, TRUS can be considered a suitable method in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. PMID:25949227

  18. Pathway to Cryogen Free Production of Hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129

    PubMed Central

    Six, Joseph S.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Stupic, Karl F.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe and hp 83Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp 129Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp 83Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For 129Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized 129Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm3/min. For hp 83Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm3/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D1 transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process. PMID:23209620

  19. Pathway to cryogen free production of hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Stupic, Karl F; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (129)Xe and hp (83)Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp (129)Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp (83)Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For (129)Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized (129)Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm(3)/min. For hp (83)Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm(3)/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D(1) transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process.

  20. MRI-based biomechanical imaging: initial study on early plaque progression and vessel remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Abendschein, Dana R.; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Yang, Deshan; McCommis, Kyle S.; Misselwitz, Bernd; Gropler, Robert J.; Tang, Dalin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to develop a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based biomechanical imaging technique to address biomechanical pathways of atherosclerotic progression and regression in vivo using a 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Initial in vivo study was carried out in an early plaque model in pigs that underwent balloon-overstretch injury to the left carotid arteries. Consecutive MRI scans were performed while the pigs were maintained on high cholesterol (progression) or normal chow (regression), with an injection of a plaque-targeted contrast agent, Gadofluorine M. At the end of study, the specimens of carotid arterial segments were dissected and underwent dedicated mechanical testing to determine their material properties. 3D FSI computational model was applied to calculate structure stress and strain distribution. The plaque structure resembles early plaque with thickened intima. Lower maximal flow shear stress correlates with the growth of plaque volume during progression, but not during regression. In contrast, maximal principle structure stress/stain (stress-P1 and strain-P1) were shown to correlate strongly with the change in the plaque dimension during regression, but moderately during progression. This MRI-based biomechanical imaging method may allow for noninvasive dynamic assessment of local hemodynamic forces on the development of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. PMID:19559552

  1. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  2. Non-cryogenic anatomical imaging in ultra-low field regime: hand MRI demonstration.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T; Castro, A; Volegov, P; Matlashov, A; Urbatis, A; Gomez, J; Espy, M

    2011-08-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI with a pulsed prepolarization is a promising method with potential for applications where conventional high-, mid-, and low-field medical MRI cannot be used due to cost, weight, or other restrictions. Previously, successful ULF demonstrations of anatomical imaging were made using liquid helium-cooled SQUIDs and conducted inside a magnetically shielded room. The Larmor frequency for these demonstrations was ∼3 kHz. In order to make ULF MRI more accessible, portable, and inexpensive, we have recently developed a non-cryogenic system. To eliminate the requirement for a magnetically shielded room and improve the detection sensitivity, we increased the frequency to 83.6 kHz. While the background noise at these frequencies is greatly reduced, this is still within the ULF regime and most of its advantages such as simplicity in magnetic field generation hardware, and less stringent requirements for uniform fields, remaining. In this paper we demonstrate use of this system to image a human hand with up to 1.5mm resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient to reveal anatomical features within a scan time of less than 7 min. This prototype can be scaled up for constructing head and full body scanners, and work is in progress toward demonstration of head imaging.

  3. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-07

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  4. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  5. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    PubMed

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased.

  6. Manifold learning for image-based breathing gating in ultrasound and MRI.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, Christian; Yigitsoy, Mehmet; Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Navab, Nassir

    2012-05-01

    Respiratory motion is a challenging factor for image acquisition and image-guided procedures in the abdominal and thoracic region. In order to address the issues arising from respiratory motion, it is often necessary to detect the respiratory signal. In this article, we propose a novel, purely image-based retrospective respiratory gating method for ultrasound and MRI. Further, we apply this technique to acquire breathing-affected 4D ultrasound with a wobbler probe and, similarly, to create 4D MR with a slice stacking approach. We achieve the gating with Laplacian eigenmaps, a manifold learning technique, to determine the low-dimensional manifold embedded in the high-dimensional image space. Since Laplacian eigenmaps assign to each image frame a coordinate in low-dimensional space by respecting the neighborhood relationship, they are well suited for analyzing the breathing cycle. We perform the image-based gating on several 2D and 3D ultrasound datasets over time, and quantify its very good performance by comparing it to measurements from an external gating system. For MRI, we perform the manifold learning on several datasets for various orientations and positions. We achieve very high correlations by a comparison to an alternative gating with diaphragm tracking.

  7. Polyaspartic acid coated iron oxide nanoprobes for PET/MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, due to their exceptional magnetic property, biocompatibility, and biodegradability, have long been studied as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (Xie et al., Curr Med Chem 16(10):1278-1294, 2009; Xie et al., Adv Drug deliv Rev 62(11):1064-1079, 2010). While previous applications mostly target reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs such as liver and lymph nodes, recent efforts have been made to impart targeting peptides or antibodies onto particle surface to enable site-specific targeting after systemic administration (Xie et al., Adv Drug Deliv Rev 62(11):1064-1079, 2010; Cai and Chen, Small 3(11):1840-1854, 2007; Corot et al., Adv Drug Deliv Rev 58 (14):1471-1504, 2006; Xie et al., Acc Chem Res 44(10):883-892). Moreover, other imaging functionalities can be loaded onto nanoparticles to achieve multimodality imaging probes (Cai and Chen, Small 3(11):1840-1854, 2007; Lee et al., J Nucl Med Soc Nucl Med 49(8):1371-1379, 2008). In this protocol, we describe the procedure of constructing an iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-based probe with high affinity towards integrin αvβ3 for positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual modality imaging. The related characterizations and validation experiments, including particle concentration determination, Prussian blue staining, animal model preparation, and in vivo PET/MRI imaging will also be discussed.

  8. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  9. In Vivo Molecular MRI Imaging of Prostate Cancer by Targeting PSMA with Polypeptide-Labeled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunkai; Sun, Ying; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Weiyong; Jiang, Jun; Guan, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhongyang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is broadly overexpressed on prostate cancer (PCa) cell surfaces. In this study, we report the synthesis, characterization, in vitro binding assay, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of PSMA targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). PSMA-targeting polypeptide CQKHHNYLC was conjugated to SPIONs to form PSMA-targeting molecular MRI contrast agents. In vitro studies demonstrated specific uptake of polypeptide-SPIONs by PSMA expressing cells. In vivo MRI studies found that MRI signals in PSMA-expressing tumors could be specifically enhanced with polypeptide-SPION, and further Prussian blue staining showed heterogeneous deposition of SPIONs in the tumor tissues. Taken altogether, we have developed PSMA-targeting polypeptide-SPIONs that could specifically enhance MRI signal in tumor-bearing mice, which might provide a new strategy for the molecular imaging of PCa. PMID:25927579

  10. NIFTY (NeuroImaging Functional Toolkit): an interactive program for functional MRI data processing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnholt, Jeff C.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Robb, Richard A.

    1995-05-01

    NIFTY (NeuroImaging Functional Toolkit) is a tool designed to perform quantitative analysis and visualization of neurofunctional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data sets. NIFTY is an OSF/Motif application which utilizes the AVW (a visualization workshop) imaging library developed in our laboratory and includes algorithms for robust image registration, statistical analysis, and mapping of neurofunctional data sets. Anisotropic diffusion routines can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise- ratio of these images. Tools capable of histogram equalization, thresholding, volume rendering, atlas matching, and a large number of other functions can then be used to visualize the data. NIFTY's development will offer a robust and flexible system of essential functions integrated into an interactive, graphically-oriented program, allowing neuroscientists the means by which to process, visualize, and interpret their data.

  11. MRI of hand and wrist with a dedicated low field mini imager: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Constantinesco, A; Brunot, B; Foucher, G

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and the early results of an MRI system designed specifically for imaging of the hand and wrist. The imager takes up little space, uses a small 0.1 Tesla water-cooled electro-magnet with a vertical magnetic field and a 15 cm air gap. The system is based on a PC micro-computer and an integrated image processing board. There is no need for a Faraday cage. The image resolution is less than 1 mm using a 128 x 128 matrix format for a typical slice thickness of 3 mm. It is possible to achieve a 0.2 mm per pixel spatial resolution when imaging the fingers.

  12. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-15

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  13. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-01

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  14. The role of MRI in image-guided needle biopsy of focal bone and soft tissue neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Khoo, M M Y; Saifuddin, A

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a critical role in the management pathway of both soft tissue and bone neoplasms, from diagnosis through to post-treatment follow-up. There are a wide range of surgical, oncological, and combined treatment regimes but these rely on accurate histopathological diagnosis. This article reviews the role of MRI in the planning of image-guided needle biopsy for suspected soft tissue and bone tumors.

  15. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  16. Iron-Loaded Magnetic Nanocapsules for pH-Triggered Drug Release and MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanocapsules were synthesized for controlled drug release, magnetically assisted delivery, and MRI imaging. These magnetic nanocapsules, consisting of a stable iron nanocore and a mesoporous silica shell, were synthesized by controlled encapsulation of ellipsoidal hematite in silica, partial etching of the hematite core in acid, and reduction of the core by hydrogen. The iron core provided a high saturation magnetization and was stable against oxidation for at least 6 months in air and 1 month in aqueous solution. The hollow space between the iron core and mesoporous silica shell was used to load anticancer drug and a T1-weighted MRI contrast agent (Gd-DTPA). These multifunctional monodispersed magnetic “nanoeyes” were coated by multiple polyelectrolyte layers of biocompatible poly-l-lysine and sodium alginate to control the drug release as a function of pH. We studied pH-controlled release, magnetic hysteresis curves, and T1/T2 MRI contrast of the magnetic nanoeyes. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of 8.6 mM–1 s–1 (r1) and 285 mM–1 s–1 (r2). PMID:24748722

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  18. Synthesis of Gd2O3:Eu nanoplatelets for MRI and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Nabil M; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Assadi, Achraf Amir; Maalej, Ramzi; Shaikh, Mohammed Nasiruzzaman; Ilyas, Muhammad; Gondal, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized Gd2O3 and Gd2O3 doped by europium (Eu) (2% to 10%) nanoplatelets using the polyol chemical method. The synthesized nanoplatelets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FESEM, TEM, and EDX techniques. The optical properties of the synthesized nanoplatelets were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy. We also studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of T1 relaxivity using 3 T MRI. The XRD for Gd2O3 revealed a cubic crystalline structure. The XRD of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanoplatelets were highly consistent with Gd2O3 indicating the total incorporation of the Eu(3+) ions in the Gd2O3 matrix. The Eu doping of Gd2O3 produced red luminescence around 612 nm corresponding to the radiative transitions from the Eu-excited state (5)D0 to the (7)F2. The photoluminescence was maximal at 5% Eu doping concentration. The stimulated CIE chromaticity coordinates were also calculated. Judd-Ofelt analysis was used to obtain the radiative properties of the sample from the emission spectra. The MRI contrast enhancement due to Gd2O3 was compared to DOTAREM commercial contrast agent at similar concentration of gadolinium oxide and provided similar contrast enhancement. The incorporation of Eu, however, decreased the MRI contrast due to replacement of gadolinium by Eu.

  19. Synthesis of Gd2O3:Eu nanoplatelets for MRI and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalej, Nabil M.; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Assadi, Achraf Amir; Maalej, Ramzi; Shaikh, Mohammed Nasiruzzaman; Ilyas, Muhammad; Gondal, Mohammad A.

    2015-05-01

    We synthesized Gd2O3 and Gd2O3 doped by europium (Eu) (2% to 10%) nanoplatelets using the polyol chemical method. The synthesized nanoplatelets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FESEM, TEM, and EDX techniques. The optical properties of the synthesized nanoplatelets were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy. We also studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of T1 relaxivity using 3 T MRI. The XRD for Gd2O3 revealed a cubic crystalline structure. The XRD of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanoplatelets were highly consistent with Gd2O3 indicating the total incorporation of the Eu3+ ions in the Gd2O3 matrix. The Eu doping of Gd2O3 produced red luminescence around 612 nm corresponding to the radiative transitions from the Eu-excited state 5D0 to the 7F2. The photoluminescence was maximal at 5% Eu doping concentration. The stimulated CIE chromaticity coordinates were also calculated. Judd-Ofelt analysis was used to obtain the radiative properties of the sample from the emission spectra. The MRI contrast enhancement due to Gd2O3 was compared to DOTAREM commercial contrast agent at similar concentration of gadolinium oxide and provided similar contrast enhancement. The incorporation of Eu, however, decreased the MRI contrast due to replacement of gadolinium by Eu.

  20. Automated Robust Image Segmentation: Level Set Method Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization with Application to Brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Dera, Dimah; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2016-07-01

    We address the problem of fully automated region discovery and robust image segmentation by devising a new deformable model based on the level set method (LSM) and the probabilistic nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We describe the use of NMF to calculate the number of distinct regions in the image and to derive the local distribution of the regions, which is incorporated into the energy functional of the LSM. The results demonstrate that our NMF-LSM method is superior to other approaches when applied to synthetic binary and gray-scale images and to clinical magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain with and without a malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme. In particular, the NMF-LSM method is fully automated, highly accurate, less sensitive to the initial selection of the contour(s) or initial conditions, more robust to noise and model parameters, and able to detect as small distinct regions as desired. These advantages stem from the fact that the proposed method relies on histogram information instead of intensity values and does not introduce nuisance model parameters. These properties provide a general approach for automated robust region discovery and segmentation in heterogeneous images. Compared with the retrospective radiological diagnoses of two patients with non-enhancing grade 2 and 3 oligodendroglioma, the NMF-LSM detects earlier progression times and appears suitable for monitoring tumor response. The NMF-LSM method fills an important need of automated segmentation of clinical MRI.

  1. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  2. Combination of Compressed Sensing and Parallel Imaging for Highly Accelerated First-Pass Cardiac Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel; Axel, Leon; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2010-01-01

    First-pass cardiac perfusion MRI is a natural candidate for compressed sensing acceleration since its representation in the combined temporal Fourier and spatial domain is sparse and the required incoherence can be effectively accomplished by k-t random undersampling. However, the required number of samples in practice (three to five times the number of sparse coefficients) limits the acceleration for compressed sensing alone. Parallel imaging may also be used to accelerate cardiac perfusion MRI, with acceleration factors ultimately limited by noise amplification. In this work, compressed sensing and parallel imaging are combined by merging the k-t SPARSE technique with SENSE reconstruction to substantially increase the acceleration rate for perfusion imaging. We also present a new theoretical framework for understanding the combination of k-t SPARSE with SENSE based on distributed compressed sensing theory. This framework, which identifies parallel imaging as a distributed multisensor implementation of compressed sensing, enables an estimate of feasible acceleration for the combined approach. We demonstrate feasibility of 8-fold acceleration in vivo with whole-heart coverage and high spatial and temporal resolution using standard coil arrays. The method is relatively insensitive to respiratory motion artifacts and presents similar temporal fidelity and image quality when compared to GRAPPA with 2-fold acceleration. PMID:20535813

  3. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  4. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  5. Extending the Lifetime of Hyperpolarized Propane Gas through Reversible Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Burueva, Dudari B; Romanov, Alexey S; Salnikov, Oleg G; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Chen, Yu-Wen; Barskiy, Danila A; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Hwang, Dennis W; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2017-03-02

    Hyperpolarized (HP) propane produced by the parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) technique has been recently introduced as a promising contrast agent for functional lung magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, its short lifetime due to a spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of less than 1 s in the gas phase is a significant translational challenge for its potential biomedical applications. The previously demonstrated approach for extending the lifetime of the HP propane state through long-lived spin states allows the HP propane lifetime to be increased by a factor of ∼3. Here, we demonstrate that a remarkable increase in the propane hyperpolarization decay time at high magnetic field (7.1 T) can be achieved by its dissolution in deuterated organic solvents (acetone-d6 or methanol-d4). The approximate values of the HP decay time for propane dissolved in acetone-d6 are 35.1 and 28.6 s for the CH2 group and the CH3 group, respectively (similar values were obtained for propane dissolved in methanol-d4), which are ∼50 times larger than the gaseous propane T1 value. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to retrieve HP propane from solution to the gas phase with the preservation of hyperpolarization.

  6. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  7. MRI-guided fiber-based fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-09-01

    Multi-modal imaging combining fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) with MRI could provide information in these two modalities as well as optimize the recovery of functional information with MR-guidance. Here, we present a MRI-guided FMT system. An optical probe was designed consisting of a fiber plate on the top and bottom sides of the animal bed, respectively. In experiment, animal was installed between the two plates. Mounting fibers on each plate, transmission measuring could be conducted from both sides of the animal. Moreover, an accurate fluorescence reconstruction was achieved with MRI-derived anatomical guidance. The sensitivity of the FMT system was evaluated with a phantom showing that with long fibers, it was sufficient to detect 10nM Cy5.5 solution with ~28.5 dB in the phantom. The system was eventually used to image MMP activity involved in atherosclerosis with two ATX mice and two control mice. The reconstruction results were in agreement with ex vivo measurement.

  8. Simultaneous Quantitative Imaging of Electrical Properties and Proton Density from B1 Maps Using MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Zhang, Xiaotong; Wang, Yicun; He, Bin

    2016-03-29

    Electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues are important diagnostic parameters and are useful for calculating subject-specific specific absorption rate distribution. On the other hand, water proton density also has clinical relevance for diagnosis purposes. These two kinds of tissue properties are inevitably associated in the technique of electrical properties tomography (EPT), which can be used to map in vivo electrical properties based on the measured B1 field distribution at Larmor frequency using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The signal magnitude in MR images is locally proportional to both the proton density of tissue and the receive B1 field; this is a source of artifact in receive B1-based EPT reconstruction because these two quantities cannot easily be disentangled. In this study, a new method was proposed for simultaneously extracting quantitative conductivity, permittivity and proton density from the measured magnitude of transmit B1 field, proton density-weighted receive B1 field, and transceiver phase, in a multi-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil using MRI, without specific assumptions to derive the proton density distribution. We evaluated the spatial resolution, sensitivity to contrast, and accuracy of the method using numerical simulations of B1 field in a phantom and in a realistic human head model. Using the proposed method, conductivity, permittivity and proton density were then experimentally obtained ex vivo in a pork tissue sample on a 7T MRI scanner equipped with a 16-channel microstrip transceiver RF coil.

  9. Simultaneous Quantitative Imaging of Electrical Properties and Proton Density From B1 Maps Using MRI.

    PubMed

    Jiaen Liu; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Xiaotong Zhang; Yicun Wang; Bin He

    2016-09-01

    Electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues are important diagnostic parameters and are useful for calculating subject-specific specific absorption rate distribution. On the other hand, water proton density also has clinical relevance for diagnosis purposes. These two kinds of tissue properties are inevitably associated in the technique of electrical properties tomography (EPT), which can be used to map in vivo electrical properties based on the measured B1 field distribution at Larmor frequency using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The signal magnitude in MR images is locally proportional to both the proton density of tissue and the receive B1 field; this is a source of artifact in receive B1-based EPT reconstruction because these two quantities cannot easily be disentangled. In this study, a new method was proposed for simultaneously extracting quantitative conductivity, permittivity and proton density from the measured magnitude of transmit B1 field, proton density-weighted receive B1 field, and transceiver phase, in a multi-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil using MRI, without specific assumptions to derive the proton density distribution. We evaluated the spatial resolution, sensitivity to contrast, and accuracy of the method using numerical simulations of B1 field in a phantom and in a realistic human head model. Using the proposed method, conductivity, permittivity and proton density were then experimentally obtained ex vivo in a pork tissue sample on a 7T MRI scanner equipped with a 16-channel microstrip transceiver RF coil.

  10. Imaging the accumulation and suppression of tau pathology using multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Holly E.; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Ma, Da; Powell, Nick M.; O'Callaghan, James M.; Harrison, Ian F.; Johnson, Ross A.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morton; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Ourselin, Sebastien; O'Neill, Michael J.; Wells, Jack A.; Collins, Emily C.; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease have served as valuable tools for investigating pathogenic mechanisms relating to neurodegeneration, including tau-mediated and neurofibrillary tangle pathology—a major hallmark of the disease. In this work, we have used multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a longitudinal study of neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, a subset of which were treated with doxycycline at different time points to suppress the tau transgene. Using this paradigm, we investigated the sensitivity of multiparametric MRI to both the accumulation and suppression of pathologic tau. Tau-related atrophy was discernible from 5.5 months within the cortex and hippocampus. We observed markedly less atrophy in the treated rTg4510 mice, which was enhanced after doxycycline intervention from 3.5 months. We also observed differences in amide proton transfer, cerebral blood flow, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the rTg4510 mice, which were significantly less altered after doxycycline treatment. We propose that these non-invasive MRI techniques offer insight into pathologic mechanisms underpinning Alzheimer's disease that may be important when evaluating emerging therapeutics targeting one of more of these processes. PMID:26923415

  11. Evaluating kurtosis-based diffusion MRI tissue models for white matter with fiber ball imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jens H; McKinnon, Emilie T; Glenn, G Russell; Helpern, Joseph A

    2017-01-13

    In order to quantify well-defined microstructural properties of brain tissue from diffusion MRI (dMRI) data, tissue models are typically employed that relate biological features, such as cell morphology and cell membrane permeability, to the diffusion dynamics. A variety of such models have been proposed for white matter, and their validation is a topic of active interest. In this paper, three different tissue models are tested by comparing their predictions for a specific microstructural parameter to a value measured independently with a recently proposed dMRI method known as fiber ball imaging (FBI). The three tissue models are all constructed with the diffusion and kurtosis tensors, and they are hence compatible with diffusional kurtosis imaging. Nevertheless, the models differ significantly in their details and predictions. For voxels with fractional anisotropies (FAs) exceeding 0.5, all three are reasonably consistent with FBI. However, for lower FA values, one of these, called the white matter tract integrity (WMTI) model, is found to be in much better accord with FBI than the other two, suggesting that the WMTI model has a broader range of applicability.

  12. Masking Level Differences – A Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Wack, David S.; Polak, Paul; Furuyama, Jon; Burkard, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study we investigated Masking Level Differences (MLD) using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), but were unable to confirm neural correlations for the MLD within the auditory cortex and inferior colliculus. Here we have duplicated conditions from our previous study, but have included more participants and changed the study site to a new location with a newer scanner and presentation system. Additionally, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is included to allow investigation of fiber tracts that may be involved with MLDs. Twenty participants were included and underwent audiometric testing and MRI scanning. The current study revealed regions of increased and decreased activity within the auditory cortex when comparing the combined noise and signal of the dichotic MLD stimuli (N0Sπ and NπS0) with N0S0. Furthermore, we found evidence of inferior colliculus involvement. Our DTI findings show strong correlations between DTI measures within the brainstem and signal detection threshold levels. Patterns of correlation when the signal was presented only to the right ear showed an extensive network in the left hemisphere; however, the opposite was not true for the signal presented only to the left ear. Our current study was able to confirm what we had previously hypothesized using fMRI, while extending our investigation of MLDs to include the characteristics of connecting neural pathways. PMID:24558392

  13. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction in pigs with Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin scintigraphy and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    ten Kate, C.I.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Schipperheyn, J.J.; Doornbos, J.; Hoedemaeker, P.J.; Maes, A.; v.d. Nat, K.H.; Camps, J.A.; Huysmans, H.A.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1990-07-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin F(ab')2 was used in a series of scintigraphic studies on experimentally induced myocardial infarctions in pigs. Antimyosin distribution recorded by planar images of in vivo pigs and by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of excised hearts delineated areas of myocardial necrosis if infarct volume exceeded 3.3 cm3. Scintigraphic images were compared with magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from excised hearts and with photographs of slices of the hearts. Infarct size and localization determined with antimyosin were compared. The MR images, with or without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), of the in vivo pigs were all false-negative; some myocardial wall thinning and high bloodpool signals were visible. Results show that both the antimyosin and the MR technique are specific methods for the visualization of induced myocardial necrosis in this animal model. However, the use of antimyosin is limited to a period ranging from 24 to 72 hours after infarction.

  14. Voltage-based Device Tracking in a 1.5 Tesla MRI during Imaging: Initial validation in swine models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion TH; Reichlin, Tobias R; Michaud, Gregory F; Watkins, Ronald D; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Kwong, Raymond Y; Stevenson, William; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Byrd, Israel; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Voltage-based device-tracking (VDT) systems are commonly used for tracking invasive devices in electrophysiological (EP) cardiac-arrhythmia therapy. During EP procedures, electro-anatomic-mapping (EAM) workstations provide guidance by integrating VDT location and intra-cardiac-ECG information with X-ray, CT, Ultrasound, and MR images. MR assists navigation, mapping and radio-frequency-ablation. Multi-modality interventions require multiple patient transfers between an MRI and the X-ray/ultrasound EP suite, increasing the likelihood of patient-motion and image mis-registration. An MRI-compatible VDT system may increase efficiency, since there is currently no single method to track devices both inside and outside the MRI scanner. Methods An MRI-compatible VDT system was constructed by modifying a commercial system. Hardware was added to reduce MRI gradient-ramp and radio-frequency-unblanking-pulse interference. VDT patches and cables were modified to reduce heating. Five swine cardiac VDT EAM-mapping interventions were performed, navigating inside and thereafter outside the MRI. Results Three-catheter VDT interventions were performed at >12 frames-per-second both inside and outside the MRI scanner with <3mm error. Catheters were followed on VDT- and MRI-derived maps. Simultaneous VDT and imaging was possible in repetition-time (TR) >32 msec sequences with <0.5mm errors, and <5% MRI SNR loss. At shorter TRs, only intra-cardiac-ECG was reliable. RF Heating was <1.5C°. Conclusion An MRI-compatible VDT system is feasible. PMID:23580479

  15. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  16. MRI 3D CISS– A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y. Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Prakash, S. Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  17. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  18. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson's r, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson's r increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  19. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  20. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jiayin; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

  1. Noninvasive MRI-SERS Imaging in Living Mice Using an Innately Bimodal Nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Mehmet V.; Zhu, Leyun; Ifediba, Marytheresa A.; Zhang, Yong; Carr, Kevin; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel nanomaterial (AuMN-DTTC) that can be used as a bimodal contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Raman spectroscopy. The probe consists of MRI-active superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, stably complexed with gold nanostructures. The gold component serves as a substrate for a Raman active dye molecule to generate a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. The synthesized probe produces T2 weighted contrast and can be used as a SERS active material both in silico (in aqueous solution) and in vivo. A quantitative assessment of T2 relaxation times was obtained using multiecho MRI analysis. The T2 relaxation times of AuMN-DTTC and MN (dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles) were 29.23 + 1.45, and 31.58 + 1.7 msec, respectively. The SERS signature of AuMN-DTTC revealed peaks at 508, 629, 782, 844, 1080, 1108, 1135, and 1242 cm−1. Intramuscular administration of the probe resulted in a decrease of the T2 relaxation time of muscle from 33.4 + 2.5 msec to 20.3 + 2.2. SERS peaks were observed at 508, 629, 782, 844, 1080, 1108, 1135, and 1242 cm−1, consistent with the in silico results. Our studies illustrate for the first time the design and in vivo application of a contrast agent, whose component modalities include MRI and SERS. The value of this agent lies in its innately bimodal nature and its application in vivo for molecular imaging applications. PMID:21194236

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation for Anterior Disc Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongjun; Wang, Mingguo; Ma, Yingwei; Lai, Qingguo; Tong, Dongdong; Zhang, Fenghe; Dong, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the criterion standard imaging technique for visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, and is currently considered the optimum modality for comprehensive evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This study was aimed at finding the value of MRI in pre-clinical diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. Material/Methods Patients primarily diagnosed as having anterior disc displacement by clinical symptoms and X-ray were selected in the present study. MRI was used to evaluate surrounding anatomical structures and position, as well as morphological and signal intensity change between patients and normal controls. Results Posterior band position was significantly different between the patient group and control group. At the maximum opened-mouth position, the location of disc intermediate zone returned to normal. At closed-mouth position, the thickness of anterior and middle, but not posterior, band increased. The motion range of the condyle in the anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) patient group was significantly less than the value in the anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) patient group and the control group. Whether at closed-mouth position or maximum opened-mouth position, the exudate volume in the patient group was greater than in the normal group. Conclusions MRI can be successfully used to evaluate multiple morphological changes at different mouth positions of normal volunteers and patients. The disc-condyle relationship can serve as an important indicator in assessing anterior disc displacement, and can be used to distinguish disc displacement with or without reduction. PMID:28176754

  3. Categorization of Pathology Causing Low Back Pain using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Nadhamuni, Kulasekaran; Karthikeyan, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low backache is the most common ailment flooding the orthopaedic clinic. Most of the population at least once seek medical attention for low back ache. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non invasive, commonly used diagnosing modality and accurate in diagnosing pathology causing low back ache. Aim: To classify and quantify the causes of low back pain referred to radiology department by MRI. Materials and Methods: Patients with back pain referred to radiology department were subjected to single MRI scan after ruling out any contraindications using the following sequences: T1W Turbo Spin Echo, T2W Turbo Spin Echo, Gradient-echo, Myelogram and short TI inversion recovery (STIR), in all imaging planes. Gadolinium enhanced T1W turbo spin echo sequence was used wherever necessary. Results: Data were analysed using Excel 2007, SPSS 14, Students t-test. Degenerative disc diseases were the commonest pathology followed by congenital and traumatic lesions. Neoplastic lesions were the least common. Commonest herniation type being the disc bulge (79%) followed by disc protrusion (15%), disc extrusion (6%) and disc sequestration (<1%). The posterolateral disc herniation as the commonest and foraminal the least. Sacralisation was the most common congenital spinal anomaly, followed by lumbar scoliosis and perineural cyst. There is no sex difference in disc protrusion but male preponderance in disc extrusion with subligmentous extrusion. Conclusion: MRI is useful in classifying the spinal lesions which again influences the treatment modality and clinical outcome. Degenerative disc disease is the single most common category which accounts for most the Low Back Ache for which a preventing strategy should be drafted. PMID:25738056

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  5. Identifying quantitative imaging features of posterior fossa syndrome in longitudinal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, Michaela; Windridge, David; Avula, Shivaram; Kumar, Ram; Lewis, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Up to 25% of children who undergo brain tumor resection surgery in the posterior fossa develop posterior fossa syndrome (PFS). This syndrome is characterized by mutism and disturbance in speech. Our hypothesis is that there is a correlation between PFS and the occurrence of hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) in structures within the posterior fossa, known as the inferior olivary nuclei (ION). HOD is exhibited as an increase in size and intensity of the ION on an MR image. Longitudinal MRI datasets of 28 patients were acquired consisting of pre-, intra-, and postoperative scans. A semiautomated segmentation process was used to segment the ION on each MR image. A full set of imaging features describing the first- and second-order statistics and size of the ION were extracted for each image. Feature selection techniques were used to identify the most relevant features among the MRI features, demographics, and data based on neuroradiological assessment. A support vector machine was used to analyze the discriminative features selected by a generative k-nearest neighbor algorithm. The results indicate the presence of hyperintensity in the left ION as the most diagnostically relevant feature, providing a statistically significant improvement in the classification of patients (p=0.01) when using this feature alone. PMID:26835496

  6. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented.

  7. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  8. Sodium and T1ρ MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage†

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1ρ relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1ρ, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1ρ relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1ρ relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1ρ in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1ρ dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1ρ relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1ρ data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models, healthy human

  9. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content with changing postures.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Jalil; Pope, Malcolm H; Graveling, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to evaluate spinal loading in vivo are limited and a large majority of studies on the mechanical functions of the spine have been in vitro cadaveric studies and/or models based on many assumptions that are difficult to validate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content measurements with changing postures. MRI studies were conducted on 25 healthy males with no history of low back pain (age 20-38). The L1 to S1 intradiscal levels were imaged in supine, sitting and standing postures using an upright 0.6 Tesla magnet, where a set of H2O: D2O7 phantoms were mounted on the back of the subjects. A calibration curve, provided from these phantoms, was applied to the absolute proton density image, yielding a pixel-by-pixel map of the water content of the NP. The NP at all levels showed a highly significant water loss (p<0.001) in sitting and standing postures compared with the supine posture. A trend towards higher levels of water was observed at all levels in the standing posture relative to sitting postures, however statistically significant differences were found only at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. This study demonstrates that variations in water content of the NP in different postures are in agreement with those determined from published invasive disc pressure measurements. The result of study demonstrates the feasibility of using MRI to determine the water content of the NP with changing postures and to use these data to evaluate spinal loading in these postures. This measurement method of water content by quantitative MR imaging could become a powerful tool for both clinical and ergonomic applications. The proposed methodology does not require invasive pressure measurement techniques.

  10. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Temporomandibular Joint Using MRI-CBCT Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lagravere, Manuel; Boulanger, Pierre; Jaremko, Jacob L.; Major, Paul W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a new approach to reconstruct a 3D model of the TMJ using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registered images, and to evaluate the intra-examiner reproducibility values of reconstructing the 3D models of the TMJ. Methods MRI and CBCT images of five patients (10 TMJs) were obtained. Multiple MRIs and CBCT images were registered using a mutual information based algorithm. The articular disc, condylar head and glenoid fossa were segmented at two different occasions, at least one-week apart, by one investigator, and 3D models were reconstructed. Differences between the segmentation at two occasions were automatically measured using the surface contours (Average Perpendicular Distance) and the volume overlap (Dice Similarity Index) of the 3D models. Descriptive analysis of the changes at 2 occasions, including means and standard deviation (SD) were reported to describe the intra-examiner reproducibility. Results The automatic segmentation of the condyle revealed maximum distance change of 1.9±0.93 mm, similarity index of 98% and root mean squared distance of 0.1±0.08 mm, and the glenoid fossa revealed maximum distance change of 2±0.52 mm, similarity index of 96% and root mean squared distance of 0.2±0.04 mm. The manual segmentation of the articular disc revealed maximum distance change of 3.6±0.32 mm, similarity index of 80% and root mean squared distance of 0.3±0.1 mm. Conclusion The MRI-CBCT registration provides a reliable tool to reconstruct 3D models of the TMJ’s soft and hard tissues, allows quantification of the articular disc morphology and position changes with associated differences of the condylar head and glenoid fossa, and facilitates measuring tissue changes over time. PMID:28095486

  11. Ultra-high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a potential examination for deep brain stimulation devices and the limitation study concerning MRI-related heating injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chuan; Li, Jun-Ju; Zhu, Guan-Yu; Shi, Lin; Yang, An-Chao; Jiang, Yin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices are restricted to undertake 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the guideline. Nevertheless, we conducted an experiment to test pathological change near the leads in different field-strength MRI. Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were assigned to Group 1 (G1, n = 6, 7.0T, DBS), Group 2 (G2, n = 6, 3.0T, DBS), Group 3 (G3, n = 6, 1.5T, DBS), and Group 4 (G4, n = 6, 1.5T, paracentesis). DBS leads were implanted in G1, G2 and G3, targeting left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami. Paracentesis was performed in G4. 24 h after MRI scan, all animals were killed for examining pathological alternation (at different distance from lead) via transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggest that the severity of tissue injury correlates with the distance to electrode instead of field strength of MRI. Up to now, the reason for the restriction of MRI indicated no significantly different pathological change.

  12. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  13. MRI Inner Ear Imaging and Tone Burst Electrocochleography in the Diagnosis of Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hornibrook, Jeremy; Flook, Edward; Greig, Sam; Babbage, Melissa; Goh, Tony; Coates, Mark; Care, Rachel; Bird, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the sensitivity of gadolinium MRI inner imaging with tone burst electrocochleography (EcochG) for diagnosing endolymphatic hydrops. Study Design A prospective study on patients who were to have an MRI scan to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Setting Tertiary care center. Patients One hundred and two patients: 57 patients with Possible, Probable, or Definite Ménière’s Disease, 25 with asymmetrical hearing loss, 18 with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, and 2 with unilateral tinnitus had additional MRI inner ear imaging and click and tone burst stimulus EcochG testing. Intervention Diagnostic. Main Outcome Measure To compare the sensitivity of the two techniques. Results In 30 patients with symptom-based Definite Ménière’s Disease, tone burst EcochG was positive in 25 (83%) and the click EcochG was positive in 9/30 (30%), and gadolinium MRI imaging diagnosed hydrops in 14 (47%). A positive result for either MRI imaging or tone burst EcochG was seen in 26 patients (87%). In 14 subjects with symptom-based Probable Ménière’s Disease, 10 (71%) had either a positive EcochG or MRI. In 13 with Possible Ménière’s Disease, four (31%) had a positive EcochG or MRI. Conclusion This study confirms the greatly enhanced diagnostic sensitivity of tone burst EcochG over click response in diagnosing endolymphatic hydrops in Ménière’s disease. Even though adequate MRI imaging was achieved in 90%, tone burst EcochG was a more sensitive test. PMID:25985318

  14. Simultaneous steering and imaging of magnetic particles using MRI toward delivery of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Becker, Aaron T.; Fagogenis, Georgios; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance navigation (MRN) offers the potential for real-time steering of drug particles and cells to targets throughout the body. In this technique, the magnetic gradients of an MRI scanner perform image-based steering of magnetically-labelled therapeutics through the vasculature and into tumours. A major challenge of current techniques for MRN is that they alternate between pulse sequences for particle imaging and propulsion. Since no propulsion occurs while imaging the particles, this results in a significant reduction in imaging frequency and propulsive force. We report a new approach in which an imaging sequence is designed to simultaneously image and propel particles. This sequence provides a tradeoff between maximum propulsive force and imaging frequency. In our reported example, the sequence can image at 27 Hz while still generating 95% of the force produced by a purely propulsive pulse sequence. We implemented our pulse sequence on a standard clinical scanner using millimetre-scale particles and demonstrated high-speed (74 mm/s) navigation of a multi-branched vascular network phantom. Our study suggests that the magnetic gradient magnitudes previously demonstrated to be sufficient for pure propulsion of micron-scale therapeutics in magnetic resonance targeting (MRT) could also be sufficient for real-time steering of these particles. PMID:27666666

  15. Simultaneous steering and imaging of magnetic particles using MRI toward delivery of therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Becker, Aaron T.; Fagogenis, Georgios; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance navigation (MRN) offers the potential for real-time steering of drug particles and cells to targets throughout the body. In this technique, the magnetic gradients of an MRI scanner perform image-based steering of magnetically-labelled therapeutics through the vasculature and into tumours. A major challenge of current techniques for MRN is that they alternate between pulse sequences for particle imaging and propulsion. Since no propulsion occurs while imaging the particles, this results in a significant reduction in imaging frequency and propulsive force. We report a new approach in which an imaging sequence is designed to simultaneously image and propel particles. This sequence provides a tradeoff between maximum propulsive force and imaging frequency. In our reported example, the sequence can image at 27 Hz while still generating 95% of the force produced by a purely propulsive pulse sequence. We implemented our pulse sequence on a standard clinical scanner using millimetre-scale particles and demonstrated high-speed (74 mm/s) navigation of a multi-branched vascular network phantom. Our study suggests that the magnetic gradient magnitudes previously demonstrated to be sufficient for pure propulsion of micron-scale therapeutics in magnetic resonance targeting (MRT) could also be sufficient for real-time steering of these particles.

  16. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange {sup 3}He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-04

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the {sup 3}He-N{sub 2} mixture. The cells could be refilled. The {sup 3}He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  17. Cilengitide inhibits progression of experimental breast cancer bone metastases as imaged noninvasively using VCT, MRI and DCE-MRI in a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Merz, Maximilian; Berger, Martin R; Goodman, Simon L; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhibiting αvβ(3)/α(v) β(5) integrins by cilengitide in experimentally induced breast cancer bone metastases using noninvasive imaging techniques. For this purpose, nude rats bearing established breast cancer bone metastases were treated with cilengitide, a small molecule inhibitor of αvβ(3) and αvβ(5) integrins (75 mg/kg, five days per week; n = 12 rats) and compared to vehicle-treated control rats (n = 12). In a longitudinal study, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flat panel volumetric computed tomography were used to assess the volume of the soft tissue tumor and osteolysis, respectively, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI was performed to determine functional parameters of the tumor vasculature reflecting blood volume and blood vessel permeability. In rats treated with cilengitide, VCT and MRI showed that osteolytic lesions and the respective bone metastatic soft tissue tumors progressed more slowly than in vehicle-treated controls. DCE-MRI indicated a decrease in blood volume and an increase in vessel permeability and immunohistology revealed increased numbers of immature vessels in cilengitide-treated rats compared to vehicle controls. In conclusion, treatment of experimental breast cancer bone metastases with cilengitide resulted in pronounced antiresorptive and antitumor effects, suggesting that αvβ(3)/αvβ(5) inhibition may be a promising therapeutic approach for bone metastases.

  18. MRI Based Preterm White Matter Injury Classification: The Importance of Sequential Imaging in Determining Severity of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Biarge, Miriam; Groenendaal, Floris; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Foti, Francesca; Cowan, Frances M.; de Vries, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of non-hemorrhagic white matter injury (WMI) based on sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been well studied. Our aim was to describe sequential MRI findings in preterm infants with non-hemorrhagic WMI and to develop an MRI classification system for preterm WMI based on these findings. Methods Eighty-two preterm infants (gestation ≤35 weeks) were retrospectively included. WMI was diagnosed and classified based on sequential cranial ultrasound (cUS) and confirmed on MRI. Results 138 MRIs were obtained at three time-points: early (<2 weeks; n = 32), mid (2–6 weeks; n = 30) and term equivalent age (TEA; n = 76). 63 infants (77%) had 2 MRIs during the neonatal period. WMI was non-cystic in 35 and cystic in 47 infants. In infants with cystic-WMI early MRI showed extensive restricted diffusion abnormalities, cysts were already present in 3 infants; mid MRI showed focal or extensive cysts, without acute diffusion changes. A significant reduction in the size and/or extent of the cysts was observed in 32% of the infants between early/mid and TEA MRI. In 4/9 infants previously seen focal cysts were no longer identified at TEA. All infants with cystic WMI showed ≥2 additional findings at TEA: significant reduction in WM volume, mild-moderate irregular ventriculomegaly, several areas of increased signal intensity on T1-weighted-images, abnormal myelination of the PLIC, small thalami. Conclusion In infants with extensive WM cysts at 2–6 weeks, cysts may be reduced in number or may even no longer be seen at TEA. A single MRI at TEA, without taking sequential cUS data and pre-TEA MRI findings into account, may underestimate the extent of WMI; based on these results we propose a new MRI classification for preterm non-hemorrhagic WMI. PMID:27257863

  19. Evaluating pH in the Extracellular Tumor Microenvironment Using CEST MRI and Other Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor acidosis is a consequence of altered metabolism, which can lead to chemoresistance and can be a target of alkalinizing therapies. Noninvasive measurements of the extracellular pH (pHe) of the tumor microenvironment can improve diagnoses and treatment decisions. A variety of noninvasive imaging methods have been developed for measuring tumor pHe. This review provides a detailed description of the advantages and limitations of each method, providing many examples from previous research reports. A substantial emphasis is placed on methods that use MR spectroscopy and MR imaging, including recently developed methods that use chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI that combines some advantages of MR spectroscopy and imaging. Together, this review provides a comprehensive overview of methods for measuring tumor pHe, which may facilitate additional creative approaches in this research field. PMID:27761517

  20. Photouncaging nanoparticles for MRI and fluorescence imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shibu, Edakkattuparambil S; Ono, Kenji; Sugino, Sakiko; Nishioka, Ayami; Yasuda, Akikazu; Shigeri, Yasushi; Wakida, Shin-Ichi; Sawada, Makoto; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2013-11-26

    Multimodal and multifunctional nanomaterials are promising candidates for bioimaging and therapeutic applications in the nanomedicine settings. Here we report the preparation of photouncaging nanoparticles with fluorescence and magnetic modalities and evaluation of their potentials for in vitro and in vivo bioimaging. Photoactivation of such bimodal nanoparticles prepared using photouncaging ligands, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, and super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles results in the systematic uncaging of the particles, which is correlated with continuous changes in the absorption, mass and NMR spectra of the ligands. Fluorescence and magnetic components of the bimodal nanoparticles are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analyses using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Bioconjugation of the nanoparticles with peptide hormones renders them with biocompatibility and efficient intracellular transport as seen in the fluorescence and MRI images of mouse melanoma cells (B16) or human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells (H1650). Biocompatibility of the nanoparticles is evaluated using MTT cytotoxicity assays, which show cell viability over 90%. Further, we combine MRI and NIR fluorescence imaging in C57BL/6 (B6) mice subcutaneously or intravenously injected with the photouncaging nanoparticles and follow the in vivo fate of the nanoparticles. Interestingly, the intravenously injected nanoparticles initially accumulate in the liver within 30 min post injection and subsequently clear by the renal excretion within 48 h as seen in the time-dependent MRI and fluorescence images of the liver, urinary bladder, and urine samples. Photouncaging ligands such as the ones reported in this article are promising candidates for not only the site-specific delivery of nanomaterials-based contrast agents and drugs but also the systematic uncaging and renal

  1. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: first report with advanced cardiac imaging using MRI.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, A N; Anavekar, N S; Ernste, F C; Mankad, S V; Le, R J; Manocha, K K; Barsness, G W

    2015-10-01

    This present case pertains to a 48-year-old woman with a history of antiphospholipid syndrome, who presented with progressive fatigue, generalized weakness, and orthopnea acutely. She had a prior diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome with recurrent deep vein thromboses (DVTs) and repeated demonstration of lupus anticoagulants. She presented in cardiogenic shock with markedly elevated troponin and global myocardial dysfunction on echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization revealed minimal disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which revealed findings of perfusion defects and microvascular obstruction, consistent with the pathophysiology of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). Diagnosis was made based on supportive imaging, including head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealing multifocal, acute strokes; microvascular thrombosis in the dermis; and subacute renal infarctions. The patient was anticoagulated with intravenous unfractionated heparin and received high-dose methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and one dose each of rituximab and cyclophosphamide. She convalesced with eventual myocardial recovery after a complicated course. The diagnosis of CAPS relies on the presence of (1) antiphospholipid antibodies and (2) involvement of multiple organs in a microangiopathic thrombotic process with a close temporal association. The myocardium is frequently affected, and heart failure, either as the presenting symptom or cause of death, is common. Despite echocardiographic evidence of myocardial dysfunction in such patients, MRIs of CAPS have not previously been reported. This case highlights the utility in assessing the involvement of the myocardium by the microangiopathic process with MRI. Because the diagnosis of CAPS requires involvement in multiple organ systems, cardiac MRI is likely an underused tool that not only reaffirms the pathophysiology of CAPS, but could also clue clinicians in to the

  2. Effect of Imaging Parameter Thresholds on MRI Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ella F.; Newitt, David C.; Kornak, John; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Esserman, Laura J.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers in breast cancer patients by subtype. Sixty-four patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Each patient received a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy and before surgery. Functional tumor volume (FTV), the imaging marker measured by DCE-MRI, was computed at various thresholds of percent enhancement (PEt) and signal-enhancement ratio (SERt). Final FTV before surgery and percent changes of FTVs at the early and final treatment time points were used to predict patients’ recurrence-free survival. The full cohort and each subtype defined by the status of hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HR+/HER2-, HER2+, triple negative) were analyzed. Predictions were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model when PEt changed from 30% to 200% in steps of 10% and SERt changed from 0 to 2 in steps of 0.2. Predictions with high hazard ratios and low p-values were considered as strong. Different profiles of FTV as predictors for recurrence-free survival were observed in each breast cancer subtype and strong associations with survival were observed at different PEt/SERt combinations that resulted in different FTVs. Findings from this retrospective study suggest that the predictive performance of imaging markers based on FTV may be improved with enhancement thresholds being optimized separately for clinically-relevant subtypes defined by HR and HER2 receptor expression. PMID:26886725

  3. Controlling RNA Expression in Cancer Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Detectable by MRI and In Vivo Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Medarova, Zdravka; Balcioglu, Mustafa; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe a protocol for the preparation of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles for noninvasive cancer imaging and therapy. In the first part of the chapter we describe the details of the contrast agent synthesis, functionalization, and characterization. In the second part we describe the methods for tumor imaging using the synthesized particles with noninvasive T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in vivo near infrared optical imaging.

  4. Fat Imaging via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Young Children (Ages 1-4 Years) without Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Shearrer, Grace E.; House, Benjamin T.; Gallas, Michelle C.; Luci, Jeffrey J.; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This pilot study developed techniques to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of specific fat deposition in 18 children (age 18 months to 4 years). Methods The children engaged in a series of practice tests to become acclimated to the scanner noises, reduce claustrophobia, and rehearse holding still for a set time. The practice tests assessed if the child could remain still for two minutes while watching a video, first while lying on a blanket, second, on the blanket with headphones, and third, in the mock scanner. The children who passed the three practice tests were then scanned with a 3T Siemens Skyra magnet. Abdominal fat distribution (region of interest (ROI) from the top of the ileac crest to the bottom of the ribcage) volume was measured using 2-point DIXON technique. This region was chosen to give an indication of the body composition around the liver. Results Twelve out of eighteen participants successfully completed the actual MRI scan. Chi-squared test showed no significant difference between male and female pass-fail rates. The median age of completed scans was 36 months, whereas the median age for children unable to complete a scan was 28 months. The average total trunk fat was 240.9±85.2mL and the average total VAT was 37.7±25.9mLand liver fat was not quantifiable due to physiological motion. Several strategies (modeling, videos, and incentives) were identified to improve pediatric imaging in different age ranges. Conclusion Using an age-specific and tailored protocol, we were able to successfully use MRI for fat imaging in a majority of young children. Development of such protocols enables researchers to better understand the etiology of fat deposition in young children, which can be used to aid in the prevention and treatment of adiposity. PMID:26901881

  5. Imaging features in conventional MRI, spectroscopy and diffusion weighted images of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS).

    PubMed

    Bender, Benjamin; Klose, Uwe; Lindig, Tobias; Biskup, Saskia; Nägele, Thomas; Schöls, Ludger; Karle, Kathrin N

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations within the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. While a small number of reports on imaging findings in routine MRI exist, reported imaging findings in DWI and spectroscopy are scarce, and limited to not genetically proven case reports. We assessed MRI including DWI and MR spectroscopy in six patients with HDLS and two asymptomatic mutation carriers. A total of 13 MRIs were evaluated and a score of the white-matter lesion (WML) load was calculated. The course of MR abnormalities was followed for 6-19 months in four patients and 95 months in one carrier. MRI revealed widespread white-matter lesions of patchy or confluent pattern especially in the frontal and occipital lobe. The pyramidal tract was less affected than the surrounding tissue in all symptomatic patients on conventional T2WI. Three of four cases with DWI showed small dots of diffusion restriction within WML. Spectroscopy showed increased levels of mIns, Cho and lactate while NAA was decreased. Asymptomatic mutation carriers had, for the age of the patients, unusually pronounced unspecific WMLs. No diffusion restriction or alterations in metabolite levels could be detected in asymptomatic mutation carriers. Microbleeds were not found in any patient. Diffusion restriction seems to be a typical imaging pattern visible in patients with active disease progression in HDLS. Spectroscopic findings and the absence of microbleeds differ clearly from reported findings in CADASIL and subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy. While the distribution and character of WMLs in asymptomatic cases remain unspecific they are likely to represent subclinical markers of HDLS.

  6. Microstructure Imaging of Crossing (MIX) White Matter Fibers from diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Hamza; Xu, Junqian; Nam, Jung Who; Keefe, Daniel F.; Yacoub, Essa; Georgiou, Tryphon; Lenglet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) reveals microstructural features of the brain white matter by quantifying the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules within axonal bundles. Yet, identifying features such as axonal orientation dispersion, density, diameter, etc., in complex white matter fiber configurations (e.g. crossings) has proved challenging. Besides optimized data acquisition and advanced biophysical models, computational procedures to fit such models to the data are critical. However, these procedures have been largely overlooked by the dMRI microstructure community and new, more versatile, approaches are needed to solve complex biophysical model fitting problems. Existing methods are limited to models assuming single fiber orientation, relevant to limited brain areas like the corpus callosum, or multiple orientations but without the ability to extract detailed microstructural features. Here, we introduce a new and versatile optimization technique (MIX), which enables microstructure imaging of crossing white matter fibers. We provide a MATLAB implementation of MIX, and demonstrate its applicability to general microstructure models in fiber crossings using synthetic as well as ex-vivo and in-vivo brain data. PMID:27982056

  7. A robust independent component analysis (ICA) model for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Jingqi; Mitra, Sunanda; Liu, Zheng; Nutter, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The coupling of carefully designed experiments with proper analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data provides us with a powerful as well as noninvasive tool to help us understand cognitive processes associated with specific brain regions and hence could be used to detect abnormalities induced by a diseased state. The hypothesisdriven General Linear Model (GLM) and the data-driven Independent Component Analysis (ICA) model are the two most commonly used models for fMRI data analysis. A hybrid ICA-GLM model combines the two models to take advantages of benefits from both models to achieve more accurate mapping of the stimulus-induced activated brain regions. We propose a modified hybrid ICA-GLM model with probabilistic ICA that includes a noise model. In this modified hybrid model, a probabilistic principle component analysis (PPCA)-based component number estimation is used in the ICA stage to extract the intrinsic number of original time courses. In addition, frequency matching is introduced into the time course selection stage, along with temporal correlation, F-test based model fitting estimation, and time course combination, to produce a more accurate design matrix for GLM. A standard fMRI dataset is used to compare the results of applying GLM and the proposed hybrid ICA-GLM in generating activation maps.

  8. Computational imaging reveals shape differences between normal and malignant prostates on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Purysko, Andrei S.; Verma, Sadhna; Kiechle, Jonathan; Gollamudi, Jay; Ghose, Soumya; Herrmann, Karin; Gulani, Vikas; Paspulati, Raj; Ponsky, Lee; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Moses, Daniel; Shnier, Ron; Delprado, Warick; Thompson, James; Stricker, Phillip; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-01-01

    We seek to characterize differences in the shape of the prostate and the central gland (combined central and transitional zones) between men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer and men who were identified as not having prostate cancer either on account of a negative biopsy or had pelvic imaging done for a non-prostate malignancy. T2w MRI from 70 men were acquired at three institutions. The cancer positive group (PCa+) comprised 35 biopsy positive (Bx+) subjects from three institutions (Gleason scores: 6–9, Stage: T1–T3). The negative group (PCa−) combined 24 biopsy negative (Bx−) from two institutions and 11 subjects diagnosed with rectal cancer but with no clinical or MRI indications of prostate cancer (Cl−). The boundaries of the prostate and central gland were delineated on T2w MRI by two expert raters and were used to construct statistical shape atlases for the PCa+, Bx− and Cl− prostates. An atlas comparison was performed via per-voxel statistical tests to localize shape differences (significance assessed at p < 0.05). The atlas comparison revealed central gland hypertrophy in the Bx− subpopulation, resulting in significant volume and posterior side shape differences relative to PCa+ group. Significant differences in the corresponding prostate shapes were noted at the apex when comparing the Cl− and PCa+ prostates. PMID:28145532

  9. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  10. 1.5 Tesla MRI-Conditional 12-lead ECG for MR Imaging and Intra-MR Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Clifford, Gari D.; Schweitzer, Jeff; Qin, Lei; Oster, Julien; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Michaud, Gregory; Stevenson, William G.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2013-01-01

    Propose High-fidelity 12-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) is important for physiological monitoring of patients during MR-guided intervention and cardiac MR imaging. Issues in obtaining non-corrupted ECGs inside MRI include a superimposed Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) voltage, gradient-switching induced-voltages, and radiofrequency (RF) heating. These problems increase with magnetic field. We intended to develop and clinically validate a 1.5T MRI-conditional 12-lead ECG system. Methods The system was constructed, including transmission-lines to reduce radio-frequency induction, and switching-circuits to remove induced voltages. Adaptive filters, trained by 12-lead measurements outside MRI and in two orientations inside MRI, were used to remove MHD. The system was tested on ten (one exercising) volunteers and four arrhythmia patients. Results Switching circuits removed most imaging-induced voltages (residual noise <3% of the R-wave). MHD removal provided intra-MRI ECGs that varied by <3.8% from those outside the MRI, preserving the true ST segment. In premature-ventricular-contraction (PVC) patients, clean ECGs separated PVC and sinus-rhythm beats. Measured heating was <1.5 C0. The system reliably acquired multiphase (SSFP) wall-motion-cine and phase-contrast-cine scans, including in subjects where 4-lead gating failed. The system required a minimum TR of 4ms to allow robust ECG processing. Conclusion High-fidelity intra-MRI 12-lead ECG is possible. PMID:23580148

  11. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  12. Genetic engineered molecular imaging probes for applications in cell therapy: emphasis on MRI approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In K; Wang, Silun; Mao, Hui; Chan, Anthony WS

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine, cell replacement therapy, and genome editing technologies (i.e. CRISPR-Cas 9) have sparked great interest in in vivo cell monitoring. Molecular imaging promises a unique approach to noninvasively monitor cellular and molecular phenomena, including cell survival, migration, proliferation, and even differentiation at the whole organismal level. Several imaging modalities and strategies have been explored for monitoring cell grafts in vivo. We begin this review with an introduction describing the progress in stem cell technology, with a perspective toward cell replacement therapy. The importance of molecular imaging in reporting and assessing the status of cell grafts and their relation to the local microenvironment is highlighted since the current knowledge gap is one of the major obstacles in clinical translation of stem cell therapy. Based on currently available imaging techniques, we provide a brief discussion on the pros and cons of each imaging modality used for monitoring cell grafts with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the reporter gene approach. Finally, we conclude with a comprehensive discussion of future directions of applying molecular imaging in regenerative medicine to emphasize further the importance of correlating cell graft conditions and clinical outcomes to advance regenerative medicine. PMID:27766183

  13. [MRI image reconstruction using polar-coordinates conversion of k-space data].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Sakaguchi, Kazuya; Obata, Takayuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we proposed the new reconstruction techniques for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using filtered back projection (FBP) or simultaneous reconstruction technique (SIRT). We converted the k-space which was acquired by conventional phase-encoding schemes from Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates and created the projection. The linear interpolation and the sinc interpolation were used in the conversion. The accuracy of the reconstructed image using projection was evaluated by the relative error in comparison with the standard image which was reconstructed by the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) with conventional Cartesian k-space. The relative error reconstructed both FBP and SIRT from projection with sinc interpolation is 0.013. The maximum value of standard image is 1.501451, FBP is 1.47921, and SIRT with iteration 100 is 1.44858 and with iteration 200 is 1.579442. The minimum value of both the standard image and the others is about 0. Visually, there is no margin between the standard image and the reconstructed image from projection with FBP or SIRT.

  14. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in focal therapy for prostate cancer: recommendations from a consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Berrend G.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; Gupta, Rajan T.; Katz, Aaron; Kirkham, Alexander; Kurhanewicz, John; Moul, Judd W.; Pinto, Peter A.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Robertson, Cary; de la Rosette, Jean; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Jones, J. Stephen; Ukimura, Osamu; Verma, Sadhna; Wijkstra, Hessel; Marberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a consensus on the utility of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to identify patients for focal therapy. Methods Urological surgeons, radiologists, and basic researchers, from Europe and North America participated in a consensus meeting about the use of mpMRI in focal therapy of prostate cancer.The consensus process was face-to-face and specific clinical issues were raised and discussed with agreement sought when possible. All participants are listed among the authors.Topics specifically did not include staging of prostate cancer, but rather identifying the optimal requirements for performing MRI, and the current status of optimally performed mpMRI to (i) determine focality of prostate cancer (e.g. localising small target lesions of ≥0.5 mL), (ii) to monitor and assess the outcome of focal ablation therapies, and (iii) to identify the diagnostic advantages of new MRI methods.In addition, the need for transperineal template saturation biopsies in selecting patients for focal therapy was discussed, if a high quality mpMRI is available. In other words, can mpMRI replace the role of transperineal saturation biopsies in patient selection for focal therapy? Results Consensus was reached on most key aspects of the meeting; however, on definition of the optimal requirements for mpMRI, there was one dissenting voice.mpMRI is the optimum approach to achieve the objectives needed for focal therapy, if made on a high quality machine (3T with/without endorectal coil or 1.5T with endorectal coil) and judged by an experienced radiologist.Structured and standardised reporting of prostate MRI is paramount.State of the art mpMRI is capable of localising small tumours for focal therapy.State of the art mpMRI is the technique of choice for follow-up of focal ablation. Conclusions The present evidence for MRI in focal therapy is limited.mpMRI is not accurate enough to consistently grade tumour aggressiveness.Template-guided saturation biopsies

  15. Methods of MRI-Based Structural Imaging in the Aging Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Makris, N.; Kennedy, D. N.; Boriel, D.L.; Rosene, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys, whose typical lifespan can be as long as 30 years in the presence of veterinary care, undergo a cognitive decline as a function of age. While cortical neurons are largely preserved in the cerebral cortex, including primary motor and visual cortex as well as prefrontal association cortex there is marked breakdown of axonal myelin and an overall reduction in white matter predominantly in the frontal and temporal lobes. Whether the myelin breakdown is diffuse or specific to individual white matter fiber pathways is important to be known with certainty. To this end the delineation and quantification of specific frontotemporal fiber pathways within the frontal and temporal lobes is essential to determine which structures are altered and the extent to which these alterations correlate with behavioral findings. The capability of studying the living brain non-invasively with MRI opens up a new window in structural-functional and anatomic-clinical relationships allowing the integration of information derived from different scanning modalities in the same subject. For instance, for any particular voxel in the cerebrum we can obtain structural T1-, diffusion- and magnetization transfer-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based information. Moreover, it is thus possible to follow any observed changes longitudinally over time. These acquisitions of multidimensional data in the same individual within the same MRI experimental setting would enable the creation of a data base of integrated structural MRI-behavioral correlations for normal aging monkeys to elucidate the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of functional senescence in the aging non-human primate. PMID:19577648

  16. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  17. Incidental Memory Encoding Assessed with Signal Detection Theory and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Benjamin; Regenbogen, Christina; Koch, Kathrin; Backes, Volker; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Pauly, Katharina; Shah, N. Jon; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that apply a “subsequent memory” approach, successful encoding is indicated by increased fMRI activity during the encoding phase for hits vs. misses, in areas underlying memory encoding such as the hippocampal formation. Signal-detection theory (SDT) can be used to analyze memory-related fMRI activity as a function of the participant’s memory trace strength (d′). The goal of the present study was to use SDT to examine the relationship between fMRI activity during incidental encoding and participants’ recognition performance. To implement a new approach, post-experimental group assignment into High- or Low Performers (HP or LP) was based on 29 healthy participants’ recognition performance, assessed with SDT. The analyses focused on the interaction between the factors group (HP vs. LP) and recognition performance (hits vs. misses). A whole-brain analysis revealed increased activation for HP vs. LP during incidental encoding for remembered vs. forgotten items (hits > misses) in the insula/temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and the fusiform gyrus (FFG). Parameter estimates in these regions exhibited a significant positive correlation with d′. As these brain regions are highly relevant for salience detection (insula), stimulus-driven attention (TPJ), and content-specific processing of mnemonic stimuli (FFG), we suggest that HPs’ elevated memory performance was associated with enhanced attentional and content-specific sensory processing during the encoding phase. We provide first correlative evidence that encoding-related activity in content-specific sensory areas and content-independent attention and salience detection areas influences memory performance in a task with incidental encoding of facial stimuli. Based on our findings, we discuss whether the aforementioned group differences in brain activity during incidental encoding might constitute the basis of general differences in memory performance

  18. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  19. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  20. Silica micro/nanospheres for theranostics: from bimodal MRI and fluorescent imaging probes to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Shanka

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nano-theranostics offer remarkable potential for future biomedical technology with simultaneous applications for diagnosis and therapy of disease sites. Through smart and careful chemical modifications of the nanoparticle surface, these can be converted to multifunctional tiny objects which in turn can be used as vehicle for delivering multimodal imaging agents and therapeutic material to specific target sites in vivo. In this sense, bimodal imaging probes that simultaneously enable magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging have gained tremendous attention because disease sites can be characterized quick and precisely through synergistic multimodal imaging. But such hybrid nanocomposite materials have limitations such as low chemical stability (magnetic component) and harsh cytotoxic effects (fluorescent component) and, hence, require a biocompatible protecting agent. Silica micro/nanospheres have shown promise as protecting agent due to the high stability and low toxicity. This review will cover a full description of MRI-active and fluorescent multifunctional silica micro/nanospheres including the design of the probe, different characterization methods and their application in imaging and treatment in cancer. PMID:25821696

  1. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  2. Predictive equations for central obesity via anthropometrics, stereovision imaging, and MRI in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jane J; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Pepper, M Reese; Yao, Ming; Xu, Bugao

    2013-01-01

    Objective Abdominal visceral adiposity is related to risks for insulin resistance and metabolic perturbations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography are advanced instruments that quantify abdominal adiposity; yet field use is constrained by their bulkiness and costliness. The purpose of this study is to develop prediction equations for total abdominal, subcutaneous, and visceral adiposity via anthropometrics, stereovision body imaging (SBI), and MRI. Design and Methods Participants (67 men and 55 women) were measured for anthropometrics, and abdominal adiposity volumes evaluated by MRI umbilicus scans. Body circumferences and central obesity were obtained via SBI. Prediction models were developed via multiple linear regression analysis, utilizing body measurements and demographics as independent predictors, and abdominal adiposity as a dependent variable. Cross-validation was performed by the data-splitting method. Results The final total abdominal adiposity prediction equation was –470.28+7.10waist circumference–91.01gender+5.74sagittal diameter (R²=89.9%); subcutaneous adiposity was –172.37+8.57waist circumference–62.65gender–450.16stereovision waist-to-hip ratio (R²=90.4%); and visceral adiposity was –96.76+11.48central obesity depth–5.09 central obesity width+204.74stereovision waist-to-hip ratio–18.59gender (R²=71.7%). R² significantly improved for predicting visceral fat when SBI variables were included, but not for total abdominal or subcutaneous adiposity. Conclusions SBI is effective for predicting visceral adiposity and the prediction equations derived from SBI measurements can assess obesity. PMID:23613161

  3. Predicting axillary lymph node metastasis from kinetic statistics of DCE-MRI breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Lin, Lilie; Gavenonis, Sara C.; Mies, Carolyn; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Kontos, Despina

    2012-03-01

    The presence of axillary lymph node metastases is the most important prognostic factor in breast cancer and can influence the selection of adjuvant therapy, both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this work we present a set of kinetic statistics derived from DCE-MRI for predicting axillary node status. Breast DCE-MRI images from 69 women with known nodal status were analyzed retrospectively under HIPAA and IRB approval. Axillary lymph nodes were positive in 12 patients while 57 patients had no axillary lymph node involvement. Kinetic curves for each pixel were computed and a pixel-wise map of time-to-peak (TTP) was obtained. Pixels were first partitioned according to the similarity of their kinetic behavior, based on TTP values. For every kinetic curve, the following pixel-wise features were computed: peak enhancement (PE), wash-in-slope (WIS), wash-out-slope (WOS). Partition-wise statistics for every feature map were calculated, resulting in a total of 21 kinetic statistic features. ANOVA analysis was done to select features that differ significantly between node positive and node negative women. Using the computed kinetic statistic features a leave-one-out SVM classifier was learned that performs with AUC=0.77 under the ROC curve, outperforming the conventional kinetic measures, including maximum peak enhancement (MPE) and signal enhancement ratio (SER), (AUCs of 0.61 and 0.57 respectively). These findings suggest that our DCE-MRI kinetic statistic features can be used to improve the prediction of axillary node status in breast cancer patients. Such features could ultimately be used as imaging biomarkers to guide personalized treatment choices for women diagnosed with breast cancer.

  4. Improving Brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Segmentation via a Novel Algorithm based on Genetic and Regional Growth

    PubMed Central

    A., Javadpour; A., Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Regarding the importance of right diagnosis in medical applications, various methods have been exploited for processing medical images solar. The method of segmentation is used to analyze anal to miscall structures in medical imaging. Objective This study describes a new method for brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) segmentation via a novel algorithm based on genetic and regional growth. Methods Among medical imaging methods, brains MRI segmentation is important due to high contrast of non-intrusive soft tissue and high spatial resolution. Size variations of brain tissues are often accompanied by various diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. As our knowledge about the relation between various brain diseases and deviation of brain anatomy increases, MRI segmentation is exploited as the first step in early diagnosis. In this paper, regional growth method and auto-mate selection of initial points by genetic algorithm is used to introduce a new method for MRI segmentation. Primary pixels and similarity criterion are automatically by genetic algorithms to maximize the accuracy and validity in image segmentation. Results By using genetic algorithms and defining the fixed function of image segmentation, the initial points for the algorithm were found. The proposed algorithms are applied to the images and results are manually selected by regional growth in which the initial points were compared. The results showed that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively. Conclusion The study concluded that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively and help us to diagnose brain diseases. PMID:27672629

  5. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheterin vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangen