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Sample records for hypertension apasl recommendations

  1. Autoimmune liver diseases in the Asia-Pacific region: Proceedings of APASL symposium on AIH and PBC 2016.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Ma, Xiong; Yokosuka, Osamu; Weltman, Martin; You, Hong; Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Kim, Yoon Jun; Abbas, Zaigham; Payawal, Diana A; Chang, Ming-Ling; Efe, Cumali; Ozaslan, Ersan; Abe, Masanori; Mitchell-Thain, Robert; Zeniya, Mikio; Han, Kwang Hyub; Vierling, John M; Takikawa, Hajime

    2016-11-01

    During the 25th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL 2016) in Tokyo, we organized and moderated an inaugural satellite symposium on the autoimmune liver diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). Following the keynote lecture by John M. Vierling (USA), speakers from the Asia-Pacific region provided an up-to-date perspective on the epidemiology, clinical practice and research in AIH and PBC in the Asia-Pacific region. Although epidemiology and clinical features of AIH seem to be similar in East Asia compared to those in western countries, the majority of patients with AIH are detected at an advanced stage and have higher mortality rates in South Asia, indicating an unmet need for earlier diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate immunosuppressive treatment. PBC is more commonly seen in Australia and East Asia. As of 2016, clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for PBC have been published in Japan and China. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is recommended as a first-line therapy by both CPG. Nevertheless, one of the unmet therapeutic needs in PBC is the treatment of patients refractory to or intolerant of UDCA. It is of interest that the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in PBC patients was low in Taiwan and mainland China where the prevalence of CHB is very high. In this review, we overview this exciting and epoch-making symposium.

  2. Challenges and scientific considerations in hypertension management reflected in the 2012 recommendations of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Poirier, Luc; Tremblay, Guy; Lindsay, Patrice; Reid, Debra; Campbell, Norman Rc; Khan, Nadia; Quinn, Robert R; Rabi, Doreen

    2012-01-01

    This article provides the scientific rationale and background information for the Canadian Hypertension Education Program's 2012 recommendations for the management of hypertension. It also summarizes the key new recommendations and the theme for 2012, which is the prevention of hypertension. The full recommendations are available at www.hypertension.ca.

  3. [French as 2005-recommendations on the management of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Halimi, J M

    2007-01-01

    Self blood pressure measurements (home BP) and/or ambulatory BP measurements are recommended in mild to moderate hypertension (140/90 - 179/109 mmHg) in order to confirm sustained hypertension and identify white coat and masked hypertension. The evaluation of target organ damages (TOD) has to be integrated in cardiovascular risk estimate and taken into account in the management of hypertensive patients. Beside echocardiography, there is a place for the screening of microalbuminuria in non diabetic hypertensive patients, but these investigations should not be performed systematically. Arterial stiffness evaluation and carotid intima-media thickness quantification are not yet recommended. Cardiovascular risk (CV risk) estimate plays a pivotal role in the therapeutic decision and strategy. The cardiovascular risk grade is based on [1] the list of cardiovascular risk factors (same list AFSSAPS recommendations on dyslipidemia), [2] the presence or absence of TOD and [3] cardiovascular complications: "low", "medium", and "high" CV risk. Lifestyle modifications are recommended in all hypertensive patients. Five antihypertensive drugs are recommended for first line therapy: beta-blockers, thiazide diuretics, ACEIs, ARA II and CCBs (and fixed low dose combinations with AFSSAPS agreement for first line). In order to initiate the treatment, Evidence-based therapy (according to clinical trials conducted in different clinical situations), certain comorbid conditions (compelling indications), efficacy and side-effects in a previous experience, and the cost are the determinants of the first choice. Most hypertensive patients require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure and for second line therapy the recommended combinations are: betablockers-diuretics, ACEIs-diuretics, ARAII-diuretics, betablockers-CCBs (DHP), ACEIs-CCBs, ARA II-CCBs and CCBs-diuretics. The delay to establish a combination therapy depend on CV risk. The BP goals are those recommended by ESH

  4. [Microabluminuria in arterial hypertension. Measurement, variables, interpretation, recommendations].

    PubMed

    Hornych, A; Marre, M; Mimran, A; Chaignon, M; Asmar, R; Fauvel, J P

    2000-11-01

    Permanent hypertension is frequently associated with increased glomerular permeability to albumin at an early stage, indicating renal involvement and endothelial dysfunction. The definition of microalbuminuria is an urinary albumin excretion of 30-300 mg/24 hrs, confirmed on two occasions over a 3 month period. It may also be expressed in microgram/min, m/l or mg/mmol of creatinine. Radio-immunological, immunonephelometric methods and Elisa are specific and the most sensitive methods of measurement. There is a large intra-individual variability (25-60%) making it essential to repeat measurements always by the same technique. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is 5-8% in the general population and 6-24% in hypertensive patients. When present, it is a marker of increased cardiovascular risk. Clinical recommendations suggest adaptation of urinary collection according to the context: screening, diagnosis or clinical research. It is always necessary to start by dip-stick detection of proteinuria, haematuria or urinary infection. Clinical research requires repeated measurement of 24 hour microalbuminuria, sometimes divided into two periods of day and night, often associated with ambulatory blood pressure recordings and renal function tests. Studies of the effects of anti-hypertensive drugs on microalbuminuria could provide better evaluation. In conclusion, measurement of microalbuminuria remains a tool of clinical research allowing an assessment of cardiovascular and renal risk of hypertensive patients.

  5. [Systemic arterial hypertension in the elderly. Recommendations for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is common in people aged 65 and older. In those aged 70 and older, hypertension is more poorly controlled than in those whose age is between 60 and 69 years. The number of trials available concerning the elderly population is limited; therefore, strong recommendations on blood pressure (BP) goals are limited. The American College of Cardiology has recently published a consensus report of management of hypertension in the elderly population. This review presents an overview of that consensus report and reviews specific studies that provide some novel findings regarding BP goals and the progression of nephropathy. In general, the evidence strongly supports a BP goal < 150/80 mm Hg for the elderly with scant data in those aged 80 and older. However, it was decided to set the goal < 140/90 mm Hg, unless the patient cannot tolerate it, and then try to achieve 140-145 mm Hg. Diuretics and calcium antagonists are the most efficient treatment; however, most patients will require two or more drugs to achieve such goals.

  6. The 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Rabi, Doreen M; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Nerenberg, Kara; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; McKay, Donald W; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Ramesh Prasad, G V; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Brian Penner, S; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Fournier, Anne; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Harris, Kevin C; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S

    2015-05-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program reviews the hypertension literature annually and provides detailed recommendations regarding hypertension diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment. This report provides the updated evidence-based recommendations for 2015. This year, 4 new recommendations were added and 2 existing recommendations were modified. A revised algorithm for the diagnosis of hypertension is presented. Two major changes are proposed: (1) measurement using validated electronic (oscillometric) upper arm devices is preferred over auscultation for accurate office blood pressure measurement; (2) if the visit 1 mean blood pressure is increased but < 180/110 mm Hg, out-of-office blood pressure measurements using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (preferably) or home blood pressure monitoring should be performed before visit 2 to rule out white coat hypertension, for which pharmacologic treatment is not recommended. A standardized ambulatory blood pressure monitoring protocol and an update on automated office blood pressure are also presented. Several other recommendations on accurate measurement of blood pressure and criteria for diagnosis of hypertension have been reorganized. Two other new recommendations refer to smoking cessation: (1) tobacco use status should be updated regularly and advice to quit smoking should be provided; and (2) advice in combination with pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation should be offered to all smokers. The following recommendations were modified: (1) renal artery stenosis should be primarily managed medically; and (2) renal artery angioplasty and stenting could be considered for patients with renal artery stenosis and complicated, uncontrolled hypertension. The rationale for these recommendation changes is discussed.

  7. The 2007 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 2 – therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadia A; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Padwal, Raj; Larochelle, Pierre; Mahon, Jeff L; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; McAlister, Finlay A; Rabkin, Simon W; Hill, Michael D; Feldman, Ross D; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Campbell, Norman RC; Logan, Alexander G; Arnold, Malcolm; Moe, Gordon; Campbell, Tavis S; Milot, Alain; Stone, James A; Jones, Charlotte; Leiter, Lawrence A; Ogilvie, Richard I; Herman, Robert J; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Carruthers, George; Culleton, Bruce; Burns, Kevin D; Ruzicka, Marcel; deChamplain, Jacques; Pylypchuk, George; Gledhill, Norm; Petrella, Robert; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Trudeau, Luc; Hegele, Robert A; Woo, Vincent; McFarlane, Phil; Touyz, Rhian M; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults. OPTIONS AND OUTCOMES: For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence was reviewed from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome. EVIDENCE: A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2005 to August 2006 to update the 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence. RECOMMENDATIONS: Dietary lifestyle modifications for prevention of hypertension, in addition to a well-balanced diet, include a dietary sodium intake of less than 100 mmol/day. In hypertensive patients, the dietary sodium intake should be limited to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day. Other lifestyle modifications for both normotensive and hypertensive patients include: performing 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintaining a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm in men and less than 88 cm in women); limiting alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; following a diet reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and one that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole

  8. The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 2 – therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hackam, Daniel G; Khan, Nadia A; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Rabkin, Simon W; Touyz, Rhian M; Campbell, Norman RC; Padwal, Raj; Campbell, Tavis S; Lindsay, M Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Quinn, Robert R; Mahon, Jeff L; Herman, Robert J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Ruzicka, Marcel; Larochelle, Pierre; Feldman, Ross D; Lebel, Marcel; Poirier, Luc; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Trudeau, Luc; Bacon, Simon L; Petrella, Robert J; Milot, Alain; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Sharma, Mukul; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Dresser, George K; Carruthers, S George; Pylypchuk, George; Burgess, Ellen D; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, GV Ramesh; Gilbert, Richard E; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; McFarlane, Philip A; Hegele, Robert A; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2010. OPTIONS AND OUTCOMES: For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, randomized trials and systematic reviews of trials were preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the general lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progressive renal impairment was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease. EVIDENCE: A Cochrane Collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2008 to August 2009 to update the 2009 recommendations. To identify additional studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence. RECOMMENDATIONS: For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to 1500 mg (65 mmol) per day in adults 50 years of age or younger, to 1300 mg (57 mmol) per day in adults 51 to 70 years of age, and to 1200 mg (52 mmol) per day in adults older than 70 years of age; perform 30 min to 60 min of moderate aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week for men or nine standard drinks per week for women; follow a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources, and that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For

  9. Exercise for Hypertension: A Prescription Update Integrating Existing Recommendations with Emerging Research.

    PubMed

    Pescatello, Linda S; MacDonald, Hayley V; Lamberti, Lauren; Johnson, Blair T

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is the most common, costly, and preventable cardiovascular disease risk factor. Numerous professional organizations and committees recommend exercise as initial lifestyle therapy to prevent, treat, and control hypertension. Yet, these recommendations differ in the components of the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) principle of exercise prescription (Ex Rx); the evidence upon which they are based is only of fair methodological quality; and the individual studies upon which they are based generally do not include people with hypertension, which are some of the limitations in this literature. The purposes of this review are to (1) overview the professional exercise recommendations for hypertension in terms of the FITT principle of Ex Rx; (2) discuss new and emerging research related to Ex Rx for hypertension; and (3) present an updated FITT Ex Rx for adults with hypertension that integrates the existing recommendations with this new and emerging research.

  10. The 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: the scientific summary -- an annual update.

    PubMed

    2008-06-01

    The present paper summarizes and highlights key messages of the 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. The 2008 recommendations emphasize proper self-measurement of blood pressure as a step toward greater patient involvement in hypertension management. Home measurement is a better predictor of cardiovascular events than office measures; it can also confirm the diagnosis of hypertension, improve blood pressure control, reduce the need for medications in some patients, screen for white coat and masked hypertension, and improve medication adherence in nonadherent patients. The recommendations continue to emphasize the importance of reducing dietary sodium and implementing other lifestyle changes to prevent and control hypertension. Furthermore, regular assessment of blood pressure at all appropriate visits and identification and management of all cardiovascular risk factures continue to be the cornerstone of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program. Most of the new evidence in 2008 confirmed previous Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. A notable new recommendation is the option to initiate pharmacotherapy with two first therapies if blood pressure is higher than 20/10 mmHg above target. Recently, the Ontario Blood Pressure survey found the treatment and control rate of hypertension in Ontario to be far higher than anywhere else in the world. This speaks to the success of primary care and the Canadian health system in diagnosing, treating and controlling hypertension.

  11. The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Quinn, Robert R; Zarnke, Kelly B; Rabi, Doreen M; Ravani, Pietro; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Rabkin, Simon W; Trudeau, Luc; Feldman, Ross D; Cloutier, Lyne; Prebtani, Ally; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Gilbert, Richard E; Ruzicka, Marcel; McKay, Donald W; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Bolli, Peter; Wilson, Thomas W; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Gelfer, Mark; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; McLean, Donna; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Burns, Kevin D; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Milot, Alain; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Tremblay, Guy; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Carruthers, S George; Pylypchuk, George B; Burgess, Ellen; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Penner, S Brian; Hegele, Robert A; McFarlane, Philip A; Khara, Milan; Pipe, Andrew; Oh, Paul; Selby, Peter; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra J; Tobe, Sheldon W; Padwal, Raj S; Poirier, Luc

    2014-05-01

    Herein, updated evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in Canadian adults are detailed. For 2014, 3 existing recommendations were modified and 2 new recommendations were added. The following recommendations were modified: (1) the recommended sodium intake threshold was changed from ≤ 1500 mg (3.75 g of salt) to approximately 2000 mg (5 g of salt) per day; (2) a pharmacotherapy treatment initiation systolic blood pressure threshold of ≥ 160 mm Hg was added in very elderly (age ≥ 80 years) patients who do not have diabetes or target organ damage (systolic blood pressure target in this population remains at < 150 mm Hg); and (3) the target population recommended to receive low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy for primary prevention was narrowed from all patients with controlled hypertension to only those ≥ 50 years of age. The 2 new recommendations are: (1) advice to be cautious when lowering systolic blood pressure to target levels in patients with established coronary artery disease if diastolic blood pressure is ≤ 60 mm Hg because of concerns that myocardial ischemia might be exacerbated; and (2) the addition of glycated hemoglobin (A1c) in the diagnostic work-up of patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. The rationale for these recommendation changes is discussed. In addition, emerging data on blood pressure targets in stroke patients are discussed; these data did not lead to recommendation changes at this time. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations will continue to be updated annually. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Context-Awareness Based Personalized Recommendation of Anti-Hypertension Drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dexin; Jin, Dawei; Goh, Tiong-Thye; Li, Na; Wei, Leiru

    2016-09-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that almost one-third of the world's adult population are suffering from hypertension which has gradually become a "silent killer". Due to the varieties of anti-hypertensive drugs, patients are interested in how these drugs can be selected to match their respective conditions. This study provides a personalized recommendation service system of anti-hypertensive drugs based on context-awareness and designs a context ontology framework of the service. In addition, this paper introduces a Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL)-based rule to provide high-level context reasoning and information recommendation and to overcome the limitation of ontology reasoning. To make the information recommendation of the drugs more personalized, this study also devises three categories of information recommendation rules that match different priority levels and uses a ranking algorithm to optimize the recommendation. The experiment conducted shows that combining the anti-hypertensive drugs personalized recommendation service context ontology (HyRCO) with the optimized rule reasoning can achieve a higher-quality personalized drug recommendation service. Accordingly this exploratory study of the personalized recommendation service for hypertensive drugs and its method can be easily adopted for other diseases.

  13. [Hypertension with chronic kidney disease: anti-hypertensive therapy recommended for the management of hypertension with CKD in JSN-CKD GL 2013 and JSH2014].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kouichi; Yutoh, Jun; Matsushita, Kei; Sakai, Masashi; Oshikawa, Jin

    2015-11-01

    For clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertension with CKD, the Japanese Society of Nephrology (JSN) and the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH) evaluated recently published evidence in corporation with each other. After considerable and careful discussion, both JSN and JSH revised their respective guidelines [the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guideline for CKD 2013 (JSN-CKD GL 2013) and JSH2014]. This section will mainly introduce anti-hypertensive therapy recommended for the management of hypertension with CKD in both guidelines. Recommendation statements for the Management of Hypertension with CKD are as follows: 1) Anti-hypertensive therapy in CKD is strongly recommended to inhibit or prevent the progression of renal dysfunction and to prevent the occurrence or recurrence of CVD by reducing blood pressure (BP) (Grade A). 2) In all diabetic CKD, the target level of clinic BP is recommended as < 130/80 mmHg, irrespective of the presence or absence of albuminuria/proteinuria (Grade B). 3) In all non-diabetic CKD, the target level of clinic BP is strongly recommended as consistently < 140/90 mmHg, irrespective of the presence or absence of albuminuria/proteinuria (Grade A). 4) In non-diabetic CKD with A2 and A3 categories, the target level of clinic BP can be set as < 130/80 mmHg (Grade C1). 5) In diabetic CKD with A1 category, ARBs and ACE inhibitors are suggested as first-line anti-hypertensive drugs(Grade C1). 6) In diabetic CKD with A2 and A3 categories, ARBs and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line anti-hypertensive drugs (Grade A). 7) In non-diabetic CKD with A1 category, ARBs, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics are recommended as first-line anti-hypertensive drugs (Grade B). 8) In non-diabetic CKD with A2 and A3 categories, ARBs and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line anti-hypertensive drugs (Grade B).

  14. [Adherence to physical activity recommendations in a hypertensive primary care population].

    PubMed

    Guitard Sein-Echaluce, M Luisa; Torres Puig-gros, Joan; Farreny Justribó, Divina; Gutiérrez Vilaplana, Josep M; Martínez Orduna, Miguela; Artigues Barberá, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of adherence to physical activity recommendations in the hypertensive population of Lerida (Spain) attended in primary care and to identify related factors. A cross sectional study was carried out in hypertensive adults. The dependent variable was adherence to physical activity recommendations measured with the Minnesota Questionnaire. The independent variables were sociodemographic factors, the information received, and attitudes to physical activity. A total of 786 hypertensive patients participated in this study; 53.9% were women and the mean age was 66.0±10.2 years. Adherence to recommendations was found in 64.3% (95% CI: 60.9-67.6); this percentage was 65.2% in men (95% CI: 60.2-70.0) and 63.4% in women (95% CI: 58.8-67.9). Greater adherence was associated with age in men and with residence in a rural area in women. In both genders, greater adherence was associated with unpaid work and with having a favorable attitude to physical activity. No association was observed with the number of recommendations received in the last 6 months. More than half the hypertensive population adhered to physical activity recommendations. To improve physical activity levels, recommendations can be tailored to the attitudes of individual patients. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards new recommendations to reduce the burden of alcohol-induced hypertension in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Anderson, Peter; Prieto, Jose Angel Arbesu; Armstrong, Iain; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Bachmann, Michael; Bastus, Nuria Bastida; Brotons, Carlos; Burton, Robyn; Cardoso, Manuel; Colom, Joan; Duprez, Daniel; Gmel, Gerrit; Gual, Antoni; Kraus, Ludwig; Kreutz, Reinhold; Liira, Helena; Manthey, Jakob; Møller, Lars; Okruhlica, Ľubomír; Roerecke, Michael; Scafato, Emanuele; Schulte, Bernd; Segura-Garcia, Lidia; Shield, Kevin David; Sierra, Cristina; Vyshinskiy, Konstantin; Wojnar, Marcin; Zarco, José

    2017-09-28

    Hazardous and harmful alcohol use and high blood pressure are central risk factors related to premature non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality worldwide. A reduction in the prevalence of both risk factors has been suggested as a route to reach the global NCD targets. This study aims to highlight that screening and interventions for hypertension and hazardous and harmful alcohol use in primary healthcare can contribute substantially to achieving the NCD targets. A consensus conference based on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical guidelines, experimental studies, and statistical modelling which had been presented and discussed in five preparatory meetings, was undertaken. Specifically, we modelled changes in blood pressure distributions and potential lives saved for the five largest European countries if screening and appropriate intervention rates in primary healthcare settings were increased. Recommendations to handle alcohol-induced hypertension in primary healthcare settings were derived at the conference, and their degree of evidence was graded. Screening and appropriate interventions for hazardous alcohol use and use disorders could lower blood pressure levels, but there is a lack in implementing these measures in European primary healthcare. Recommendations included (1) an increase in screening for hypertension (evidence grade: high), (2) an increase in screening and brief advice on hazardous and harmful drinking for people with newly detected hypertension by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals (evidence grade: high), (3) the conduct of clinical management of less severe alcohol use disorders for incident people with hypertension in primary healthcare (evidence grade: moderate), and (4) screening for alcohol use in hypertension that is not well controlled (evidence grade: moderate). The first three measures were estimated to result in a decreased hypertension prevalence and hundreds of saved lives annually in the examined countries

  16. 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations: The scientific summary – an update of the 2010 theme and the science behind new CHEP recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Norman RC; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Feldman, Ross; Poirier, Luc; Kwong, Margaret Moy Lum; Lebel, Marcel; McAlister, Finlay A; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2010-01-01

    The present article is a summary of the theme, the key recommendations for management of hypertension and the supporting clinical evidence of the 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP). In 2010, CHEP emphasizes the need for health care professionals to stay informed about hypertension through automated updates at www.htnupdate.ca. A new interactive Internet-based lecture series will be available in 2010 and a program to train community hypertension leaders will be expanded. Patients can also sign up to receive regular updates in a pilot program at www.myBPsite.ca. In 2010, the new recommendations include consideration for using automated office blood pressure monitors, new targets for dietary sodium for the prevention and treatment of hypertension that are aligned with the national adequate intake values, and recommendations for considering treatment of selected hypertensive patients at high risk with calcium channel blocker/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor combinations and the use of angiotensin receptor blockers. PMID:20485687

  17. Drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy: a critical review of adult guideline recommendations.

    PubMed

    Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Sequeira, Reginald P; Alkhaja, Alwaleed K; Damanhori, Awatif H H

    2014-03-01

    This review evaluates the guideline recommendations for the management of hypertension in pregnancy as presented by 25 national/international guidelines developed for the management of arterial hypertension in adults. There is a general consensus that oral α-methyldopa and parenteral labetalol are the drugs of choice for nonsevere and severe hypertension in pregnancy, respectively. Long-acting nifedipine is recommended by various guidelines as an alternative for first-line and second-line therapy in nonsevere and severe hypertension. The safety of β-blockers, atenolol in particular, in early and late stages of pregnancy is unresolved; their use is contraindicated according to several guidelines. Diuretic-associated harmful effects on maternal and fetal outcomes are controversial: their use is discouraged in pregnancy. It is important to develop specific guidelines for treating hypertension in special groups such as adult females of childbearing age and sexually active female adolescents to minimize the risk of adverse effects of drugs on the fetus. In several guidelines, the antihypertensive classes, recommended drug(s), intended drug formulation, and route of administration are not explicit. These omissions should be addressed in future guideline revisions in order to enhance the guidelines' utility and credibility in clinical practice.

  18. [Update of consensus recommendations of the Chilean Hypertension Society about ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Prat M, Hernán; Valdés S, Gloria; Román A, Oscar; Zarate M, L Hernán

    2009-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is a valuable tool to evaluate the blood pressure pattern, to identify hypertensive patients, to diagnose white coat and masked hypertension and in situations in which a tight control of hypertension is crucial. This is an update of 1999 consensus recommendations about the use to ABPM, considering that there is new evidence concerning its benefits, and the clinical experience with its application has increased. Equipment programming, its installation, the interpretation and analysis of the data are described, and a report sheet for patients is included. New recommendations have been added to the accepted indications. Normal blood pressure ranges for children and pregnant women have been replaced by new data.

  19. 2014 Hypertension Guideline: Recommendation for a Change in Goal Systolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institute National Hypertension Guideline was developed to assist primary care physicians and other health care professionals in the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated hypertension in adult men and nonpregnant women aged 18 years and older. The new guideline reflects general acceptance, with minor modifications, of the “Evidence-Based Guideline” report by the panel members appointed to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 8th Joint National Committee. A major practice change is the recommendation for goal systolic blood pressure less than 150 mmHg in patients aged 60 years and older who are treated for hypertension in the absence of diabetes or chronic kidney disease. This article describes the reasons for, evidence for, and consequences of the change, and is followed by the National Guidelines handout. PMID:26057683

  20. Do Hypertensive Individuals Who Are Aware of Their Disease Follow Lifestyle Recommendations Better than Those Who Are Not Aware?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Kong, Kyoung Ae

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle modification is the first step in hypertension management. Our objective was to assess adherence to lifestyle recommendations by individuals who were aware of their hypertension and to identify characteristics associated with non-adherence. Using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2010-2012, we compared the adherence to six lifestyle recommendations of hypertensive subjects aware of the status of their condition with that of those who were not aware, based on survey regression analysis. The characteristics associated with non-adherence were assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Of all hypertensive subjects, <20% adhered to a healthy diet and reduced salt intake and about 80% moderated alcohol consumption and did not smoke. Half of all subjects maintained normal body weight and engaged in physical activity. Most lifestyle features of aware hypertensive Koreans did not differ greatly from those of hypertensive individuals who were not aware. Reduction in salt intake was slightly more prevalent among those aware of their hypertensive status. Obesity was more prevalent among the aware hypertensive subjects, and the prevalence of obesity increased with the duration of hypertension. Male gender, younger age, residence in a rural area, low income, and the use of antihypertensive medication were associated with non-adherence to lifestyle recommendations by hypertensive individuals. Many hypertensive Koreans do not comply with lifestyle recommendations for the management of hypertension. The association between the use of antihypertensive medications and non-adherence suggested an over-reliance on medication rather than a commitment to a healthy lifestyle. Our study highlights that efforts encouraging healthy lifestyles, as the first step in hypertension management, need to be increased.

  1. [Pulmonary hypertension due to chronic lung disease: Recommendations of the Cologne Consensus Conference 2016].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, H; Behr, J; Bremer, H; Claussen, M; Douschan, P; Halank, M; Held, M; Hoeper, M M; Holt, S; Klose, H; Krüger, S; Lange, T J; Reichenberger, F; Skowasch, D; Ulrich, S; Wilkens, H; Seeger, W

    2016-10-01

    The 2015 European Guidelines on Pulmonary Hypertension did not cover only pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but also some aspects of pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease. The European Guidelines point out that the drugs currently used to treat patients with PAH (prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, sGC stimulators) have not been sufficiently investigated in other forms of PH. Therefore, the European Guidelines do not recommend the use of these drugs in patients with chronic lung disease and PH. This recommendation, however, is not always in agreement with medical ethics as physicians feel sometimes inclined to treat other form of PH which may affect quality of life and survival of these patients in a similar manner. To this end, it is crucial to consider the severity of both PH and the underlying lung disease. In June 2016, a Consensus Conference organized by the PH working groups of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Respiratory Medicine (DGP) and the German Society of Pediatric Cardiology (DGPK) was held in Cologne, Germany, to discuss open and controversial issues surrounding the practical implementation of the European Guidelines. Several working groups were initiated, one of which was dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of PH in patients with chronic lung disease. The recommendations of this working group are summarized in the present paper.

  2. The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1 – blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk

    PubMed Central

    Padwal, Raj S; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Khan, Nadia A; Grover, Steven; McKay, Donald W; Wilson, Thomas; Penner, Brian; Burgess, Ellen; McAlister, Finlay A; Bolli, Peter; Hill, Michael D; Mahon, Jeff; Myers, Martin G; Abbott, Carl; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Honos, George; Mann, Karen; Tremblay, Guy; Milot, Alain; Cloutier, Lyne; Chockalingam, Arun; Rabkin, Simon W; Dawes, Martin; Touyz, Rhian M; Bell, Chaim; Burns, Kevin D; Ruzicka, Marcel; Campbell, Norman RC; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension. OPTIONS AND OUTCOMES: The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required. EVIDENCE: MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2007 to October 2008 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes. VALIDATION: All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually. PMID

  3. The 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1 – blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk

    PubMed Central

    Padwal, Raj S; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Khan, Nadia A; Grover, Steven; McAlister, Finlay A; McKay, Donald W; Wilson, Thomas; Penner, Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Bolli, Peter; Hill, Michael D; Mahon, Jeff; Myers, Martin G; Abbott, Carl; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Honos, George; Mann, Karen; Tremblay, Guy; Milot, Alain; Cloutier, Lyne; Chockalingam, Arun; Rabkin, Simon W; Dawes, Martin; Touyz, Rhian M; Bell, Chaim; Burns, Kevin D; Ruzicka, Marcel; Campbell, Norman RC; Lebel, Marcel; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension. OPTIONS AND OUTCOMES: The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, degree of blood pressure elevation, method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required. EVIDENCE: MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2006 to October 2007 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2008 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes. PMID:18548142

  4. The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I – blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Robert R; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Padwal, Raj S; Myers, Martin G; Cloutier, Lyne; Bolli, Peter; McKay, Donald W; Khan, Nadia A; Hill, Michael D; Mahon, Jeff; Hackam, Daniel G; Grover, Steven; Wilson, Thomas; Penner, Brian; Burgess, Ellen; McAlister, Finlay A; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; McLean, Donna; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Honos, George; Mann, Karen; Tremblay, Guy; Milot, Alain; Chockalingam, Arun; Rabkin, Simon W; Dawes, Martin; Touyz, Rhian M; Burns, Kevin D; Ruzicka, Marcel; Campbell, Norman RC; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, GV Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension. EVIDENCE: MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2008 to October 2009 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Changes to the recommendations for 2010 relate to automated office blood pressure measurements. Automated office blood pressure measurements can be used in the assessment of office blood pressure. When used under proper conditions, an automated office systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher should be considered analogous to a mean awake ambulatory systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher and diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher, respectively. VALIDATION: All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. To be approved, all recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually. PMID:20485688

  5. Financial Incentives and Physician Commitment to Guideline-Recommended Hypertension Management: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hysong, Sylvia J.; Simpson, Kate; Pietz, Kenneth; SoRelle, Richard; Broussard, Kristen; Petersen, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of financial incentives on physician goal commitment to guideline-recommended hypertension care. Study design Clinic-level cluster-randomized controlled trial with four arms: control, individual-, group-, or combined incentives. Intervention arm participants received performance-based incentives every four months for five periods. All participants received guideline education at baseline and audit and feedback every four months. Methods 83 full-time primary care physicians at 12 VA Medical Centers completed web-based survey responses to Hollenbeck’s goal commitment scale every four months and telephone interviews at months 8 and 16. Results Physician goal commitment did not vary over time or across arms. Participants reported patient non-adherence and consistent follow-up as perceived barriers and facilitators to successful hypertension care, suggesting providers may perceive hypertension management as more of a patient responsibility (external locus of control). Conclusions Financial incentives may constitute an insufficiently strong intervention to influence goal commitment when providers attribute performance to external forces beyond their control. PMID:23145846

  6. Recommendations for Screening and Detection of Connective-Tissue Disease Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Dinesh; Gladue, Heather; Channick, Richard; Chung, Lorinda; Distler, Oliver; Furst, Daniel E.; Hachulla, Eric; Humbert, Marc; Langleben, David; Mathai, Stephen C.; Saggar, Rajeev; Visovatti, Scott; Altorok, Nezam; Townsend, Whitney; FitzGerald, John; McLaughlin, Vallerie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) affects up to 15% of patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Previous recommendations developed as part of larger efforts in PAH did not provide detailed recommendations for patients with CTD-PAH. Therefore, we sought to develop recommendations for screening and early detection of CTD-PAH. Methods We performed a systematic review for the screening and diagnosis of PAH in CTD by searching the literature. Using the RAND/UCLA methodology, we developed case scenarios followed by 2 stages of voting—first international experts from a variety of specialties voted anonymously on the appropriateness of each case scenario and then the experts met in a face-to-face meeting to discuss and resolve discrepant votes to arrive at consensus recommendations. Results The key recommendations state that patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) should be screened for PAH. In addition, mixed connective tissue diseases (MCTD) or other CTD’s with scleroderma features should also be screened for PAH (scleroderma-spectrum disorder). Initial screening evaluation in patients with SSc and scleroderma-spectrum disorders include pulmonary function test (PFT) including diffusion capacity carbon monoxide (DLCO), transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE), and NT- Pro BNP. In SSc and spectrum disorders, TTE and PFT should be performed on annual basis. The full screening panel (TTE, PFT, and NT-ProBNP) should be performed as soon as any new signs or symptoms are present. Conclusion We provide consensus-based, evidence-driven recommendations for screening and early detection of CTD-PAH. It is our hope that these recommendations will lead to earlier detection of CTD-PAH and ultimately improve patient outcomes. PMID:24022584

  7. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease: recommendations of the Cologne Consensus Conference 2016].

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, S; Lang, I M; Blindt, R; Bonderman, D; Bruch, L; Diller, G P; Felgendreher, R; Gerges, C; Hohenforst-Schmidt, W; Holt, S; Jung, C; Kindermann, I; Kramer, T; Kübler, W M; Mitrovic, V; Riedel, A; Rieth, A; Schmeisser, A; Wachter, R; Weil, J; Opitz, C

    2016-10-01

    The 2015 European Guidelines on Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension are also valid for Germany. While the guidelines contain detailed recommendations regarding pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), they contain only a relatively short paragraph on other, much more common forms of PH such as PH due to left heart disease. Despite the lack of data, targeted PAH treatments are increasingly being used for PH associated with left heart disease. This development is of concern because of limited ressources and the need to base treatments on scientific evidence. On the other hand, PH is a frequent problem that is highly relevant for morbidity and mortality in patients with left heart disease, representing an unmet need of targeted PH therapies. It that sense, the practical implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany requires the consideration of several specific issues and already existing novel data. This requires a detailed commentary to the guidelines, and in some aspects an update already appears necessary. In June 2016, a Consensus Conference organized by the PH working groups of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Respiratory Medicine (DGP) and the German Society of Pediatric Cardiology (DGPK) was held in Cologne, Germany. This conference aimed to solve practical and controversial issues surrounding the implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany. To this end, several working groups were initiated, one of which was specifically dedicated to PH associated with left heart disease. This article summarizes the results and recommendations of this working group.

  8. Screening for primary hypertension in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-11-05

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening and diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for blood pressure in children and adolescents, the effectiveness and harms of treatment of screen-detected primary childhood hypertension, and the association of hypertension with markers of cardiovascular disease in childhood and adulthood. This recommendation applies to children and adolescents who do not have symptoms of hypertension. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents to prevent subsequent cardiovascular disease in childhood or adulthood.

  9. Screening for primary hypertension in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-11-01

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening and diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for blood pressure in children and adolescents, the effectiveness and harms of treatment of screen-detected primary childhood hypertension, and the association of hypertension with markers of cardiovascular disease in childhood and adulthood. This recommendation applies to children and adolescents who do not have symptoms of hypertension. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents to prevent subsequent cardiovascular disease in childhood or adulthood.

  10. Adherence to Hypertension Management Recommendations for Patient Follow-Up Care and Lifestyle Modifications Made By Military Healthcare Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    NP) were included in this study. Exclusion Hypertension 28 criteria included pregnant women with hypertension, those less than 40 years of age, and...mls) of ethanol per day for women and lighter weight people). 3. To what extent do Military Healthcare Providers adhere to the JNC VI recommendations...humanitarian missions, the deployment of military personnel is inevitable. Healthy Airmen will therefore deploy physically able, fit men and women

  11. Evaluation of sexual function in hypertensive men receiving treatment: a review of current guidelines recommendation.

    PubMed

    Karavitakis, Markos; Komninos, Christos; Theodorakis, Pavlos N; Politis, Vasilios; Lefakis, Georgios; Mitsios, Kostas; Koritsiadis, Sotirios; Doumanis, Grigorios

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that some classes of antihypertensive drugs may induce or exacerbate sexual and/or erectile dysfunction (ED) more than others. Sexually related side effects of antihypertensive treatment may compromise patient's and partner's quality of life. Often, these side effects can lead to withdrawal or poor compliance with therapy resulting in abnormal blood pressure and associated morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether hypertension clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) address ED and/or other sexual issues as either an adverse outcome of chosen therapy or as a factor to consider in treatment decision. Hypertension CPGs were identified by searching PubMed (from 2000 to current), the World Wide Web, bibliographies of retrieved guidelines, and official home pages of major medical societies. The main outcome measures used for this study were guidelines assessment using a set of author-determined survey questions. Twelve CPGs were identified and analyzed. From these 12, only three emphasized the importance of assessing sexual function prior to initiation and/or follow-up of antihypertensive therapy; only five described potential sexual side effects associated with some drugs; only two provided specific management recommendations on commencing antihypertensive therapy in sexually active men or those with preexisting ED and address the timeline of the potential drug-induced impairment of sexual function. Only a minority of CPGs for the treatment of hypertension consider ED or other sexual issues as either an adverse outcome or as a factor to consider in treatment. Sexual function is an important aspect of quality of life for both the individual and his partner. It is therefore imperative to select therapy with the least possible potential for causing sexual sequelae and enable the best achievable balance between therapeutic efficacy, quality of life, and therapeutic compliance. Based on these results, our proposed algorithm attempts to

  12. Clinical management of drug-induced hypertension: 2013 Practical Recommendations of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA).

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Results from recent observational studies conducted in our country and including approximately 160,000 patients with hypertension, reported that only 37 % of patients achieve effective blood pressure control under treatment. These data confirm that blood pressure control amongst the hypertensive population is still largely unsatisfactory in Italy. For this reason, the Italian Society of Hypertension aims to generate a number of interventions to improve blood pressure control in Italy, including integrated actions with General Practitioners, the implementation of hypertension awareness in the general population, a larger use of home blood pressure measurements, and a survey aimed at identifying all clinical and excellence centers for hypertension diagnosis and treatment throughout the whole national territory. Many therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce a persistent or transient increase in blood pressure or interfere with the effect of antihypertensive drugs, causing sodium retention and expansion of the extra-cellular volume, activating the sympathetic nervous system and inducing vasoconstriction. This aspect represents one of the most common cause of secondary forms of hypertension, which often is under-evaluated by the physicians. In this review article, the potential causes of secondary forms of hypertension caused by use/abuse of drugs or substances are summarized.

  13. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Musinguzi, Geofrey; Bastiaens, Hilde; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.; Mukose, Aggrey; Van geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nuwaha, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda. Methods In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV), 23 Health Center III (HCIII), 41 Health Center II (HCII) and 52 private clinics/dispensaries) in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations. Results Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating) patients with hypertension, and most (80.2%) were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW). Less than half (46%) of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%), beta blockers (56%) and calcium channel blockers (48.4%). Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5

  14. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Musinguzi, Geofrey; Bastiaens, Hilde; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Mukose, Aggrey; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nuwaha, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda. In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV), 23 Health Center III (HCIII), 41 Health Center II (HCII) and 52 private clinics/dispensaries) in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations. Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating) patients with hypertension, and most (80.2%) were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW). Less than half (46%) of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%), beta blockers (56%) and calcium channel blockers (48.4%). Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5, 1.9%) indicated that they

  15. The relationship between currently recommended ambulatory systolic blood pressure measures and left ventricular mass index in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bjelakovic, Bojko; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Vukomanovic, Vladislav; Lukic, Stevo; Prijic, Sergej; Krstic, Milos; Bjelakovic, Ljiljana; Saranac, Ljiljana; Velickovic, Ana

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between currently recommended ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) measures used to classify pediatric hypertension and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in children with true ambulatory hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional survey among 94 children who were consecutively referred for suspected hypertension. The calculated ABP measures were average 24-h systolic blood pressure (24-h aSBP) and 24-h SBP load. The LVMI was estimated by M-mode echocardiography using Devereux's formula and indexed by height(2,7). A total of 35 children fulfilled the criteria for true ambulatory hypertension (elevated office blood pressure, 24-h SBP load >25 %, and 24-h aSBP >95th percentile). Compared with children not fulfilling these criteria, those with true ambulatory hypertension had significantly higher values of 24-h aSBP, 24-h SBP load, and LVMI, as well as body mass index (BMI; P < 0.0001). In a separate analysis of both groups, none of the examined ABP measures adjusted for age, sex, and BMI correlated with LVMI. In those with true hypertension, only BMI was significantly associated with increased LVMI (F = 9.651; P = 0.004; adjusted R (2) = 0.203). The results of our study suggest that pediatric hypertension, as determined by currently recommended ABP (SBP) measures, is not associated with subclinical end-organ damage as defined by the increased left ventricular mass. Therefore, additional factors associated with BMI increase must be considered as risk factors for the development of end-organ damage in hypertensive children.

  16. Australian perspective regarding recommendations for physical activity and exercise rehabilitation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Robin; Jenkins, Sue; Maiorana, Andrew; Gain, Kevin; O’Driscoll, Gerry; Gabbay, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine the opinion of health care professionals within Australia, regarding acceptable levels of exertion and symptoms, and referral for exercise rehabilitation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Method In 2010, 76 health care professionals at a specialist pulmonary hypertension meeting in Australia were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included case studies of patients with PAH in World Health Organization (WHO) functional classes II–IV. For each case study, respondents were asked to report their opinion regarding the acceptable level of exertion and symptoms during daily activities, and whether they would refer the patient for exercise rehabilitation. Three additional questions asked about advice in relation to four specific physical activities. Results The response rate was 70% (n = 53). Overall, 58% of respondents recommended patients undertake daily activities ‘as tolerated’. There was no consensus regarding acceptable levels of breathlessness or fatigue, but the majority of respondents considered patients should have no chest pain (73%) and no more than mild light-headedness (92%) during daily activities. Overall, 63% of respondents would have referred patients for exercise rehabilitation. There was little difference in opinion regarding the acceptable level of exertion or symptoms, or referral for exercise rehabilitation, according to functional class. However, the patients’ functional class did influence the advice given regarding the specific physical activities. Conclusion In 2010, there were inconsistencies between individual health care professionals within Australia regarding appropriate levels of physical exertion and acceptable symptoms during daily activities. Almost two-thirds of the respondents reported they would refer patients for exercise rehabilitation. PMID:22247620

  17. Clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure: Is it time to recommend for all patients with hypertension?

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Kario, Kazuomi; Covic, Adrian; Bertelsen, Nathan; Afsar, Baris; Ozkok, Abdullah; Wiecek, Andrzej; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension is a very common disease, and office measurements of blood pressure are frequently inaccurate. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) offers a more accurate diagnosis, more detailed readings of average blood pressures, better blood pressure measurement during sleep, fewer false positives by detecting more white-coat hypertension, and fewer false negatives by detecting more masked hypertension. ABPM offers better management of clinical outcomes. For example, based on more accurate measurements of blood pressure variability, ABPM demonstrates that taking antihypertensive medication at night leads to better controlled nocturnal blood pressure, which translates into less end organ damage and fewer clinical complications of hypertension. For these reasons, albeit some shortcomings which were discussed, ABPM should be considered as a first-line tool for diagnosing and managing hypertension.

  18. [Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is well known to one of the risk factors to reduce cognitive function, however, it is still unclear whether anti-hypertensive therapy is effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological studies suggested antihypertensive therapy from the middle-age could reduce risk of dementia. The meta-analysis including HYVET also suggested blood pressure lowering from the elderly might be also effective to prevent development of dementia. The network meta-analysis and the cohort study using mega-data bank suggested ARB might be effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to administration with other anti-hypertensive drugs. Although the further major clinical investigation is required, anti-hypertensive treatment might be useful to manage hypertensive patients with dementia.

  19. [Management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents: Recommendations of the European Society of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Lurbe, E; Cifkova, R; Cruickshank, J K; Dillon, M J; Ferreira, I; Invitti, C; Kuznetsova, T; Laurent, S; Mancia, G; Morales-Olivas, F; Rascher, W; Redon, J; Schaefer, F; Seeman, T; Stergiou, G; Wühl, E; Zanchetti, A

    2010-07-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents has been gaining ground in cardiovascular medicine, mainly due to the advances made in several areas of pathophysiological and clinical research. These guidelines arose from the consensus reached by specialists in the detection and control of hypertension in children and adolescents. Furthermore, these guidelines are a compendium of scientific data and the extensive clinical experience it contains represents the most complete information that doctors, nurses and families should take into account when making decisions. These guidelines, which stress the importance of hypertension in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, should act as a stimulus for governments to develop a global effort for the early detection and suitable treatment of high pressure in children and adolescents. J Hypertens 27:1719-1742 Q 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  20. The recommendations of a consensus panel for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and associated supine hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Schmidt, Peter; Biaggioni, Italo; Frazier-Mills, Camille; Freeman, Roy; Isaacson, Stuart; Karabin, Beverly; Kuritzky, Louis; Lew, Mark; Low, Phillip; Mehdirad, Ali; Raj, Satish R; Vernino, Steven; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2017-01-03

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is common in patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, dementia with Lewy bodies, and peripheral neuropathies including amyloid or diabetic neuropathy. Due to the frequency of nOH in the aging population, clinicians need to be well informed about its diagnosis and management. To date, studies of nOH have used different outcome measures and various methods of diagnosis, thereby preventing the generation of evidence-based guidelines to direct clinicians towards 'best practices' when treating patients with nOH and associated supine hypertension. To address these issues, the American Autonomic Society and the National Parkinson Foundation initiated a project to develop a statement of recommendations beginning with a consensus panel meeting in Boston on November 7, 2015, with continued communications and contributions to the recommendations through October of 2016. This paper summarizes the panel members' discussions held during the initial meeting along with continued deliberations among the panel members and provides essential recommendations based upon best available evidence as well as expert opinion for the (1) screening, (2) diagnosis, (3) treatment of nOH, and (4) diagnosis and treatment of associated supine hypertension.

  1. Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazelton, G. Blue; Renn, Kristen A.; Stewart, Dafina-Lazarus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, the editors provide a summary of the information shared in this sourcebook about the success of students who have minoritized identities of sexuality or gender and offer recommendations for policy, practice, and further research.

  2. Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazelton, G. Blue; Renn, Kristen A.; Stewart, Dafina-Lazarus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, the editors provide a summary of the information shared in this sourcebook about the success of students who have minoritized identities of sexuality or gender and offer recommendations for policy, practice, and further research.

  3. 2013 ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recommendations for the diagnosis of adult hypertension, assessment of cardiovascular and other hypertension-associated risk, and attainment of therapeutic goals.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Correlation between systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is much greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime office measurements. The 2013 ABPM guidelines specified herein are based on ABPM patient outcomes studies and constitute a substantial revision of current knowledge. The asleep SBP mean and sleep-time relative SBP decline are the most significant predictors of CVD events, both individually as well as jointly when combined with other ABPM-derived prognostic markers. Thus, they should be preferably used to diagnose hypertension and assess CVD and other associated risks. Progressive decrease by therapeutic intervention of the asleep BP mean is the most significant predictor of CVD event-free interval. The 24-h BP mean is not recommended to diagnose hypertension because it disregards the more valuable clinical information pertaining to the features of the 24-h BP pattern. Persons with the same 24-h BP mean may display radically different 24-h BP patterns, ranging from extreme-dipper to riser types, representative of markedly different risk states. Classification of individuals by comparing office with either the 24-h or awake BP mean as "masked normotensives" (elevated clinic BP but normal ABPM), which should replace the terms of "isolated office" or "white-coat hypertension", and "masked hypertensives" (normal clinic BP but elevated ABPM) is misleading and should be avoided because it disregards the clinical significance of the asleep BP mean. Outcome-based ABPM reference thresholds for men, which in the absence of compelling clinical conditions are 135/85 mmHg for the awake and 120/70 mmHg for the asleep SBP/DBP means, are lower by 10/5 mmHg for SBP/DBP in uncomplicated, low-CVD risk, women and lower by 15/10 mmHg for SBP/DBP in male and female high-risk patients, e.g., with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and/or past CVD

  4. Management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents: recommendations of the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Cifkova, Renata; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Dillon, Michael J; Ferreira, Isabel; Invitti, Cecilia; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laurent, Stephane; Mancia, Giuseppe; Morales-Olivas, Francisco; Rascher, Wolfgang; Redon, Josep; Schaefer, Franz; Seeman, Tomas; Stergiou, George; Wühl, Elke; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents has gained ground in cardiovascular medicine, thanks to the progress made in several areas of pathophysiological and clinical research. These guidelines represent a consensus among specialists involved in the detection and control of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The guidelines synthesize a considerable amount of scientific data and clinical experience and represent best clinical wisdom upon which physicians, nurses and families should base their decisions. They call attention to the burden of hypertension in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, these guidelines should encourage public policy makers, to develop a global effort to improve identification and treatment of high blood pressure among children and adolescents.

  5. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Lepine, Todd

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death.(1) Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension.(2,3) In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system.(4) The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of people 60 to 69 years of age and at least three-fourths of those 70 years of age and older are affected.(5) Most individuals with hypertension do not have it adequately controlled.(1,6) Medication noncompliance due to avoidance of side effects is suggested to be a primary factor.(6) The epidemic incidence of hypertension and its significant cost to society indicate that a well-tolerated, cost-effective approach to treatment is urgently needed.

  6. Screening for Hypertension in Children and Adolescents: Methodology and Current Practice Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michaela N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.; Phillips, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) requires urgent, uniform, and consistent attention across all frontiers of pediatric health care not only because of established links between the onset of HTN during one’s youth and its sustenance throughout adulthood but also because of the sequelae associated with the disease’s trajectory, such as cardiovascular disease, end organ damage, and decreased quality of life. Although national guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pediatric HTN have been available for nearly 40 years, knowledge and recognition of the problem by clinicians remain poor due to a host of influencing factors. The purpose of this article is to explicate key issues contributing to the inaccurate measurement of blood pressure and misclassification of HTN among children and to present strategies to address these issues. PMID:28361048

  7. Prevalence of Sodium and Fluid Restriction Recommendations for Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Tonya; Cueva Cobo, Giovanna; Dillingham, Christine; Burger, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are often afflicted with the consequences of right heart failure including volume overload. Counseling to assist the patient in the dietary restriction of sodium and fluid may be underutilized. Methods: Consecutive patients seen in the PH Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida from June to November 2013. Results: 100 patients were included; 70 were women and most had group 1 PH (n = 69). Patient characteristics using mean (±SD) were: Age 63 ± 13 years, functional class 3 ± 1, brain natriuretic peptide 302 ± 696 pg/mL, 6-min walk 337 ± 116 m, right atrial pressure 8 ± 5 mmHg, and mean pulmonary artery pressure 42 ± 13 mmHg. Overall, 79 had had complete (32) or partial instruction (47) and 21 had no prior counseling to restrict sodium or fluid. Of the 47 with partial instruction, 42 received complete education during the PH Clinic visit. Of the 21 without prior instruction, 19 received complete education during the PH visit. Seven patients with the opportunity to have their education enhanced or provided did not receive any additional counseling during the PH visit. Conclusion: Sodium and fluid restriction is an important but perhaps underutilized strategy to manage volume overload in patients with right heart failure. Focused questioning and education may permit an increase in the patients receiving instruction in this regard. PMID:27417785

  8. Prevalence of Sodium and Fluid Restriction Recommendations for Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Tonya; Cobo, Giovanna Cueva; Dillingham, Christine; Burger, Charles D

    2015-07-28

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are often afflicted with the consequences of right heart failure including volume overload. Counseling to assist the patient in the dietary restriction of sodium and fluid may be underutilized. Consecutive patients seen in the PH Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida from June to November 2013. 100 patients were included; 70 were women and most had group 1 PH (n = 69). Patient characteristics using mean (±SD) were: Age 63 ± 13 years, functional class 3 ± 1, brain natriuretic peptide 302 ± 696 pg/mL, 6-min walk 337 ± 116 m, right atrial pressure 8 ± 5 mmHg, and mean pulmonary artery pressure 42 ± 13 mmHg. Overall, 79 had had complete (32) or partial instruction (47) and 21 had no prior counseling to restrict sodium or fluid. Of the 47 with partial instruction, 42 received complete education during the PH Clinic visit. Of the 21 without prior instruction, 19 received complete education during the PH visit. Seven patients with the opportunity to have their education enhanced or provided did not receive any additional counseling during the PH visit. Sodium and fluid restriction is an important but perhaps underutilized strategy to manage volume overload in patients with right heart failure. Focused questioning and education may permit an increase in the patients receiving instruction in this regard.

  9. ARBs and ACEis together in the treatment of hypertension and its complications? current practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, Luis M; Segura, Julian

    2010-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is highly prevalent in the general population. Its contribution to the development and evolution of cardiovascular and renal disease is well recognized. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) have demonstrated favorable effects on cardiovascular and renal prognosis; however, some limitations have been described, for example angiotensin and aldosterone breakthrough. This article describes several therapeutical strategies that can be administered with an ACEi or ARB, such as the direct renin inhibitors or the aldosterone receptor antagonists. The addition of an ACEi to an ARB or vice versa was initially considered as a way of obtaining a stronger suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), but recent evidence has shown that the combination of the two classes of drugs does not seem to afford the expected increase in benefit. RAAS suppression with monotherapy is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects, but has several limitations. Direct renin inhibitors and aldosterone receptor antagonists will increase the benefits of dual blockade. We need randomized trial data supporting reduction of cardiovascular events with an adequate safety profile using combination therapies.

  10. 2014 Hypertension Recommendations From the Eighth Joint National Committee Panel Members Raise Concerns for Elderly Black and Female Populations

    PubMed Central

    Krakoff, Lawrence R.; Gillespie, Robert L.; Ferdinand, Keith C.; Fergus, Icilma V.; Akinboboye, Ola; Williams, Kim A.; Walsh, Mary Norine; Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Pepine, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    A report from panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee titled "2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults" has garnered much attention due to its major change in recommendations for hypertension treatment for patients ≥60 years of age and for their treatment goal. In response, certain groups have opposed the decision to initiate pharmacologic treatment to lower blood pressure (BP) at systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg and treat to a goal systolic BP of <150 mm Hg in the general population age ≥60 years. This paper contains 3 sections–an introduction followed by the opinions of 2 writing groups–outlining objections to or support of maintaining this proposed strategy in certain at-risk populations, namely African Americans, women, and the elderly. Several authors argue for maintaining current targets, as opposed to adopting the new recommendations, to allow for optimal treatment for older women and African Americans, helping to close sex and race/ethnicity gaps in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. PMID:25060376

  11. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 3. Recommendations on alcohol consumption. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, NR; Ashley, MJ; Carruthers, SG; Lacourciere, Y; McKay, DW

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations concerning the effects of alcohol consumption on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults (except pregnant women). OPTIONS: There are 2 main options for those at risk for hypertension: avert the condition by limiting alcohol consumption or by using other nonpharmacologic methods, or maintain or increase the risk of hypertension by making no change in alcohol consumption. The options for those who already have hypertension include decreasing alcohol consumption or using another nonpharmacologic method to reduce hypertension; commencing, continuing or intensifying antihypertensive medication; or taking no action and remaining at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. OUTCOMES: The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1996 with the terms ethyl alcohol and hypertension. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of articles identified, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design, and graded according to the level of evidence. VALUES: A high value was placed on the avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: A reduction in alcohol consumption from more than 2 standard drinks per day reduces the blood pressure of both hypertensive and normotensive people. The lowest overall mortality rates in observational studies were associated with drinking habits that were within these guidelines. Side effects and costs were not measured in any of the studies. RECOMMENDATIONS: (1) It is recommended that health care professionals determine how much alcohol their patients consume. (2) To reduce blood pressure in the

  12. A tool for reliable self-home blood pressure monitoring designed according to the European Society of Hypertension recommendations: the Microlife WatchBP Home monitor.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Jaenecke, Bernd; Giovas, Periklis P; Chang, Arron; Chung-Yueh, Yen; Tan, Ty-Minh

    2007-04-01

    Self-blood pressure monitoring by patients at home (HBPM) is being increasingly used in clinical practice and has been endorsed by hypertension societies as an important adjunct to the conventional office blood pressure measurements. Several problems, however, exist regarding the application of HBPM in practice, such as device inaccuracy, observer bias and misreporting, variable monitoring schedule and variable method for summarizing measurements. The European Society of Hypertension Working Group (ESH-WG) on Blood Pressure Monitoring has published detailed recommendations on how to apply HBPM in clinical practice. The Microlife WatchBP Home monitor is designed to provide reliable and unbiased self-blood pressure monitoring by patients at home, strictly according to the ESH-WG recommendations. Dual-function automated oscillometric monitor for HBPM in the arm, with memory, PC link capacity and embedded monitoring schedule. The device has a Usual mode for casual HBPM and a Diag (diagnostic) mode for HBPM strictly according to the ESH-WG proposed schedule (duplicate morning and evening measurements for 7 days). Readings are averaged by the device after exclusion of the initial day according to ESH-WG recommendations and can be transferred to PC for storing or printing. A pilot study in hypertensive patients with previous experience in HBPM suggested that the device is user-friendly and well accepted. The Microlife WatchBP Home monitor is a novel device that provides a reliable and unbiased assessment of home blood pressure strictly according to the ESH recommendations.

  13. Adherence to Hypertension Management Recommendations for Patient Follow-Up Care and Lifestyle Modifications Made by Military Healthcare Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Exclusion Hypertension 28 criteria included pregnant women with hypertension, those less than 40 years of age, and non-beneficiaries of military...mls) of ethanol? (This equals 24 ounces of beer or 2 ounces (60 mls) of 100 proof whiskey per day or 0.5 ounces (15 mls) of ethanol per day for women ...deployment of military personnel is inevitable. Healthy Airmen will therefore deploy physically able, fit men and women Hypertension 13 prepared to

  14. Achievement of recommended glucose and blood pressure targets in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in clinical practice – study rationale and protocol of DIALOGUE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with type 2 diabetes have 2–4 times greater risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than those without, and this is even further aggravated if they also suffer from hypertension. Unfortunately, less than one third of hypertensive diabetic patients meet blood pressure targets, and more than half fail to achieve target HbA1c values. Thus, appropriate blood pressure and glucose control are of utmost importance. Since treatment sometimes fails in clinical practice while clinical trials generally suggest good efficacy, data from daily clinical practice, especially with regard to the use of newly developed anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive compounds in unselected patient populations, are essential. The DIALOGUE registry aims to close this important gap by evaluating different treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients with respect to their effectiveness and tolerability and their impact on outcomes. In addition, DIALOGUE is the first registry to determine treatment success based on the new individualized treatment targets recommended by the ADA and the EASD. Methods DIALOGUE is a prospective observational German multicentre registry and will enrol 10,000 patients with both diabetes and hypertension in up to 700 sites. After a baseline visit, further documentations are scheduled at 6, 12 and 24 months. There are two co-primary objectives referring to the most recent guidelines for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension: 1) individual HbA1c goal achievement with respect to anti-diabetic pharmacotherapy and 2) individual blood pressure goal achievement with different antihypertensive treatments. Among the secondary objectives the rate of major cardio-vascular and cerebro-vascular events (MACCE) and the rate of hospitalizations are the most important. Conclusion The registry will be able to gain insights into the reasons for the obvious gap between the demonstrated efficacy and safety of anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive

  15. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Cleroux, J; Feldman, RD; Petrella, RJ

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults. OPTIONS: People may engage in no, sporadic or regular physical activity that may be of low, moderate or vigorous intensity. For sedentary people with hypertension, the options are to undertake or maintain regular physical activity and to avoid or moderate medication use; to use another lifestyle modification technique; to commence or continue antihypertensive medication; or to take no action and remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. OUTCOMES: The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms exercise, exertion, physical activity, hypertension and blood pressure. Both reports of trials and review articles were obtained. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of these articles, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. VALUES: A high value was placed on avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Physical activity of moderate intensity involving rhythmic movements with the lower limbs for 50-60 minutes, 3 or 4 times per week, reduces blood pressure and appears to be more effective than vigorous exercise. Harm is uncommon and is generally restricted to the musculoskeletal injuries that may occur with any repetitive activity. Injury occurs more often with jogging than with walking, cycling or swimming. The costs include the costs of appropriate shoes, garments and equipment, but these were not specifically

  16. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Spence, J. D.; Barnett, P. A.; Linden, W.; Ramsden, V.; Taenzer, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of stress management on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults (except pregnant women). OPTIONS: Alternatives to stress management include other nonpharmacologic interventions and medical therapy; these options are not mutually exclusive. OUTCOMES: The health outcome considered was reduction of blood pressure. There is little evidence to date that stress management prevents death or vascular events. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. EVIDENCE: A systematic search of the literature (which yielded, among other sources, 3 meta-analyses) was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms essential hypertension, treatment, psychological, behavioural, cognitive, relaxation, mediation, biofeedback and stress management. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of the articles identified, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. VALUES: A high value was placed on the avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by uncontrolled hypertension. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The magnitude of the reduction in blood pressure obtained with multicomponent, individualized cognitive behavioural intervention for stress management was comparable in some studies to that obtained with weight loss or drugs; single-component interventions such as biofeedback or relaxation were less effective. The adverse effects of stress-management techniques are minimal, but the cost for effective interventions is substantial, similar initially to drug costs; continuing costs are probably minimal. RECOMMENDATIONS: (1) In patients with hypertension, the contribution of stress should be considered. (2) For hypertensive patients in whom stress

  17. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    PubMed

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-05-04

    To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults. People may engage in no, sporadic or regular physical activity that may be of low, moderate or vigorous intensity. For sedentary people with hypertension, the options are to undertake or maintain regular physical activity and to avoid or moderate medication use; to use another lifestyle modification technique; to commence or continue antihypertensive medication; or to take no action and remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms exercise, exertion, physical activity, hypertension and blood pressure. Both reports of trials and review articles were obtained. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of these articles, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. A high value was placed on avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. Physical activity of moderate intensity involving rhythmic movements with the lower limbs for 50-60 minutes, 3 or 4 times per week, reduces blood pressure and appears to be more effective than vigorous exercise. Harm is uncommon and is generally restricted to the musculoskeletal injuries that may occur with any repetitive activity. Injury occurs more often with jogging than with walking, cycling or swimming. The costs include the costs of appropriate shoes, garments and equipment, but these were not specifically measured. (1) People with mild hypertension should engage in 50-60 minutes

  18. The goal of blood pressure in the hypertensive patient with diabetes is defined: now the challenge is go from recommendations to practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The recent Latin American and European guidelines published this year has proposed as a goal for blood pressure control in patients with diabetes type 2 a value similar or inferior to 140/90 mmHg. High blood pressure is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases and deaths globally. Although once hypertension is detected, 80% of individuals are on a pharmacologic therapy only a minority is controlled. Diabetes also is a risk factor for other serious chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Whether specifically targeting lower fasting glucose levels can reduce cardiovascular outcomes remains unknown. Hypertension is present in 20% to 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes, depending on age, ethnicity, obesity, and the presence of micro or macro albuminuria. High blood pressure substantially increases the risk of both macro and micro vascular complications, doubling the risk of all-cause mortality and stroke, tripling the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastening the progression of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Thus, blood pressure lowering is a major priority in preventing cardiovascular and renal events in patients with diabetes and hypertension. During many years the BP goals recommended in patients with diabetes were more aggressive than in patients without diabetes. As reviewed in this article many clinical trials have demonstrated not only the lack of benefits of lowering the BP below 130/80 mmHg, but also the J-shaped relationship in DM patients. Overall we discuss the importance of define the group of patients in whom significant BP reduction could be particularly dangerous and, on the other hand, those with a high risk of stroke who could benefit most from an intensive hypotensive therapy. In any case, the big challenge now is avoid the therapeutic inertia (leaving diabetic patients with BP values of 140/90 mmHg or higher) at all costs, as this would lead to an unacceptable toll in terms of human lives

  19. Recommendations for utilization of the paracorporeal lung assist device in neonates and young children with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Sweet, Stuart C; Grady, R Mark; Boston, Umar S; Huddleston, Charles B; Hoganson, David M; Shepard, Mark; Raithel, Steve; Mehegan, Mary; Doctor, Allan; Spinella, Philip C; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2016-03-01

    The management of decompensating critically ill children with severe PH is extremely challenging and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Unfortunately, even with optimal care, these children might continue to deteriorate and develop inadequate systemic perfusion and at times cardiac arrest secondary to a pulmonary hypertensive crisis. Tools to support these children are limited, and at times, the team should proceed with offering extracorporeal support, especially in newly diagnosed patients who have not benefitted from medical therapy prior to their acute deterioration, in patients with severe pulmonary venous disease and in patients with alveolar capillary dysplasia. Currently, the only approved mode for extracorporeal support in pediatric patients with PH eligible for lung transplantation is ECMO. To decrease the risks associated with ECMO, and offer potential for increased duration of support, extubation, and rehabilitation, we transitioned four small children with refractory PH from ECMO to a device comprising an oxygenator interposed between the PA and LA. This work describes in great detail our experience with this mode of support with emphasis on exclusion criteria, the implantation procedure, and the post-implantation management.

  20. Standards for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring clinical reporting in daily practice: recommendations from the Italian Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to provide practical indications to healthcare professionals and manufacturers of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) devices on the characteristics and minimum required contents of a standard ABPM report to be used in the clinical practice. Such indications will help make ABPM reports more easily interpretable and independent from the ABPM device and software used. The first important and unavoidable step of ABPM reporting is a quality assessment: if a recording does not meet the minimum requirements for quality criteria, the reporting physician should advise the patient to repeat the test and should not further proceed to a diagnostic evaluation and interpretation of the recording. A basic clinical report must contain the list of each single reading, the graphical display of individual readings and hourly average values, the mean, minimum and maximum values, and SDs of blood pressure and heart rate values for the 24 h, daytime and night-time, day-night differences, and blood pressure loads. The final medical report should be prepared in a quite logically structured way, considering the following: (i) a judgment on the overall quality of the 24 h recording; (ii) an indication of whether average 24 h, daytime and night-time systolic, and diastolic blood pressure values are within or above the normal limits; and (iii) a description of the 24 h pattern of blood pressure fluctuations. A final general statement on the normotensive or hypertensive status and on the degree of blood pressure control in case of treated patients should also be provided.

  1. Adherence to recommended lifestyle modifications and factors associated for hypertensive patients attending chronic follow-up units of selected public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tibebu, Abel; Mengistu, Daniel; Negesa, Lemma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction One of the most prevalent noncommunicable diseases is hypertension (HTN). The availability of effective antihypertensive medications does not result in the expected outcomes in terms of controlling blood pressure. The rationale for these and other findings of uncontrolled HTN points toward poor adherence. The most neglected causes of uncontrolled HTN are unhealthy lifestyles. Few studies have been conducted to show the gap and magnitude of self-management adherence. Objective This study aimed to assess adherence to recommended lifestyle modifications of hypertensive patients undergoing follow-up at chronic follow-up units of public health hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2016. Methods Institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted in four public health hospitals which were selected by drawing lots. Systematic random sampling was used to select study subjects. The results of the descriptive statistics were expressed as percentages and frequencies. Associations between lifestyle modification and independent variables were ana-lyzed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The study was conducted from February 15, 2016 to April 15, 2016. Results The study included 404 respondents with a 97% response rate; 210 (52%) were male and the mean age was 54.00±10.77 years. The respondents’ adherence to lifestyle modifications was 23%. The lifestyle adherence was found to be better in females, patients who had comorbidities, and had been knowledgeable about the disease and was poor among young adult respondents. Conclusion The rates of adherence to lifestyle changes were generally found to be low. Educational sessions that especially focus on lifestyle modifications and ongoing support for patients should be designed and studies which assess all the components of self-management should be conducted for comparison among different subgroups. PMID:28280305

  2. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  3. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double-blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Omboni, Stefano; Malacco, Ettore; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil) with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril), by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (<140/90 mmHg), and for elderly hypertensive patients (<150/90 mmHg). The efficacy of olmesartan was not negatively affected by age, sex, hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65–69 years), in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical practice, providing some hint on the possible different response of elderly hypertensive patients to two different drugs acting on the renin–angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines. PMID:26491273

  4. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double-blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines.

    PubMed

    Omboni, Stefano; Malacco, Ettore; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil) with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril), by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (<140/90 mmHg), and for elderly hypertensive patients (<150/90 mmHg). The efficacy of olmesartan was not negatively affected by age, sex, hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65-69 years), in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical practice, providing some hint on the possible different response of elderly hypertensive patients to two different drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines.

  5. The PREMIER intervention helps participants follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary pattern and the current Dietary Reference Intakes recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hwa; Appel, Lawrence J; Funk, Kristine; Craddick, Shirley; Chen, Chuhe; Elmer, Patricia; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Champagne, Catherine

    2007-09-01

    To examine the influence of the PREMIER study lifestyle interventions on dietary intakes and adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern and the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). An 18-month multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing two multicomponent lifestyle intervention programs to an advice only control group. A total of 810 participants were recruited from local communities and randomized into the study. Individuals were eligible if they were aged 25 years or older, had body mass index between 18.5 and 45.0, not taking antihypertensive medication, and had prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension (systolic blood pressure 120 to 159 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure 80 to 95 mm Hg). The two active intervention programs were a behavioral lifestyle intervention that implements established recommendations, and an established intervention plus the DASH dietary pattern. Both interventions consisted of intensive group and individual counseling sessions. The control group received a brief advice session after randomization and again after 6 months of data collection. Dietary intakes were collected by two random 24-hour recalls at baseline, 6 months, and 18 months. The primary outcome of the PREMIER study was change in systolic blood pressure at 6 months. The main outcomes examined here include dietary variables collected by 24-hour recall at each time point. Nutrient intakes were calculated and compared among the time points and the three intervention groups using mixed models with repeated measures at 6 and 18 months. Proportion of participants who met or achieved the original DASH nutrient intake levels and the DRIs were calculated and compared among the three intervention groups. P<0.01 was considered statistically significant. Participants in both the established intervention and established intervention plus DASH dietary pattern groups substantially reduced energy, total fat, saturated fat, and sodium intake and these

  6. Review of hepatocellular cancer, hypertension and renal impairment as late complications of acute porphyria and recommendations for patient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mary Felicity

    2012-11-01

    This review critically appraises the data emerging from small retrospective and prospective cohort studies suggesting that patients with the autosomal dominant acute porphyrias may be at increased risk of hepatocellular cancer (HCC), hypertension (HT) and renal impairment. The most striking finding is a marked excess risk of HCC in Swedish patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). As Sweden has a relatively high prevalence of AIP due to a founder effect, it is uncertain to what extent the finding is generalisable to other populations or other acute porphyrias and whether early intervention through screening can improve outcomes. As yet there is no evidence for the cost-effectiveness of systematic surveillance for HCC in acute porphyria outside Sweden. Data from several populations also suggest a high prevalence of chronic sustained HT and renal impairment in AIP, but it is uncertain if this represents a true excess risk, in particular for asymptomatic patients. As these long-term complications are important and potentially treatable, a pragmatic recommendation is that symptomatic patients with acute porphyria should be offered specialist long-term follow-up and, for those aged >50 years, annual liver ultrasound may be considered following discussion of the likely risks and benefits. Opportunistic cardiovascular risk assessment can readily be incorporated into a structured annual review so that appropriate drugs safe for use in acute porphyria are prescribed promptly. As these diseases are rare, collaborative international epidemiological studies such as those being coordinated through the European Porphyria Network are essential to inform best clinical practice.

  7. Effects of recommendations to follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet v. usual dietary advice on childhood metabolic syndrome: a randomised cross-over clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Saneei, Parvane; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Rajaei, Somayeh; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    The effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan on childhood metabolic syndrome (MetS) and insulin resistance remain to be determined. The present study aimed to assess the effects of recommendations to follow the DASH diet v. usual dietary advice (UDA) on the MetS and its features in adolescents. In this randomised cross-over clinical trial, sixty post-pubescent adolescent girls with the MetS were randomly assigned to receive either the recommendations to follow the DASH diet or UDA for 6 weeks. After a 4-week washout period, the participants were crossed over to the alternate arm. The DASH group was recommended to consume a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and low in saturated fats, total fats and cholesterol. UDA consisted of general oral advice and written information about healthy food choices based on healthy MyPlate. Compliance was assessed through the quantification of plasma vitamin C levels. In both the groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline and at the end of each phase of the intervention. The mean age and weight of the participants were 14.2 (SD 1.7) years and 69 (SD 14.5) kg, respectively. Their mean BMI and waist circumference were 27.3 kg/m2 and 85.6 cm, respectively. Serum vitamin C levels tended to be higher in the DASH phase than in the UDA phase (860 (SE 104) v. 663 (SE 76) ng/l, respectively, P= 0.06). Changes in weight, waist circumference and BMI were not significantly different between the two intervention phases. Although changes in systolic blood pressure were not statistically significant between the two groups (P= 0.13), recommendations to follow the DASH diet prevented the increase in diastolic blood pressure compared with UDA (P= 0.01). We found a significant within-group decrease in serum insulin levels (101.4 (SE 6.2) v. 90.0 (SE 5.5) pmol/l, respectively, P= 0.04) and a non-significant reduction in the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance

  8. A conversation with Drs. Kaplan and Moser about conflicting data, confusing results, and some recent treatment recommendations for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Post, Wendy; Moser, Marvin; Kaplan, Norman

    2005-10-01

    Following a hypertension symposium in Baltimore, MD, on June 1, 2005, Dr. Wendy Post from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, had the opportunity to interview two of the outstanding hypertension experts in the United States on several controversial issues in hypertension management. Dr. Norman Kaplan is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Southwestern Health Science Center in Dallas, TX, and Dr. Marvin Moser is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Both have been leaders in the field of hypertension treatment and education for more than 40 years. Dr. Kaplan's book Clinical Hypertension has been a standard textbook since 1973 and is now in its ninth edition. Dr. Marvin Moser was the Senior Medical Consultant to the National High Blood Pressure Education Program from 1974 to 2002 and was Chairman of the first Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure and a member of the six subsequent committees. His book Clinical Management of Hypertension is in its seventh edition. Drs. Moser and Kaplan were corecipients of the 2004 International Society of Hypertension Award for Outstanding Contributions to Hypertension Treatment and Education and have lectured extensively throughout the United States and overseas.

  9. Recommendations on the Use of Echocardiography in Adult Hypertension: A Report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE).

    PubMed

    Marwick, Thomas H; Gillebert, Thierry C; Aurigemma, Gerard; Chirinos, Julio; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Galderisi, Maurizio; Gottdiener, John; Haluska, Brian; Ofili, Elizabeth; Segers, Patrick; Senior, Roxy; Tapp, Robyn J; Zamorano, Jose L

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension remains a major contributor to the global burden of disease. The measurement of blood pressure continues to have pitfalls related to both physiological aspects and acute variation. As the left ventricle (LV) remains one of the main target organs of hypertension, and echocardiographic measures of structure and function carry prognostic information in this setting, the development of a consensus position on the use of echocardiography in this setting is important. Recent developments in the assessment of LV hypertrophy and LV systolic and diastolic function have prompted the preparation of this document. The focus of this work is on the cardiovascular responses to hypertension rather than the diagnosis of secondary hypertension. Sections address the pathophysiology of the cardiac and vascular responses to hypertension, measurement of LV mass, geometry, and function, as well as effects of treatment.

  10. [Turkish Hypertension Consensus Report].

    PubMed

    Arıcı, Mustafa; Birdane, Alparslan; Güler, Kerim; Yıldız, Bülent Okan; Altun, Bülent; Ertürk, Şehsuvar; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Özbakkaloğlu, Mert; Ersöz, Halil Önder; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Tükek, Tufan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Erdem, Yunus

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is a common and important public health problem in Turkey and worldwide. Recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension have been presented in many nationally and internationally agreed European and American guidelines. However, there are differences among these guidelines, and some of the recommendations are not consistent with clinical practice in our country. Consensus report preparation, with the participation of relevant associations, was considered necessary to merge recommendations by evaluating hypertension guidelines from the perspective of Turkey and to create a joint approach in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in adults. For this purpose, it was aimed to prepare a practical text in Turkey in which all physicians dealing with hypertensive patients, from family practitioners in primary care to specialists in tertiary care, could come to agreement on common concepts, and which would be used as a basic reference guideline. Considering health care practices and sociocultural structure in Turkey, this report aimed to enhance awareness on hypertension, provide a common basis for different definitions and values as well as therapeutic options in various guidelines, and establish a practical reference guide to improve clinical practices in Turkey. This report is not a document describing hypertension in every aspect, but a reference, including basic recommendations with outlines. Care was taken to ensure that recommendations were evidence-based and valid for a majority of patients in clinical practice. However, it should be kept in mind that an approach assessment should be made on an individual basis for each patient.

  11. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  13. [Hypertension in children and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas, Martín; Mendoza-González, Celso; Méndez, Arturo; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Buendía, Alfonso; Férez-Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus.

  14. A comparison of food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: USDA's MyPyramid, NHLBI's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard's Healthy Eating Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: the US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard University's Healthy Eating Pyramid. Estimates of nutrient values associated with following each of the food guides at the 2,000-calorie level were made using a composite approach. This approach calculates population-weighted nutrient composites for each food group and subgroup, assuming average choices within food groups. Nutrient estimates were compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes and other goals and limits. Recommendations were similar regarding almost all food groups for both the type and amount of foods. Primary differences were seen in the types of vegetables and protein sources recommended and the amount of dairy products and total oil recommended. Overall nutrient values were also similar for most nutrients, except vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium. These food guides were derived from different types of nutrition research, yet they share consistent messages: eat more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; eat less added sugar and saturated fat; and emphasize plant oils.

  15. [2013 Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recommendations for the diagnosis of adult hypertension, assessment of cardiovascular and other hypertension-associated risk, and attainment of therapeutic goals (summary). Joint recommendations from the International Society for Chronobiology (ISC), American Association of Medical Chronobiology and Chronotherapeutics (AAMCC), Spanish Society of Applied Chronobiology, Chronotherapy, and Vascular Risk (SECAC), Spanish Society of Atherosclerosis (SEA), and Romanian Society of Internal Medicine (RSIM)].

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco; Crespo, Juan J; Fabbian, Fabio; Haus, Erhard; Manfredini, Roberto; Mojón, Artemio; Moyá, Ana; Piñeiro, Luis; Ríos, María T; Otero, Alfonso; Balan, Horia; Fernández, José R

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is much greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime office measurements. The 2013 ABPM guidelines specified herein are based on ABPM patient outcomes studies and constitute a substantial revision of current knowledge. The asleep SBP mean and sleep-time relative SBP decline are the most significant predictors of CVD events, both individually as well as jointly when combined with other ABPM-derived prognostic markers. Thus, they should be preferably used to diagnose hypertension and assess CVD and other associated risks. Progressive decrease by therapeutic intervention in the asleep BP mean is the most significant predictor of CVD event-free interval. The 24 h BP mean is not recommended to diagnose hypertension because it disregards the more valuable clinical information pertaining to the features of the 24 h BP pattern. Persons with the same 24 h BP mean may display radically different 24 h BP patterns, ranging from extreme-dipper to riser types, representative of markedly different risk states. Classification of individuals by comparing office with either the 24 h or awake BP mean as "masked normotensives" (elevated clinic BP but normal ABPM), which should replace the terms of "isolated office" or "white-coat hypertension", and "masked hypertensives" (normal clinic BP but elevated ABPM) is misleading and should be avoided because it disregards the clinical significance of the asleep BP mean. Outcome-based ABPM reference thresholds for men, which in the absence of compelling clinical conditions are 135/85 mmHg for the awake and 120/70 mmHg for the asleep SBP/DBP means, are lower by 10/5 mmHg for SBP/DBP in uncomplicated, low-CVD risk, women and lower by 15/10 mmHg for SBP/DBP in male and female high-risk patients, e.g., with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and/or past CVD events. In

  16. Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... on Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents . This final recommendation statement applies to children and ...

  17. [Treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension under the new French hospital financing system. Recommendations of the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Working Group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine].

    PubMed

    Sitbon, O; Humbert, M; Simonneau, G

    2005-11-05

    Activity-based financing (that is, casemix-based hospital payments, known as T2A) is intended to harmonize and improve the fairness of remuneration of public and private hospitals. T2A will ultimately rely mainly on a flat rate per admission, set according to the diagnosis-related group (DRG). Although payment for drugs is usually included in the DRG price, some expensive drugs will be reimbursed on an additional cost basis after implementation of a "best practices" agreement. Four drugs used for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension are eligible for this additional reimbursement: 3 prostacyclin derivatives (intravenous epoprostenol, inhaled iloprost, and subcutaneous treprostinil), and oral bosentan, an endothelin receptor antagonist. The Pulmonary Vascular Diseases working group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine has developed guidelines for the best practices in use of these drugs.

  18. Evaluation of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Gaurav; Baracco, Rossana

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is an important public health problem, and increasingly children are being diagnosed with primary hypertension. As the list of secondary causes of hypertension is extensive, pediatric practitioners increasingly need to decide on investigations needed for evaluating children presenting with high blood pressure. The differentiation between primary and secondary hypertension is paramount to understanding this important health issue, since many forms of secondary hypertension require specific treatment. The review evaluates the current available guidelines and practice patterns for evaluating children with elevated blood pressure. The review also aims to provide a framework for cost-effective evaluation strategies for children with elevated blood pressure based on current recommendations and evidence.

  19. Hypertension in special populations.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2005-07-01

    Hypertension is a multifaceted disease that may present somewhat differently in various populations. It is clear that hypertensive treatment reduces cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular outcomes for all patients, yet recent clinical trial data suggest that some groups may benefit more than others from specific drug intervention. Furthermore, these data justify specific approaches for some special populations. This article reviews important features of the presentation, rationale for treatment, and treatment recommendations for the treatment of hypertension in special populations. The special populations addressed include diabetic patients, the elderly, and women.

  20. Management and treatment of patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension: recommendations from the Department of Veterans Affairs Hepatitis C Resource Center Program and the National Hepatitis C Program.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Lim, Joseph K; Lim, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    Cirrhosis represents the end stage of any chronic liver disease. Hepatitis C and alcohol are currently the main causes of cirrhosis in the United States. Although initially cirrhosis is compensated, it eventually becomes decompensated, as defined by the presence of ascites, variceal hemorrhage, encephalopathy, and/or jaundice. These management recommendations are divided according to the status, compensated or decompensated, of the cirrhotic patient, with a separate section for the screening, diagnosis, and management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as this applies to patients with both compensated and decompensated cirrhosis. In the compensated patient, the main objective is to prevent variceal hemorrhage and any practice that could lead to decompensation. In the decompensated patient, acute variceal hemorrhage and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis are severe complications that require hospitalization. Hepatorenal syndrome is also a severe complication of cirrhosis but one that usually occurs in patients who are already in the hospital and, as it represents an extreme of the hemodynamic alterations that lead to ascites formation, it is placed under treatment of ascites. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of the complications of cirrhosis have allowed for a more rational management of cirrhosis and also for the stratification of patients into different risk groups that require different management. These recommendations are based on evidence in the literature, mainly from randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses of these trials. When few or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and consensus conferences with involvement of recognized experts. A rational management of cirrhosis will result in improvements in quality of life, treatment adherence, and, ultimately, in outcomes.

  1. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  2. Pharmacologic Management of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Misurac, Jason; Nichols, Kristen R; Wilson, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in children is common, and the prevalence of primary hypertension is increasing with the obesity epidemic and changing dietary choices. Careful measurement of blood pressure is important to correctly diagnose hypertension, as many factors can lead to inaccurate blood pressure measurement. Hypertension is diagnosed based on comparison of age-, sex-, and height-based norms with the average systolic and diastolic blood pressures on three separate occasions. In the absence of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD), stage I hypertension is managed first by diet and exercise, with the addition of drug therapy if this fails. First-line treatment of stage I hypertension with TOD and stage II hypertension includes both lifestyle changes and medications. First-line agents include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and calcium-channel blockers. Hypertensive emergency with end-organ effects requires immediate modest blood pressure reduction to alleviate symptoms. This is usually accomplished with IV medications. Long-term reduction in blood pressure to normal levels is accomplished gradually. Specific medication choice for outpatient hypertension management is determined by the underlying cause of hypertension and the comparative adverse effect profiles, along with practical considerations such as cost and frequency of administration. Antihypertensive medication is initiated at a starting dose and can be gradually increased to effect. If ineffective at the recommended maximum dose, an additional medication with a complementary mechanism of action can be added.

  3. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, and Assessment of Risk of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kevin C; Benoit, Geneviève; Dionne, Janis; Feber, Janusz; Cloutier, Lyne; Zarnke, Kelly B; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M; Fournier, Anne

    2016-05-01

    We present the inaugural evidence-based Canadian recommendations for the measurement of blood pressure in children and the diagnosis and evaluation of pediatric hypertension. Rates of pediatric hypertension are increasing concomitant with increased rates of childhood obesity. With this, there is growing awareness of the need to measure blood pressure in children. Consequently, the present recommendations have been developed to address an important gap and improve the clinical care of children. For 2016, a total of 15 recommendations are presented. These are categorized in a fashion similar to that of the existing adult recommendations. Specifically, we present recommendations on (1) accurate measurement of blood pressure in children, (2) criteria for diagnosis of hypertension in children, (3) assessment of overall cardiovascular risk in hypertensive children, (4) routine laboratory tests for the investigation of children with hypertension, (5) ambulatory blood pressure measurement in children, and (6) the role of echocardiography. We discuss the rationale for the recommendations and present additional supporting material for the clinician, including tables with standardized techniques for blood pressure measurement and determination of normative blood pressure values for children. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will update the recommendations annually and develop future evidence-based recommendations to guide prevention and treatment of pediatric hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ESPR uroradiology task force and ESUR paediatric working group: imaging recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part IV: Minutes of the ESPR uroradiology task force mini-symposium on imaging in childhood renal hypertension and imaging of renal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael; Lobo, M L; Papadopoulou, F; Avni, F E; Blickman, J G; Dacher, J N; Damasio, B; Darge, K; Ording-Müller, L S; Vivier, P H; Willi, U

    2011-07-01

    Two new recommendations of the European Society of Radiology task force and the European Society of Uroradiology workgroup on paediatric uroradiology are presented. One deals with diagnostic imaging in children after trauma to the urinary tract-renal trauma, in particular. The other concerns the evaluation of suspected renal hypertension. Available data in the paediatric literature are either unsatisfactory or controversial for both of these clinical settings. Therefore, the following consensus-based proposals aim at outlining effective imaging algorithms to reduce invasive imaging procedures while optimising diagnostic accuracy. The objective of following a more uniform imaging approach is to facilitate future meta-analysis as well as multicentre and other more evidence-based studies. The practise in paediatric radiology is typically based on local availability and on the limitations of professional expertise and equipment, balanced against the perceived needs of the individual child. Although this is unlikely to change in the near future, it does not release the physicians in charge of diagnostic imaging from their responsibility in choosing and providing state-of-the-art imaging and management protocols that are adapted specifically for use in children.

  5. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that affect your kidneys, arteries, heart or endocrine system. Secondary hypertension can also occur during pregnancy. Secondary ... blood pressure, such as kidney, artery, heart or endocrine system problems. Complications Secondary hypertension can worsen the underlying ...

  6. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  7. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Rector's The Kidney . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 48. Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 67. Victor RG. Systemic hypertension: ...

  8. Hypertensive Crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... 18,2017 Know the two types of HBP crisis to watch for A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) ...

  9. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society's consensus conference on the management of mild hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, A G

    1984-01-01

    Since the publication in 1977 of joint recommendations by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, the Canadian Heart Foundation and the Ontario Council of Health on the detection and management of hypertension in Canada, several clinical trials on the efficacy of antihypertensive drug treatment in patients with mild hypertension have been undertaken. The Canadian Hypertension Society (CHS) felt that the results of these trials should be reviewed to determine whether existing recommendations on treatment should be changed. Three expert panels appointed by the CHS reviewed evidence on the clinical efficacy of antihypertensive therapy, the diagnosis of hypertension and the treatment of mild hypertension, and formulated recommendations on the care of mildly hypertensive patients in Canada. A consensus conference of biomedical scientists, practising physicians and government representatives reviewed and reached agreement on the panels' recommendations. The final recommendations of the conference are presented in this report. PMID:6149806

  10. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  11. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)--the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    PubMed

    Malbrain, M L N G; De laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  12. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (iah) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (acs) - the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    PubMed

    Malbrain, M L N G; De Laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  13. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  14. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  15. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, Assessment of Risk, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander A; Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; McBrien, Kerry; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Harris, Kevin C; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force provides annually updated, evidence-based recommendations to guide the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we present 4 new recommendations, as well as revisions to 2 previous recommendations. In the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension, automated office blood pressure, taken without patient-health provider interaction, is now recommended as the preferred method of measuring in-office blood pressure. Also, although a serum lipid panel remains part of the routine laboratory testing for patients with hypertension, fasting and nonfasting collections are now considered acceptable. For individuals with secondary hypertension arising from primary hyperaldosteronism, adrenal vein sampling is recommended for those who are candidates for potential adrenalectomy. With respect to the treatment of hypertension, a new recommendation that has been added is for increasing dietary potassium to reduce blood pressure in those who are not at high risk for hyperkalemia. Furthermore, in selected high-risk patients, intensive blood pressure reduction to a target systolic blood pressure ≤ 120 mm Hg should be considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in hypertensive individuals with uncomplicated, stable angina pectoris, either a β-blocker or calcium channel blocker may be considered for initial therapy. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these recommendations are discussed. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will continue to provide annual updates.

  16. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  17. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  18. Screening for renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, N R; Sfakianakis, G N

    1991-05-01

    The most common curable cause of high blood pressure is renovascular hypertension. Although hypertension is common in the United States, only a minority, approximately 1%, of patients have a renovascular cause. Using clinical criteria, a subgroup of these patients can be selected in which the prevalence of renovascular hypertension will be approximately 15%. In these selected patients, it is appropriate to proceed to a radiographic screening modality to look for a significant renal artery stenosis. The choice of modality should reflect the strengths and expertise of each specific institution. Hypertensive urography is no longer recommended for screening. Excellent results have been reported with intravenous DSRA in institutions where a strong interest in this procedure exists. Furthermore, intravenous DSRA is easily coupled with the collection of renal vein samples for renin assay. Intravenous DSRA, however, has not maintained widespread use. Although the radionuclide renogram is no longer adequate as a radiographic screening tool, stimulation with an ACE inhibitor, such as captopril or enalaprilat, may produce excellent results. In many institutions, this is the most appropriate examination. Furthermore, it is relatively noninvasive. Merely detecting a significant renal artery stenosis does not, however, mean the patient has renovascular hypertension. Both hypertension and a renal artery stenosis may be present and not be causally related. Because renovascular hypertension is, at least initially, renin mediated, the demonstration of increased renin production by the ipsilateral kidney should confirm renovascular hypertension. Prospective application of these results to patients undergoing revascularization techniques, however, has been disappointing. This may be related to problems in patient preparation, sample collection, renin assay, or even the physiology of chronic hypertension, which is incompletely renin mediated. Thus, offering revascularization only to

  19. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  1. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Get the Quick Facts For this topic NOTE: ... at least 6 months) Drinking large amounts of alcohol over a long period of time Portal hypertension ...

  2. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  3. [Hypertension and sports activity].

    PubMed

    Mos, Lucio; Driussi, Caterina; Mihaleje, Martina

    2010-10-01

    The importance of physical activity in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated in many studies. In particular, the effect of exercise, especially aerobioc exercise, is to reduce blood pressure and heart rate by reducing sympathetic tone, and to correct many factors of the metabolic syndrome. Exercise prescription should be based on knowledge of the changes induced by training, but also on risk assessment, both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular, of hypertensive subjects. It is generally accepted that for prevention and treatment of hypertension is useful to perform 3-4 weekly sessions of aerobic exercise for 30-45 min, at 50-70% of maximum working capacity. The recommended activities are walking, running, cycling and programs of mixed aerobic exercise. People with hypertension may follow their own personal inclinations, by choosing a sport and doing it at a competitive level. In hypertensive athletes the eligibility for competitive sports activities implies a careful medical evaluation, according to the recently published Italian COCIS cardiac guidelines.

  4. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  5. Management of severe hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leslie A; Simpson, Lynn L; Rochelson, Burton

    2016-03-01

    While hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death in most of the world, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are the leading cause of maternal mortality in the United States. The opportunity to improve outcomes lies in timely and appropriate response to severe hypertension. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnostic criteria for severe hypertension, choice of antihypertensive agents, and recommended algorithms for evaluation and management of acute changes in clinical status. Adhering to standard practices ensures that care teams can timely and appropriate care to these high risk patients. With heightened surveillance and prompt evaluation of signs and symptoms of worsening hypertension, maternal morbidity and mortality can be decreased.

  6. Hepatitis B and C in pregnancy: a review and recommendations for care

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberg, JC; Berkley, EMF; Thiel, KW; Leslie, KK

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge regarding pregnancy and hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as recent efforts to reduce the rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Maternal infection with either HBV or HCV has been linked to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, including MTCT. MTCT for HBV has been reduced to approximately 5% overall in countries including the US that have instituted postpartum neonatal HBV vaccination and immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin. However, the rate of transmission of HBV to newborns is nearly 30% when maternal HBV levels are greater than 200 000 IU ml−1 (>6 log10 copies ml−1). For these patients, new guidelines from the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) indicate that, in addition to neonatal vaccination and immunoprophylaxis, treating with antiviral agents such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or telbivudine during pregnancy beginning at 32 weeks of gestation is safe and effective in preventing MTCT. In contrast to HBV, no therapeutic agents are yet available or recommended to further decrease the risk of MTCT of HCV, which remains 3 to 10%. HCV MTCT can be minimized by avoiding fetal scalp electrodes and birth trauma whenever possible. Young women with HCV should be referred for treatment post delivery, and neonates should be closely followed to rule out infection. New, better-tolerated treatment regimens for HCV are now available, which should improve outcomes for all infected individuals. PMID:25233195

  7. Hepatitis B and C in pregnancy: a review and recommendations for care.

    PubMed

    Dunkelberg, J C; Berkley, E M F; Thiel, K W; Leslie, K K

    2014-12-01

    Our objective was to provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge regarding pregnancy and hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as recent efforts to reduce the rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Maternal infection with either HBV or HCV has been linked to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, including MTCT. MTCT for HBV has been reduced to approximately 5% overall in countries including the US that have instituted postpartum neonatal HBV vaccination and immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin. However, the rate of transmission of HBV to newborns is nearly 30% when maternal HBV levels are greater than 200 000 IU ml(-1) (>6 log10 copies ml(-1)). For these patients, new guidelines from the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) indicate that, in addition to neonatal vaccination and immunoprophylaxis, treating with antiviral agents such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or telbivudine during pregnancy beginning at 32 weeks of gestation is safe and effective in preventing MTCT. In contrast to HBV, no therapeutic agents are yet available or recommended to further decrease the risk of MTCT of HCV, which remains 3 to 10%. HCV MTCT can be minimized by avoiding fetal scalp electrodes and birth trauma whenever possible. Young women with HCV should be referred for treatment post delivery, and neonates should be closely followed to rule out infection. New, better-tolerated treatment regimens for HCV are now available, which should improve outcomes for all infected individuals.

  8. Management of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Essop, M R; Galie, N; Badesch, D B; Lalloo, U; Mahomed, A G; Naidoo, D P; Ntsekhe, M; Williams, P G

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a potentially lethal disease mainly affecting young females. Although the precise mechanism of PAH is unknown, the past decade has seen the advent of many new classes of drugs with improvement in the overall prognosis of the disease. Unfortunately the therapeutic options for PAH in South Africa are severely limited. The Working Group on PAH is a joint effort by the South African Heart Association and the South African Thoracic Society tasked with improving the recognition and management of patients with PAH. This article provides a brief summary of the disease and the recommendations of the first meeting of the Working Group.

  9. Assessing healthcare professional knowledge, attitudes, and practices on hypertension management. Announcing a new World Hypertension League resource.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norm R C; Dashdorj, Naranjargal; Baatarsuren, Uurtsaikh; Myanganbayar, Maral; Dashtseren, Myagmartseren; Unurjargal, Tsolmon; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo; Beheiry, Hind Mamoun; Mohan, Sailesh; Almustafa, Bader; Niebylski, Mark; Lackland, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    To assist hypertension control programs and specifically the development of training and education programs on hypertension for healthcare professionals, the World Hypertension League has developed a resource to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices on hypertension management. The resource assesses: (1) the importance of hypertension as a clinical and public health risk; (2) education in national or international hypertension recommendations; (3) lifestyle causes of hypertension; (4) measurement of blood pressure, screening, and diagnosis of hypertension; (5) lifestyle therapy counseling; (6) cardiovascular risk assessment; (7) antihypertensive drug therapy; and (8) adherence to therapy. In addition, the resource assesses the attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals for task sharing/shifting, use of care algorithms, and use of registries with performance reporting functions. The resource is designed to help support the Global Hearts Alliance to provide standardized and enhanced hypertension control globally. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hypertension in children: approach to management.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension in children is an important often under diagnosed condition. There are no absolute values of normal blood pressure in children as it varies with age, gender and height. Normative blood pressure data is available for different ages, sexes and heights, the diagnosis of hypertension should be based on these values. It is recommended that all children over the age of 3 years should have blood pressure measured whenever seen by a doctor. Essential hypertension can occur in children, but hypertension secondary to an underlying cause (most often renal) is more likely. Secondary hypertension tends to be more severe, sustained and at times uncontrolled. Evaluation includes a thorough history and physical examination and certain basic laboratory tests. All attempts should be made to look for the etiology in cases where secondary hypertension is suspected. Management of hypertension in children must incorporate non pharamacological measures including weight reduction, exercise and dietary modifications. Pharamacological treatment is indicated for; a) symptomatic hypertension, b) if there is evidence of end organ damage and c) for those unresponsive to nonpharmacological treatment. A number of drugs are available for children with hypertension; commonly used ones are calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics. Choice of a drug depends on the underlying cause of hypertension and presence of comorbidity, if any.

  11. [Arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1993-07-01

    It is considered hypertension in children, the persistent increase of the blood pressure values above percentile 95 for age and sex, in no less than three determinations, with adequate register techniques. Blood pressure is maintained mainly by the regulation of metabolism of sodium and water in the intravascular space, through the adequate balance of intake, filtration, reabsorption and renal throughout. It is also regulated by hormonal factors. Weight gain control in teen-agers could be useful to prevent high blood pressure in adults. In children, it is generally secondary to renal, reno-vascular, endocrinological or tumoral diseases. Clinical manifestations and the recommended diagnostic procedures are analysed to detect the most frequent causes of hypertension at different ages. Most cases response with antihypertensive drugs in combination with hyposodic diet. For the hypertensive crisis, asa diuretics and powerful antihypertensive drugs may be employed. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency could also need dialytic treatments. Renovascular diseases require almost always invasive treatments. Better prognosis in children with severe high blood pressure is related with recent diagnostic procedures, surgical techniques and antihypertensive drugs improvements.

  12. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  13. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  14. Diagnostic status of hypertension on the adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Andrade, Flavia C D

    2016-12-01

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is a widely recommended diet for individuals with hypertension. Adherence to the DASH diet has been shown to be effective for controlling hypertension, but it is unclear whether a hypertension diagnosis has an impact on adherence to the diet and nutrient intake. This study examined the association between hypertension diagnosis and the DASH nutrient intake using the multivariate linear regression method. The sample was composed of individuals with hypertension in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2007 to 2012. The outcome was the DASH accordance score (0 to 9 points), which measures the intake of nine nutrients compared to target amounts. Study findings indicate that a diagnostic status of hypertension was associated with increased consumption of sodium, saturated fat, total fat, and protein. Adherence to the DASH diet was more likely to be associated with health conditions such as obesity and heart diseases and lifestyle behaviors such as current smoking status and physical activity. Individuals diagnosed with hypertension showed less adherence to the DASH diet than those not diagnosed with hypertension, so a diagnosis of hypertension did not seem to provide an incentive to engage in healthy dietary behavior. Overall, regardless of diagnostic status, individuals with hypertension did not seem to follow the DASH guidelines.

  15. Resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonpharmacologic strategies for managing hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randy; Aukerman, Glen

    2006-06-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends lifestyle modification for all patients with hypertension or prehypertension. Modifications include reducing dietary sodium to less than 2.4 g per day; increasing exercise to at least 30 minutes per day, four days per week; limiting alcohol consumption to two drinks or less per day for men and one drink or less per day for women; following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (high in fruits, vegetables, potassium, calcium, and magnesium; low in fat and salt); and achieving a weight loss goal of 10 lb (4.5 kg) or more. Alternative treatments such as vitamin C, coenzyme Q10, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids have been suggested for managing hypertension, but evidence for their effectiveness is lacking.

  17. Physical Activity and the Prevention of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Keith M.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2013-01-01

    As the worldwide prevalence of hypertension continues to increase, the primary prevention of hypertension has become an important global public health initiative. Physical activity is commonly recommended as an important lifestyle modification that may aid in the prevention of hypertension. Recent epidemiologic evidence has demonstrated a consistent, temporal, and dose-dependent relationship between physical activity and the development of hypertension. Experimental evidence from interventional studies have further confirmed a relationship between physical activity and hypertension as the favorable effects of exercise on blood pressure reduction have been well characterized in recent years. Despite the available evidence strongly supporting a role for physical activity in the prevention of hypertension, many unanswered questions regarding the protective benefits of physical activity in high-risk individuals, the factors that may moderate the relationship between physical activity and hypertension, and the optimal prescription for hypertension prevention remain. We review the most recent evidence for the role of physical activity in the prevention of hypertension and discuss recent studies that have sought to address these unanswered questions. PMID:24052212

  18. Drug-induced hypertension: an unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-01-01

    A myriad variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce either a transient or persistent increase in blood pressure, or interfere with the blood pressure-lowering effects of antihypertensive drugs. Some agents cause either sodium retention or extracellular volume expansion, or activate directly or indirectly the sympathetic nervous system. Other substances act directly on arteriolar smooth muscle or do not have a defined mechanism of action. Some medications that usually lower blood pressure may paradoxically increase blood pressure, or an increase in pressure may be encountered after their discontinuation. In general, drug-induced pressure increases are small and transient: however, severe hypertension involving encephalopathy, stroke, and irreversible renal failure have been reported. The deleterious effect of therapeutic agents is more pronounced in patients with preexisting hypertension, in those with renal failure, and in the elderly. Careful evaluation of a patient's drug regimen may identify chemically induced hypertension and obviate unnecessary evaluation and facilitate antihypertensive therapy. Once chemical-induced hypertension has been identified, discontinuation of the causative agent is recommended, although hypertension can often be managed by specific therapy and dose adjustment if continued use of the offending agent is mandatory. The present review summarizes the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypertension in children and adolescents: an approach to management of complex hyper-tension in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Kevin; Falkner, Bonita

    2009-10-01

    Although primary (essential) hypertension is detectable in childhood, secondary causes of hypertension must be considered in evaluating and managing hypertension in children and adolescents. Very young children and children with severe hypertension may have an underlying cause of the hypertension. Interventions to control elevated blood pressure (BP) are clinically important for all children with high BP. Nonpharmacologic approaches are recommended for all asymptomatic children with hypertension and prehypertension. Some children and adolescents will require pharmacologic therapy to control BP and to optimize organ protection. Recent advancements in pediatric clinical trials of antihypertensive agents have provided data on BP-lowering effects and safety in children. Little has been published on the choice and use of various classes of antihypertensive drugs for management of secondary hypertension in children and adolescents. This review focuses on the clinical management of specific types of secondary hypertension in pediatric patients.

  1. Detailed recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The recommendations which have resulted from this workshop have come from several sources, including most importantly the break-out sessions, but also from discussions with other leaders in the field, some www discussions, and least of all the organization committee of the workshop. They may be divided into three sections, the ones which need immediate attention or should happen before the bulk of activities can take place, the priority items that will form the bulk of future research activities, and the important continuing items, that are ancillary to the main objective but help to nurture the field.

  2. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary hypertension usually limit a person’s ability to exercise and do other activities. CausesWhat causes pulmonary hypertension?Many things can cause pulmonary hypertension. However, sometimes ...

  4. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Savale, Laurent; Sattler, Caroline; Sitbon, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is defined by the combination of portal hypertension and precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP < 15 mmHg and PVR > 3 Wood units). PoPH is characterised by pathobiological mechanisms that are similar to other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prevalence of PoPH is estimated at 0.5-5% among patients with portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis. Treatment strategies most commonly employed for PoPH patients are based on recommendations for idiopathic PAH management. Indeed, the choice of specific PAH treatment must take account the severity of the underlying liver disease. Prognosis of PoPH patients is dependent on both the severity of PAH and of the underlying liver disease. PoPH may be a contraindication for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) if mean pulmonary arterial pressure is > 35 mmHg associated with severe right ventricular dysfunction or high level of pulmonary vascular resistance (> 3-4 Wood units). Bridge therapy with specific PAH therapies should be considered in those patients in an attempt to improve pulmonary hemodynamic and thereby allow OLT with acceptable risk. Recent data suggest that stabilize, improve or cure PoPH seems to be possible by combining specific PAH therapies and liver transplantation in selected patients. Clinical and experimental evidences suggest that IFN therapy may be a possible risk factor for PAH.

  6. Hypertension prevention beliefs of Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Aroian, Karen J; Peters, Rosalind M; Rudner, Nancy; Waser, Lynn

    2012-04-01

    This qualitative study used focus group methodology to explore attitudes and beliefs of Hispanics regarding hypertension prevention behaviors. The sample was composed of 17 participants from varied Hispanic backgrounds. The theory of planned behavior guided interview questions. Analysis indicated that participants were knowledgeable about and had a positive attitude toward preventing hypertension. However, they identified numerous barriers to preventive behaviors. Two key themes, limited resources (e.g., no time to prepare healthy meals or exercise) and cultural expectations and values (e.g., traditional food as a marker of ethnicity, hospitality, and affection; valuing social interaction over solitary exercise) summarized significant barriers to engaging in recommended preventive behaviors. Findings suggest that literature about lack of knowledge about hypertension prevention in Hispanics may be outdated or not applicable to many Hispanics. Select resource and cultural barriers to engaging in hypertension prevention behaviors are important areas to target. Exercise, stress reduction, and diet modification strategies for hypertension prevention among Hispanics should be consistent with the cultural norms regarding the importance of social interactions and leisure.

  7. Treating Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schlembach, Dietmar; Homuth, Volker; Dechend, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is present in about 10 % of all pregnancies. The frequency of chronic hypertension and that of gestational hypertension is increasing. The management of pregnant women with hypertension remains a significant, but controversial, public health problem. Although treatment of hypertension in pregnancy has shown to reduce maternal target organ damage, considerable debate remains concerning treatment. We review current evidence regarding treatment goals, the ideal treatment starting time, and which drugs are available for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  8. Essential hypertension vs. secondary hypertension among children.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E; Barratt, Michelle S; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Milewicz, Diane M; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents") from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3-17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08-19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Lifestyle Modifications to Prevent and Control Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Samadian, Fariba; Dalili, Nooshin; Jamalian, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is the most important, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. High salt intake may predispose children to develop hypertension later. A modest reduction in population salt intake worldwide would result in a major improvement in public health. Regarding smoking as another risk factor, there are various strategies that can be used to promote smoking cessation. Physicians are in an excellent position to help their patients stop smoking. Targeted weight loss interventions in population subgroups might be more effective for the prevention of hypertension than a general-population approach. A diet rich in high-potassium fruit and vegetables is strongly recommended. Fresh products are best; normal potassium content is reduced when foods are canned or frozen. Calcium supplementation reduces blood pressure in hypertensive individuals during chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition and high calcium diet enhances vasorelaxation in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension. Magnesium should be considered by anyone seeking to prevent or treat high blood pressure. The foundation for a healthy blood pressure consists of a healthy diet, adequate exercise, stress reduction, and sufficient amounts of potassium and magnesium, but further investigations are required before making definitive therapeutic recommendations on magnesium use. Alcohol usage is a more frequent contributor to hypertension than is generally appreciated. For hypertensive patients in whom stress appears to be an important issue, stress management should be considered as an intervention. Individualized cognitive behavioral interventions are more likely to be effective than single-component interventions.

  10. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  11. Oxidative Stress Marker and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Draganovic, Dragica; Lucic, Nenad; Jojic, Dragica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. Hence, research and test of role and significance of oxidative stress in hypertensive disturbance in pregnancy is very important. Aim: Aims of this research were to determine a level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as oxidative stress marker in blood of pregnant woman with pregnancy induced hypertension and to analyze correlation of TBARS values with blood pressure values in pregnancy induced hypertensive pregnant women. Patients and methods: Research has been performed at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Clinical Centre in the Republic of Srpska. It covered 100 pregnant women with hypertension and 100 healthy pregnant women of gestation period from 28 to 40 weeks. Level of TBARS is determined as an equivalent of malondialdehyde standard, in accordance with recommendations by producer (Oxi Select TBARS Analisa Kit). Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. All pregnant women experiencing hypertension had increased TBARS values in medium value interval over 20 µmol, 66%, whereas in group of healthy pregnant women, only 1% experienced increased TBARS value. Pregnant women with difficult preeclampsia (32%) had high TBARS values, over 40 µmol, and with mild PIH, only 4.9% pregnant women. Conclusion: Pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension have extremely increased degree of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. TBARS values are in positive correlation with blood pressure values, respectively the highest TBARS value were present in pregnant women with the highest blood pressure values. PMID:28210016

  12. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that “the lower, the better” for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended

  13. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that "the lower, the better" for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended BP

  14. An approach to the young hypertensive patient.

    PubMed

    Mangena, P; Saban, S; Hlabyago, K E; Rayner, B

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of death worldwide. Globally and locally there has been an increase in hypertension in children, adolescents and young adults<40 years of age. In South Africa, the first decade of the millennium saw a doubling of the prevalence rate among adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years. This increase suggests that an explosion of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease can be expected in the forthcoming decades. A large part of the increased prevalence can be attributed to lifestyle factors such as diet and physical inactivity, which lead to overweight and obesity. The majority (>90%) of young patients will have essential or primary hypertension, while only a minority (<10%) will have secondary hypertension. We do not recommend an extensive workup for all newly diagnosed young hypertensives, as has been the practice in the past. We propose a rational approach that comprises a history to identify risk factors, an examination that establishes the presence of target-organ damage and identifies clues suggesting secondary hypertension, and a limited set of basic investigations. More specialised tests should be performed only where there is a clinical suspicion that a secondary cause for hypertension exists. There have been no randomised clinical trials on the treatment of hypertension in young patients. Expert opinion advises an initial emphasis on lifestyle modification. This can comprise a diet with reduced salt and refined carbohydrate intake, an exercise programme and management of substance abuse issues. Failure of lifestyle measures or the presence of target-organ damage should prompt the clinician to initiate pharmacotherapy. We recommend referral to a specialist practitioner in cases of resistant hypertension, where there is severe target-organ damage and when a secondary cause is suspected.

  15. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  16. [Management of severe arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Leeman, M

    2015-09-01

    Severe arterial hypertension is defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥180 mmHg and/or a diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Initial assessment is to identify acute, ongoing, target-organ damage such as pulmonary edema, aortic dissection, ... (hypertensive emergency). If so, the patient requires urgent and specific management in a hospital setting. More commonly, however, BP in the severe range is relatively asymptomatic and not associated with end-organ damage (hypertensive urgency). Management can usually be carried out in the ambulatory setting. Severe hypertension should first be confirmed after a period of rest in a quiet room. If BP remains in the severe range, an antihypertensive drug can be initiated. Otherwise, the patient should be referred for further evaluation within a few days ; however, an antihypertensive treatment could be started immediately if there is concern that urgent outpatient follow-up cannot be ensured or if the patient is at high cardiovascular risk. The choice of the first drug should be tailored according to associated conditions and possible contraindications. Some guidelines recommend starting therapy with an antihypertensive combination of two drugs. In all cases, rapid and excessive reduction in BP, which could compromise organ perfusion, must be avoided, especially in elderly patients. In the short-term (days), BP should be progressively lowered to < 160/100 mmHg. In the long term, a BP < 140/90 mmHg should be obtained.

  17. [Hypertensive crisis: urgency and hypertensive emergency].

    PubMed

    Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Doménech Feria-Carot, Mónica; Morales Salinas, Alberto; Coca Payeras, Antonia

    2016-11-18

    Hypertensive crises lumped several clinical situations with different seriousness and prognosis. The differences between hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depends on if this situation involves a vital risk for the patient. This risk is defined more by the severity of the organ damage than for the higher values of blood pressure. The hypertensive urgency not involves an immediately risk for the patient, for these reason, the treatment can be completed after discharged. Otherwise, the hypertensive emergency is a critical clinical condition that requires hospital assistance. Faced with a patient, with severe hypertension, asymptomatic or with unspecific symptoms we must be careful. First, we need to confirm the values of blood pressure, with several measures of blood pressure and investigate and treat factors, which triggered this situation. The objective of medical treatment for hypertensive urgency is to reduce blood pressure values (at least 20% of baseline values) but to avoid sudden reduction of these values. In hypertensive urgencies rapid acting drug should not be used because of the risk of ischemic stroke and use drugs with longer half-life. The cardiovascular risk of these patients is higher than that do not suffer hypertensive crisis. The treatment must be personalized in each hypertensive emergency and intravenous it’s the best route to treat these patients.

  18. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Phan, David Giang; Dreyfuss-Tubiana, Céline; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disease, the most common chronic disease. Hypertensive emergency is much less frequent and only affects 1 to 2 % of all hypertensive patients. The true hypertensive emergency is characterized by the serious damage of one hypertensive target organ and requires an urgent intravenous treatment. Isolated blood pressure elevation should not be regarded as a hypertensive emergency if there is no target organ damage, even if the blood pressure is very high. These situations of "false hypertensive emergency", or hypertensive urgencies, often requires an immediate treatment, but oral. Signs of visceral pain of true hypertensive emergency often are a poor general condition, severe headache, decreased visual acuity, neurological deficit of ischemic or hemorrhagic cause, confusion, dyspnea with orthopnoea revealing heart failure, angina, chest pain revealing an aortic dissection, proteinuria, acute renal failure or eclampsia. True hypertensive emergencies include several entities, namely: severe hypertension, malignant hypertension and accelerated hypertension. If malignant hypertension is not treated, the prognosis is poor with 50 % death risk in the following year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypertension and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda; Parto, Parham; Krim, Selim R

    2016-07-01

    Despite its continued increase in prevalence in minorities, data regarding hypertension (HTN) control among such ethnic groups remains limited. This review highlights the most recent literature on the epidemiology, prevalence, and treatment strategies of HTN among four racial groups (non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians). Overall awareness and treatment of HTN were found to be higher in blacks when compared with NHWs. Access to health insurance is associated with successful HTN control, particularly among the Hispanic populations. Recent data from SBP Intervention Trial suggests the blood pressure control and adherence rates in blacks were highest among men, with a higher number of comorbidities, and on diuretic therapy. Additionally, the initiation of thiazide-type diuretics and calcium channel blocker was superior to β-adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers in blood pressure lowering among blacks. However, no specific treatment recommendations exist for Hispanics or Asians. Finally, recent guidelines from the Joint National Commission recommend initial treatment with a thiazide-type diuretic regardless of race. Despite recent progress, racial disparities in awareness and treatment of HTN continue to exist. To reduce this important gap, future research should focus on epidemiologic, genetic, and sociologic factors as well as specific therapies to achieve maximum medical benefit in these subgroups.

  20. Resistant hypertension and the Birmingham Hypertension Square.

    PubMed

    Felmeden, D C; Lip, G Y

    2001-06-01

    Recent guidelines for the treatment of hypertension place great emphasis on tighter blood pressure control, especially in the presence of hypertensive target organ damage and diabetes. In order to achieve these treatment targets, more patients will require a combination of antihypertensive medications. However, resistant hypertension may have many possible underlying causes, and clinicians should appreciate how to detect and tackle these potential problems. Effective and synergistic combinations are therefore of vital importance, especially in patients with resistant hypertension. The choice of rational first- and second-line drugs that act in synergy could lead to better blood pressure management as well as significant financial savings for health care resources. The use of the Birmingham Hypertension Square for the optimum choice of add-in drugs for the treatment of resistant hypertension may aid management.

  1. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M

    2014-07-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

  2. Combination therapy in hypertension: an Asia-Pacific consensus viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid; Reyes, Eugenio B; Sritara, Piyamitr; Pancholia, Arvind; Van Phuoc, Dang; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension incurs a significant healthcare burden in Asia-Pacific countries, which have suboptimal rates of blood pressure (BP) treatment and control. A consensus meeting of hypertension experts from the Asia-Pacific region convened in Hanoi, Vietnam, in April 2013. The principal objectives were to discuss the growing problem of hypertension in the Asia-Pacific region, and to develop consensus recommendations to promote standards of care across the region. A particular focus was recommendations for combination therapy, since it is known that most patients with hypertension will require two or more antihypertensive drugs to achieve BP control, and also that combinations of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action achieve BP targets more effectively than monotherapy. The expert panel reviewed guidelines for hypertension management from the USA and Europe, as well as individual Asia-Pacific countries, and devised a treatment matrix/guide, in which they propose the preferred combination therapy regimens for patients with hypertension, both with and without compelling indications. This report summarizes key recommendations from the group, including recommended antihypertensive combinations for specific patient populations. These strategies generally entail initiating therapy with free drug combinations, starting with the lowest available dosage, followed by treatment with single-pill combinations once the BP target has been achieved. A single reference for the whole Asia-Pacific region may contribute to increased consistency of treatment and greater proportions of patients achieving BP control, and hence reducing hypertension-related morbidity and mortality.

  3. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Venous Hypertension: Epidemiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Craig B; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common form of PH, defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≥15 mm Hg. PH-LHD development is associated with more severe left-sided disease and its presence portends a poor prognosis, particularly once right ventricular failure develops. Treatment remains focused on the underlying LHD and despite initial enthusiasm for PH-specific therapies, most studies have been disappointing and their routine clinical use cannot be recommended. More work is urgently needed to better understand the pathophysiology underlying this disease and to develop effective therapeutic strategies.

  4. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests. Once you have a diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, exercise testing can help your doctor determine its severity. ... so the doctor can rate your activity level. Exercise testing may be ongoing ... hypertension The World Health Organization has established five groups ...

  5. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  6. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no ... seek care right away. Emotional Issues and Support Living with PH may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and ...

  7. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with headache and extreme hypertension. Computed tomography showed diffuse brain stem hypodensity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse brain stem vasogenic edema. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hypertensive encephalopathy, which classically occurs at parietooccipital white matter. Because of its atypical location, the diagnosis can be challenging. Moreover, the coexistence of hypertension and brain stem edema could also direct clinicians toward a diagnosis of ischemic infarction, leading to a completely contradictory treatment goal.

  8. An evidence-based practice case study: white coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Mary Ellis

    2015-01-01

    White coat hypertension, also referred to as isolated clinical hypertension, is a condition in which blood pressure rises in the medical setting due to anxiety. White coat hypertension causes no more than 15 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure or 7 mmHg increase in diastolic blood pressure in normotensive patients, and these increases in blood pressures should return to baseline within 3 visits to the medical provider. In this case, a 77-year-old white man presented to preoperative testing, with a blood pressure of 265/101 mmHg, claiming to have white coat hypertension. This case discusses the interventions implemented for this particular patient and the misdiagnosis and misperceptions of white coat hypertension by both clinicians and patients. This article also addresses recommendations for diagnosis, treatment options, and follow-up for patients with true white coat hypertension.

  9. Economics of hypertension control. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key aspects of the problem of estimating the economic burden of hypertension and hypertension-related disease, the use of economic models, and the opportunities for containing the costs. More information is needed on the population-attributable risk of hypertension in various countries, which is indispensable to estimate the part of hypertension in the burden of stroke and heart disease. The population and high-risk approaches to hypertension control also have economic consequences, which may vary in different societies and must be assessed to ensure proper allocation of resources. Cost-containment can be achieved by more selective diagnostic investigations and by opting for cheaper drugs, though the choice of treatment is difficult owing to uncertainties in the quality-of-life estimates. PMID:7554012

  10. DEPRESSION IN HYPERTENSIVE SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V.; Parikh, G.J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY 168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed. The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level. Further hypertensives were classified into: 1. Hypertension without organ involvement 2. Hypertension with LVH only 3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement 4. Malignant hypertension Depression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  11. Hypertension in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tibazarwa, Kemi B; Damasceno, Albertino A

    2014-05-01

    The past 2 decades have seen a considerable global increase in cardiovascular disease, with hypertension remaining by far the most common. More than one-third of adults in Africa are hypertensive; as in the urban populations of most developing countries. Being a condition that occurs with relatively few symptoms, hypertension remains underdetected in many countries; especially in developing countries where routine screening at any point of health care is grossly underutilized. Because hypertension is directly related to cardiovascular disease, this has led to hypertension being the leading cause of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as a result of patients living, often unknowingly, with uncontrolled hypertension for prolonged periods of time. In Africa, hypertension is the leading cause of heart failure; whereas at global levels, hypertension is responsible for more than half of deaths from stroke, just less than half of deaths from coronary artery disease, and for more than one-tenth of all global deaths. In this review, we discuss the escalating occurrence of hypertension in developing countries, before exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different measures to control hypertension, and the challenges of adopting these measures in developing countries. On a broad level, these include steps to curb the ripple effect of urbanization on the health and disease profile of developing societies, and suggestions to improve loopholes in various aspects of health care delivery that affect surveillance and management of hypertension. Furthermore, we consider how the industrial sectors' contributions toward the burden of hypertension can also be the source of the solution.

  12. [Guidelines for the management of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Prieto-Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2014-09-01

    In the last year, several scientific societies have published guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. In Spain, two clinical practice guidelines have had a strong impact and have been closely followed in the last few years: the first is the Guideline of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, although their last report (JNC 7) was published in 2003; the second is the clinical practice guideline for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH), whose latest version was published in 2007, although an update was published in 2009. A new ESC/ESH document, published in 2013, adopts a mainly educational stance, closely rooted in clinical practice. Many of the recommendations maintain the same criteria as previous guidelines. However, the new publication shows greater rigor and contains major contributions such as specification of the level of evidence and grade of recommendation for each recommendation, which was lacking in the previous guidelines of these societies. The document is both practical and easy to consult, consisting of 17 tables, 5 figures and 18 blocks of recommendations. The JNC 8 report, however, has a single objective: to respond to three questions that are considered a priority and which refer exclusively to drug therapy. Nine recommendations are made relating to these three questions.

  13. South African hypertension practice guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Seedat, YK; Rayner, BL; Veriava, Yosuf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes Extensive data from many randomised, controlled trials have shown the benefit of treating hypertension (HTN). The target blood pressure (BP) for antihypertensive management is systolic < 140 mmHg and diastolic < 90 mmHg, with minimal or no drug side effects. Lower targets are no longer recommended. The reduction of BP in the elderly should be achieved gradually over one month. Co-existent cardiovascular (CV) risk factors should also be controlled. Benefits Reduction in risk of stroke, cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. Recommendations Correct BP measurement procedure is described. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors and recommendations for antihypertensive therapy are stipulated. Lifestyle modification and patient education are cornerstones of management. The major indications, precautions and contra-indications are listed for each antihypertensive drug recommended. Drug therapy for the patient with uncomplicated HTN is either mono- or combination therapy with a low-dose diuretic, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and an ACE inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). Combination therapy should be considered ab initio if the BP is ≥ 160/100 mmHg. In black patients, either a diuretic and/or a CCB is recommended initially because the response rate is better compared to an ACEI. In resistant hypertension, add an alpha-blocker, spironolactone, vasodilator or β-blocker. Validity The guideline was developed by the Southern African Hypertension Society 2014©. PMID:25629715

  14. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort.

  15. Dietary sodium intake among Canadian adults with and without hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; de Groh, M; Morrison, H; Robinson, C; Vardy, L

    2011-03-01

    Almost 30% of hypertension among Canadians may be attributed to excess dietary sodium. We examined the average sodium intake of Canadians aged 30 years and over, with and without hypertension, by age, sex and diabetes status using 24-hour recall data from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, Nutrition. We compared absolute (crude) average sodium intake levels of those with and without hypertension to the 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) guidelines and adjusted average sodium intake between those with and without hypertension. Both those with and without diagnosed hypertension display average sodium intakes well above the 1500 mg/day recommended by the 2009 CHEP guidelines (2950 mg/day and 3175 mg/day, respectively). After confounding adjustment, those with hypertension have significantly higher average sodium intake (p = .0124). Stratified subgroup analyses found the average sodium intake among those with hypertension was higher for men between 30 and 49 years old (p = .0265), women between 50 and 69 years old (p = .0083) and those without diabetes (p = .0071) when compared to their counterparts without hypertension. Better approaches are needed to reduce sodium intake in hypertension patients, as well as the general population.

  16. Non-drug therapy in prevention and control of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sainani, G S

    2003-10-01

    Non-drug therapy is a very vital aspect in prevention and treatment of hypertension. The successive reports of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertension, WHO scientific report on primary prevention of essential hypertension and national High Blood Pressure Education Program's working groups report on primary prevention of hypertension have stressed on the non-drug therapy. Today a busy family physician does not spend enough time to explain to the patient various dietary and lifestyle modifications but straightaway prescribes the drugs. Every patient of hypertension from the stage of pre-hypertension to grade 2 hypertension should follow non-drug therapy. If non-drug therapy is strictly adhered, one can prevent cases of pre-hypertension from progressing to hypertension stage and one can reduce or stop the medications in Grade I (mild) hypertension. We have discussed the role of low salt, high potassium diet, role of caffeine intake, calcium and magnesium supplements, fish oil intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, role of physical exercise, stress reduction and bio-feedback, yoga, meditation and acupuncture. These recommendations regarding diet and lifestyle modifications should be targeted to population at large through public health authorities, non-government organisations and news media.

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hypertension in Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    von Drygalski, Annette; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; Bettencourt, Ricki; Bergstrom, Jaclyn; Kruse-Jarres, R; Quon, Doris VK; Wassel, Christina; Li, Ming C; Waalen, Jill; Elias, Darlene J; Mosnier, Laurent O; Allison, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage. We therefore investigated the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension in adult patients with hemophilia (PWH). PWH ≥18 years (n=458) from 3 geographically different cohorts in the United States were evaluated retrospectively for hypertension and risk factors. Results were compared to the nationally representative sample provided by the contemporary National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). PWH had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to NHANES. Overall, the prevalence of hypertension was 49.1% in PWH compared to 31.7 % in NHANES. At ages 18–44, 45–64, 65–74, and ≥ 75 the prevalence of hypertension for PWH was 31.8%, 72.6%, 89.7%, and 100.0% compared to 12.5%, 41.2%, 64.1%, and 71.7% in NHANES, respectively. Of treated hypertensive PWH, only 27.1% were controlled, compared to 47.7% in NHANES (all p-values <0.05). Age, body mass index, diabetes and renal function were independently associated with hypertension. Among patients with moderate or severe hemophilia there was a trend (~ 1.5-fold) for higher odds of having hypertension compared to patients with mild hemophilia. Based on these results, new care models for adult PWH and further studies for the etiology of hypertension in hemophilia are recommended. PMID:23630949

  18. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  19. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Chiara; Modena, Maria Grazia

    2011-03-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic disease in industrialized countries and represents the most common major cardiovascular risk factor after the fifth decade of life in both men and women. The prevalence of hypertension is lower in premenopausal women than men, whereas in postmenopausal women it is higher than in men. Mechanisms responsible for the increase in blood pressure are complex and multifactorial, including loss of estrogen, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, modification in renin-angiotensin system spillover and sympathetic activation. In addition, postmenopausal hypertension can be considered an isolated disease, more typical of elderly women, or part of the metabolic syndrome, which is indeed more common in early postmenopausal women. In particular, metabolic syndrome may be considered a potentially unfavourable prognostic factor in hypertensive postmenopausal women, because it seems to worsen the severity of hypertension and reduce the capacity to respond to specific treatments. This article summarizes the different causes of postmenopausal hypertension and the specific treatment recommended by guidelines for this condition.

  20. Metabolomics in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Sonja B; Sharman, James E; Adams, Murray J; Edwards, Lindsay M

    2014-06-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent chronic medical condition and a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In the majority of hypertensive cases, the underlying cause of hypertension cannot be easily identified because of the heterogeneous, polygenic and multi-factorial nature of hypertension. Metabolomics is a relatively new field of research that has been used to evaluate metabolic perturbations associated with disease, identify disease biomarkers and to both assess and predict drug safety and efficacy. Metabolomics has been increasingly used to characterize risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypertension, and it appears to have significant potential for uncovering mechanisms of this complex disease. This review details the analytical techniques, pre-analytical steps and study designs used in metabolomics studies, as well as the emerging role for metabolomics in gaining mechanistic insights into the development of hypertension. Suggestions as to the future direction for metabolomics research in the field of hypertension are also proposed.

  1. Secondary Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Malha, Line; August, Phyllis

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension is a common medical complication of pregnancy. Although 75-80 % of women with preexisting essential hypertension will have uncomplicated pregnancies, the presence of secondary forms of hypertension adds considerably to both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Renovascular hypertension, pheochromocytoma, and Cushing's syndrome in particular are associated with accelerating hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal loss. Primary aldosteronism is a more heterogeneous disorder; there are well-documented cases where blood pressure and hypokalemia are improved during pregnancy due to elevated levels of progesterone. However, superimposed preeclampsia, worsening hypertension, and early delivery are also reported. When possible, secondary forms of hypertension should be diagnosed and treated prior to conception in order to avoid these complications.

  2. White coat hypertension in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Jurko, Alexander; Minarik, Milan; Jurko, Tomas; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2016-01-15

    The article summarizes current information on blood pressure changes in children during clinic visit. White coat as a general dressing of physicians and health care personnel has been widely accepted at the end of the 19th century. Two problems can be associated with the use of white coat: white coat phenomenon and white coat hypertension. Children often attribute pain and other unpleasant experience to the white coat and refuse afterwards cooperation with examinations. Definition of white coat hypertension in the literature is not uniform. It has been defined as elevated blood pressure in the hospital or clinic with normal blood pressure at home measured during the day by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring system. White coat effect is defined as temporary increase in blood pressure before and during visit in the clinic, regardless what the average daily ambulatory blood pressure values are. Clinical importance of white coat hypertension is mainly because of higher risk for cardiovascular accidents that are dependent on end organ damage (heart, vessels, kidney). Current data do not allow any clear recommendations for the treatment. Pharmacological therapy is usually started in the presence of hypertrophic left ventricle, changes in intimal/medial wall thickness of carotic arteries, microalbuminuria and other cardiovascular risk factors. Nonpharmacological therapy is less controversial and certainly more appropriate. Patients have to change their life style, need to eliminate as much cardiovascular risk factors as possible and sustain a regular blood pressure monitoring.

  3. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  4. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Roman, Antonio; López-Meseguer, Manuel; Domingo, Enric

    2015-06-22

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension has achieved significant progress over the past 20 years. Currently, 3 groups of drugs have proven useful for the treatment of this disease: endothelin receptor antagonist, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostacyclin and its analogues. It is recommended to initiate treatment with one of these drugs, the choice depending on the initial severity of patient disease and the preferences of the treating physician. When the patient does not have a satisfactory response, new drugs acting at a different pathway are most commonly added. At this time, considering referral for lung transplantation could be an alternative. Most experts recommend grouping maximum experience in what is known as expert centers. Treatment has led to better survival in these patients, but there is still a long way to cure this life-threatening disease.

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  7. Impact of Hypertension on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino; Yaffe, Kristine; Biller, José; Bratzke, Lisa C.; Faraci, Frank M.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Gulati, Martha; Kamel, Hooman; Knopman, David S.; Launer, Lenore J.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Seshadri, Sudha; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina

    2017-01-01

    Background Age-related dementia, most commonly caused by Alzheimer disease or cerebrovascular factors (vascular dementia), is a major public health threat. Chronic arterial hypertension is a well-established risk factor for both types of dementia, but the link between hypertension and its treatment and cognition remains poorly understood. In this scientific statement, a multidisciplinary team of experts examines the impact of hypertension on cognition to assess the state of the knowledge, to identify gaps, and to provide future directions. Methods Authors with relevant expertise were selected to contribute to this statement in accordance with the American Heart Association conflict-of-interest management policy. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the literature, and summarized the available data. Results Hypertension disrupts the structure and function of cerebral blood vessels, leads to ischemic damage of white matter regions critical for cognitive function, and may promote Alzheimer pathology. There is strong evidence of a deleterious influence of midlife hypertension on late-life cognitive function, but the cognitive impact of late-life hypertension is less clear. Observational studies demonstrated a cumulative effect of hypertension on cerebrovascular damage, but evidence from clinical trials that antihypertensive treatment improves cognition is not conclusive. Conclusions After carefully reviewing the literature, the group concluded that there were insufficient data to make evidence-based recommendations. However, judicious treatment of hypertension, taking into account goals of care and individual characteristics (eg, age and comorbidities), seems justified to safeguard vascular health and, as a consequence, brain health. PMID:27977393

  8. Timeline of History of Hypertension Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saklayen, Mohammad G.; Deshpande, Neeraj V.

    2016-01-01

    It is surprising that only about 50 years ago hypertension was considered an essential malady and not a treatable condition. Introduction of thiazide diuretics in late 50s made some headway in successful treatment of hypertension and ambitious multicenter VA co-operative study (phase 1 and 2) started in 1964 for diastolic hypertension ranging between 90 and 129 mmHg and completed by 1971 established for the first time that treating diastolic hypertension reduced CV events such as stroke and heart failure and improved mortality. In the following decade, these results were confirmed for the wider US and non-US population, including women and goal-oriented BP treatment to diastolic 90 became the standard therapy recommendation. But isolated systolic hypertension (accounting for two-thirds of the 70 million hypertensive population in USA alone) was not considered treatable until 1991 when SHEP study (systolic hypertension in elderly program) was completed and showed tremendous benefits of treating systolic BP over 160 mmHg using only a simple regimen using small dose chlorthalidone with addition of atenolol if needed. In the next two decades, ALLHAT and other studies examined the comparability of outcomes with use of different classes and combinations of antihypertensive drugs. Although diastolic BP goal was established as 90 in the late 70s and later confirmed by HOT study, the goal BP for systolic hypertension was not settled until very recently with completion of SPRINT study. ACCORD study showed no significant difference in outcome with sys 140 vs. 120 in diabetics. But recently completed SPRINT study with somewhat similar protocol as in ACCORD but in non-diabetic showed almost one-quarter reduction in all-cause mortality and one-third reduction of CV events with systolic BP goal 120. PMID:26942184

  9. Hypertension and exercise.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K

    1993-11-01

    A sedentary lifestyle may be a risk for hypertension, according to the results of both cross sectional and longitudinal studies. However, exercise may reverse the adverse effects of lack of activity. Many controlled studies have shown that exercise lowers systolic/diastolic blood pressure by at least 10/5 mmHg. Exercise not only improves blood pressure, but also attenuates other risk factors for cardiovascular complications. Dynamic isotonic exercise (e.g., weight lifting). Milder (e.g., brisk walking for 30-60 minutes/day) rather than moderate to severe exercise (e.g., running) is also recommended because of similar effectiveness and better compliance. The underlying mechanism of action of exercise on blood pressure seems to be multifactorial involving a decrease in pressor factors such as plasma norepinephrine, the serum Na/K ratio, endogenous ouabain-like substance and erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume, as well as an increase in depressor factors such as plasma prostaglandin E, serum taurine and urinary dopamine excretion.

  10. Sodium intake and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karppanen, Heikki; Mervaala, Eero

    2006-01-01

    In current diets, the level of sodium is very high, whereas that of potassium, calcium, and magnesium is low compared with the level in diets composed of unprocessed, natural foods. We present the biologic rationale and scientific evidence that show that the current salt intake levels largely explain the high prevalence of hypertension. Comprehensive reduction of salt intake, both alone and particularly in combination with increases in intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium, is able to lower average blood pressure levels substantially. During the past 30 years, the one-third decrease in the average salt intake has been accompanied by a more than 10-mm Hg fall in the population average of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and a 75% to 80% decrease in both stroke and coronary heart disease mortality in Finland. There is no evidence of any harmful effects of salt reduction. Salt-reduction recommendations alone have a very small, if any, population impact. In the United States, for example, the per capita use of salt increased by approximately 55% from the mid-1980s to the late 1990s. We deal with factors that contribute toward increasing salt intakes and present examples of the methods that have contributed to the successful salt reduction in Finland.

  11. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  12. Beta-blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2010-12-15

    Beta blockers have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular conditions for decades. Despite a long history and status as a guideline-recommended treatment option for hypertension, recent meta-analyses have brought into question whether β blockers are still an appropriate therapy given outcomes data from other antihypertensive drug classes. However, β blockers are a heterogenous class of agents with diverse pharmacologic and physiologic properties. Much of the unfavorable data revealed in the recent meta-analyses were gleaned from studies involving nonvasodilating, traditional β blockers, such as atenolol. However, findings with traditional β blockers may not be extrapolated to other members of the class, particularly those agents with vasodilatory activity. Vasodilatory β blockers (i.e., carvedilol and nebivolol) reduce blood pressure in large part through reducing systemic vascular resistance rather than by decreasing cardiac output, as is observed with traditional β blockers. Vasodilating ability may also ameliorate some of the concerns associated with traditional β blockade, such as the adverse effects on metabolic and lipid parameters, including an increased risk for new-onset diabetes. Furthermore, vasodilating ability is physiologically relevant and important in treating a condition with common co-morbidities involving metabolic and lipid abnormalities such as hypertension. In patients with hypertension and diabetes or coronary artery disease, vasodilating β blockers provide effective blood pressure control with neutral or beneficial effects on important parameters for the co-morbid disease. In conclusion, it is time for a reexamination of the clinical evidence for the use of β blockers in hypertension, recognizing that there are patients for whom β blockers, particularly those with vasodilatory actions, are an appropriate treatment option.

  13. Prevention and treatment of postpartum hypertension.

    PubMed

    Magee, Laura; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2013-04-30

    hypertension, two trials (120 women) compared intravenous hydralazine with either sublingual nifedipine or intravenous labetalol. There were no maternal deaths or hypotension. Use of additional antihypertensive therapy did not differ between groups (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.04 to 9.07; two trials), but the trials were not consistent in their effects. For women with pre-eclampsia, postnatal furosemide may decrease the need for postnatal antihypertensive therapy in hospital, but more data are needed on substantive outcomes before this practice can be recommended. There are no reliable data to guide management of women who are hypertensive postpartum. Any antihypertensive agent used should be based on a clinician's familiarity with the drug. Future studies should include data on postpartum analgesics, severe maternal hypertension, breastfeeding, hospital length of stay, and maternal satisfaction with care.

  14. Overcoming therapeutic inertia in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2010-01-01

    Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) remains a leading contributor to cardiovascular disease and mortality worldwide. Although current practice guidelines recommend treating patients with hypertension to defined BP goals, the approach is not widely implemented, and BP control in clinical practice is much worse than that attained in clinical trials. Recent and ongoing clinical trials are utilizing more aggressive approaches with combination therapy as initial treatment. This article discusses the problem of therapeutic or clinical inertia when attempting to control hypertension and highlights differences in BP control rates between clinical trials and real-world practice. Additionally, the rationale for an ongoing treat-to-goal study using a fixed-dose combination of amlodipine/olmesartan medoxomil in patients with hypertension not controlled on monotherapy is provided.

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Román, J Sánchez; Hernández, F J García; Palma, M J Castillo; Medina, C Ocaña

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is an idiopathic process or can be associated with another circumstances (connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, exposure to appetite suppressants or another drugs or infectious agents such as HIV). Most patients are diagnosed as the result of an evaluation of symptoms, whereas others are diagnosed incidentally or during screening of asymptomatic populations at risk. We reviews systematic screening for the approach to diagnosing pulmonary arterial hypertension. A diagnostic algorithm can guide the evaluation but it can be modified according to specific clinical circumstances. The number of therapeutic options has increased.in the last years. We reviews the use of calcium-channel blockers, prostacyclin (and analogues), endothelin-receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and the use of combination therapy, and provides specific recommendations about the actual treatment.

  16. Hypertension in young adults.

    PubMed

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  17. [Definition of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Degaute, J P

    1994-01-01

    Recent publication of several consensus by well-known international experts in the field of high blood pressure gives us the opportunity to update the definition of hypertension. For the first time, systolic blood pressure is taken into account to define hypertensives. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been recently developed for the evaluation and treatment of hypertensive patients. Due to the absence of world-wide recognized normative data and the lack of prospective studies assessing the superiority of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over casual blood pressure measurement for the prediction of cardiovascular events, the use of this new technique is to be restricted to a limited number of hypertensive patients.

  18. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  19. [Hypertension in women].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages.

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  1. Awareness of salt restriction is not reflected in the actual salt intake in Japanese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Adachi, Tomoko; Nakashima, Ryuma; Sugamori, Takashi; Endo, Akihiro; Ito, Takafumi; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for hypertension management recommend reducing salt intake to <6 g/day for hypertensive patients. However, it is not currently known whether hypertensive patients' awareness of the recommended reduced salt diet correlates with their actual intake. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between actual salt intake of Japanese hypertensive patients and their awareness of the recommended guidelines for reduced dietary salt intake. In total, 236 outpatients (146 males and 90 females) with a mean age 69.7 ± 12.5 years were included in this study. Daily dietary salt intake was estimated using sodium and creatinine concentrations detected in spot urine samples. The patients filled out a questionnaire regarding their awareness of recommended salt restriction for hypertension management. The questionnaire distinguished the patients' awareness of recommended salt restriction in four levels (low, moderate, high and very high). The mean estimated salt intake was 9.72 ± 2.43 g/day. Patients' awareness regarding salt intake in all levels provided in the questionnaire did not correlate with actual salt intake (p = 0.731). Our results demonstrated that Japanese hypertensive outpatients consumed higher levels of salt than the target value recommended by Japanese guidelines. There was no correlation between actual salt intake and patients' awareness of the recommended reduction in salt. These results suggest that monitoring salt intake and informing patients of their actual salt intake are necessary for effective hypertension management.

  2. African Americans, hypertension and the renin angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sandra F; Nicholas, Susanne B; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Norris, Keith C

    2014-01-01

    African Americans have exceptionally high rates of hypertension and hypertension related complications. It is commonly reported that the blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors is attenuated in African Americans due to a greater likelihood of having a low renin profile. Therefore these agents are often not recommended as initial therapy in African Americans with hypertension. However, the high prevalence of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease makes treatment with RAS inhibitors more compelling. Despite lower circulating renin levels and a less significant fall in blood pressure in response to RAS inhibitors in African Americans, numerous clinical trials support the efficacy of RAS inhibitors to improve clinical outcomes in this population, especially in those with hypertension and risk factors for cardiovascular and related diseases. Here, we discuss the rationale of RAS blockade as part of a comprehensive approach to attenuate the high rates of premature morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension among African Americans. PMID:25276290

  3. Hypertension Canada's 2017 Guidelines for Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension in Adults.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander A; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi; McBrien, Kerry; Butalia, Sonia; Zarnke, Kelly B; Nerenberg, Kara; Harris, Kevin C; Nakhla, Meranda; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Gryn, Steven E; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Sivapalan, Praveena; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Kline, Gregory; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Côté, Anne-Marie; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension Canada provides annually updated, evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we introduce 10 new guidelines. Three previous guidelines have been revised and 5 have been removed. Previous age and frailty distinctions have been removed as considerations for when to initiate antihypertensive therapy. In the presence of macrovascular target organ damage, or in those with independent cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive therapy should be considered for all individuals with elevated average systolic nonautomated office blood pressure (non-AOBP) readings ≥ 140 mm Hg. For individuals with diastolic hypertension (with or without systolic hypertension), fixed-dose single-pill combinations are now recommended as an initial treatment option. Preference is given to pills containing an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in combination with either a calcium channel blocker or diuretic. Whenever a diuretic is selected as monotherapy, longer-acting agents are preferred. In patients with established ischemic heart disease, caution should be exercised in lowering diastolic non-AOBP to ≤ 60 mm Hg, especially in the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy. After a hemorrhagic stroke, in the first 24 hours, systolic non-AOBP lowering to < 140 mm Hg is not recommended. Finally, guidance is now provided for screening, initial diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of renovascular hypertension arising from fibromuscular dysplasia. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these guidelines are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Melatonin production in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Rapoport, S I; Shatalova, A M; Malinovskaia, N K; Vettenberg, L

    2000-01-01

    Hypertensive subjects were examined for production of melatonin. In severe hypertension night levels of melatonin diminished, the day production is as in the controls. The role of melatonin in pathogenesis of essential hypertension is discussed.

  5. Drug Treatment of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Catherine M.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders represent major causes of pregnancy related maternal mortality worldwide. Similar to the non-pregnant population, hypertension is the most common medical disorder encountered during pregnancy and is estimated to occur in about 6–8% of pregnancies [1]. A recent report highlighted hypertensive disorders as one of the major causes of pregnancy-related maternal deaths in the United States, accounting for 579 of the 4693 (12.3%) maternal deaths that occurred between 1998 and 2005 [2]. In low-income and middle-income countries, preeclampsia and its convulsive form, eclampsia, are associated with 10–15% of direct maternal deaths [3]. The optimal timing and choice of therapy for hypertensive pregnancy disorders involves carefully weighing the risk-versus-benefit ratio for each individual patient, with an overall goal of improving maternal and fetal outcomes. In this review we have compared and contrasted the recommendations in different treatment guidelines and we have outlined some newer perspectives on management. We have aimed to provide a clinically orientated guide to the drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy. PMID:24554373

  6. Drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Catherine M; Garovic, Vesna D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders represent major causes of pregnancy-related maternal mortality worldwide. Similar to the non-pregnant population, hypertension is the most common medical disorder encountered during pregnancy and is estimated to occur in about 6-8 % of pregnancies. A recent report highlighted hypertensive disorders as one of the major causes of pregnancy-related maternal deaths in the USA, accounting for 579 (12.3 %) of the 4,693 maternal deaths that occurred between 1998 and 2005. In low-income and middle-income countries, preeclampsia and its convulsive form, eclampsia, are associated with 10-15 % of direct maternal deaths. The optimal timing and choice of therapy for hypertensive pregnancy disorders involves carefully weighing the risk-versus-benefit ratio for each individual patient, with an overall goal of improving maternal and fetal outcomes. In this review, we have compared and contrasted the recommendations from different treatment guidelines and outlined some newer perspectives on management. We aim to provide a clinically oriented guide to the drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  7. [Approach to hypertension in the older population].

    PubMed

    Roca, Francisco Valls

    2014-05-01

    Hypertension is one of the most frequent causes for seeking primary care attention and its prevalence increases with age, affecting 68% of people older than 60 years. Data indicate that the prevalence of hypertense individuals older than 65 years has increased from 48% in 2002 to 58% in 2010. High blood pressure is related to 1 out of every 2 deaths from cardiovascular causes in the Spanish population ≥ 50 years and causes 13.5% of premature deaths worldwide, both in persons with hypertension and in those with high-normal blood pressure. Although few clinical trials have been performed in the older population, especially in the very old, there is evidence that diastolic and systolic blood pressure control reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in older hypertense individuals. Consequently, the updates of the various clinical practice guidelines continue to include among their objectives-with some nuances-good blood pressure control in this population group. The present article reviews new evidence on the approach to hypertension in the elderly, which has modified some of the recommendations made in the clinical practice guidelines of several scientific societies.

  8. Characteristics of hypertension in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Li, Yan

    2012-10-01

    In China, the prevalence of hypertension is currently 18.8 %, and a major risk factor for hypertension is unbalanced dietary sodium and potassium intakes. High dietary sodium intake may change the circadian rhythm of 24-h blood pressure, which is characterized by a higher nighttime blood pressure. The prevalence of isolated nighttime hypertension, defined as a nighttime blood pressure of at least 120 mm Hg systolic or 70 mm Hg diastolic and a daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure less than 135/85 mm Hg, is higher in Chinese than in Europeans. The complications of hypertension are also different across ethnicities, being mainly stroke instead of myocardial infarction in Chinese. Lowering of blood pressure provides more protection against stroke than against myocardial infarction, and calcium channel blockers provide more protection against stroke than do other classes of antihypertensive drugs. Current Chinese hypertension guidelines recommend calcium channel blockers as the most suitable class of drugs of the five classes of antihypertensive drugs.

  9. Beyond inpatient and outpatient care: alternative model for hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Ho, P Michael; Rumsfeld, John S

    2006-10-19

    Hypertension is a major contributor to worldwide cardiovascular mortality, however, only one-third of patients with hypertension have their blood pressure treated to guideline recommended levels. To improve hypertension control, there may need to be a fundamental shift in care delivery, one that is population-based and simultaneously addresses patient, provider and system barriers. One potential approach is home-based disease management, based on the triad of home monitoring, team care, and patient self-care. Although there may be challenges to achieving the vision of home-based disease management, there are tremendous potential benefits of such an approach for reducing the global burden of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Management of hypertension in diabetic patients: outstanding issues.

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel; Barrios, Vivencio; Coca, Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of premature mortality in Type 2 diabetes mellitus; consequently, good management of all risk factors is vital. The recent reappraisal of the European Society of Hypertension guidelines on hypertension management reset the blood pressure goal for Type 2 diabetic patients to blood pressure <140/90 mmHg. Although this recommendation is based on the best available evidence, further data are still required to provide a better understanding of the natural history of Type 2 diabetes in order to establish blood pressure goals throughout the natural history of the diabetic patient with hypertension.

  11. Hypertension in the elderly: unique challenges and management.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Faruk; Yesil, Yusuf; Balogun, Rasheed A; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad M

    2013-08-01

    Elderly individuals, worldwide, are on the rise, posing new challenges to care providers. Hypertension is highly prevalent in elderly individuals, and multiple challenges face care providers while managing it. In addition to treating hypertension, the physician must treat other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with or without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. This review discusses some of the unique characteristics of high blood pressure in the elderly and provides an overview of the challenges facing care providers, as well as the current recommendations for management of hypertension in the elderly.

  12. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  13. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  14. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  15. Epigenomics of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W.; Mattson, David L.; Kotchen, Theodore A.; Liu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension. Essential hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving multiple genetic and environmental factors and mediated by alterations in multiple biological pathways. Because the non-genetic mechanisms may involve epigenetic modifications, epigenomics is one of the latest concepts and approaches brought to bear on hypertension research. In this article, we summarize briefly the concepts and techniques for epigenomics, discuss the rationale for applying epigenomic approaches to study hypertension, and review the current state of this research area. PMID:24011581

  16. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  17. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Rodrigo Vanerson Passos; Souza, Michel Kendy; Passos, Clévia Santos; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Simoes, Herbert Gustavo; Prestes, Jonato; Boim, Mirian Aparecida; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Franco, Maria do Carmo Pinho; Moraes, Milton Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH). Objective This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing), performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC), on blood pressure (BP) and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with SH. Methods Fifteen male SHR [206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBP)] and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP) were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY) and SHR (SED-SHR); RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC); and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC). Systolic BP and heart rate (HR) were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05), whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in HR only for the RT1 group (p < 0.05). There was a higher increase in strength in the RT2 (140%; p < 0.05) group as compared with RT1 (11%; p > 0.05). Conclusions Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength. PMID:26840054

  18. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  19. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  20. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  1. Hypertension in women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  2. Hypertension in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Extremera, Blas; Cía-Gómez, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hypertension in the Western countries is continuously increasing in the elderly population and remains the leading cause of cardiovascular and morbidity. Methods. we analysed some significant clinical trials in order to present the relevant findings on those hypertensive population. Results. Several studies (SYST-EUR, HYVET, CONVINCE, VALUE, etc.) have demonstrated the benefits of treatment (nitrendipine, hydrochrotiazyde, perindopril, indapamide, verapamil, or valsartan) in aged hypertensive patients not only concerning blood pressure values but also the other important risk factors. Conclusion. Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disorder in the Western countries, and the relevance of receiving pharmacological treatment of hypertension in aged patients is crucial; in addition, the results suggest that combination therapy—nitrendipine plus enalapril—could have more benefits than those observed with the use of nitrendipine alone. PMID:21876789

  3. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension.

  4. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  5. Hypertension burden in Luxembourg

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Schritz, Anna; Barré, Jessica; Delagardelle, Charles; Krippler, Serge; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it remains the main cause of death in Luxembourg. We aimed to estimate the current prevalence of hypertension, associated risk factors, and its geographic variation in Luxembourg. Cross-sectional, population-based data on 1497 randomly selected Luxembourg residents aged 25 to 64 years were collected as part of the European Health Examination Survey from 2013 to 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, self-report of a physician diagnosis or on antihypertensive medication. Standard and Bayesian regressions were used to examine associations between hypertension and covariates, and also geographic distribution of hypertension across the country. Nearly 31% of Luxembourg residents were hypertensive, and over 70% of those were either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled. The likelihood of hypertension was lower in men more physically active (odds ratio [95% credible region] 0.6 [0.4, 0.9]) and consuming alcohol daily (0.3 [0.1, 0.8]), and higher in men with a poor health perception (1.6 [1.0, 2.7]) and in women experiencing depressive symptoms (1.8 [1.3, 2.7]). There were geographic variations in hypertension prevalence across cantons and municipalities. The highest odds ratio was observed in the most industrialized region (South-West) (1.2 [0.9, 1.6]) with a positive effect at 90% credible region. In Luxembourg, the vast majority of people with hypertension are either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled, which constitutes a major, neglected public health challenge. There are geographic variations in hypertension prevalence in Luxembourg, hence the role of individual and regional risk factors along with public health initiatives to reduce disease burden should be considered. PMID:27603374

  6. Elevated Urinary T Helper 1 Chemokine Levels in Newly Diagnosed Hypertensive Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Övünç Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Zeybek, Cengiz; Gök, Faysal; Pekel, Aysel; Muşabak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence suggests that T helper (Th) cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and anti-hypertensive treatment on urinary Th1 chemokines. Methods: The study groups consisted of three types of patients: hypertensive obese, healthy, and non-hypertensive obese. Pre-treatment and post-treatment samples of the hypertensive obese group and one sample from the other two groups were evaluated for urinary chemokine: regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP10), and monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG). In the hypertensive obese group, urine microalbumin: creatinine ratio was examined before and after treatment. We recommended lifestyle changes to all patients. Captopril was started in those who could not be controlled with lifestyle changes and those who had stage 2 hypertension. Results: Twenty-four hypertensive obese (mean age 13.1), 27 healthy (mean age 11.2) and 22 non-hypertensive obese (mean age 11.5) children were investigated. The pre-treatment urine albumin: creatinine ratio was positively correlated with pre-treatment MIG levels (r=0.41, p<0.05). RANTES was significantly higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive and non-hypertensive obese group than in the controls. The urinary IP10 and MIG levels were higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive obese group than in the non-hypertensive obese. Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment values indicated significant decreases in RANTES, IP10, and MIG levels in the hypertensive obese group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Th1 cells could be activated in obese hypertensive children before the onset of clinical indicators of target organ damage. Urinary RANTES seemed to be affected by both hypertension and obesity, and urinary IP10 and MIG seemed to be affected predominantly by hypertension. PMID:26831550

  7. Risks for Hypertension among Undiagnosed African American Mothers and Daughters

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction This study examines risks for high blood pressure (BP) among undiagnosed African American (AA) mothers and daughters, because AA children are at risk for hypertension due to familial influences. Method This study was cross-sectional in design and included 70 AA mother and daughter participants from the Detroit metropolitan area. Results BP readings clinically diagnostic of hypertension were found for mothers (25.7%) and daughters (54.3%), although they were undiagnosed. Many participants with BP readings in pre-hypertension or hypertension categories were overweight or obese (mothers, 90.9%; daughters, 50.2%). Fewer underweight or normal weight mothers (25.0%) and daughters (64.3%) had BP readings indicative of hypertension. Lower diastolic BP was associated with higher body mass index (BMI) among mothers (r = −.34, p = .045). Higher systolic blood pressure was positively related to potassium consumption among daughters and total AAs (r = .55, p = .005 and r = .41, p = .003 respectively). Discussion Early screening for hypertension is needed to improve health among AAs. Health providers should use American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for determining hypertension in children. Research on familial and environment influences on BP among children is recommended to determine early risk for hypertension development. PMID:19875025

  8. Hypertension in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Win, Ni Ni; Kuan, Lai Pei; Aung, Kyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension in Malaysia and to assess the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia. The distribution of hypertension in Malaysia was assessed based on available data in 3 National Health and Morbidity Surveys (NHMSs) and 1 large scale non-NHMS during the period of 1996 to 2011. Summary statistics was used to characterize the included surveys. Differences in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension between any 2 surveys were expressed as ratios. To assess the independent associations between the predictors and the outcome variables, regression analyses were employed with prevalence of hypertension as an outcome variable. Overall, there was a rising trend in the prevalence of hypertension in adults ≥30 years: 32.9% (30%–35.8%) in 1996, 42.6% (37.5%–43.5%) in 2006, and 43.5% (40.4%–46.6%) in 2011. There were significant increase of 32% from 1996 to 2011 (P < 0.001) and of 29% from 1996 to 2006 (P < 0.05), but only a small change of 1% from 2006 to 2011 (P = 0.6). For population ≥18 years, only a 1% increase in prevalence of hypertension occurred from the 2006 NHMS (32.2%) to the 2011 NHMS (32.7%) (P = 0.25). A relative increase of 13% occurred in those with primary education (P < 0.001) and a 15% increase was seen in those with secondary education (P < 0.001). The rate of increase in the prevalence of hypertension in the population with income level RM 3000–3999 was the highest (18%) during this period. In general, the older age group had higher prevalence of hypertension in the 2006 and 2011 NHMSs. The prevalence peaked at 74.1% among population aged 65 to 69 years in the 2011 NHMS. Both the proportion of awareness and the control of hypertension in Malaysia improved from 1996 to 2006. A change in the control of hypertension was 13% higher in women than in men. The findings suggest that

  9. Hypertension in Pregnancy: Is it time for a new approach to treatment?

    PubMed Central

    MOSER, Marvin; BROWN, Catherine M.; ROSE, Carl H.; GAROVIC, Vesna D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders represent major causes of pregnancy-related maternal mortality worldwide. The current definition and treatment recommendations for elevated blood pressure during pregnancy in the US have remained unchanged for many years, unlike the recommendations for hypertension treatment in the general population. Clinical studies have provided convincing evidence that women with hypertensive pregnancy disorders are at both immediate and long-term risk for cardiovascular complications; these findings suggest that consideration be given to lowering the presently recommended blood pressure thresholds, both for the initiation of therapy and for therapeutic targets, and to simplifying the approach to the management of elevated blood pressure in pregnancy. This review focuses on the current treatment strategies for hypertensive pregnancy disorders, new developments in the field of hypertension, in general, and in pregnant patients, in particular, and their potential impact on contemporary blood pressure goals and the use of specific antihypertensive medications in pregnancy. PMID:22573074

  10. Athletic participation by children and adolescents who have systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Teri M; Benjamin, Holly J; Brenner, Joel S; Cappetta, Charles T; Demorest, Rebecca A; Gregory, Andrew J M; Halstead, Mark; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; Martin, Stephanie; Rice, Stephen G

    2010-06-01

    Children and adolescents who have hypertension may be at risk for complications when exercise causes their blood pressure to rise even higher. The purpose of this statement is to update recommendations concerning the athletic participation of individuals with hypertension, including special populations such as those with spinal cord injuries or obesity, by using the guidelines from "The 36th Bethesda Conference: Eligibility Recommendations for Competitive Athletes with Cardiovascular Abnormalities"; "The Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents"; and "The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure."

  11. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  12. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hansson, L

    1996-10-01

    TREATMENT OF ELDERLY HYPERTENSIVES: Treatment of hypertension in the elderly is nowadays an accepted and highly effective medical intervention following the positive reports on the benefits of lowering elevated arterial pressure in elderly patients. Most of the intervention studies an antihypertensive treatment in elderly patients have used diuretics or beta-blockers or the two in combination as the therapy by which blood pressure was lowered. However, from a theoretical point of view, novel therapies such as calcium antagonists could offer advantages that would translate into an even greater reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than has been obtained with the traditional antihypertensive therapies used so far. DATA ON CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN THE ELDERLY: Some of the studies in elderly hypertensives that are currently in progress are using calcium antagonists as one of the main therapies, e.g. the Swedish Trial in Old patients with hypertension (STOP-Hypertension)-2 study and the Systolic hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) study. Another source of information is a large database on nicardipine, a dihydropyridine-derived calcium antagonist, used in the treatment of elderly hypertensives.

  13. [Hypertension and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rosas, Martín; Lomelí, Catalina; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Méndez, Arturo; Férez Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that hypertension in pregnancy is an under recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Compared with women who have had normotensive pregnancies, those who are hypertensive during pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and have a less favorable overall risk profile for CVD years after the affected pregnancies. One factor that might underlie this relationship is that hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia, in particular) and CVD share several common risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes mellitus and renal disease). Alternatively, hypertension in pregnancy could induce long-term metabolic and vascular abnormalities that might increase the overall risk of CVD later in life. In both cases, evidence regarding risk-reduction interventions specific to women who have had hypertensive pregnancies is lacking. While awaiting results of large-scale studies, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy should be screened for during assessment of a woman's overall risk profile for CVD. Women at high risk must be monitored closely for conventional risk factors that are common to both CVD and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and treated according to current evidence-based national guidelines.

  14. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Slama, Michel; Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina; Frohlich, Edward D

    2002-07-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension is the most common cause of cardiac failure. Recent studies have shown that isolated diastolic dysfunction very often accompanies hypertensive heart disease. Ventricular diastolic function may be divided into an active relaxation phase and a passive compliance period. These two components have been investigated invasively, and they remain the gold standards for the study of diastolic function. However, in the routine clinical setting, echocardiographic and Doppler techniques are most useful for evaluating ventricular filling. Thus, analysis of E and A waves of mitral flow have provided important and useful information. Unfortunately, these indices depend on too many factors. Newer indices obtained from ventricular time intervals, tissue Doppler imaging, and color M-mode echocardiography have enhanced the means to assess diastolic function. In addition, new methods including MRI and cine CT have also provided better understanding of left ventricular filling in hypertension. Using these techniques, diastolic dysfunction has been found to be common in patients with hypertension, even before left ventricular hypertrophy is demonstrable and before hypertension in young, normotensive male offspring of hypertensive parents has developed. Furthermore, it has been made clear recently that myocardial ischemia and fibrosis are two important factors associated with diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

  15. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  16. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R S; Frohlich, E D

    1990-09-01

    The relationships between stress and hypertension have been evaluated extensively. Acutely, stress has been shown to increase blood pressure by increasing cardiac output and the heart rate without affecting total peripheral resistance. Acute stress has been found to increase levels of catecholamines, cortisol, vasopressin, endorphins and aldosterone, which may in part explain the increase in blood pressure. However, a primary role for the activation of the sympathetic nervous system has recently been suggested in several studies. Studies in the rat are beginning to determine specific central nervous system pathways which transform stressful stimuli into signals triggering a cardiovascular response without direct cortical participation. Furthermore, acute stress reduces renal sodium excretion, which contributes to an increase in blood pressure. Several studies suggest that prolonged stress may predispose people and animals to prolonged hypertension and certain populations are at risk for the development of stress-induced hypertension. It is likely that prolonged stress-induced hypertension is the result of neurohormonal trophic factors which cause vascular hypertrophy or atherosclerosis. Because stress can affect measurement of blood pressure due to the phenomenon of 'white-coat hypertension', ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is emerging as an important feature in the evaluation of patients with hypertension. Finally, relaxation techniques are being used increasingly in the treatment of patients with hypertension.

  17. Exercise and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharman, James E; La Gerche, Andre; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the benefits of regular exercise is irrefutable and increasing physical activity levels should be a major goal at all levels of health care. People with hypertension are less physically active than those without hypertension and there is strong evidence supporting the blood pressure-lowering ability of regular exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals. This narrative review discusses evidence relating to exercise and cardiovascular (CV) risk in people with hypertension. Comparisons between aerobic, dynamic resistance, and static resistance exercise have been made along with the merit of different exercise volumes. High-intensity interval training and isometric resistance training appear to have strong CV protective effects, but with limited data in hypertensive people, more work is needed in this area. Screening recommendations, exercise prescriptions, and special considerations are provided as a guide to decrease CV risk among hypertensive people who exercise or wish to begin. It is recommended that hypertensive individuals should aim to perform moderate intensity aerobic exercise activity for at least 30 minutes on most (preferably all) days of the week in addition to resistance exercises on 2-3 days/week. Professionals with expertise in exercise prescription may provide additional benefit to patients with high CV risk or in whom more intense exercise training is planned. Despite lay and media perceptions, CV events associated with exercise are rare and the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the risks. In summary, current evidence supports the assertion of exercise being a cornerstone therapy in reducing CV risk and in the prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  19. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  20. Management of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Castillo, Leonardo; Gopinath, Shankar; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2008-01-01

    Effective management of intracranial hypertension involves meticulous avoidance of factors that precipitate or aggravate increased intracranial pressure. When intracranial pressure becomes elevated, it is important to rule out new mass lesions that should be surgically evacuated. Medical management of increased intracranial pressure should include sedation, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, and osmotherapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline. For intracranial hypertension refractory to initial medical management, barbiturate coma, hypothermia, or decompressive craniectomy should be considered. Steroids are not indicated and may be harmful in the treatment of intracranial hypertension resulting from traumatic brain injury. PMID:18514825

  1. Our correspondence with the World Health Organization about the hypertension guidelines.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    (1) Following publication of the hypertension guidelines by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Society of Hypertension (ISH) we wrote to Dr Brundtland, criticizing the recommendations that markedly conflicted with reliable published data. (2) We were not happy with Dr Brundtland's response to our letter, so we have stopped the process to become a WHO collaborating centre.

  2. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  3. Drug-induced hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... desipramine) Caffeine (including the caffeine in coffee and energy drinks) Corticosteroids Cyclosporine Ephedra and many other herbal products Erythropoietin Estrogens (including birth control pills) and other ... drugs Yohimbe Rebound hypertension occurs when blood ...

  4. Hypertensive Screening Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Douglas P.; Gillen, John C.

    1977-01-01

    Data derived from a health screening program conducted at Wright State University indicates that hypertensive screening is a justifiable procedure and one which can be carried out with minimum effort and expense. (MB)

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  6. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  7. Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGE Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy ... e189 Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 TABLE 1. Types of ...

  8. Hypertensive emergencies of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wilson, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is commonly encountered in pregnancy and has both maternal and fetal effects. Acute hypertensive crisis most commonly occurs in severe preeclampsia and is associated with maternal stroke, cardiopulmonary decompensation, fetal decompensation due to decreased uterine perfusion, abruption, and stillbirth. Immediate stabilization of the mother including the use of intervenous antihypertensives is required and often delivery is indicated. With appropriate management, maternal and fetal outcomes can be excellent.

  9. [Hypertension in old age].

    PubMed

    García-Palmieri, M

    1995-09-01

    Hypertension occurs in 50% of the elderly persons in industrialized societies. This disorder of the regulation of the arterial blood pressure has different manifestations in different age groups. The young hypertensive usually has an increase in cardiac output and a normal peripheral vascular resistance. The elderly patient with hypertension exhibits a decreased cardiac output and an increased peripheral vascular resistance. In the elderly hypertensive there is a progressive anteriolar narrowing and there is hardening of the largest arteries. The vascular disease that contributes to the hypertension in the elderly also causes hypoperfusion of the target organs. During the aging process there is a decrease in cardiac output, glomerular filtration rate, vital capacity, renal plasma flow and maximal cardiac rate. There are changes in the kidneys and the liver that influence the way different medications are handled by the body. The main findings of the Australian, EWPHE, Coope & Warrender, SHEP, STOP-HYP and MRC studies of hypertension in the elderly have been summarized. The intervention studies have proven that the treatment of hypertension in the elderly patient is efficacious and decreases the mortality and morbidity due to coronary and cerebrovascular events. The pharmacologic agents available for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly are the diuretics, beta blockers, vasodilators, calcium-channel blockers, adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The morbidity and mortality benefits derived from antihypertensive trials are greater for the older than for the younger patients. The pharmacologic antihypertensive agents to be used in older patients will also depend upon the presence or not of associated illnesses in which some agents might be harmful or contraindicated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Diastolic function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Diamond, J A

    2001-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension may present as asymptomatic findings on noninvasive testing, or as fulminant pulmonary edema, despite normal left ventricular systolic function. Up to 40% of hypertensive patients presenting with clinical signs of congestive heart failure have normal systolic left ventricular function. In this article we review the pathophysiologic factors affecting diastolic function in individuals with diastolic function, current and emerging tools for measuring diastolic function, and current concepts regarding the treatment of patients with diastolic congestive heart failure.

  11. Hypertension and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deak, Teresa M; Moskovitz, Joshua B

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is increasing in prevalence and incidence and its treatment becoming more commonplace. Associated complications of pregnancy, including end-organ damage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia, are leading sources of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, requiring an emergency physician to become proficient with their identification and treatment. This article reviews hypertension in pregnancy as it relates to outcomes, with special emphasis on preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia.

  12. Ambiguities in the Guidelines for the Management of Arterial Hypertension: Indian Perspective with a Call for Global Harmonization.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Grover, Abhinav; Hungin, A P S

    2017-02-01

    Many medical professional societies have formulated guidelines to treat hypertension, but there existed differences with respect to diagnosis, blood pressure (BP) targets, pharmacotherapy of hypertension, and grades of evidence. A MEDLINE search for hypertension guidelines was performed to compare Indian guidelines for hypertension (IGH) with these guidelines. A majority of the guidelines had consensus on the cutoff value (140/90 mmHg, recorded twice) to diagnose hypertension. The Joint National Committee 8 (JNC 8), IGH, Japanese Society of hypertension (JSH), Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP), and American Society of Hypertension/International Society of Hypertension (ASH/ISH) guidelines provide a higher BP target for the elderly hypertensive populations, while the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and European Society of Hypertension (ESH) guidelines provided a lower BP target for the elderly patients. However, a meta-analysis showed benefits of having a systolic BP target of <130 mmHg for all patients. Treatment of hypertension according to JNC 8, NICE, and ASH/ISH guidelines varies among the black and the non-black population which recommended thiazide or calcium channel blockers for the black population. There is no special mention of pharmacotherapy or BP targets for the South Asian population in various guidelines including IGH despite evidence of higher risk of hypertension-associated complications in this population. It is suggested that all the available guidelines should be harmonized with highest level of evidence available to minimize ambiguities associated with management of hypertension.

  13. Mexican registry of pulmonary hypertension: REMEHIP.

    PubMed

    Sandoval Zarate, Julio; Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos; Ramirez-Rivera, Alicia; Zamudio, Tomas Pulido; Gutierrez-Fajardo, Pedro; Elizalde Gonzalez, Jose; Leon, Mario Seoane Garcia De; Gamez, Miguel Beltran; Abril, Francisco Moreno Hoyos; Michel, Rodolfo Parra; Aguilar, Humberto Garcia

    REMEHIP is a prospective, multicentre registry on pulmonary hypertension. The main objective will be to identify the clinical profile, medical care, therapeutic trends and outcomes in adult and pediatric Mexican patients with well-characterized pulmonary hypertension. REMEHIP a multicenter registry began in 2015 with a planned recruitment time of 12 months and a 4-year follow-up. The study population will comprise a longitudinal cohort study, collecting data on patients with prevalent and incident pulmonary hypertension. Will be included patients of age >2 years and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension by right heart catheterization within Group 1 and Group 4 of the World Health Organization classification. The structure, data collection and data analysis will be based on quality current recommendations for registries. The protocol has been approved by institutional ethics committees in all participant centers. All patients will sign an informed consent form. Currently in Mexico, there is a need of observational registries that include patients with treatment in the everyday clinical practice so the data could be validated and additional information could be obtained versus the one from the clinical trials. In this way, REMEHIP emerges as a link among randomized clinical trials developed by experts and previous Mexican experience. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Liver surgery in cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans J; Renner, Philipp; Lang, Sven A

    2016-03-07

    The prevalence of hepatic cirrhosis in Europe and the United States, currently 250 patients per 100000 inhabitants, is steadily increasing. Thus, we observe a significant increase in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension needing liver resections for primary or metastatic lesions. However, extended liver resections in patients with underlying hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension still represent a medical challenge in regard to perioperative morbidity, surgical management and postoperative outcome. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification recommends to restrict curative liver resections for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients to early tumor stages in patients with Child A cirrhosis not showing portal hypertension. However, during the last two decades, relevant improvements in preoperative diagnostic, perioperative hepatologic and intensive care management as well as in surgical techniques during hepatic resections have rendered even extended liver resections in higher-degree cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension possible. However, there are few standard indications for hepatic resections in cirrhotic patients and risk stratifications have to be performed in an interdisciplinary setting for each individual patient. We here review the indications, the preoperative risk-stratifications, the morbidity and the mortality of extended resections for primary and metastatic lesions in cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, we provide a review of literature on perioperative management in cirrhotic patients needing extrahepatic abdominal surgery and an overview of surgical options in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis.

  15. Fish oil, essential fatty acids, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, R M

    1994-08-01

    A proper balance between the n-3 and n-6 series of essential fatty acids (EFAs) is essential for homeostasis and normal growth in humans. Dietary supplement with fish oil and related n-3 EFAs has been used to study their antihypertensive property in animals and humans with borderline and essential hypertension. In the animal models, chronic treatment of young animals generally only attenuated the development of hypertension. In animals with hypercholesterolemia, n-3 EFA supplement increased the incidence of atherosclerosis. In humans, chronic treatment with fish oil only produced a small reduction in blood pressure. The concerns are that the high dose of fish oil may interfere with the control of blood glucose in diabetic patients, and may cause prolonged bleeding in surgical patients. Studies on the animal models of hypertension showed that n-6 EFAs are more effective than n-3 EFAs in lowering and normalizing the blood pressure of these animals, probably through the production of tissue prostaglandins, which favour vasodilation. The antihypertensive effect of the n-6 EFAs in humans is not well known, because there are only a few studies, usually involving a very small number of patients. A possible side effects of n-6 EFAs for concern is that they might stimulate tumour development. A careful examination of these risk factors is needed before any recommendation can be made concerning the use of EFAs for the control of hypertension for humans.

  16. Hypertension: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio

    2012-11-01

    High blood pressure (BP) along with smoking habit and lipid disorders are the most important and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prevalence of high BP has grown progressively over time with a progressive increase not only in the absolute number of patients but in the proportion of those showing BP values out of control. The increasing world-wide prevalence of hypertension and the related increase in burden of the disease due to diagnosis, treatment and management of the complications mandates both Health Authorities and research institutions to find out new strategies to improve the BP control. So, one of the main questions is which are the possible perspectives for the future of high BP management, and in particular how can we face the problem of hypertension in the near future? Four main points will be shortly discussed: the genetic contribution to hypertension development and control, the availability of effective preventive strategies, the improvement of disease management, and the role of extensive control of concomitant risk factors. It is relatively easy to suppose that the integration of the best available knowledge with the more recent diagnostic and therapeutic achievements will improve the management of hypertension through a more effective detection of subjects at risk who will undergo an earlier diagnosis leading to a more tailored, tolerated and effective treatment of the hypertensive disease. This means that the future direction of the hypertension management is the simpler: the patient instead of the disease.

  17. Patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amar, Jacques

    2007-06-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in the majority of treated patients, especially those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This was demonstrated by a French study that showed that 70% of treated hypertensive patients are not controlled to the target level of 140/90 mmHg. This proportion reached 84% in hypertensive patients with diabetes (target level 130/85 mmHg). What are the reasons for this disappointing situation? Observational studies have shown that only a minority of patients with uncontrolled hypertension receive triple therapy including a diuretic. In this respect, self-measurement of blood pressure should improve the situation by allowing clinicians to base their decision to intensify hypertension treatment on more solid evidence than consultation blood pressure measurements alone. Patient-related factors may also contribute to this situation. Treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension often have multiple risk factors. This is associated with or is a source of poor treatment observance linked to patient psychological factors or a result of the increased consumption of medication. Finally, risk factors themselves may be responsible for problems with blood pressure control as a result of their detrimental effects on large arteries as well as the microvascular network. The early correction of such vascular anomalies is vital for medium and long-term blood pressure control.

  18. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures.

  19. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  20. [Pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Rosengarten, Dror; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder defined by elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PAH can be idiopathic or associated with a variety of medical conditions such as scleroderma, congenital heart disease, left heart failure, lung disease or chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. This progressive disease can cause severe right heart failure and death. Normal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy may produce fatal consequences in PAH patients. Current guidelines recommend that pregnancy be avoided or terminated early in women with PAH. During the past decade, new advanced therapies for PAH have emerged gathering reports of successful pregnancies in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Substantial risk still exists and current recommendations have not changed. Nevertheless, in selected cases, if a patient insists on continuing the pregnancy, being fully aware of the risks involved, an intensive treatment approach should be implemented in experienced centers. This is necessary in order to control pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy and reduce the risk so as to improve outcomes. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of PAH in pregnancy and appropriate management during pregnancy, delivery and the post-partum period.

  1. Physiologic rationale for calcium antagonist therapy in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L M

    1998-01-01

    pathophysiologic and clinical heterogeneity of hypertension. People are different. By analogy with an elevated temperature, the same elevation of blood pressure that leads to the diagnosis of 'essential' hypertension may result from many different "primary" causes, which just happen to have hypertension as one shared clinical manifestation. This immediately implies that when we ask, "Is this drug good, or preferred for hypertension?" the answer should be, "It depends." As an obvious example, to be discussed in more detail below, the salt-sensitive hypertensive responds to dietary salt recommendations and to different drug classes differently from an individual who is not salt-sensitive.

  2. A New Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Hypertension in Canada.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Lyne; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Padwal, Raj S; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Bolli, Peter; McLean, Donna; Milot, Alain; Tobe, Sheldon W; Tremblay, Guy; McKay, Donald W; Townsend, Raymond; Campbell, Norm; Gelfer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Accurate blood pressure measurement is critical to properly identify and treat individuals with hypertension. In 2005, the Canadian Hypertension Education Program produced a revised algorithm to be used for the diagnosis of hypertension. Subsequent annual reviews of the literature have identified 2 major deficiencies in the current diagnostic process. First, auscultatory measurements performed in routine clinical settings have serious accuracy limitations that have not been overcome despite great efforts to educate health care professionals over several years. Thus, alternatives to auscultatory measurements should be used. Second, recent data indicate that patients with white coat hypertension must be identified earlier in the process and in a systematic manner rather than on an ad hoc or voluntary basis so they are not unnecessarily treated with antihypertensive medications. The economic and health consequences of white coat hypertension are reviewed. In this article evidence for a revised algorithm to diagnose hypertension is presented. Protocols for home blood pressure measurement and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are reviewed. The role of automated office blood pressure measurement is updated. The revised algorithm strongly encourages the use of validated electronic digital oscillometric devices and recommends that out-of-office blood pressure measurements, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (preferred), or home blood pressure measurement, should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  4. Olmesartan medoxomil, amlodipine besylate and hydrochlorothiazide triple combination for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is an increasingly prevalent cardiovascular risk factor associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Lowering blood pressure (BP) to recommended levels reduces the risk of hypertension-associated cardiovascular events. Despite current treatment options and recommendations, the BP of many patients remains suboptimally controlled. There is a need for more effective management in patients not achieving BP goals on current monotherapy or combination therapy. Regimens combining three or more antihypertensive agents have been shown to increase the proportion of patients achieving BP goals. Recent data suggest that the combination of olmesartan medoxomil, amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide is a rational treatment option offering safe and effective BP reductions and goal attainment in a greater proportion of patients compared with dual-combination regimens. As the understanding of the importance of BP control grows, treatment options that enable patients to achieve BP goals quickly and safely will become increasingly important in hypertension management.

  5. [Patient cooperation in hypertensive therapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Holzgreve, H

    1980-02-22

    Patients with hypertension usually follow the medical recommendations only very inadequately. It can be assumed that perhaps 50-60% of hypertensives take less than 50-80% of the drugs prescribed. Improved cooperation will best be achieved when the nature of their illness, the necessity for prolonged treatment and the consequences of not being treated are carefully and intelligently explained to the patient. The plan of treatment should be simple and adapted to the living habits as closely as possible. The patient should be instructed on the possible side-effects of the drug as early as possible and strengthened in his own sense of responsibility (e.g. keeping a record and measuring his own blood pressure). Regular follow-up examinations possibly by the appointment system should be arranged. The legislators and the pharmaceutic industry are asked to produce package inserts which patients can understand.

  6. Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malha, Line; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Loop diuretics are not recommended in current hypertension guidelines largely due to the lack of outcome data. Nevertheless, they have been shown to lower blood pressure and to offer potential advantages over thiazide-type diuretics. Torsemide offers advantages of longer duration of action and once daily dosing (vs. furosemide and bumetanide) and more reliable bioavailability (vs. furosemide). Studies show that the previously employed high doses of thiazide-type diuretics lower BP more than furosemide. Loop diuretics appear to have a preferable side effect profile (less hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and possibly less glucose intolerance). Studies comparing efficacy and side effect profiles of loop diuretics with the lower, currently widely prescribed, thiazide doses are needed. Research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions about loop diuretic use in hypertension and to determine their rightful place in the antihypertensive arsenal.

  7. Keeping an eye on dialysis: the association of hemodialysis with intraocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Gilbert, Aubrey L; Rosas, Sylvia E

    2015-11-01

    Intraocular hypertension is common during hemodialysis. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome and intraocular hypertension occur via similar pathophysiologic mechanisms. These mechanisms may contribute to the development of glaucoma and cataracts in a patient population already at high risk for ocular abnormalities, given the common risk factors for chronic kidney disease and impaired aqueous humor outflow. We describe a patient with complicated diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, and recent cataract surgery who developed severe intraocular hypertension during hemodialysis. We recommend increased awareness of the symptoms of intraocular hypertension and subsequent ophthalmologic surveillance in order to prevent long-term visual complications.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  9. Research recommendations [Chapter 10

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; Alvin L. Medina; John N. Rinne

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains a number of research recommendations that have developed from the 15 years of research on the UVR conducted by the Southwest Watershed Science Team, as well as from insights from key cooperators and contacts. It is meant to be our best insight as to where efforts should go now. Achieving these recommendations will depend on a number of factors,...

  10. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    PubMed

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  11. Sleep and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory BP studies indicate that even small increases in BP, particularly nighttime BP levels, are associated with significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, sleep-related diseases that induce increases in BP would be anticipated to substantially affect cardiovascular risk. Both sleep deprivation and insomnia have been linked to increases in incidence and prevalence of hypertension. Likewise, sleep disruption attributable to restless legs syndrome increases the likelihood of having hypertension. Observational studies demonstrate a strong correlation between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the risk and severity of hypertension, whereas prospective studies of patients with OSA demonstrate a positive relationship between OSA and risk of incident hypertension. Intervention trials with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) indicate a modest, but inconsistent effect on BP in patients with severe OSA and a greater likelihood of benefit in patients with most CPAP adherence. Additional prospective studies are needed to reconcile observational studies suggesting that OSA is a strong risk factor for hypertension with the modest antihypertensive effects of CPAP observed in intervention studies. PMID:20682533

  12. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  13. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Lawrence; Dresang, Lee T; Fontaine, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Elevated blood pressure in pregnancy may represent chronic hypertension (occurring before 20 weeks' gestation or persisting longer than 12 weeks after delivery), gestational hypertension (occurring after 20 weeks' gestation), preeclampsia, or preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. Preeclampsia is defined as hypertension and either proteinuria or thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, impaired liver function, pulmonary edema, or cerebral or visual symptoms. Proteinuria is not essential for the diagnosis and does not correlate with outcomes. Severe features of preeclampsia include a systolic blood pressure of at least 160 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure of at least 110 mm Hg, platelet count less than 100 × 103 per µL, liver transaminase levels two times the upper limit of normal, a doubling of the serum creatinine level or level greater than 1.1 mg per dL, severe persistent right upper-quadrant pain, pulmonary edema, or new-onset cerebral or visual disturbances. Preeclampsia without severe features can be managed with twice-weekly blood pressure monitoring, antenatal testing for fetal well-being and disease progression, and delivery by 37 weeks' gestation. Preeclampsia with any severe feature requires immediate stabilization and inpatient treatment with magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive drugs, corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity if less than 34 weeks' gestation, and delivery plans. Preeclampsia can worsen or initially present after delivery. Women with hypertensive disorders should be monitored as inpatients or closely at home for 72 hours postpartum.

  14. Management of mild hypertension in adults.

    PubMed

    Viera, Anthony J; Hawes, Emily M

    2016-11-21

    Elevated blood pressure is a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects one in three adults. Blood pressure lowering drugs substantially reduce the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and premature death, but most clinical trials showing benefits have primarily included patients with moderate to severe hypertension, known cardiovascular disease, or elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. The benefits of treating mild hypertension in patients without cardiovascular disease are less clear, but recent meta-analyses offer some insights. Pooled data from trials that include a large percentage of participants with mild hypertension show significant reductions in stroke, death from cardiovascular disease, and total mortality. Meta-analyses comparing lower blood pressure targets also suggest a benefit of treating patients with mild hypertension, although net benefits are greater for patients at higher absolute levels of cardiovascular disease risk. Before starting drug treatment, most patients should have out-of-office monitoring to confirm hypertension. Lifestyle modifications for reducing blood pressure are appropriate for all patients and may be recommended while delaying drug treatment for those at lower absolute levels of cardiovascular disease risk. Patient level control of blood pressure is supported by home monitoring and by once daily, low cost drug. Control of blood pressure for a population of patients is enhanced by system level interventions such as registries, implementation of evidence based protocols, drug titration visits, and performance metrics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Knowledge and awareness of hypertension among patients with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Familoni, B Oluranti; Ogun, S Abayomi; Aina, A Olutoyin

    2004-05-01

    In Nigeria, systemic hypertension is the commonest noncommunicable disease, and public awareness about hypertension and its determinants is poor. This study aims to assess the knowledge and level of awareness of the disease among hypertensive patients attending the medical outpatient clinic of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH). Hypertensive patients who attended the medical outpatient clinic during the one-year study period and gave their consent were recruited into the study. Response to a questionnaire on various aspects of hypertension was analyzed using the STATA for Windows software. There were 254 hypertensive patients, of which 111 were males and 143 were females, giving a male: female ratio of 1:1.3. The mean age (SD) of the patients was 51 years +/- 12.2; 52.4% of the participants were aware that hypertension was the commonest noncommunicable disease in Nigeria. About one in 10 patients (11.4%) was aware that "nil symptom" is the commonest symptom of hypertension, while 37% were not aware that hypertension could cause renal failure. Only about one-third (35.4%) of the patients knew that hypertension should ideally be treated for life, while 58.3% believed that antihypertensive drugs should be used only when there are symptoms. The remaining 6.3% believed that the treatment of hypertension should be for periods ranging from two weeks to five years but not for life. This study has demonstrated inadequate knowledge of hypertension in patients with hypertension in our study population. Conscious efforts should be made and time set aside to health educate hypertensive patients. Organization of "hypertensive club or society" could be encouraged. These will reduce dissemination of false or inaccurate information by hypertensive patients to the public and its attendant dangers.

  16. How will the growing threat of resistant hypertension impact the future treatment of high blood pressure?

    PubMed

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2013-11-01

    Hypertension treatment and control efforts represent a major component of primary care with dedicated clinical guidelines and recommendations. However, high blood pressure (BP) control rates are complicated with the difficult to treat and resistant hypertensive patients. This category of patient, therefore, affects the development and implementation of the clinical guidelines. The recommendations of specific algorithms for resistant hypertension and difficult-to-treat patients with elevated BPs have been developed in consideration of new therapies and combination drug treatment. Hypertension treatment guidelines include and will continue to grade evidence from randomized clinical trials with detailed strategies on the management of these high-risk patients. Although resistant hypertension affects high BP control rates, the inclusion of refined pharmaceutical and device treatment strategies in evidence-based guidelines will be expected to have a significant impact on the clinical management of this high-risk patient population.

  17. Hypertension criterion for stroke prevention--to strengthen the principle of individualization in guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yicong; Chen, Xinran; Dang, Ge; Zhao, Yuhui; Ouyang, Fubing; Su, Zhenpei; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension, as recommended by most guidelines, is determined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg. A threshold-based definition of hypertension, however, ignores sex and age, pathophysiology, and disparities in patient-specific conditions. Moreover, the harmful effects of hypertension-induced target organ damage cannot be ignored. Although the principle of individualization for hypertension management is recommended, especially for stroke prevention, how to practice it in a clinical setting has not been clearly elaborated. Therefore, we put forward a proposal for individualized hypertension management incorporating target organ damage, the main harmful effect of hypertension. We propose that hypertension should be diagnosed when an individual's blood pressure exceeds some difference from their own baseline in young adulthood, accompanied by any hypertension-induced target organ damage, confirmed by various detection methods. Application of this proposal to stroke prevention will hopefully strengthen the principle of individualized hypertension management. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Portopulmonar hypertension: Updated review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Almendros, Nielzer; Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz N; Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; Espinola Zavaleta, Nilda; Muñoz-Martínez, Sergio G; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-12-13

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare global entity, although epidemiological data are unknown in Mexico. However, chronic liver diseases are very prevalent in Mexico. The PPH is the 4th subtype in frequency in the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its diagnosis is within 2 groups: patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension and candidates for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Both echocardiogram and a right cardiac catheterization are crucial for diagnosis in both scenarios. The PPH is a challenge for OLT since it can increase perioperative mortality significantly. The use of specific therapy is the cornerstone of this disease, as a measure to improve the outcome of those who become candidates for OLT with moderate to severe PPH. It is important to recognize that PPH can be a contraindication to OLT. So far the role of lung-liver transplantation or heart-lung-liver transplantation as a measure to heal pulmonary vascular disease in patients with PPH is uncertain.

  19. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  20. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-03

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  1. [Hypertension and heart].

    PubMed

    Hennersdorf, Marcus G; Strauer, Bodo E

    2006-03-22

    The term hypertensive heart disease covers the entities left ventricular hypertrophy, microangiopathy, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, und increased risk of arrhythmias. From the pathophysiological point of view this is caused by hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes, interstitial fibrosis and media hypertrophy of the arterioles. As an earliest sign of hypertensive heart disease a microangiopathy can be diagnosed. Also a diastolic dysfunction can be found as an early change. In further persisting arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy develops (often asymmetric), and later a systolic dysfunction. Clinically, the patients suffer from angina pectoris, dyspnea and rhythm disorders. Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of ventricular malignant arrhythmias. Thus, the main therapeutic principle should be antihypertensive therapy with the goal of regression of hypertrophy and, as a consequence, a decreased mortality risk.

  2. Oral contraceptives and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G D

    1977-01-01

    A variety of studies have noted that the use of oral contraceptives generally leads to mild increases in blood pressure which are usually reversible when the medication is discontinued. Representative data from the Walnut Creek Contraceptive Drug Study and the Royal College of General Practitioners Study concerning the magnitude of excess risk and relation to duration of use and pull content are shown. Preliminary data from women, aged 25-34 years, taking multiphasic health checkups in Oakland and San Francisco, suggest that black as well as white women are susceptible to this side effect of oral contraceptives. A method is given for estimating the proportion of hypertensives among a population of young women that is attributable to oral contraceptive use. Although the risk of pull-induced hypertension is small for the average user, oral contraceptives appear to be an important identifiable cause of hypertension in samples of women studied.

  3. Snakes and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition of Angiotensin Conversion in Experimental Renovascular Hypertension. By Miller ED Jr, Samuels A, Haber E, and Barger AC. Science 1972; 177:1108-9. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.Constriction of the renal artery and controlled reduction of renal perfusion pressure is followed by a prompt increase in systemic renin activity and a concomitant rise in blood pressure in trained, unanesthetized dogs. The elevated blood pressure induced by the renal artery stenosis can be prevented by prior treatment with the nonapeptide Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro, which blocks conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Further, the nonapeptide can restore systemic pressure to normal in the early phase of renovascular hypertension. These results offer strong evidence that the renin- angiotensin system is responsible for the initiation of hypertension in the unilaterally nephrectomized dog with renal artery constriction.

  4. [Hypertension and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    The number of patients with high blood pressure and osteoporosis are increased year by year in our society. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidism to increase serum calcium level by calcium release from bone, which may accelerate osteoporosis. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. Recently, it has been reported that angiotensin receptor blockade clinically decreased the incidence of bone fracture. Renin-angiotensin system might be common molecule to regulate both hypertension and osteoporosis.

  5. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, P.

    1990-01-01

    In susceptible persons emotional stress results in immediate sympathetic stimulation, with a vasomotor response that results in a high-output state and elevated blood pressure; the vasopressor response seems to be transient. There seems to be no longitudinal epidemiologic validation of the attractive hypothesis that transiently elevated blood pressures are the prelude to fixed hypertension, however. The acquisition of hypertension by populations abandoning their traditional mode of living has been attributed to the sociocultural stress inherent in westernization, but these studies usually have not taken into account concomitants of this type of acculturation, such as dietary changes and increased body weight. The inverse relationship of blood pressure levels to education could explain the development of hypertension when aspiration to upward mobility is thwarted. The severity of perceived occupational stress relates inversely to blood pressure, suggesting that familiarity with a job renders the demands made by the work environment more predictable and less threatening in terms of vasopressor response. PMID:2219875

  6. Diagnosis, Epidemiology, and Management of Hypertension in Children.

    PubMed

    Rao, Goutham

    2016-08-01

    National guidelines for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in children have been available for nearly 40 years. Unfortunately, knowledge and recognition of the problem by clinicians remain poor. Prevalence estimates are highly variable because of differing standards, populations, and blood pressure (BP) measurement techniques. Estimates in the United States range from 0.3% to 4.5%. Risk factors for primary hypertension include overweight and obesity, male sex, older age, high sodium intake, and African American or Latino ancestry. Data relating hypertension in childhood to later cardiovascular events is currently lacking. It is known that BP in childhood is highly predictive of BP in adulthood. Compelling data about target organ damage is available, including the association of hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, carotid-intima media thickness, and microalbuminuria. Guidelines from both the United States and Europe include detailed recommendations for diagnosis and management. Diagnostic standards are based on clinic readings, ambulatory BP monitoring is useful in confirming diagnosis of hypertension and identifying white-coat hypertension, masked hypertension, and secondary hypertension, as well as monitoring response to therapy. Research priorities include the need for reliable prevalence estimates based on diverse populations and data about the long-term impact of childhood hypertension on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Priorities to improve clinical practice include more education among clinicians about diagnosis and management, clinical decision support to aid in diagnosis, and routine use of ambulatory BP monitoring to aid in diagnosis and to monitor response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Hypertension from the perspective of Iranian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Roshanak; Gharooni, Manouchehr; Amin, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaeil; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, hypertension is considered as a global public health issue and in recent decades, it has shown a growing trend due to changes in lifestyle. The purpose of this investigation was to compare symptoms of hypertension with known diseases in ancient medical texts and to find a disease that had the maximum overlap of symptoms with hypertension. In this qualitative study, reliable sources of traditional medicine such as The Canon of Medicine by Avicenna, The Complete Art of Medicine (Kitab Kamil as-Sina'aat-Tibbiyya) by Haly Abbas, Facilitating Treatment and a letter for Health preservation (Tahsil Al-Elaj and Resale Hafez Al-Sehha) by Mohammad Taghi Shirazi, and some reliable resources of conventional medicine such as Harrison's principles of internal medicine and databases such as Pubmed, Scopus, SID, and Magiran were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlapping symptoms with hypertension. By taking notes from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Findings showed that hypertension has the most overlap with Imila (accumulation of normal or abnormal fluid in the body) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a quietly perfect overlap and there are other causes and reasons including dry dystemperament of vessel wall (atherosclerosis), hot dystemperament of heart or damages to other organs like liver, kidney and nervous system that could also lead to hypertension according to Iranian traditional medicine. Finding the equivalent disease to HTN based on Iranian traditional medicine, could suggest a better strategy for preventing, treating and reducing debilitating its complications in the future. In conclusion, we can approach to hypertension with recommendations for reducing Imtila when we are dealing with a kind of hypertension that corresponds to Imtila. Therefore, if patient is suffering from another type of hypertension like dry dystemperament of vessel wall, it surely requires

  8. Hypertension and Its Correlates Among School Adolescents in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Tanu; Ingle, G. K.; Meena, G. S.; Kishore, Jugal; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is fast emerging as a major health problem amongst all school adolescents, particularly in urban areas. Regular screening of the students for this is required for preventing the emergence of complications later in life. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with the objective to determine the prevalence of hypertension amongst urban school adolescents and its correlation with anthropometric measurements. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a school in Central Delhi involving all 315 students of 9th and 11th standard. A preforma was filled by the students and anthropometric measurements along with blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken for each student. Data was analyzed using Epi-info 2005 and SPSS 16.0. Results: Out of the total 315 students, 208 (66%) were boys and 107 (34%) were girls and the mean age was 14.31 ± 0.96 years. Overall prevalence of malnutrition was 24% and boys were found to be more obese as compared to girls. There were 5 students (1.6%) who were found to have systolic hypertension while 17 (5.4%) were found to have diastolic hypertension while 4.1% (n = 13) of the participants were systolic pre-hypertensive and 26% (n = 82) were in stage of diastolic pre-hypertension. Body mass index and gender were found to be independent predictor for systolic hypertension. Conclusions: Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension was high amongst the school children. BP check-up for children and adolescents is thus recommended to take remedial action on time. PMID:24791194

  9. Hypertension From the Perspective of Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Roshanak; Gharooni, Manouchehr; Amin, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaeil; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, hypertension is considered as a global public health issue and in recent decades, it has shown a growing trend due to changes in lifestyle. Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to compare symptoms of hypertension with known diseases in ancient medical texts and to find a disease that had the maximum overlap of symptoms with hypertension. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, reliable sources of traditional medicine such as The Canon of Medicine by Avicenna, The Complete Art of Medicine (Kitab Kamil as-Sina’aat-Tibbiyya) by Haly Abbas, Facilitating Treatment and a letter for Health preservation (Tahsil Al-Elaj and Resale Hafez Al-Sehha) by Mohammad Taghi Shirazi, and some reliable resources of conventional medicine such as Harrison’s principles of internal medicine and databases such as Pubmed, Scopus, SID, and Magiran were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlapping symptoms with hypertension. By taking notes from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Results: Findings showed that hypertension has the most overlap with Imila (accumulation of normal or abnormal fluid in the body) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a quietly perfect overlap and there are other causes and reasons including dry dystemperament of vessel wall (atherosclerosis), hot dystemperament of heart or damages to other organs like liver, kidney and nervous system that could also lead to hypertension according to Iranian traditional medicine. Conclusions: Finding the equivalent disease to HTN based on Iranian traditional medicine, could suggest a better strategy for preventing, treating and reducing debilitating its complications in the future. In conclusion, we can approach to hypertension with recommendations for reducing Imtila when we are dealing with a kind of hypertension that corresponds to Imtila. Therefore, if patient is suffering from another type of

  10. Is the prevalence of hypertension in overweight children overestimated?

    PubMed

    Wirix, Aleid J G; Nauta, Jeroen; Groothoff, Jaap W; Rabelink, Ton J; HiraSing, Remy A; Chinapaw, Mai Jm; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to explore different methods for screening and diagnosing hypertension-which definitions and criteria to use-in children and in addition to determine the prevalence of hypertension in Dutch overweight children. A cross-sectional study performed in the Dutch Child Health Care setting. Four Child Health Care centres in different cities in the Netherlands. 969 overweight (including obese) and 438 non-overweight children, median age 11.7 years (range 4.1-17.10), 49% boys. The main outcome was blood pressure, and the difference in prevalence of hypertension using different criteria for blood pressure interpretation: using the first blood pressure measurement, the mean of two measurements and the lowest of three measurements on two different occasions. Looking at the first measurement alone, 33% of overweight and 21% of non-overweight children had hypertension. By comparing the mean of the first two measurements with reference values, 28% of overweight children and 16% of non-overweight children had hypertension. Based on the lowest of three consecutive measurements, the prevalence decreased to 12% among overweight children and 5% among non-overweight children at visit one and at visit two 4% of overweight children still had hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is highly dependent on the definitions and criteria used. We found a prevalence of 4% in overweight children, which is considerably lower than suggested by recent literature (4%-33%). This discrepancy can be explained by our more strict definition of hypertension. However, to draw any conclusions on the prevalence, normal values using the same definition of hypertension should be established. Despite the low prevalence, we recommend measuring blood pressure in all overweight children in view of later cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Appraisal of the quality and contents of clinical practice guidelines for hypertension management in Chinese medicine: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Ya; Han, Xue-Jie; Weng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Xue-Yao; Liu, Yu-Qi; Li, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Da-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Ping; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2016-12-09

    To evaluate the quality and consistency of recommendations in the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for hypertension in Chinese medicine (CM). CM CPGs were identified from 5 electronic databases and hand searches through related handbooks published from January 1990 to December 2013. Three reviewers independently appraised the CPGs based on the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument, and compared the CPGs' recommendations on CM syndrome pattern classification and treatment. Five CM CPGs for hypertension were included. The quality score of the evidence-based (EB) guideline was higher than those of the consensus-based with no explicit consideration of evidence-based (CB-EB) and the consensus-based (CB) guidelines. Three out of five patterns in the CPGs were recommended by the EB guideline. Tianma Gouteng Formula () in the EB guideline was recommended mostly for hypertension patients with pattern of ascendant hyperactivity of Gan (Liver)-yang and pattern of yin deficiency with yang hyperactivity in the CPGs. Acupuncture and massage were recommended for Grade I and Grade II hypertension with severe symptoms weakening the quality of life in the EB guideline. For Grade I and Grade II hypertension, CM could be used alone, while for Grade III hypertension, they should be used in combination with Western medicines. The quality of EB guideline was higher than those of CB and CB-EB CPGs in CM for hypertension and CM should be prescribed alone or combined with Western medicines based on the grade of hypertension.

  12. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  13. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  14. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  15. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  16. Immune mechanisms in hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Porteri, Enzo; Petroboni, Beatrice; Gavazzi, Alice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Low grade inflammation may have a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Several studies showed that both innate and adaptive immune systems may be involved, being T cells the most important players. Particularly, the balance between Th1 effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes may be crucial for blood pressure elevation and related organ damage development. In the presence of a mild elevation of blood pressure, neo-antigens are produced. Activated Th1 cells may then contribute to the persistent elevation of blood pressure by affecting vasculature, kidney and perivascular fat. On the other hand, Tregs represent a lymphocyte subpopulation with an anti-inflammatory role, being their activity crucial for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, Tregs were demonstrated to be able to protect from blood pressure elevation and from the development of organ damage, including micro and macrovascular alterations, in different animal models of genetic or experimental hypertension. In the vasculature, inflammation leads to vascular remodeling through cytokine activity, smooth muscle cell proliferation and oxidative stress. It is also known that a consistent part of ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is mediated by inflammatory infiltration and that Treg cell infusion have a protective role. Also the central nervous system has an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. In conclusion, hypertension development involves chronic inflammatory process. Knowledge of cellular and molecular players in the progression of hypertension has dramatically improved in the last decade, by assessing the central role of innate and adaptive immunity cells and proinflammatory cytokines driving the development of target organ damage. The new concept of role of immunity, especially implicating T lymphocytes, will eventually allow discovery of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and

  17. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, J; Egger, K; Harloff, A

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the clinical findings as well as thes diagnostic and therapeutic options for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri). Furthermore, the pathophysiological concepts are discussed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with no established pathogenesis. Common symptoms include headaches, visual loss and pulsatile tinnitus. Treatment has two major goals: the alleviation of headaches and the preservation of vision. Weight loss and acetazolamide are the cornerstones in the treatment of the disorder. Drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve sheath fenestration and stent angioplasty of a sinus stenosis can be employed in severe cases.

  18. Hypertension in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2012-06-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men, but cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women.

  19. Neurological theory of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eggers, A E

    2003-06-01

    Review of the older literature on the relationship between migraine and hypertension, written in the era before either condition could be treated, discloses a high rate of co-morbidity. A neurological theory of essential hypertension is proposed in which the two diseases are brought together into one entity. It is hypothesized that abnormally functioning serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus, as part of a chronic stress response, inappropriately activate and inhibit parts of the central and autonomic nervous systems, so as to cause the two conditions. This theory builds on a previously published neural theory of migraine.

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension: definition, classification and treatments].

    PubMed

    Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Humbert, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a cardio-pulmonary disorder that may involve multiple clinical conditions and can complicate the majority of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Its definition is an increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) \\hbox{$\\geqslant $} ⩾ 25 mmHg at rest, leading to right heart failure and ultimately death. The clinical classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) categorizes PH into groups which share similar pathophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics and treatments. Five groups of disorders that cause PH are identified: pulmonary arterial hypertension (Group 1) which is a pre-capillary PH, defined by a normal pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) \\hbox{$\\leqslant $} ⩽ 15 mmH, due to remodelling of the small pulmonary arteries (<500 μm); pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (Group 2) which is a post-capillary PH, defined by an increased pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) >15 mmHg; pulmonary hypertension due to chronic lung disease and/or hypoxia (Group 3); chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension (Group 4); and pulmonary hypertension due to unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms (Group 5). PAH (PH group 1) can be treated with agents targeting three dysfunctional endothelial pathways of PAH: nitric oxide (NO) pathway, endothelin-1 pathway and prostacyclin pathway. Patients at low or intermediate risk can be treated with either initial monotherapy or initial oral combination therapy. In patients at high risk initial combination therapy including intravenous prostacyclin analogues should be considered. Patients with inadequate clinical response to maximum treatment (triple therapy with an intravenous prostacyclin) should be assessed for lung transplantation. Despite progresses, PAH remains a fatal disease with a 3-year survival rate of 58%. Treatment of group 2, group 3 and group 5 PH is the treatment of the causal disease and PAH therapeutics are not recommended. Treatment of group 4 PH is

  1. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension.

  2. Establishment of a Difficult Hypertension Clinic in Whangarei, New Zealand: the first 18 months.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Walter

    2008-11-07

    A Difficult Hypertension Clinic was established at Whangarei Hospital (Whangarei, Northland, New Zealand) in March 2006 in response to a perceived need amongst general practitioners. The experience with the first 150 patients is reviewed. Mean BP at referral was 162/89 mmHg, and mean number of antihypertensive drugs was 2.49. Mean BP at discharge from the Difficult Hypertension Clinic was 138/78 mmHg and mean number of antihypertensive drugs 3.16. The commonest cause of hypertension resistance was underprescription of diuretics. Secondary or contributory causes of hypertension were identified in 28 (19%) of patients, and white coat hypertension in three (2%). The Difficult Hypertension Clinic established in our hospital is an effective model for achieving clinical targets and care recommended in evidence-based guidelines.

  3. Integrating Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jordana B; Cohen, Debbie L

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension were historically based on in-office blood pressure measurements. However, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently expanded their recommendations on screening for hypertension to include out-of-office blood pressure measurements to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension. Out-of-office blood pressure monitoring modalities, including ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring, are important tools in distinguishing between normotension, masked hypertension, white-coat hypertension, and sustained (including uncontrolled or drug-resistant) hypertension. Compared to in-office readings, out-of-office blood pressures are a greater predictor of renal and cardiac morbidity and mortality. There are multiple barriers to the implementation of out-of-office blood pressure monitoring which need to be overcome in order to promote more widespread use of these modalities.

  4. How do Urban African Americans and Latinos View the Influence of Diet on Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Carol R.; Tuzzio, Leah; Rojas, Mary; Monteith, Sharifa A.; Sisk, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension and its complications continue to be major health problems that disproportionately affect poor minority communities. Although dietary modification is an effective treatment for hypertension, it is not clear how hypertensive minority patients view diet as part of their treatment, and what barriers affect their abilities to eat healthy diets. We conducted nine focus groups with 88 African American and Latino patients treated for hypertension to assess their knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs concerning hypertension. Participants generally agreed that certain foods and food additives play an important role in the cause and treatment of hypertension. However, they found clinician-recommended diets difficult to follow in the context of their family lives, social situations, and cultures. These diets were often considered expensive, an unwelcome departure from traditional and preferred diets, socially isolating, and not effective enough to obviate the need for medications. These findings suggest the importance of culturally sensitive approaches to dietary improvements. PMID:15531820

  5. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    PubMed

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  6. Recommended Textbooks (Booksearch).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates four textbooks recommended by junior high and high school teachers for teaching writing and literature: "Enjoying Literature" (published by Macmillan, 1985); "Exposition: Critical Writing and Thinking" (Robert J. Gula); "Situational Writing" (Gene Krupa); and "Double Exposure: Composing through Writing…

  7. Updated Lightning Safety Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, R. James; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the recommendations of the Lightning Safety Group (LSG), which was first convened during the 1998 American Meteorological Society Conference. Findings outline appropriate actions under various circumstances when lightning threatens. (WRM)

  8. Updated Lightning Safety Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, R. James; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the recommendations of the Lightning Safety Group (LSG), which was first convened during the 1998 American Meteorological Society Conference. Findings outline appropriate actions under various circumstances when lightning threatens. (WRM)

  9. [Anticoagulation therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima

    2008-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis implicates in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Anticoagulation therapy (warfarin) has been recommended by many experts in the treatment of PAH. However, the long-term effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy remains controversial. Because of the various drugs, such as epoprostenol, bosentan, and sildenafil, for the treatment of PAH recently, warfarin alone is not a realistic therapy for PAH. Accordingly we reviewed the previous manuscript regarding anticoagulation therapy for PAH, and looked at the current role of anticoagulation therapy in Japan.

  10. Diet quality and adherence to a healthy diet in Japanese male workers with untreated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, Masao; Kanauchi, Kimiko

    2015-07-10

    As Japanese societies rapidly undergo westernisation, the prevalence of hypertension is increasing. We investigated the association between dietary quality and the prevalence of untreated hypertension in Japanese male workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 433 male workers who completed a brief food frequency questionnaire. Adherence to the WHO-based Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), the American Heart Association 2006 Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and Mediterranean-style diet was assessed using four adherence indexes (HDI score, AI-84 score, DASH score and MED score). Hypertension classes were classified into three categories: non-hypertension, untreated hypertension and treated hypertension (ie, taking antihypertensive medication). The prevalence of untreated hypertension and treated hypertension was 22.4% and 8.5%, respectively. Patients with untreated hypertension had significantly lower HDI and AI-84 scores compared with non-hypertension. DASH and MED scores across the three hypertension classes were comparable. After adjusting for age, energy intake, smoking habit, alcohol drinking, physical activity and salt intake, a low adherence to HDI and a lowest quartile of AI-84 score were associated with a significantly higher prevalence of untreated hypertension, with an OR of 3.33 (95% CI 1.39 to 7.94, p=0.007) and 2.23 (1.09 to 4.53, p=0.027), respectively. A lower dietary quality was associated with increased prevalence of untreated hypertension in Japanese male workers. Our findings support a potential beneficial impact of nutritional assessment using diet qualities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. [Management of hypertension (ESC Guideline 2007/DHL Guideline 2008)].

    PubMed

    Krauss, Timothy; Schunkert, Heribert

    2009-02-01

    The 2007 ESH/ESC (European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension focus on the individual patient with his specific cardiovascular risk profile. The existing hypertension classification remains the same as in previous editions. However, specific patient characteristics and risk profiles require a more individualized approach. Recommended diagnostic procedures have been extended in order to detect existing subclinical organ damage and/or established cardiovascular or renal diseases at an early stage. Urgency and mode of therapeutic approach can directly be derived from the relevant risk stratification matrix which continues to be an integral component of the current guidelines. The primary goal of treatment of the hypertensive patient is to achieve a maximum reduction in the long-term total risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Since blood pressure lowering per se is thought to be of major importance to achieve these goals, a number of well-established pharmaceutical substances remain at hand of the practitioner. In addition, lifestyle changes are increasingly regarded to be of high importance. In patients with established comorbidities and in young subjects the choice of a specific pharmaceutical substance class is fundamental. The gap between guideline recommendations and poor blood pressure control in medical practice remains and needs to be closed. Therefore, a collective striving of all parties involved for early detection and effective treatment is needed to overcome the current and future burden of arterial hypertension.

  12. Exercise as medicine: role in the management of primary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Millar, Philip J; Goodman, Jack M

    2014-07-01

    Primary hypertension affects ∼1 in 5 Canadians and significantly increases the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and early mortality. Guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend lifestyle modifications (e.g., increased physical activity, smoking cessation, moderate alcohol consumption, improved dietary choices) as the frontline strategy to prevent and manage high blood pressure (BP). In particular, acute and chronic aerobic exercise has consistently been shown to reduce resting and ambulatory BP, with the largest effects in hypertensive patients. Current guidelines recommend 30-60 min of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise 4-7 days per week, in addition to activities of daily living. The role of resistance training in the management of hypertension is less clear, although available data suggests resistance exercise can be performed safely without risk of increasing BP or adverse events. Presently, resistance exercise (8-10 exercises, 1-2 set(s) of 10-15 repetitions, 2-3 days/week) is advocated only as an adjunct exercise modality. Patients desiring to begin an exercise program should complete the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q or PAR-Q+) or as required, the Electronic Physical Activity Readiness Medical Examination (ePARmed-X) or Physician Clearance Form in consultation with their clinician and (or) trained exercise professional. A greater emphasis on utilizing exercise as medicine will produce positive nonpharmacologic benefits for hypertensive patients and improve overall cardiovascular risk profiles.

  13. Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society 2014 Consensus Statement: Pharmacotherapies in Cardiac Critical Care Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, John S; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2016-03-01

    To review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapies. Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension have been applied for the benefit of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no pulmonary arterial hypertension medications approved for children in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension as infusions (IV and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first-line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and is commonly used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in the ICU. Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with pulmonary arterial

  14. Social Tagging Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Jäschke, Robert; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd; Symeonidis, Panagiotis

    The new generation of Web applications known as (STS) is successfully established and poised for continued growth. STS are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. But while STS bring new opportunities, they revive old problems, such as information overload. Recommender Systems are well known applications for increasing the level of relevant content over the "noise" that continuously grows as more and more content becomes available online. In STS however, we face new challenges. Users are interested in finding not only content, but also tags and even other users. Moreover, while traditional recommender systems usually operate over 2-way data arrays, STS data is represented as a third-order tensor or a hypergraph with hyperedges denoting (user, resource, tag) triples. In this chapter, we survey the most recent and state-of-the-art work about a whole new generation of recommender systems built to serve STS.We describe (a) novel facets of recommenders for STS, such as user, resource, and tag recommenders, (b) new approaches and algorithms for dealing with the ternary nature of STS data, and (c) recommender systems deployed in real world STS. Moreover, a concise comparison between existing works is presented, through which we identify and point out new research directions.

  15. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  16. Gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among young adults.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bethany; Zajacova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health.

  17. Gender Differences in Hypertension and Hypertension Awareness Among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    EVERETT, BETHANY; ZAJACOVA, ANNA

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health. PMID:25879259

  18. Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension among adolescents.

    PubMed

    McNiece, Karen L; Poffenbarger, Timothy S; Turner, Jennifer L; Franco, Kathy D; Sorof, Jonathan M; Portman, Ronald J

    2007-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension on the basis of the 2004 National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group guidelines in an adolescent school-screening population. Cross-sectional assessment of blood pressure (BP) in 6790 adolescents (11-17 years) in Houston schools was conducted from 2003 to 2005. Initial measurements included height, weight, and 4 oscillometric BP readings. Repeat measurements were obtained on 2 subsequent occasions in students with persistently elevated BP. Final prevalence was adjusted for loss to follow-up and logistic regression used to assess risk factors. BP distribution at initial screen was 81.1% normal, 9.5% pre-hypertension, and 9.4% hypertension (8.4% Stage 1; 1% Stage 2). Prevalence after 3 screenings was 81.1% normal, 15.7% pre-hypertension, and 3.2% hypertension (2.6% Stage 1; 0.6% Stage 2). Hypertension and pre-hypertension increased with increasing body mass index. Sex, race, and classification as either at-risk for overweight or overweight were independently associated with pre-hypertension. Only classification as overweight was associated with hypertension. Application of new classification guidelines for adolescents with elevated BP reveals approximately 20% are at risk for hypertension. Further research determining the significance of each BP category and refining definitions to account for BP variability is warranted.

  19. Treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Czarina Acelajado, M; Calhoun, D A

    2009-12-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is a common clinical problem. Patients with RH have increased cardiovascular risk. These patients also have high risk for having reversible causes of hypertension and may potentially benefit from special diagnostic or therapeutic considerations. The purpose of this review was to discuss RH, its definition, recognition, evaluation and treatment. Authors define RH and the implications of this definition. They present latest data on its prevalence, prognostic implications, genetics, and patient characteristics. Elements of pseudoresistance and possible etiologies of treatment resistance are also identified. Lastly, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to RH are discussed, focusing on antihypertensive medication classes that have proven benefit in patients with RH, and also on novel therapeutic approaches in these patients. RH is a common clinical problem and carries an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as well as target organ damage. Patients with RH are aat high risk for reversible causes of hypertension and may benefit from special diagnostic or therapeutic considerations. Elements of pseudoresistance, intake of interfering substances and secondary causes of hypertension should be searched for and corrected, if possible. Therapeutic lifestyle modifications should be emphasized. Medical therapy includes optimizing diuretic use and considering the use of mineralocorticoid antagonists as add on antihypertensive agents. Novel approaches include surgical and transcatheter techniques, chronotherapy, and new classes of antihypertensive agents.

  20. Hypertension in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aglony, Marlene; Acevedo, Monica; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In adults, hypertension has long been perceived as a public health problem. By contrast, its impact in childhood is far less appreciated. In fact, quite often, high blood pressure in children is not even diagnosed. Blood pressure is a vital sign that is routinely obtained during a physical examination of adults, but only very seldom in children. The diagnosis of hypertension in children is complicated because 'normal' blood pressure values vary with age, sex and height. As a consequence, almost 75% of the cases of arterial hypertension and 90% of the cases of prehypertension in children and adolescents are currently undiagnosed. Furthermore, adolescence hypertension is increasing in prevalence as the prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful method for risk evaluation in adolescents. In addition to being viewed as an important cardiovascular risk factor in adolescents, elevated blood pressure should prompt a thorough search for other modifiable risk factors that, if treated, might reduce teenagers' risk of developing cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Thus, assessing blood pressure values in children represents one of the most important measurable markers of cardiovascular risk later in life and a major step in preventive medicine.

  1. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  3. Children and Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  4. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  5. Children and Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  6. Decoding white coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-03-16

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the "white coat" condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure.

  7. Decoding white coat hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-01-01

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the “white coat” condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure. PMID:28352632

  8. Self-Care Behaviors and Related Factors in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zinat Motlagh, Sayed Fazel; Chaman, Reza; Sadeghi, Erfan; Eslami, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background An assessment of an individual’s hypertension self-care behavior may provide clinicians and practitioners with important information regarding how to better control hypertension. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the self-care behaviors of hypertensive patients. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in a sample of 1836 patients of both genders who had been diagnosed with hypertension in urban and rural health centers in the Kohgiluyeh Boyerahmad Province in southern Iran. They were randomly selected and were invited to participate in the study. Self-care activities were measured using the H-hypertension self-care activity level effects. Results The mean age of the respondents was 63 (range: 30 - 92), and 36.1% reported adherence to the recommended levels of medication; 24.5% followed the physical activity level guidelines. Less than half (39.2%) met the criteria for practices related to weight management, and adherence to low-salt diet recommendations was also low (12.3%). Overall, 86.7% were nonsmokers, and 100% abstained from alcohol. The results of a logistic regression indicated that gender was significantly associated with adherence to physical activity (OR = 0.716) and non-smoking (OR = 1.503) recommendations; that is, women were more likely to take part in physical activity than men. There was also a significant association between age and adherence to both a low-salt diet (OR = 1.497) and medication (OR = 1.435). Conclusions Based on our findings, it is crucial to implement well-designed educational programs to improve hypertension self-care behaviors. PMID:27621938

  9. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment.

  10. [Hypertension In pregnancy: practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Jaafar; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Ditisheim, Agnès

    2014-09-10

    Hypertension is the most frequent medical disorder of pregnancy. Whether in the form of a chronic hypertension or a pregnancy induced-hypertension, or preeclampsia, it is associated with major maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Improvement of prenatal care allowed a reduction in the number of poor outcomes. However, our partial understanding of the origin of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia limits the establishment of robust prediction models and efficient preventive interventions. This review discusses actual considerations on the clinical approach to hypertension in pregnancy.

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  12. PREVALENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS AMONG PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Chahoud, Jad; Mrad, Jad; Semaan, Adele; Asmar, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among patients with arterial hypertension, and indirectly, the crucial impact of adopting screening for diabetes as a standard procedure for all patients diagnosed with arterial hypertension. This cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of hypertensive patients recruited from three different university hospitals in Lebanon. Blood pressure and glycemic blood measurements were determined in all subjects. In addition, a complete clinical history and physical exam were performed. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS 19.0. Frequencies for the different variables were calculated, and the chi-square and independent sample t-tests were conducted. This study included 294 patients. Prevalence of diabetes was 27%, and 23% of diabetic patients were newly diagnosed. More than half of the subjects suffering from DM had uncontrolled blood pressure, contrasted with only one third of the non-diabetic subjects with uncontrolled hypertension. The prevalence of DM in patients with essential hypertension was more than double that of the general population. Therefore, major recommendations would be to adopt strictly the diabetes screening requirements and aggressive management among hypertensive patients to minimize both the health and cost burdens associated with undetected DM.

  13. The Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS): a catalyst for change.

    PubMed

    Williams, B

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension is now established as a major risk factor for premature cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes and all modern treatment guidelines recommend the routine treatment of hypertension in these patients. However, these developments have been relatively recent. Only a decade ago, outside of small studies in patients with nephropathy, there was little evidence with regard to the efficacy and safety of treating elevated blood pressure in people with Type 2 diabetes. Consequently, for many patients, elevated blood pressure remained undetected and untreated. This changed with the publication of the Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS) in 1998. This study revealed that hypertension was very common in people with Type 2 diabetes and demonstrated the dramatic benefits of blood pressure lowering in reducing their risk of major macrovascular and microvascular complications. The unequivocal evidence from this study provided a much-needed catalyst for change, propelling blood pressure measurement and its treatment to the forefront of risk management in these patients. Many studies have followed and many questions remain with regard to the preferred anti-hypertensive treatment strategy and optimal treatment targets for blood pressure. In the meantime, many millions of patients with Type 2 diabetes worldwide have benefited and will continue to benefit from the therapeutic insights gained from the treatment of blood pressure in the 1148 patients enrolled in the Hypertension in Diabetes Study in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study.

  14. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  15. Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dimeo, Fernando; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H

    2012-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is broadly recommended by current European and American hypertension guidelines. It remains elusive, however, whether exercise leads to a reduction of blood pressure in resistant hypertension as well. The present randomized controlled trial examines the cardiovascular effects of aerobic exercise on resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension was defined as a blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg in spite of 3 antihypertensive agents or a blood pressure controlled by ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Fifty subjects with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to participate or not to participate in an 8- to 12-week treadmill exercise program (target lactate, 2.0±0.5 mmol/L). Blood pressure was assessed by 24-hour monitoring. Arterial compliance and cardiac index were measured by pulse wave analysis. The training program was well tolerated by all of the patients. Exercise significantly decreased systolic and diastolic daytime ambulatory blood pressure by 6±12 and 3±7 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.03 each). Regular exercise reduced blood pressure on exertion and increased physical performance as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake and lactate curves. Arterial compliance and cardiac index remained unchanged. Physical exercise is able to decrease blood pressure even in subjects with low responsiveness to medical treatment. It should be included in the therapeutic approach to resistant hypertension.

  16. The double challenge of resistant hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Patrick; Massy, Ziad A; Azizi, Michel; Bakris, George; Ritz, Eberhard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Heine, Gunnar H; Jager, Kitty J; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Ortiz, Alberto; Vanholder, Raymond; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel; Stengel, Bénédicte; Fouque, Denis

    2015-10-17

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above goal despite adherence to a combination of at least three optimally dosed antihypertensive medications, one of which is a diuretic. Chronic kidney disease is the most frequent of several patient factors or comorbidities associated with resistant hypertension. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease, while chronic kidney disease is associated with an impaired prognosis in patients with resistant hypertension. Recommended low-salt diet and triple antihypertensive drug regimens that include a diuretic, should be complemented by the sequential addition of other antihypertensive drugs. New therapeutic innovations for resistant hypertension, such as renal denervation and carotid barostimulation, are under investigation especially in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We discuss resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5 (ie, patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) and not on dialysis), in terms of worldwide epidemiology, outcomes, causes and pathophysiology, evidence-based treatment, and a call for action.

  17. Resistant hypertension: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Dell' Omo, Giulia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Cameli, Matteo; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Coiro, Stefano; Emdin, Michele; Liga, Riccardo; Marcucci, Rossella; Morrone, Doralisa; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Padeletti, Luigi; Savino, Ketty

    2017-09-05

    Despite the availability of anti-hypertensive medications with proven efficacy and good tolerability, many hypertensive patients have blood pressure levels(BP) not at the goals set by international societies. Some of these patients are either non-adherent to the prescribed drugs or not optimally treated. However, a proportion, despite adequate treatment, has resistant hypertension(RH) defined as office BP above goal despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses (one ideally being a diuretic). Diagnosis of RH based upon office measurements, however, needs confirmation through 24-h BP monitoring to exclude "white coat" RH since cardiovascular events and mortality rates follow mean ambulatory BPs. Although several studies have approached the issue of the prevalence of RH in the hypertensive population, its prevalence is by and large based upon reasonable but approximate estimates for reasons detailed in the text. Standardized combination therapy based upon angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, amlodipine or other dihydropiridine calcium channel blockers and a diuretic (thiazide and thiazide-like compounds as cholrthalidone or indapamide) has been advocated to treat RH with spironolactone as fourth add-on drug. Interventional procedures such as renal denervation have been devised to treat RH and implemented in some patients with RH not responding to medical treatment. However, the results of this interventional procedure have insofar not been positive. It is unclear whether RH constitutes a specific phenotype of EH or should rather be considered a more serious form of uncontrolled hypertension. Whatever the case, its presence associates with and increased cardio- and cerebrovascular risk and deserves, therefore, particular care.

  18. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  19. Hypertension in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hanna, N N; Kenady, D E

    1999-12-01

    Adrenal-dependent hypertension syndromes are uncommon forms of hypertension. They include primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, Cushing"s syndrome, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Pheochromocytomas are the cause of hypertension in 0.1% to 0.2% of hypertensive patients. Excess catecholamine release and other neural and humoral mechanisms contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension. Patients with pheochromocytomas have a potentially curable cause of endocrine hypertension and, if undetected, pheochromocytomas confer a high risk for morbidity and mortality, especially during surgical procedures and pregnancy. All patients with incidental adrenal tumors, regardless of tumor size, should be biochemically screened for pheochromocytoma (especially before resection or needle biopsy) to avoid precipitation of a lethal hypertensive crisis.

  20. [Pathophysiology of hypertension: what's new?].

    PubMed

    Büchner, Nikolaus; Vonend, Oliver; Rump, Lars Christian

    2006-06-01

    The pathophysiology of primary hypertension is still unresolved and appears more complex than ever. It is beyond the scope of this article to review all new scientific developments in this field. On clinical grounds, hypertension is divided into primary and secondary forms. Here, the authors discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension associated with three common disease entities showing a large overlap with primary hypertension: chronic kidney disease (CKD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and hyperaldosteronism. Especially in CKD and OSA, the activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays a crucial role. It is the authors' belief that hypertension due to these three diseases is more common than previously appreciated and may account for about 20% of the hypertensive population. The knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology allows early diagnosis and guides optimal treatment of these hypertensive patients.

  1. Rauwolfia in the Treatment of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lobay, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is a safe and effective treatment for hypertension. The plant was used by many physicians throughout India in the 1940s and then was used throughout the world in the 1950s, including in the United States and Canada. It fell out of popularity when adverse side effects, including depression and cancer, became associated with it. This author reviews the scientific literature with regard to the use of Rauwolfia and the treatment of hypertension. The author reviews the plant’s botany, chemistry, and pharmacology and provides a researched and documented method of action for the active ingredients. With special emphasis on the plant’s role in treating high blood pressure, the author looks at medical uses of the plant, critically examining its adverse side effects, toxicology, and carcinogenicity. The author refutes the association between the plant and carcinogenicity and discusses the importance of correct dosing and of screening patients to minimize the occurrence of depression. He concludes with the recommendation of use of low dose Rauwolfia (LDR) for suitable patients with hypertension. The plant provides clinicians with a safe and effective adjunct to pharmaceuticals in the treatment of high blood pressure. PMID:26770146

  2. Distributed Deliberative Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-García, Juan A.; Díaz-Agudo, Belén; González-Sanz, Sergio; Sanchez, Lara Quijano

    Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is one of most successful applied AI technologies of recent years. Although many CBR systems reason locally on a previous experience base to solve new problems, in this paper we focus on distributed retrieval processes working on a network of collaborating CBR systems. In such systems, each node in a network of CBR agents collaborates, arguments and counterarguments its local results with other nodes to improve the performance of the system's global response. We describe D2ISCO: a framework to design and implement deliberative and collaborative CBR systems that is integrated as a part of jcolibritwo an established framework in the CBR community. We apply D2ISCO to one particular simplified type of CBR systems: recommender systems. We perform a first case study for a collaborative music recommender system and present the results of an experiment of the accuracy of the system results using a fuzzy version of the argumentation system AMAL and a network topology based on a social network. Besides individual recommendation we also discuss how D2ISCO can be used to improve recommendations to groups and we present a second case of study based on the movie recommendation domain with heterogeneous groups according to the group personality composition and a group topology based on a social network.

  3. Space Station Software Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Four panels of invited experts and NASA representatives focused on the following topics: software management, software development environment, languages, and software standards. Each panel deliberated in private, held two open sessions with audience participation, and developed recommendations for the NASA Space Station Program. The major thrusts of the recommendations were as follows: (1) The software management plan should establish policies, responsibilities, and decision points for software acquisition; (2) NASA should furnish a uniform modular software support environment and require its use for all space station software acquired (or developed); (3) The language Ada should be selected for space station software, and NASA should begin to address issues related to the effective use of Ada; and (4) The space station software standards should be selected (based upon existing standards where possible), and an organization should be identified to promulgate and enforce them. These and related recommendations are described in detail in the conference proceedings.

  4. Urotherapy recommendations for bedwetting.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K. C.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of urotherapy recommendations prior to pharmacological or moisture alarm treatment in the management of bedwetting in children. METHODS: Children assessed for bedwetting at a voiding dysfunction clinic were admitted to a prospective, uncontrolled pilot study. The families were instructed to follow specific urotherapy recommendations. RESULTS: Of the 23 children who completed the study, sixteen (70%) improved with at least one less wet night per week, nine (39%) with at least a 50% reduction, and five (22%) resolved. CONCLUSION: Urotherapy recommendations prior to pharmacological or moisture alarm treatment shows promise and potential for the management of children with bedwetting. Further studies are necessary to determine if the improvement is sustained. PMID:12126283

  5. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  6. Self-medication among people living with hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Rahmawati, Riana; Bajorek, Beata V

    2017-04-01

    Self-medication is commonly practised by patients, underpinned by health beliefs that affect their adherence to medication regimens, and impacting on treatment outcomes. This review explores the scope of self-medication practices among people with hypertension, in terms of the scale of use, types of medication and influencing factors. A comprehensive search of English language, peer-reviewed literature published between 2000 and 2014 was performed. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria; 22 of these focused on complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). Anti-hypertensive medications are listed among the 11% of products that patients reportedly obtain over-the-counter (OTC) for self-medication. On average, 25% of patients use CAMs, mostly herbs, to lower blood pressure. Recommendations by family, friends and neighbours are the most influential factors for self-medication with CAMs. Faith in treatment with CAMs, dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and the desire to reduce medication costs are also cited. Most (70%) patients with hypertension take OTC medicines to treat minor illnesses. The concurrent use of anti-hypertensive medications with analgesics and herbal medicines is commonly practised. The sociodemographic profile of patients engaging in self-medication differs markedly in the articles reviewed; self-medication practices cannot be attributed to a particular profile. Low disclosure of self-medication is consistently reported. This review highlights a high proportion of people with hypertension practise self-medication. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of self-medication with OTC and anti-hypertensive medications on hypertension treatment. Health professionals involved in hypertension management should be mindful of any types of self-medication practices.

  7. The evolving definition of systemic arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S; Giles, Thomas D

    2010-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease. Hypertension also contributes to excessive morbidity and mortality. Whereas excellent therapeutic options are available to treat hypertension, there is an unsettled issue about the very definition of hypertension. At what level of blood pressure should we treat hypertension? Does the definition of hypertension change in the presence of co-morbid conditions? This article covers in detail the evolving concepts in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension in Hemolytic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  9. Hypertension and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Seux, Marie Laure; Lenoir, Hermine; Rigaud, Anne Sophie; Forette, Françoise

    2003-11-01

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases. Several epidemiologic studies have also indicated a positive correlation between cognitive decline or dementia and blood pressure level. Indeed, the results of most longitudinal studies show that cognitive functioning is often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Cerebral infarcts, lacunae, and white matter changes are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia, but may also favor the development of Alzheimer's disease. Microcirculation disorders and endothelial dysfunctions are also advanced to explain the deterioration in cognitive functions in hypertensive subjects. Data from recent therapeutic trials open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments and must be confirmed by other studies.

  10. Hypertension in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women. PMID:22427070

  11. Recommendations for Alternative Credit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenderman, Ed; And Others

    Following a review of the mathematics topics taught in accounting, electronics, auto, food and clothing, and metals courses at Linn-Benton Community College, Albany, Oregon, recommendations were made to grant one semester of mathematics credit for completing a two-year sequence of these courses. The other required semester of mathematics should be…

  12. CETA: Assessment and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Committee on Evaluation of Employment and Training Programs.

    This document presents the principal findings and recommendations of a study conducted by the Committee on Evaluation of Employment and Training Program to assess the impact of CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) on manpower programs. This report is divided into two parts. Part 1 provides an overview of CETA's history, summarizes…

  13. Personalized Course Sequence Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Xing, Tianwei; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2016-10-01

    Given the variability in student learning it is becoming increasingly important to tailor courses as well as course sequences to student needs. This paper presents a systematic methodology for offering personalized course sequence recommendations to students. First, a forward-search backward-induction algorithm is developed that can optimally select course sequences to decrease the time required for a student to graduate. The algorithm accounts for prerequisite requirements (typically present in higher level education) and course availability. Second, using the tools of multi-armed bandits, an algorithm is developed that can optimally recommend a course sequence that both reduces the time to graduate while also increasing the overall GPA of the student. The algorithm dynamically learns how students with different contextual backgrounds perform for given course sequences and then recommends an optimal course sequence for new students. Using real-world student data from the UCLA Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department, we illustrate how the proposed algorithms outperform other methods that do not include student contextual information when making course sequence recommendations.

  14. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  15. [Dietary modification in hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Kloock, B; König, D

    2006-11-23

    Successful treatment of hypertension requires a holistic approach. In this connection, focusing on a healthy lifestyle, eating, drinking and consumption behavior and, finally, the quality of foodstuffs and the exercise habits of the patient represents an essential supplement to the classical forms of pharmaceutical treatment. The major dietary-physiological factors have been shown to be weight reduction, the monitoring of salt consumption, appropriate intake of fiber, a preference for vegetables, and a reduction of immoderate alcohol consumption.

  16. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  17. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  18. Severe paroxysmal hypertension (pseudopheochromocytoma).

    PubMed

    Mann, Samuel J

    2008-02-01

    Paroxysmal hypertension always engenders a search for a catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma. Yet 98% of people with paroxysmal hypertension do not have this tumor. The cause and management of paroxysmal hypertension remain a mystery, and the subject of remarkably few papers. This review presents an approach to understanding and successfully treating this disorder. Patients experience symptomatic blood pressure surges likely linked to sympathetic nervous system stimulation. A specific personality profile associated with this disorder suggests a psychological basis, attributable to repressed emotion related to prior emotional trauma or a repressive (nonemotional) coping style. Based on this understanding, three forms of intervention, alone or in combination, appear successful: antihypertensive therapy with agents directed at the sympathetically mediated blood pressure elevation (eg, combined alpha- and beta-blockade or central alpha-agonists such as clonidine); psychopharmacologic interventions including anxiolytic and/or antidepressant agents; and psychological intervention, particularly reassurance and increased psychological awareness. An appropriately selected intervention can reduce or eliminate attacks in most patients.

  19. Beta blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thadani, U

    1983-11-10

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective in the management of patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Noncardioselective agents, cardioselective agents and beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are equally effective, provided they are used in equipotent doses. Beta blockers can be used as first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and can be safely combined with diuretics, vasodilators, or both, for a better control of blood pressure. The exact mechanism by which beta blockers decrease blood pressure remains speculative, but they all reduce cardiac output during long-term therapy; drugs with ISA lower cardiac output and heart rate less than do drugs without ISA. Pharmacokinetic properties of beta blockers differ widely; drugs metabolized by the liver have shorter plasma half-lives than drugs primarily excreted by the kidneys. Although many of the side effects of various beta blockers are similar, differences in water and lipid solubility account for a higher incidence of central nervous system side effects with lipid-soluble drugs (such as propranolol and metoprolol) than with hydrophilic drugs (such as atenolol and timolol). The incidence of cold extremities has been reported to be less with drugs with ISA, and the incidence of bronchospasm less with cardioselective drugs. In the management of uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension, all beta blockers are equally effective and produce less troublesome side effects than alternative antihypertensive agents. For effective therapy beta blockers can be used in 2 divided daily doses or even once daily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Hypertension: management perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2012-10-01

    The increasing worldwide prevalence of hypertension and the related increase in cost due to diagnosis, management and negative outcomes forces public health institutions and clinical researchers to find new strategies to improve blood pressure (BP) control. So what are the possible future perspectives for high BP management? Three main points are briefly discussed in this article: individualized therapy, the known genetic contribution to hypertension development and control, and the improvement of disease management, including perspectives on new antihypertensive drug development. It is likely that the integration of the best available current knowledge with recent diagnostic and therapeutic achievements for the management of hypertension prevention and treatment will lead to the early detection of at-risk conditions, early diagnosis, and individualized and efficacious treatment. The most promising antihypertensive drugs currently in development are innovative renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulators. Further drugs have potentially interesting mechanisms of action, but renalase analogs are in the very early phases of development, and available endothelin antagonists have a poor safety profile.

  1. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  2. Treprostinil for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Lang, Irene; Naeije, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Treprostinil is a stable, long-acting prostacyclin analogue which can be administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a portable miniature delivery system. Subcutaneous treprostinil has been shown in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to improve exercise capacity, clinical state, functional class, pulmonary hemodynamics, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, an uncommon disease of poor prognosis. Side effects include facial flush, headache, jaw pain, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea, all typical of prostacyclin, and manageable by symptom-directed dose adjustments, and infusion site pain which may make further treatment impossible in 7%–10% of the patients. Long-term survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with subcutaneous treprostinil is similar to that reported with intravenous epoprostenol. There are uncontrolled data suggesting efficacy of subcutaneous treprostinil in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treprostinil can also be administered intravenously, although increased doses, up to 2–3 times those given subcutaneously, appear to be needed to obtain the same efficacy. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial of inhaled treprostinil on top of bosentan and sildenafil therapies have shown significance on the primary endpoint, which was exercise capacity as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes. Trials of oral formulations of treprostinil have been initiated. PMID:18827901

  3. Hypertension: issues in control and resistance.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Minor, Deborah S

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in more than 50% of treated patients. Barriers to hypertension control include those that are patient-related, physician-related, and related to the health system. Identification of uncontrolled hypertension, pseudoresistant hyper-tension, and resistant hypertension require thoughtful attention to accurate blood pressure measurement, lifestyle factors, evaluation for secondary causes of hypertension, and proper treatment. Recent guidelines emphasize the importance of aggressive treatment and referral to hypertension specialists for patients with resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure that remains above goal despite the use of three appropriate anti-hypertensive agents.

  4. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage in Ghanaian Civil Servants with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Addo, Juliet; Smeeth, Liam; Leon, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low levels of detection, treatment and control of hypertension have repeatedly been reported from sub Saharan Africa, potentially increasing the likelihood of target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1015 urban civil servants aged≥25 years from seven central government ministries in Accra, Ghana. Participants diagnosed to have hypertension were examined for target organ involvement. Hypertensive target organ damage was defined as the detection of any of the following: left ventricular hypertrophy diagnosed by electrocardiogram, reduction in glomerular filtration rate, the presence of hypertensive retinopathy or a history of a stroke. Results Of the 219 hypertensive participants examined, 104 (47.5%) had evidence of target organ damage. The presence of target organ damage was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The odds of developing hypertensive target organ damage was five to six times higher in participants with blood pressure (BP)≥180/110 mmHg compared to those with BP<140/90 mmHg, and there was a trend to higher odds of target organ damage with increasing BP (p = 0.001). Women had about lower odds of developing target organ damage compared to men. Conclusions The high prevalence of target organ damage in this working population associated with increasing blood pressure, emphasises the need for hypertension control programs aimed at improving the detection of hypertension, and importantly addressing the issues inhibiting the effective treatment and control of people with hypertension in the population. PMID:19701488

  5. Update on pathophysiology and treatment of hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Debbie L; Townsend, Raymond R

    2011-10-01

    Hypertension is common in the elderly, and its prevalence increases with aging. The vascular system is a prototypical aging tissue, and arterial stiffness plays a major role in hypertension as the individual ages. Some unique aging changes in the nitric oxide and angiotensin II pathways are particularly important for vascular aging. Studies focusing on direct measures of vascular stiffness have increased understanding of the pathophysiology behind increased arterial stiffness. Goal blood pressure in the elderly is debated, but based on current outcome data, a goal blood pressure of 150/80-90 mm Hg is reasonable in at least the very elderly. This review discusses in detail the various landmark hypertension studies in the elderly. We recommend use of thiazide diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers as either monotherapy or in combination, with beta-blockers reserved for patients with specific indications.

  6. Imaging in hypertensive heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Kramer, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive heart disease is the target organ response to arterial hypertension. Left ventricular hypertrophy represents an important predictor for cardiovascular events. Myocardial fibrosis, a common end point in hypertensive heart disease, has been linked to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Echocardiography is clinically useful in the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy and the assessment of diastolic function. Although echocardiography is more widely available, cardiac magnetic resonance has been demonstrated to be more reproducible for the estimation of left ventricular mass. Future developments in cardiac magnetic resonance techniques may facilitate the quantification of diffuse fibrosis that occurs in hypertensive heart disease. Thus, advances in cardiac imaging provide comprehensive, noninvasive tools for imaging left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, myocardial fibrosis and ischemia observed in hypertensive heart disease. The objective of this article is to summarize the state-of-the-art and the future of multimodality imaging of hypertensive heart disease. PMID:21453216

  7. Calcium channel antagonists in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    1989-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of calcium entry-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure is related to their capacity to act upon the primary hemodynamic derangement in hypertension: the increased peripheral vascular resistance. They can be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of various forms of hypertensive disease. The calcium entry-blockers appear to be the most useful agents for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly and for the treatment of hypertension associated with ischemic heart disease, pulmonary obstructive disease, peripheral vascular disease, and supraventricular arrhythmias. They are effective in reducing blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertension and must be considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertensive crisis.

  8. Rationale for establishing a mechanism to increase reimbursement to hypertension specialists.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J; Egan, Brent; Giles, Thomas D; Bakris, George L; White, William B; Sansone, Torry M

    2013-06-01

    Hypertension is an important public health problem both in the United States and worldwide, contributing to many forms of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Although great strides have been made in the proportion of the US population that achieves recommended blood pressure targets, many Americans still have undertreated and uncontrolled blood pressure that increases the risk of expensive strokes, heart attacks, heart failure, and dialysis. Because hypertension is a common but heterogeneous and sometimes complex condition, the American Society of Hypertension (ASH) has, since 1999, designated physicians as "ASH Hypertension Specialists." Such Hypertension Specialists (as defined by ASH's Specialist Program) are fully licensed physicians with a primary board certification who are competent in all aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, as evidenced by passing a specific examination on these topics offered by ASH's Specialist Program. These physicians have a proven track record of controlling blood pressure in "resistant hypertensive" patients, the general population whom they serve, and educating other physicians to help them achieve higher blood pressure control rates among their patient populations. This report sets out a rationale for increased reimbursement for care of hypertensive patients by ASH-Designated Hypertension Specialists. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Investigation into Differences in Level of Knowledge about Hypertension between High School Students and Elderly People.

    PubMed

    Sanagawa, Akimasa; Ogasawara, Misa; Kusahara, Yuri; Yasumoto, Miki; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

     As a major chronic non-communicable disease, hypertension is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, stroke and, if not treated appropriately, premature death. A population-based approach aimed at decreasing high blood pressure among the general population is an important component of any comprehensive plan to prevent hypertension. However, few studies have investigated generational differences in knowledge about, and consciousness of, hypertension. Thus, we conducted a questionnaire survey about hypertension, with the aim of clarifying differences of understanding about hypertension between high school students and elderly people. The results of this investigation suggested that there is indeed a generational difference: knowledge about hypertension, and awareness of its relationship with salt intake, was higher in elderly people than in high school students. Furthermore, our study showed that among high school students, salt intake consciousness correlated with a family history of hypertension. By contrast, in elderly people, salt intake consciousness is related to age and to an awareness of recommended daily salt intake. This study strongly showed that knowledge and consciousness of hypertension varied among generations, with the elderly being more aware and conscientious about salt intake. Acknowledgement of this generational diversity is critical to developing an effective overall preventive strategy for hypertension.

  10. Multiple and large simple renal cysts are associated with prehypertension and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Ting; Yang, Yi-Ching; Wu, Jin-Shang; Chang, Ying-Fang; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2013-05-01

    Although simple renal cysts are thought to be related to hypertension, no reports have examined the relationship between simple renal cysts and prehypertension. Here, we evaluated the effects of simple renal cysts on prehypertension and hypertension and the role of serum renin levels in the cyst-related prehypertension/hypertension in adults. A total of 14,995 patients were enrolled and divided into normotension, prehypertension, and hypertension groups. Simple renal cysts were classified into different categories based on number (1 vs. ≥ 2 cm) and size (<2 vs. ≥ 2 cm). In multivariate analysis, simple renal cysts were independently related to prehypertension/hypertension. Two or more simple renal cysts or cyst of ≥ 2 cm were independently associated with prehypertension/hypertension. However, the association between cyst of ≥ 2 cm and prehypertension/hypertension disappeared after further adjusting for serum renin level in an exposure-matched subgroup analysis. Thus, the presence of two or more simple renal cysts and cyst of ≥ 2 cm were the important determinants of prehypertension and hypertension in adults. One possible mechanism of cyst-related prehypertension/hypertension may be related to an increased serum renin level. We recommend close monitoring of blood pressure routinely among patients with two or more simple renal cysts.

  11. The Treatment of Hypertension During Pregnancy: When Should Blood Pressure Medications Be Started?

    PubMed Central

    Scantlebury, Dawn C.; Schwartz, Gary L.; Acquah, Letitia A.; White, Wendy M.; Moser, Marvin; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders (HPD) are important causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition, a history of HPD has been associated with an increased risk for maternal cardiovascular disease later in life, possibly due to irreversible vascular and metabolic changes that persist beyond the affected pregnancies. Therefore, treatment of HPD may not only improve immediate pregnancy outcomes, but also the maternal long-term cardiovascular health. Unlike the recommendations for hypertension treatment in the general population, treatment recommendations of HPD have not changed substantially for more than two decades. This is particularly true for mild to moderate hypertension in pregnancy, defined as a blood pressure of 140–159/90–109 mm Hg. This review focuses on the goals of therapy, treatment strategies, and new developments in the field of HPD that should be taken into account when considering blood pressure targets and pharmacological options for treatment of hypertension in pregnant women. PMID:24057769

  12. [Management of arterial hypertension before 20weeks gestation in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Seguro, Florent; Duly Bouhanick, Béatrice; Chamontin, Bernard; Amar, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In the first 6 months of pregnancy, the primary goal of antihypertensive treatment is to prevent the complications of severe hypertension. Initiation of antihypertensive drug treatment is recommended in pregnant women with severe hypertension (blood pressure>160/110mmHg). Initiation of antihypertensive drug treatment should also be considered in pregnant women at high cardiovascular risk (diabetes, chronic kidney disease, personal history of cardiovascular disease) with moderate hypertension (blood pressure between 140-159/90-109mmHg). A systolic blood pressure goal<160 and a diastolic blood pressure goal between 85 and 100mmHg is recommended in pregnancy. Labetalol, nifedipine, nicardipine and alphamethyldopa should be considered preferential antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy. Salt restriction, physical exercise and weight loss have not demonstrated any effect in the prevention of preeclampsia and serious maternal complications of hypertension.

  13. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Paradoxical hypertension with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Herzog, Eyal; Halpern, Dan G; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Subacute (medical) tamponade develops over a period of days or even weeks. Previous studies have shown that subacute tamponade is uncommonly associated with hypotension. On the contrary, many of those patients are indeed hypertensive at initial presentation. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertensive cardiac tamponade and hemodynamic response to pericardial effusion drainage. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent pericardial effusion drainage for subacute pericardial tamponade. Diagnosis of pericardial tamponade was established by the treating physician based on clinical data and supportive echocardiographic findings. Patients were defined as hypertensive if initial systolic blood pressure (BP) was ≥140 mm Hg. Thirty patients with subacute tamponade who underwent pericardial effusion drainage were included in the analysis. Eight patients (27%) were hypertensive with a mean systolic BP of 167 compared to 116 mm Hg in 22 nonhypertensive patients. Hypertensive patients with tamponade were more likely to have advanced renal disease (63% vs 14%, p <0.05) and pre-existing hypertension (88% vs 46, p <0.05) and less likely to have systemic malignancy (0 vs 41%, p <0.05). Systolic BP decreased significantly in patients with hypertensive tamponade after pericardial effusion drainage. Those results are consistent with previous studies with an estimated prevalence of hypertensive tamponade from 27% to 43%. In conclusion, a hypertensive response was observed in approximately 1/3 of patients with subacute pericardial tamponade. Relief of cardiac tamponade commonly resulted in a decrease in BP.

  15. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  17. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rheumatologic rehabilitation: towards recommendations.

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, S; Del Rosso, A; Matucci Cerinic, M

    2014-11-06

    Rheumatic patients are highly complex and often affected by chronic diseases. Rehabilitation is generally needed for proper management of the underlying disease. This article describes the characteristics of an effective rheumatologic rehabilitation, takes into account data published in international literature, suggests recommendations based on scientific evidence to develop a correct rehabilitation plan for rheumatic patients and proposes the basis to draw up guidelines in the field of rheumatologic rehabilitation.

  19. FELASA Guidelines and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) has been releasing guidelines and recommendations on several laboratory animal science disciplines for more than 15 y. The Working Groups producing these documents comprise specialists in each of the addressed topics, are nominated by the FELASA constituent associations, and are elected by the FELASA Board of Management. The FELASA guidelines and recommendations are not regulatory but rather are proposals based on scientific knowledge and the state of the art of laboratory animal science activities. Because they are supported by laboratory animal science associations that represent the vast majority of European professionals, these guidelines and recommendations have influenced the development of various regulatory requirements in Europe, including those related to education and training, routine laboratory animal activities, and animal health monitoring. Some reports fill existing gaps in the European legal framework or complement it. The Working Groups occasionally collaborate with other European organizations, thus enhancing the professional input and effect of the documents produced. The recently established AALAS–FELASA Liaison Body may result in future international cooperation that benefits laboratory animal science and welfare in a global context. PMID:22776188

  20. Prevalence, awareness and risk factors of hypertension in a large cohort of Iranian adult population

    PubMed Central

    MALEKZADEH, Masoud M.; ETEMADI, Arash; KAMANGAR, Farin; KHADEMI, Hooman; GOLOZAR, Asieh; ISLAMI, Farhad; POURSHAMS, Akram; POUSTCHI, Hossein; NAVABAKHSH, Behrouz; NAEMI, Mohammad; PHAROAH, Paul D.; ABNET, Christian C.; BRENNAN, Paul; BOFFETTA, Paolo; DAWSEY, Sanford M.; ESTEGHAMATI, Alireza; MALEKZADEH, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background There is considerable variation in hypertension prevalence and awareness, and their correlates, across different geographic locations and ethnic groups. We performed this cross-sectional analysis on data from the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). Methods Enrollment in this study occurred in 2004–2008, and included 50,045 healthy subjects from Golestan Province in northeastern Iran. Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140, a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90, a prior diagnosis of hypertension, or the use of antihypertensive drugs. Potential correlates of hypertension and its awareness were analyzed by logistic regression adjusted for sex, age, BMI, place of residence, literacy, ethnicity, physical activity, smoking, black and green tea consumption and wealth score. Results Of the total cohort participants, 21,350 (42.7%) were hypertensive. Age-standardized prevalence of hypertension, using the 2001 WHO standard world population, was 41.8% (95%CI: 38.3%–45.2%). Hypertension was directly associated with female sex, increased BMI, Turkmen ethnicity, and lack of physical activity, and inversely associated with drinking black tea and wealth score. Among hypertensive subjects, 46.2% were aware of their disease, 17.6% were receiving antihypertensive medication, and 32.1% of the treated subjects had controlled hypertension. Hypertension awareness was greater among women, the elderly, overweight and obese subjects, and those with a higher wealth score. Conclusions Hypertension is highly prevalent in rural Iran, many of the affected individuals are unaware of their disease, and the rate of control by antihypertensive medications is low. Increasing hypertension awareness and access to health services, especially among less privileged residents are recommended. PMID:23673348

  1. Aliskiren-hydrochlorothiazide combination for the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2008-03-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and currently has been estimated at 30% of the US population. Of these, only 36.8% have their blood pressure reduced to recommended levels of lower than 140/90 mmHg for uncomplicated hypertension, or less than 130/80 mmHg for patients with diabetes mellitus or renal disease. Since monotherapy controls blood pressure in less than 50% of treated hypertensive patients, combination therapy is often required to bring blood pressure to the recommended levels of the 7th Joint National Committee report. One of the most effective and widely used combinations is the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). Aliskiren, a new blocker of the renin-angiotensin system has been developed and approved by the US FDA on 18th January 2008 for the treatment of hypertension. Aliskiren is a direct inhibitor of renin, the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of angiotensin II, a powerful vasoconstrictive peptide. Several randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that aliskiren administered in single daily doses of 150, 300 or 600 mg alone and in combination with HCTZ 12.5 and 25 mg is effective in lowering blood pressure, and is safe and well tolerated. In this article, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile and the clinical application of aliskiren alone and in combination with HCTZ will be discussed.

  2. High sodium causes hypertension: evidence from clinical trials and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vamsi; Sridhar, Arvind; Machado, Roberto F; Chen, Jiwang

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a cardiovascular disease affecting approximately one out of every seven people worldwide. High-sodium consumption has been generally accepted as a risk factor for developing hypertension. Today, global sodium consumption greatly exceeds guidelines recommended by all medical institutions. This review synthesizes the data of landmark mammalian and human studies which investigated the role of sodium in the pathogenesis of hypertension, along with modern studies questioning this relationship. Recent studies concerning the potential pathways by which high-sodium concentration induces hypertension were reviewed. Human trials and population studies revealed a strong correlation between high blood pressure and average dietary sodium; and animal studies found a dramatic reduction in vascular function in a variety of mammals treated with high-sodium diets. In spite of a few contrarian studies, we found overwhelming evidence that elevated sodium consumption could cause hypertension.

  3. Diagnosing and Managing Primary Aldosteronism in Hypertensive Patients: a Case-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism with a prevalence of 8 % of hypertension and 20 % of pharmacologically resistant hypertension is the most common secondary cause of hypertension. Yet, the diagnosis is missed in the vast majority of patients. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for primary aldosteronism in patients with sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) ≥150/100 mmHg if possible prior to initiation of antihypertensive therapy, and in patients with resistant hypertension, spontaneous or diuretic-induced hypokalemia, adrenal incidentaloma, obstructive sleep apnea, a family history of early onset of hypertension or cerebrovascular accident

  4. Brain-Gut-Bone Marrow Axis: Implications for Hypertension and Related Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Santisteban, Monica M; Kim, Seungbum; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2016-04-15

    Hypertension is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and disorders directly influencing cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, etc. Despite aggressive attempts to influence lifestyle modifications and advances in pharmacotherapeutics, a large percentage of patients still do not achieve recommended blood pressure control worldwide. Thus, we think that mechanism-based novel strategies should be considered to significantly improve control and management of hypertension. The overall objective of this review is to summarize implications of peripheral- and neuroinflammation as well as the autonomic nervous system-bone marrow communication in hematopoietic cell homeostasis and their impact on hypertension pathophysiology. In addition, we discuss the novel and emerging field of intestinal microbiota and roles of gut permeability and dysbiosis in cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Finally, we propose a brain-gut-bone marrow triangular interaction hypothesis and discuss its potential in the development of novel therapies for hypertension.

  5. The Post-Anesthetic Care of Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Gangadharan, Meera; Hartke, Lopa P; Twite, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    Few conditions make even the most experienced pediatric anesthesiologists take pause. Pulmonary hypertension is one such condition due to the associated high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Much is written about the intraoperative management of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This article will instead focus on postoperative care and review the evidence in support of a risk stratification approach for the post-anesthetic disposition of these patients. The total risk for post-anesthetic adverse events includes the patient's baseline risk factors and the incremental risks imposed by the procedure and anesthetic. A proposal with recommendations to guide practitioners and a table summarizing relevant factors are provided. Last, the readers' attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of pulmonary hypertensive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (precapillary) differs significantly from pulmonary venous hypertension (postcapillary); the anesthetic management for one may be relatively contraindicated in the other. Their dissimilarities justify the need to distinguish them for study and research endeavors.

  6. Liquorice: a root cause of secondary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Calum N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a patient presenting with hypertension and hypokalaemia who was ultimately diagnosed with liquorice- induced pseudohyperaldosteronism. This rare cause of secondary hypertension illustrates the importance of a methodical approach to the assessment of hypertension. PMID:28210494

  7. Complicated hypertension related to the abuse of ephedrine and caffeine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jeffrey A; Setty, Arathi; Steiner, Matthew J; Kaufman, Kenneth R; Skotzko, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Ephedra containing products (ECPs), which most often contain additional sources of caffeine alkaloids, may be an under-recognized cause of hypertension. ECPs, especially when used in combination or at higher than recommended doses, can cause life-threatening cardiovascular and neurological complications. We present a case of hypertensive encephalopathy with new onset generalized tonic-clonic seizure secondary to concomitant use of two OTC supplements containing a mixture of ephedrine and caffeine alkaloids.

  8. Drug induced hypertension--An unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Messerli, Franz H; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-09-15

    Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension or well-known forms of secondary hypertension, such as renal disease, renal artery stenosis, or common endocrine diseases (hyperaldosteronism or pheochromocytoma). Physicians are less aware of drug induced hypertension. A variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances may increase blood pressure. When a patient with well controlled hypertension is presented with acute blood pressure elevation, use of drug or chemical substance which increases blood pressure should be suspected. Drug-induced blood pressure increases are usually minor and short-lived, although rare hypertensive emergencies associated with use of certain drugs have been reported. Careful evaluation of prescription and non-prescription medications is crucial in the evaluation of the hypertensive individual and may obviate the need for expensive and unnecessary evaluations. Discontinuation of the offending agent will usually achieve adequate blood pressure control. When use of a chemical agent which increases blood pressure is mandatory, anti-hypertensive therapy may facilitate continued use of this agent. We summarize the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action.

  9. Malignant hypertension with reversible brainstem hypertensive encephalopathy and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ichiro; Uchino, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tanahashi, Norio

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with headache and nausea. Severe hypertension, renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and anemia were present. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of her head revealed widespread hyperintense lesions located in the brainstem and cerebellum on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging. Hypertensive encephalopathy was suspected, and antihypertensive therapy was started. A second MRI of the patient's head on day 12 of hospitalization revealed that the hyperintensities in the brainstem and cerebellum had almost disappeared, and that thrombocytopenia, anemia, and renal dysfunction had also gradually improved. Test results led to a diagnosis of malignant hypertension. This patient was regarded as suffering from malignant hypertension with reversible brainstem hypertensive encephalopathy (RBHE) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). RBHE and TMA are known to occur as complications of malignant hypertension, but there has been no previous report of them occurring simultaneously. RBHE and TMA related to malignant hypertension are both conditions that can be improved by the rapid institution of antihypertensive therapy, and as such, early diagnosis and treatment are important. When treating patients with malignant hypertension, the possibility that it may be complicated by both RBHE and TMA must be kept in mind. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  11. Importance of Mean Red Cell Distribution Width in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Ahmed; Farooq, Junaid H; Assad, Salman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Ahmed, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Red cell distribution width (RDW), expressed in femtoliters (fl), is a measure of the variation in the size of circulating erythrocytes and is often expressed as a direct measurement of the width of the distribution. We aim to observe the mean value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in hypertensive patients. Increased RDW can be used as a tool for early diagnosis, as an inflammatory marker, and a mortality indicator in hypertensive patients due to its close relation to inflammation. Materials and methodology Hypertensive patients who had the condition for more than one year duration, diagnosed according to the Joint National Committee (JNC 7) criteria were subjected to complete blood count and RDW measurement. One hundred patients, aged between 12 years and 65 years were enrolled from the outpatient department of medicine at the Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Results The mean age (± SD) of the patients was 51.48 ± 10.08 years. Out of 100 patients 69% were males whereas 31% were females. The overall frequency of hypertension more than five years was 55% subjects whereas 45% individuals had duration of hypertension less than five years. Mean RDW in females was found to be 49.35±8.42 fl while mean RDW in males was 44.78±7.11 fl. An independent sample t-test was applied to assess if there was any significant difference between age and gender. No significant difference between age and gender was found (p<0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to assess any association of RDW with gender. RDW values in females was found to be statistically significantly higher than in males (U=603, p=0.01). Linear regression showed that mean RDW value increased with increasing age (P <0.001). Conclusions A significant number of patients with hypertension have increased levels of RDW. Therefore, it is recommended that serum RDW should be checked regularly in patients with hypertension. PMID:28070471

  12. Device-Guided Breathing for Hypertension: a Summary Evidence Review.

    PubMed

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Beinortas, Tumas; Bauza, Karolis; Nunan, David

    2016-04-01

    Persistently raised blood pressure is one of the major risk factors for diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Uncontrolled hypertension is also associated with high rates of mortality, particularly in middle and high-income countries. Lifestyle factors such as poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity and smoking are all thought to contribute to the development of hypertension. As a result, the management of hypertension should begin with modifying these lifestyle factors. Beyond this, drug interventions are used as the predominant form of management. However, adherence to medications can be highly variable, medication side effects are common, and may require regular monitoring or, in some individuals may be ineffective. Therefore, additional non-pharmacologic interventions that lower blood pressure may be advantageous when combined with lifestyle modifications. Such interventions may include relaxation therapies such as slow breathing exercises, which can be initiated by means of specific devices. The technique of device-guided breathing (DGB) has been considered by guideline developers in the management of hypertension. One specific device, the Resperate, has received US FDA and UK NHS approval over the last few years. In this review, we summarise the evidence base on efficacy and find that although some clinical trials exist that demonstrate a BP-lowering effect, others do not. There is currently insufficient evidence from pooled data to recommend the routine use of device-guided breathing in hypertensive patients.

  13. Trandolapril/verapamil combination in hypertensive diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    García Donaire, José A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are directly affected by arterial hypertension. When associated with diabetes mellitus, the potential deleterious effects are well amplified. Both conditions play a central role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and renal insufficiency. Prevalence of hypertension is much higher among diabetic than non-diabetic patients, and the hypertensive patient is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Current international guidelines recommend aggressive reductions in blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients with additional risk factors, including cardiovascular risk factors, and emphasize the relevance of intensive reduction in patients with diabetes mellitus; a goal of 130/80 mm Hg is required. To achieve BP target a combination of antihypertensives will be needed, and the use of long-acting drugs that are able to provide 24-hour efficacy with a once-daily dosing confers the noteworthy advantages of compliance improvement and BP variation lessening. Lower dosages of the individual treatments of the combination therapy can be administered for the same antihypertensive efficiency as that attained with high dosages of monotherapy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers as a combination have theoretically compelling advantages for vessel homeostasis. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained release combination has showed beneficial effects on cardiac and renal systems as well as its antihypertensive efficacy, with no metabolic disturbances. This combination can be considered as an effective therapy for the diabetic hypertensive population. PMID:17583177

  14. Fermented milk for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-04-18

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle interventions, such as fermented milk, would be of great importance. To investigate whether fermented milk or similar products produced by lactobacilli fermentation of milk proteins has any blood pressure lowering effect in humans when compared to no treatment or placebo. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), English language databases, including MEDLINE (1966-2011), EMBASE (1974-2011), Cochrane Complementary Medicine Trials Register, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED) (1985-2011), Food science and technology abstracts (1969-2011). Randomised controlled trials; cross over and parallel studies evaluating the effect on blood pressure of fermented milk in humans with an intervention period of 4 weeks or longer. Data was extracted individually by two authors, afterwards agreement had to be obtained before imputation in the review. A modest overall effect of fermented milk on SBP was found (MD -2.45; 95% CI -4.30 to -0.60), no effect was evident on DBP (MD -0.67; 95% CI -1.48, 0.14). The review does not support an effect of fermented milk on blood pressure. Despite the positive effect on SBP the authors conclude, for several reasons, that fermented milk has no effect on blood pressure. The effect found was very modest and only on SBP, the included studies were very heterogeneous and several with weak methodology. Finally, sensitivity and subgroup analyses could not reproduce the antihypertensive effect. The results do not give notion to the use of fermented milk as treatment for hypertension or as a lifestyle intervention for pre-hypertension nor would it influence population blood pressure.

  15. [Arterial hypertension and prediabetes].

    PubMed

    Boned Ombuena, Patricia; Rodilla Sala, Enrique; Costa Muñoz, José Antonio; Pascual Izuel, José María

    2016-11-04

    The aim of this study was to assess the factors related to new diabetes in hypertensive. This prospective follow-up study involved 2588 non-diabetic, hypertensive patients. The total follow-up was 15053 patient-years with a median of 3.4 years (interquartile interval 1.4-6.8). During the follow-up 333 (13%) patients had new diabetes, with a conversion rate of 2.21 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-2.46) 100/patients/year. In a Cox proportional hazard model including baseline characteristics and modifications during the follow up the three components of metabolic syndrome (excluding blood pressure and glucose values) HR 1.69 (95% CI, 1.36-2.09), family history of diabetes HR 1,49 (95% CI, 1,20-1,85) and baseline blood glucose ≥110 mg/dl HR 7.84 (95% CI, 5.99-10.29) were the most important factors related to new diabetes. Weight variation during the follow up, and statins, beta-bloquers or diuretic treatment did not increase the risk of new diabetes, blood pressure control at the end of study reduce the risk HR 0,74 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91). In hypertensive non-diabetic patients in primary prevention the factors related to new diabetes can easily identified at the beginning of follow up. Being obese, with family history of diabetes, and glucose values ≥110 mg/dl dramatically increase the risk of developing new diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Chronotherapy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bendersky, M

    2015-01-01

    The blood pressure profile in most normo- and hypertensive subjects are currently known, as well as the impact their changes induced on the cardio- and cerebrovascular risk. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has contributed greatly to the knowledge of this parameter. It to correct the schedule of drug administration (chronotherapy) with changes in any component of the BP profile that have better correlation with risk. These include the nocturnal decrease and the morning BP surge. Investigations in this direction are still scarce, and multicenter studies need to be conducted that can answer the true preventive impact of such modifications.

  17. Thrombocytopenia in hypertensive disease of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Habas, Elmukhtar; Rayani, Amnna; Ganterie, Ramadan

    2013-04-01

    complications. Gestational thrombocytopenia (GT) is recognized as a major cause of thrombocytopenia particularly in hypertensive pregnant women during the third trimester. Careful follow up during and after pregnancy for those women is recommended.

  18. ISFM Consensus Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertension in Cats.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samantha S; Sparkes, Andrew H; Briscoe, Katherine; Carter, Jenny; Sala, Salva Cervantes; Jepson, Rosanne E; Reynolds, Brice S; Scansen, Brian A

    2017-03-01

    Practical relevance: Feline hypertension is a common disease in older cats that is frequently diagnosed in association with other diseases such as chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism (so-called secondary hypertension), although some cases of apparent primary hypertension are also reported. The clinical consequences of hypertension can be severe, related to 'target organ damage' (eye, heart and vasculature, brain and kidneys), and early diagnosis followed by appropriate therapeutic management should help reduce the morbidity associated with this condition. Clinical challenges: Despite being a common disease, routine blood pressure (BP) monitoring is generally performed infrequently, probably leading to underdiagnosis of feline hypertension in clinical practice. There is a need to: (i) ensure BP is measured as accurately as possible with a reproducible technique; (ii) identify and monitor patients at risk of developing hypertension; (iii) establish appropriate criteria for therapeutic intervention; and (iv) establish appropriate therapeutic targets. Based on current data, amlodipine besylate is the treatment of choice to manage feline hypertension and is effective in the majority of cats, but the dose needed to successfully manage hypertension varies between individuals. Some cats require long-term adjuvant therapy and, occasionally, additional therapy is necessary for emergency management of hypertensive crises. Evidence base: These Guidelines from the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) are based on a comprehensive review of the currently available literature, and are aimed at providing practical recommendations to address the challenges of feline hypertension for veterinarians. There are many areas where more data is required which, in the future, will serve to confirm or modify some of the recommendations in these Guidelines.

  19. The growing epidemic of hypertension among children and adolescents: a challenging road ahead.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Farahnak

    2012-10-01

    Currently, it is clear that primary hypertension begins in childhood and that it contributes to the early development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension also increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and that risk rises as blood pressure levels escalate. As among adult patients, overweight and obesity rates are on the rise among children and adolescents with primary hypertension and can develop target organ damage including left ventricular hypertrophy. An elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria are early manifestations of cardiovascular disease and CKD in hypertensive patients. Lifestyle interventions are recommended for all children with hypertension. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for symptomatic children, those with stage 2 hypertension, and children with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension who exhibit an insufficient response to lifestyle modifications. Although the recommendations for choice of drugs generally are similar for children and adults, dosages for children should be lower, based on weight, and adjusted very carefully. Medications that are effective and safe for children and adolescents include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and calcium channel-blockers. Hypertension is not being detected early enough for initiation of a treatment regimen to reduce death and disability. Initiatives should be undertaken to make health care providers and the general population more aware of the seriousness of hypertension in children and adolescents. This review focuses on the principles underlying the importance of a team approach for hypertension control, especially one that incorporates increased data sharing using enhanced health information technology for early detection and intervention.

  20. How to manage hypertension with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis?

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Belmonte, Romain; Illuminati, Guilio; Barral, Xavier; Schneider, Fabrice; Chavent, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in patients with hypertension has been the topic of great controversy. Major contemporary clinical trials such as the Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery lesions (CORAL) and Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic lesions (ASTRAL) have failed to show significant benefit of revascularization over medical management in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. We present here the implications and limitations of these trials and formulate recommendations for management of ARAS.

  1. HyperCare: a prototype of an active database for compliance with essential hypertension therapy guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Caironi, P. V.; Portoni, L.; Combi, C.; Pinciroli, F.; Ceri, S.

    1997-01-01

    HyperCare is a prototype of a decision support system for essential hypertension care management. The medical knowledge implemented in HyperCare derives from the guidelines for the management of mild hypertension of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension, and from the recommendations of the United States Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. HyperCare has been implemented using Chimera, an active database language developed at the Politecnico di Milano. HyperCare proves the possibility to use active database systems in developing a medical data-intensive application where inferential elaboration of moderate complexity is required. PMID:9357634

  2. [Hypertension in pregnancy--chaos in terminology of literature world-wide].

    PubMed

    Janků, K; Unzeitig, V; Roztocil, A; Janků, P

    1995-06-01

    The authors submit an account of the terminology of toxemia of pregnancy and hypertension during pregnancy which are used in the world literature. They draw attention to the lack of uniformity which leads to a distortion of statistics. Differences in the nomenclature and incorrect enlistment of hypertension may lead also to an inadequate type of treatment and conduction of delivery. The authors recommend the use of nomenclature based on the pathogenesis and on their own experience. They emphasize the difference in the pathogenesis, therapy, prognosis and prevention of different types of hypertension.

  3. [Team-based care involving pharmacists and nurses to improve the management of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Santschi, V; Wuerzner, G; Chiolero, A; Burnand, B; Paradis, G; Burnier, M

    2012-09-12

    Only half of hypertensive patients has controlled blood pressure. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with low blood pressure control, 25-30% of CKD patients achieving adequate blood pressure. The Community Preventive Services Task Force has recently recommended team-based care to improve blood pressure control. Team-based care of hypertension involves facilitating coordination of care among physician, pharmacist and nurse and requires sharing clinical data, laboratory results, and medications, e.g., electronically or by fax. Based on recent studies, development and evaluation of team-based care of hypertensive patients should be done in the Swiss healthcare system.

  4. Renal artery stenosis and hypertension after abdominal irradiation for Hodgkin disease. Successful treatment with nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Salvi, S.; Green, D.M.; Brecher, M.L.; Magoos, I.; Gamboa, L.N.; Fisher, J.E.; Baliah, T.; Afshani, E.

    1983-06-01

    Hypertension secondary to stenosis of the left renal artery developed in a thirteen-year-old male six years after completion of inverted Y irradiation (3,600 rad) for abdominal Hodgkin disease. Surgical treatment with nephrectomy resulted in control of the hypertension without the use of antihypertensive agents. We review the literature for this unusual complication of abdominal irradiation, and recommend that a 99mTc-DMSA renal scan, selective renal vein sampling for renin determinations, and renal arteriography be performed on any patient in whom hypertension develops following abdominal irradiation in childhood.

  5. Mechanisms and management of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Williams, Olubunmi; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most commonly inherited kidney disease, characterized by progressive cyst growth and renal enlargement, resulting in renal failure. Hypertension is common and occurs early, prior to loss of kidney function. Whether hypertension in ADPKD is a primary vasculopathy secondary to mutations in the polycystin genes or secondary to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by cyst expansion and intrarenal ischemia is unclear. Dysregulation of the primary cilium causing endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is a component of ADPKD. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypertension in ADPKD and give specific recommendations for its treatment.

  6. Expert Consensus on the Treatment of Hypertension with Chinese Patent Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li Ying; Chan, Kam Wa; Yuwen, Ya; Shi, Nan Nan; Han, Xue Jie; Lu, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study was aimed to determine the therapeutic principle and identify Chinese Patent Medicine (CPM) with corresponding indications for hypertension treatment. Methods. Three rounds of Delphi survey were mailed among 40 cardiovascular integrative medicine specialists. Items with agreement of more than 80% respondents were included in the consensus. Results. According to majority of the panelists, CPM is suitable for most hypertensive patients and should be used according to traditional Chinese medicine pattern classification. CPM could be used alone for grade 1 hypertension and could be used in combination with Western biomedicine (WM) for both grade 2 and grade 3 hypertension. It is recommended that less than two CPMs are used simultaneously. For the treatment of grade 2 and 3 hypertension, CPM and WM should be taken separately. Recommended CPMs included Tianma Gouteng granule, Qiju Dihuang capsule, Jinkui Shenqi pill, Yinxingye tablet, Niuhuang Jiangya pill and Banxia Tianma pill. The indications of 4 CPMs were specified with symptoms related to TCM pattern classification by the experts. Conclusions. An expert consensus on CMP application was formed for the treatment of hypertension in the form of integrative medicine. A flow of IM hypertension management was proposed based on the results of the survey. PMID:23662141

  7. Statement on pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, David G.; Cockrill, Barbara A.; Safdar, Zeenat; Wilson, Victoria J.; Al Hazmi, Manal; Preston, Ioana R.; MacLean, Mandy R.; Lahm, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy outcomes in patients with pulmonary hypertension remain poor despite advanced therapies. Although consensus guidelines recommend against pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension, it may nonetheless occasionally occur. This guideline document sought to discuss the state of knowledge of pregnancy effects on pulmonary vascular disease and to define usual practice in avoidance of pregnancy and pregnancy management. This guideline is based on systematic review of peer-reviewed, published literature identified with MEDLINE. The strength of the literature was graded, and when it was inadequate to support high-level recommendations, consensus-based recommendations were formed according to prespecified criteria. There was no literature that met standards for high-level recommendations for pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations on pregnancy avoidance and management. Further, we identified the current state of knowledge on the effects of sex hormones during pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart and suggested areas for future study. There is currently limited evidence-based knowledge about both the basic molecular effects of sex hormones and pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and the best practices in contraception and pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We have drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations to guide clinicians in these challenging topics, but further research is needed in this area to define best practices and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26401246

  8. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  9. Panel summary of recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Bonnie J.; Coleman, Martin E.; Mitchell, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    The following Space Station internal contamination topics were addressed: past flight experience (Skylab and Spacelab missions); present flight activities (Spacelabs and Soviet Space Station Mir); future activities (materials science and life science experiments); Space Station capabilities (PPMS, FMS, ECLSS, and U.S. Laboratory overview); manned systems/crew safety; internal contamination detection; contamination control - stowage and handling; and contamination control - waste gas processing. Space Station design assumptions are discussed. Issues and concerns are discussed as they relate to (1) policy and management, (2) subsystem design, (3) experiment design, and (4) internal contamination detection and control. The recommendations generated are summarized.

  10. Clinical Recommendation: Vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Andrea; Romano, Mary

    2016-12-01

    Vulvovaginitis is a commonly encountered condition among prepubertal and adolescent females. The objective of this report is to provide the latest evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal and adolescent females. In this systematic review we used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation evidence system. Vulvovaginal complaints are common in the pediatric and adolescent age group. The patient's age in conjunction with history and associated complaints will guide evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. Treatment should include counseling on hygiene and voiding techniques as well as therapy for any specific pathogens identified.

  11. Endocrine hypertension – Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashpal; Kotwal, Narendra; Menon, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing's syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease. PMID:22145133

  12. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  13. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  14. Hypertensive retinopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, Sherry A.

    2003-01-01

    A 12-year-old cat presented for sudden blindness was diagnosed with hypertensive retinopathy on the basis of ophthalmologic and ultrasonic examination. Renal failure due to a large intranephric cyst obstructing the right ureter and renal artery was the suggested cause of the systemic hypertension. The cat died 8 hours after unilateral nephrectomy. PMID:12650046

  15. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  16. Hypertensive emergencies. Etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Meryem; Ram, Venkata C S

    2003-01-01

    Although systemic hypertension is a common clinical disorder, hypertensive emergencies are unusual in clinical practice. Situations that qualify as hypertensive emergencies include accelerated or malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute left ventricular failure, acute aortic dissection, pheochromocytoma crisis, interaction between tyramine-containing foods or drugs and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, eclampsia, drug-induced hypertension and possibly intracranial hemorrhage. It is important to recognize these conditions since immediate lowering of systemic blood pressure is indicated. The diagnosis of hypertensive emergencies depends on the clinical manifestations rather than on the absolute level of the blood pressure. Depending on the target organ that is affected, the manifestations of hypertensive emergencies can be quite expressive, yet variable. Thus, the physician has to make the clinical diagnosis urgently in order to render appropriate therapy. Several parenteral drugs can quickly and effectively lower the blood pressure in hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous fenoldopam, a selective dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, offers the advantage of improving renal blood flow and causing natriuresis. Intravenous nicardipine may be beneficial in reserving tissue perfusion in patients with ischemic disorders. Whereas trimethaphan camsilate is the drug of choice for managing acute aortic dissection, hydralazine remains the drug of choice for the treatment of eclampsia. The alpha-adrenoceptor, phentolamine, is useful in patients with pheochromocytoma crisis. Enalaprilat is the only ACE inhibitor available for parenteral use and may be particularly useful in treating hypertensive emergencies in patients with heart failure. However, ACE inhibitors may cause a precipitous fall in blood pressure in patients who are hypovolemic. Although useful as adjunctive therapy in hypertensive crises, diuretics should be used with caution in these patients because prior

  17. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Reem, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Primary (idiopathic) intracranial hypertension has been considered to be a rare entity, but with no precise estimates of the pediatric incidence in the United States. There have been attempts to revise the criteria over the years and adapt the adult criteria for use in pediatrics. The clinical presentation varies with age, and symptoms tending to be less obvious in younger individuals. In the prepubertal population, incidentally discovered optic disc edema is relatively common. By far the most consistent symptom is headache; other symptoms include nausea, vomiting tinnitus, and diplopia. Treatment mainstays include weight loss when appropriate and acetazolamide. Furosemide may exhibit a synergistic benefit when used in conjunction with acetazolamide. Surgical interventions are required relatively infrequently, but include optic nerve sheath fenestration and cerebrospinal fluid shunting. Pain and permanent vision loss are the two major complications of this disorder and these manifestations justify aggressive treatment. Once intracranial hypertension has resolved, up to two thirds of patients develop a new or chronic headache type that is different from their initial presenting headache.

  18. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Charlotte U.; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens E.; Simonsen, U.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin and the G-protein coupled apelin receptor (APLNR) are expressed in several tissues throughout the organism. Apelin is localized in vascular endothelial cells while the APLNR is localized in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vessels and in the heart. Apelin is regulated by hypoxia inducible factor -1α and bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2. Patients with PAH have lower levels of plasma-apelin, and decreased apelin expression in pulmonary endothelial cells. Apelin has therefore been proposed as a potential biomarker for PAH. Furthermore, apelin plays a role in angiogenesis and regulates endothelial and smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation complementary and opposite to vascular endothelial growth factor. In the systemic circulation, apelin modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, induces eNOS-dependent vasodilatation, counteracts angiotensin-II mediated vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting potential new therapeutic target for PH. PMID:22140623

  19. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension in polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Liu, Tao; Cai, Ying-ying; Luo, Lian; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mengmeng; Cai, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively common in connective tissue diseases. However, few studies have focused on the pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with polymyositis (PM). Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of PH and determine the associated factors for PH in patients with PM. Multicenter study of 61 patients with PM underwent evaluation including general information, physical examination, laboratory indictors, thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) imaging, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). TTE was performed to estimate the pulmonary arterial pressure. PH was defined as resting systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) ≥40 mmHg. PH was identified in ten patients (16.39 %) who had few cardiopulmonary symptoms. PM patients with PH had higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pericardial effusion (PE) compared with patients without PH (18 vs. 11.5 %, p = 0.005; 11.5 vs. 9.8 %, p = 0.004; respectively). After controlling for age, gender, and potential factors, ILD and PE were independently associated with PH in patients with PM in multivariate analysis (OR = 8.193, 95 % CI 1.241-54.084, p = 0.029; OR = 8.265, 95 % CI 1.298-52.084, p = 0.025; respectively). Depending on TTE, the possible prevalence of PH was 16.39 % in patients with PM. Both ILD and PE may contribute to the development of PH in PM.

  1. New Standards for Diagnosing Hypertension Are Met with Skepticism | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Members of the Eighth Joint National Committee recently released new standards for treating hypertension, also referred to as high blood pressure (BP). The new standards do not recommend treatment changes for individuals under 60 years of age. However, treatment changes were recommended for people over the age of 60 who do not have conditions such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease (CKD), but whose BP numbers are 150/90 or higher. This BP threshold is up from the previously recommended threshold of 140/90. The panel also recommended that for people over 60 years of age who have diabetes or CKD, treatment should begin when BP is 140/90, which is an increase from 130/80. Treatment may involve lifestyle changes and/or medication to bring the BP numbers into a healthy range.

  2. New Standards for Diagnosing Hypertension Are Met with Skepticism | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Members of the Eighth Joint National Committee recently released new standards for treating hypertension, also referred to as high blood pressure (BP). The new standards do not recommend treatment changes for individuals under 60 years of age. However, treatment changes were recommended for people over the age of 60 who do not have conditions such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease (CKD), but whose BP numbers are 150/90 or higher. This BP threshold is up from the previously recommended threshold of 140/90. The panel also recommended that for people over 60 years of age who have diabetes or CKD, treatment should begin when BP is 140/90, which is an increase from 130/80. Treatment may involve lifestyle changes and/or medication to bring the BP numbers into a healthy range.

  3. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  4. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  5. Pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Armaganidis, Apostolos

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with haemolytic disorders and is a frequent finding in echocardiographic screening of patients with β thalassaemia. Substantial progress has been made in understanding of the multifactorial pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia. Haemolysis, reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, iron overload, and hypercoagulopathy are among the main pathogenetic mechanisms. Various disease-directed therapeutic methods, such as transfusion, chelation, and splenectomy, have important roles in the development of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia. Studies investigating the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia are mostly based on echocardiographic findings, and are thus limited by the scarcity of information derived from right heart catheterisation. Invasive pulmonary haemodynamic data are needed to clarify the true prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia, to better understand the underlying pathophysiology and risk factors, and to define the optimum therapy for this devastating complication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients.

  7. [Syndrome of recommended patient].

    PubMed

    Sanz Rubiales, A; del Valle Rivero, M L; Flores Pérez, L A; Hernansanz de la Calle, S; García Recio, C; López-Lara Martín, F

    2002-08-01

    "Syndrome of recommended patient" is manifested as the presence of numerous unexpected and unusual complications in patients that the treating physician is trying to give a better assistance. Even assuming that a few complications may appear by chance, there are several factors from daily clinical practice that facilitate the presence of such a syndrome, and some of them can be corrected in order to reduce its incidence. All of them come from the change on daily clinical practice on these patients, as if they do not fit for the attention provided for other people. These factors favouring the presence of this syndrome come from: patients' attitude, inefficient use of health resources, absence of an adequate register of clinical data and change in usual clinical practice on interpretation of diagnostic tests as well as in the indication of treatment of these patients. The best way to prevent this "syndrome of recommended patient" is to maintain, even within these patients, an attitude based on solid clinical knowledge and to follow up the same clinical rules accepted for other patients.

  8. French recommendations on electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    André-Obadia, N; Lamblin, M D; Sauleau, P

    2015-03-01

    Electroencephalography allows the functional analysis of electrical brain cortical activity and is the gold standard for analyzing electrophysiological processes involved in epilepsy but also in several other dysfunctions of the central nervous system. Morphological imaging yields complementary data, yet it cannot replace the essential functional analysis tool that is EEG. Furthermore, EEG has the great advantage of being non-invasive, easy to perform and allows repeat testing when follow-up is necessary, even at the patient's bedside. Faced with advances in knowledge, techniques and indications, the Société de neurophysiologie clinique de langue française (SNCLF) and the Ligue française contre l'épilepsie (LFCE) found it necessary to provide an update on EEG recommendations. This article will review the methodology applied to this work, refine the various topics detailed in the following chapters. It will go over the summary of recommendations for each of these chapters and highlight proposals for writing an EEG report. Some questions could not be answered by review of the literature; in such cases, in addition to the guidelines the working and reading groups provided their expert opinion.

  9. Description of antihypertensive use in patients with resistant hypertension prescribed four or more agents.

    PubMed

    Hanselin, Michele R; Saseen, Joseph J; Allen, Richard R; Marrs, Joel C; Nair, Kavita V

    2011-12-01

    Data describing the use of recommended antihypertensive agents in the resistant hypertension population are limited. Treatment recommendations for resistant hypertension include maximizing diuretic therapy by using chlorthalidone and/or adding an aldosterone antagonist. Additional recommendations include combining antihypertensive agents from different drug classes. This retrospective cohort study describes antihypertensive use in patients with resistant hypertension defined as the concurrent use of ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Claims data from the Medstat MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter database were used to identify patients with resistant hypertension based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes and National Drug Codes between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009. Of the 5 442 410 patients with hypertension in the database, 140 126 met study criteria. The most frequently prescribed antihypertensive classes were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (96.2%), diuretics (93.2%), calcium channel blockers (83.6%), and β-blockers (80.0%). Only 3.0% and 5.9% of patients were on chlorthalidone or an aldosterone antagonist, respectively. A total of 15.6% of patients were treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor plus angiotensin receptor blocker. Our findings demonstrate that frequently prescribed antihypertensive agents for the treatment of resistant hypertension included guideline-recommended first-line agents. However, evidence-based and recommended agents, such as chlorthalidone and aldosterone antagonists, were underused. Moreover, minimally efficacious combinations, such as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker, were prescribed at higher rates than evidence-based and recommended agents.

  10. [Comparison of hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts].

    PubMed

    Suárez, P; Castillo, J; Pardellas, H; Vadillo, J; Lema, M; Noya, M

    1998-05-01

    Arterial hypertension and hypohyalinosis of the arterias perforantes are said to be the commonest cause of lacunar infarcts, although other etiological factors and anatomo-pathological lesions are described more and more frequently. We designed a study to compare the clinical topographic and prognostic characteristics of patients with hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. We selected 51 patients with lacunar infarcts: in 23 (45%) arterial hypertension was the only etiological factor recognized. In 28 (55%) other risk factors (16 diabetes mellitus, 17 cardiopathy, 8 hyperlipemia, 13 cigarette smoking and 11 alcoholism) were seen. We evaluated the form of presentation, the type of infarct and whether this was associated with headache. The degree of defect was determined on admission using the Canadian scale. The size of the infarct was measured on CT or RM, using whichever measurement was greater. The evolution of the condition was determined on the Canadian scale and the index of Barthel after three months. Age and sex distribution was similar to both groups. Motor hemiparesia was the commonest lacunar syndrome and the distribution was similar. There was no difference in form of onset, association with headache or neurological defect between the hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. The topographical distribution, the presentation of single or multiple lesions, the size of the infarcts and the prognosis were similar in both groups. Lacunar infarcts, whether hypertensive or not, show no differences regarding clinical, neuro-radiological or evolutionary characteristics.

  11. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period.

  12. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%–5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period. PMID:27147865

  13. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and

  14. The results of a survey of physicians about the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2014 and its clinical use.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Masaki; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated physicians' awareness and use of the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2014 (JSH2014) and is based on the results of a survey performed by the Publicity and Advertisement Committee of JSH. A questionnaire was used to survey physicians' awareness of the JSH2014, their recommended target blood pressure for hypertensive patients with complications and their use of antihypertensive drugs. Physicians who downloaded a PDF version of JSH2014 during the 6 months after its publication (April-September 2014) were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Of the 7872 respondents, 91% were aware of the JSH and complied partially, mostly or completely with it in their practice. With reference to hypertensive patients, ∼70% of physicians who completed the questionnaire recommended a target blood pressure (BP) of 140/90 mm Hg for an office BP value, and 40% recommended 135/85 mm Hg for a home BP value. Physicians recommended target BP levels of 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease (50-63% of physician surveyed) and for elderly patients with diabetes or kidney disease (45-55% of respondents), whereas they recommended 140/90 mm Hg for elderly patients with low cardiovascular disease risk (56-60% of physician surveyed) and for patients with chronic-phase stroke (40-47% of respondents). The most commonly prescribed combination of antihypertensive drugs was angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) with calcium channel blocker. In addition, physicians' first choice of drug for patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease was most often ARB. Overall, the survey results showed that the new recommendations from the JSH2014 accurately reflect daily clinical practices for hypertension management used by Japanese physicians.

  15. Longitudinal Study of Hypertensive Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Overall and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E; Gnakaméné, Jean-Barthélémy; Bahous, Sola Aoun; Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Thomas, Frédérique

    2017-04-10

    Despite adequate glycemic and blood pressure control, treated type 2 diabetic hypertensive subjects have a significantly elevated overall/cardiovascular risk. We studied 244 816 normotensive and 99 720 hypertensive subjects (including 7480 type 2 diabetics) attending medical checkups between 1992 and 2011. We sought to identify significant differences in overall/cardiovascular risk between hypertension with and without diabetes mellitus. Mean follow-up was 12.7 years; 14 050 all-cause deaths were reported. From normotensive to hypertensive populations, a significant progression in overall/cardiovascular mortality was observed. Mortality was significantly greater among diabetic than nondiabetic hypertensive subjects (all-cause mortality, 14.05% versus 7.43%; and cardiovascular mortality, 1.28% versus 0.7%). No interaction was observed between hemodynamic measurements and overall/cardiovascular risk, suggesting that blood pressure factors, even during drug therapy, could not explain the differences in mortality rates between diabetic and nondiabetic hypertensive patients. Using cross-sectional regression models, a significant association was observed between higher education levels, lower levels of anxiety and depression, and reduced overall mortality in diabetic hypertensive subjects, while impaired renal function, a history of stroke and myocardial infarction, and increased alcohol and tobacco consumption were significantly associated with increased mortality. Blood pressure and glycemic control alone cannot reverse overall/cardiovascular risk in diabetics with hypertension. Together with cardiovascular measures, overall prevention should include recommendations to reduce alcohol and tobacco consumption and improve stress, education levels, and physical activity.

  16. Hypertension and hemodialysis: pathophysiology and outcomes in adult and pediatric populations.

    PubMed

    Van Buren, Peter N; Inrig, Jula K

    2012-03-01

    Hypertension is prevalent in adult and pediatric end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis. Volume overload is a primary factor contributing to hypertension, and attaining true dry weight remains a priority for nephrologists. Other contributing factors to hypertension include activation of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, endothelial cell dysfunction, arterial stiffness, exposure to hypertensinogenic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances during hemodialysis. Epidemiologic studies in adults show that uncontrolled hypertension results in cardiovascular morbidity, but reveal increased mortality risk at low blood pressure, so that it remains unclear what the target blood pressure should be. Despite the lack of a definitive BP target, gradual dry weight reduction should be the first intervention for BP control. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors have been shown to improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and are recommended as the initial pharmacologic therapy for hypertensive hemodialysis patients. Short-daily or nocturnal hemodialysis are also good therapeutic options for these patients. It is already established that hypertension in pediatric hemodialysis patients is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, and there is emerging evidence that the mechanisms causing hypertension are similar to adults. Hypertension in adult and pediatric hemodialysis patients warrants aggressive management, although clinical trial evidence of a target BP that improves mortality does not currently exist.

  17. Does the Cardiologist Have a Key Role in Long-Term Management of Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Andreas; Steverding, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a widespread chronic condition which is usually treated with hypertensive drugs. However, 50% of hypertensive patients do not achieve control of their blood pressure below the standard target of 140/90 mmHg when treated with a single antihypertensive drug. Generally, hypertension specialists have a key role in managing hypertensive patients. Methods A retrospective case note review based on observations made in a cardiological outpatient clinic in Germany was carried out to assess whether the recommendation given by hypertension specialists were followed. The aim was to lower the blood pressure to < 130/85 mmHg over a period of six months by administering the new antihypertensive drug Zaneril® (lercanidipine/enalapril). Twenty-four hour blood pressure profiles were monitored a fortnight and six months later. Results Of the 130 patients, whose average blood pressure was 163/87 mmHg before receiving hypertensive treatment, only 44 (34%) were still on Zaneril® therapy six months later. Eighty-four patients (65%) did not turn up for follow-up examinations. The blood pressure of patients who were under Zaneril® therapy for the whole six months was better adjusted than that of patients who changed their treatment in the meantime (133/78 mmHg vs. 139/80 mmHg). Conclusions Specialists have only little influence on the long-term therapy of hypertensive patients.

  18. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  19. Weight control in the management of hypertension. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This article, which includes a brief description of the mechanisms and some epidemiological findings in obesity and high blood pressure, sums up present knowledge on a complex subject and provides guidance to medical practitioners on the management of obese hypertensive patients. Weight reduction, together with drug therapy in severe and moderate hypertension, and other non-pharmacological methods and continuing observation in mild hypertension are the essential measures to be applied. In addition to the lowering of blood pressure, weight loss offers several other metabolic and haemodynamic benefits. PMID:2670295

  20. Evaluation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in hypertensive patients attending a tertiary hospital in calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nnenna Adaeze, Nnamani; Uchenna Emeribe, Anthony; Abdullahi Nasiru, Idris; Babayo, Adamu; Uko, Emmanuel K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Several biomedical findings have established the effects of hypertension on haemostasis and roles of blood coagulation products in the clinical course of hypertension. Methods. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining effects of hypertension on prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in hypertensive patients in comparison with normotensive subjects attending a tertiary hospital in Calabar. Forty-two (42) hypertensive patients and thirty-nine (39) normotensive control subjects were investigated for PT and APTT using Quick one-stage methods. Results. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) correlated positively with APTT (r = 0.3072, r = 0.4988; P < 0.05) in hypertensive patients. DBP, SBP, PT, and APTT were significantly higher in hypertensive patients when compared to normotensive subjects (P < 0.05). DBP correlated negatively with duration of illness (r = -0.3097; P < 0.05) in hypertensive patients and positively with age of normotensive subjects (r = 0.3523; P < 0.05). Conclusion. The results obtained indicated that measurements of PT and APTT may serve as indices for evaluating hemostatic abnormalities in hypertensive patients and guide for antihypertensive therapy. However, to have better understanding of hemostatic activities in hypertension, it is recommended to conduct D-dimer, platelet factors, and protein assays.

  1. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  2. IRIS Product Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) evaluation of SIGMET Inc.'s Integrated Radar Information System (IRIS) Product Generator and recommendations for products emphasizing lightning and microburst tools. The IRIS Product Generator processes radar reflectivity data from the Weather Surveillance Radar, model 74C (WSR-74C), located on Patrick Air Force Base. The IRIS System was upgraded from version 6.12 to version 7.05 in late December 1999. A statistical analysis of atmospheric temperature variability over the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Weather Station provided guidance for the configuration of radar products that provide information on the mixed-phase (liquid and ice) region of clouds, between 0 C and -20 C. Mixed-phase processes at these temperatures are physically linked to electrification and the genesis of severe weather within convectively generated clouds. Day-to-day variations in the atmospheric temperature profile are of sufficient magnitude to warrant periodic reconfiguration of radar products intended for the interpretation of lightning and microburst potential of convectively generated clouds. The AMU also examined the radar volume-scan strategy to determine the scales of vertical gaps within the altitude range of the 0 C to -20 C isotherms over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/CCAFS area. This report present's two objective strategies for designing volume scans and proposes a modified scan strategy that reduces the average vertical gap by 37% as a means for improving radar observations of cloud characteristics in the critical 0 C to -20 C layer. The AMU recommends a total of 18 products, including 11 products that require use of the IRIS programming language and the IRIS User Product Insert feature. Included is a cell trends product and display, modeled after the WSR-88D cell trends display in use by the National Weather Service.

  3. Audit of hypertension in general practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, S C; Chandramani, T; Chen, T Y; Chong, K N; Harbaksh, S; Lee, T W; Lin, H G; Sheikh, A; Tan, C W; Teoh, L C

    2005-10-01

    An audit of hypertension management was done in October 2004 in nine general practice (GP) clinics. Two structure, ten process and two outcome indicators were assessed. Results showed that targets were achieved in only four indicators, i.e., weight recording (89%), BP monitoring (85.8%), follow-up interval not exceeding 6 months (87.9%) and mean diastolic BP (73.9%). The other indicators (hypertension registry, reminder mechanisms for defaulters, recording of smoking, height, fundoscopy, monitoring of lipid profile, blood sugar, ECG, renal function and achievement of target mean systolic pressure) showed adequacy percentages varying from 22.1 to 68.7. Out of the 1260 patients assessed, 743 (59%) achieved a mean BP < or = 140/90 (or < or = 130/80 mmHg with diabetes mellitus / renal insufficiency) in the last 3 recorded readings. There was a vast difference between individual clinics. Reasons for not achieving targets were discussed and remedial measures for implementation were recommended.

  4. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension. PMID:28298894

  5. Hemodynamic Thresholds for Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Christian; Gerges, Mario; Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lixia; Sadushi-Kolici, Roela; Jakowitsch, Johannes; Lang, Marie B; Lang, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    Hemodynamic differentiation between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and postcapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) is important because treatment options are strikingly different for the two disease subsets. Whereas patients with PAH can be treated effectively with targeted therapies, their use in postcapillary PH is currently not recommended. Our aim was to establish an algorithm to identify patients who are likely to experience a significant hemodynamic treatment response. We determined hemodynamic cutoffs to discriminate between idiopathic PAH and postcapillary PH in a large database of 4,363 stable patients undergoing first diagnostic right and left heart catheterizations. In a second step, we performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized, placebo-controlled trials including 541 patients with PAH who received treprostinil or placebo, to validate hemodynamic cutoffs with regard to treatment response. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (mPAWP) < 12 mm Hg and diastolic pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (DPG) ≥ 7 mm Hg as the best hemodynamic discriminators between idiopathic PAH and postcapillary PH. In our treatment study, only patients with mPAWP < 12 mm Hg, DPG > 20 mm Hg or a combination of both had a significant placebo-corrected improvement in hemodynamics. mPAWP < 12 mm Hg and DPG > 20 mm Hg identify patients with PAH who are likely to have significant hemodynamic improvement with prostacyclin treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Portal hypertension. Evidence-based guide].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Orozco Zepeda, Héctor; Plata-Muñoz, Juan José

    2004-01-01

    Treatment of portal hypertension has evolved widely during the last decades. Advances in physiopathology have allowed better application of therapeutic options and also have permitted to know the natural history of varices and variceal bleeding, predicting which patients have a higher risk of bleeding. It also permits probability of designing patient treatment. According to liver function and subadjacent liver disease, it is possible to offer different alternatives within the three possible scenarios (primary prophylaxis, acute bleeding episode, and secondary prophylaxis). For primary prophylaxis, pharmacotherapy offers the best choice. Endoscopic banding is also growing in these scenarios and probably will be accepted in the near future. For the acute bleeding episode, endoscopic therapy (sclerosis and/or bands) and/or pharmacologic therapy (octreotide, terlipresin) represent best choice, considering TIPS as a rescue option. Surgery is not used routinely in this scenario in most centers. For secondary prophylaxis, pharmaco- and endoscopic therapy are first-line treatments, while TIPS and surgery as second-line treatments. TIPS is mainly used in patients on a waiting list for liver transplantation. Surgery offers good results for low-risk patients, with good liver function and with portal blood-flow preserving procedures (selective shunts, extensive devascularizations). Liver transplantation is recommended for patients with poor liver function because together with portal hypertension, it treats subadjacent liver disease.

  7. Definitions and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Condliffe, Robin; Frantz, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh; Kurzyna, Marcin; Langleben, David; Manes, Alessandra; Satoh, Toru; Torres, Fernando; Wilkins, Martin R; Badesch, David B

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest, measured during right heart catheterization. There is still insufficient evidence to add an exercise criterion to this definition. The term pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) describes a subpopulation of patients with PH characterized hemodynamically by the presence of pre-capillary PH including an end-expiratory pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and a pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units. Right heart catheterization remains essential for a diagnosis of PH or PAH. This procedure requires further standardization, including uniformity of the pressure transducer zero level at the midthoracic line, which is at the level of the left atrium. One of the most common problems in the diagnostic workup of patients with PH is the distinction between PAH and PH due to left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). A normal PAWP does not rule out the presence of HFpEF. Volume or exercise challenge during right heart catheterization may be useful to unmask the presence of left heart disease, but both tools require further evaluation before their use in general practice can be recommended. Early diagnosis of PAH remains difficult, and screening programs in asymptomatic patients are feasible only in high-risk populations, particularly in patients with systemic sclerosis, for whom recent data suggest that a combination of clinical assessment and pulmonary function testing including diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, biomarkers, and echocardiography has a higher predictive value than echocardiography alone.

  8. 2015 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology and the Taiwan Hypertension Society for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Chung-Yin; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chao, Chia-Lun; Liu, Ping-Yen; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Li, Yi-Heng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Chen, Wen-Jone; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2015-01-01

    targets are <140/90 mmHg for all other patient groups, except for patients ≥80 years of age in whom a BP target of <150/90 mmHg would be optimal. For the management of hypertension, we proposed a treatment algorithm, starting with life style modification (LSM) including S-ABCDE (Sodium restriction, Alcohol limitation, Body weight reduction, Cigarette smoke cessation, Diet adaptation, and Exercise adoption). We emphasized a low-salt strategy instead of a no-salt strategy, and that excessively aggressive sodium restriction to <2.0 gram/day may be harmful. When drug therapy is considered, a strategy called "PROCEED" was suggested (Previous experience, Risk factors, Organ damage, Contraindications or unfavorable conditions, Expert's or doctor's judgment, Expenses or cost, and Delivery and compliance issue). To predict drug effects in lowering BP, we proposed the "Rule of 10" and "Rule of 5". With a standard dose of any one of the 5 major classes of anti-hypertensive agents, one can anticipate approximately a 10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (Rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (DBP) (Rule of 5). When doses of the same drug are doubled, there is only a 2-mmHg incremental decrease in SBP and a 1-mmHg incremental decrease in DBP. Preferably, when 2 drugs with different mechanisms are to be taken together, the decrease in BP is the sum of the decrease of the individual agents (approximately 20 mmHg in SBP and 10 mmHg in DBP). Early combination therapy, especially single-pill combination (SPC), is recommended. When patient's initial treatment cannot get BP to targeted goals, we have proposed an adjustment algorithm, "AT GOALs" (Adherence, Timing of administration, Greater doses, Other classes of drugs, Alternative combination or SPC, and LSM + Laboratory tests). Treatment of hypertension in special conditions, including treatment of resistant hypertension, hypertension in women, and perioperative management of hypertension, were also mentioned. The

  9. American College of Sports Medicine. Position Stand. Physical activity, physical fitness, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    1993-10-01

    Hypertension is present in epidemic proportions in adults of industrialized societies and is associated with a markedly increased risk of developing numerous cardiovascular pathologies. There is a continuing debate as to the efficacy of aggressive pharmacological therapy in individuals with mild to moderate elevations in blood pressure. This has led to a search for nonpharmacological therapies, such as exercise training, for these individuals. The available evidence indicates that endurance exercise training by individuals at high risk for developing hypertension will reduce the rise in blood pressure that occurs with time. Thus, it is the position of the American College of Sports Medicine that endurance exercise training is recommended as a nonpharmacological strategy to reduce the incidence of hypertension in susceptible individuals. A large number of studies indicate that endurance exercise training will elicit a 10 mm Hg average reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures in individuals with mild essential hypertension (blood pressures 140-180/90-105 mm Hg). Endurance exercise training also has the capacity to improve other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in hypertensive individuals. Endurance exercise training appears to elicit even greater reductions in blood pressure in patients with secondary hypertension due to renal dysfunction. The mode (large muscle activities), frequency (3-5 d.wk-1), duration (20-60 min), and intensity (50-85% of maximal oxygen uptake) of the exercise recommended to achieve this effect are generally the same as those prescribed for developing and maintaining cardiovascular fitness in healthy adults. Exercise training at somewhat lower intensities (40-70% VO2max) appears to lower blood pressure as much, or more, than exercise at higher intensities, which may be important in specific hypertensive populations. Physically active and fit individuals with hypertension have markedly lower rates of mortality than

  10. [Pulmonary hypertension : What is new in therapy?].

    PubMed

    Sommer, N; Hecker, M; Tello, K; Richter, M; Liebetrau, C; Weigand, M A; Seeger, W; Ghofrani, A; Gall, H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a group of pulmonary vascular diseases that are characterized by progressive exertional dyspnea and right heart insufficiency ultimately resulting in right heart decompensation. The classification is into five clinical subgroups that form the absolutely essential basis for decisions on the indications for different pharmacological and non-pharmacological forms of treatment. The guidelines were updated in 2015 and in addition to the hitherto existing pharmacological treatment options of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists and prostacyclins, the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat has now been incorporated for treatment of certain forms of PH. This article provides an overview of the new treatment recommendations in the current guidelines, e. g. for PH patients who are in intensive care units due to surgical interventions or progressive right heart insufficiency.

  11. [Segmental arterial mediolysis and renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gaud, Simon; Cridlig, Joelle; Claudon, Michel; Diarrassouba, Assetou; Kessler, Michèle; Frimat, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare nonarteriosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease of unknown origin that causes vascular occlusion or massive life-threatening intraabdominal hemorrhages. SAM is an acute disease. The initial injurious phase consist in mediolysis, then evolves in chronic vascular lesions. Diagnostic criteria are histologic, but rarely accessible apart from surgical complications. To our knowledge, there is no recommendation concerning therapy and follow-up of these patients. In our patient, we were interested in the atypical clinical presentation with renovascular hypertension, and the coexistence of acute and chronic vascular lesions that suppose the existence of recurrences in the evolution of this disease. We are interested also in the link that might exist between renal infarct and SAM, SAM's chronic vascular lesions and fibromuscular dysplasia vascular lesions.

  12. Novel serum biomarkers in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Neil; Johnson, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a difficult-to-treat condition with high mortality. Biomarkers are utilized to aid with diagnosis, prognostication and response to treatment. A clinically useful and PAH-specific single biomarker that is easy to measure remains elusive. This is in part due to the heterogeneity of PAH and its complex etiology. Brain natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment are currently the most widely used serum markers; however, several novel serum biomarkers have been investigated recently. Taken individually, the evidence for each of these seems provisionally promising though currently weak overall. It is likely that a multibiomarker panel will be recommended in the future, with the optimal combination yet to be determined.

  13. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: changing approaches to management].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V; Batyraliev, T A; Belenkov, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to different aspects of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); new classification of PAH is published in 2010. There are idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with other diseases. Current guidelines recommend to treat PAH only after the verification of diagnosis with right heart catheterization and acute tests with vasodilators. Patients-reactors should be treated with calcium antagonists. The following drugs related to one of three categories should be used in PAH: (1) prostanoids (epoprostenol, iloprost et al.); (2) blockers of endothelin receptors (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan); (3) phosphodiesterase 5 type inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil et al.) In majority of cases the combined treatment is used, usually the combination of bosentan and sildenafil is used.

  14. Dermatoglyphics in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Agampodi, Thilini C; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2015-08-12

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and mortality. A major medical advancement would be a better means to ascertain which persons are at higher risk for becoming hypertensive beforehand. To that end, there have been a number of studies showing that certain dermatoglyphic markers are associated with hypertension. This association could be explained if the risk toward developing hypertension later on in life is somehow connected with fetal development of dermatoglyphics. It would be highly valuable from a clinical standpoint if this conjecture could be substantiated since dermatoglyphic markers could then be used for screening out individuals who might be at an elevated risk of becoming hypertensive. The aim of this review was to search for and appraise available studies that pertain to the association between hypertension and dermatoglyphics.A systematic literature search conducted using articles from MEDLINE (PubMed), Trip, Cochran, Google scholar, and gray literature until December 2014. Of the 37 relevant publications, 17 were included in the review. The review performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement.This review showed a fairly consistent finding of an increased frequency of whorl patterns along with a higher mean total ridge count in digital dermatoglyphic results in hypertensive samples compared to controls. However, it was imperative to discuss several limitations found in the studies that could make this association as yet unsettled.

  15. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  16. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  17. WNK kinases and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chou-Long; Kuo, Elizabeth; Toto, Robert D

    2008-03-01

    The present review summarizes recent literature and discusses the potential roles of WNKs in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. WNKs (with-no-lysine [K]) are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine protein kinases with unusual protein kinase domains. The role of WNK kinases in the control of blood pressure was first revealed by the findings that mutations of two members, WNK1 and WNK4, cause Gordon's syndrome. Laboratory studies have revealed that WNK kinases play important roles in the regulation of sodium and potassium transport. Animal models have been created to unravel the pathophysiology of sodium transport disorders caused by mutations of the WNK4 gene. Potassium deficiency causes sodium retention and increases hypertension prevalence. The expression of WNK1 is upregulated by potassium deficiency, raising the possibility that WNK1 may contribute to salt-sensitive essential hypertension associated with potassium deficiency. Associations of polymorphisms of WNK genes with essential hypertension in the general population have been reported. Mutations of WNK1 and WNK4 cause hypertension at least partly by increasing renal sodium retention. The role of WNK kinases in salt-sensitive hypertension within general hypertension is suggested, but future work is required to firmly establish the connection.

  18. Recent clinical and translational advances in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Falkner, Bonita

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological reports describe a child population increase in BP level and an increase in prevalence of hypertension, that is largely, but not entirely, driven by a concurrent increase in childhood obesity. Given current estimates, ≈10% of adolescents have hypertension or prehypertension. In addition to obesity, dietary salt intake and waist circumference, a marker of visceral obesity, are found to be independently associated with the rise in BP among children and adolescents. Dietary salt intake in urban children is well above recommended levels largely because of consumption of processed and fast foods. Childhood exposures, such as stress,52 salt, and fructose, as well as lifestyles, including food sources, sleep patterns, and reductions in physical activity may have a role in obesity-high BP associations. In addition, clinical and translational evidence is mounting that intrauterine exposures alter can effect changes in fetal development that have an enduring effect on cardiovascular and metabolic function later in life. These effects can be detected even in children who are products of a term otherwise normal pregnancy. Hypertension in childhood has been defined statistically (BP ≥ 95th percentile) because of lack of outcome data that links a BP level with heightened risk for future cardiovascular events. Therefore, primary hypertension had been considered a risk factor for later hypertension in adulthood. Intermediate markers of TOD, including cardiac hypertrophy, vascular stiffness, and increases in cIMT, are detectable in adolescents with primary hypertension. Evidence that vascular injury is present in the early phase of hypertension and even in prehypertension warrants consideration on the current definition of pediatric hypertension. With further studies on TOD and other risk factors in addition to high BP, it may be possible to shift from a statistical definition to a definition of childhood hypertension that is evidence based. Preventing or

  19. [Differences between the 2013 and 2014 hypertension guidelines.: Position of the Central American and Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention].

    PubMed

    Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Wyss, Fernando; Coca, Antonio; Ramírez, Agustín J; Valdez, Osiris; Valerio, Luis F

    2015-03-01

    Between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 the most internationally influential hypertension guidelines were published. Although there are no major differences between them, there are discrepancies that can have an impact on treatment and prognosis for individuals with hypertension. This article analyzes the main controversial elements in the guides and presents the recommendations of the Sociedad Centroamericana y del Caribe de Hipertensión y Prevención Cardiovascular (Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention). The main differences are found a) in the categorization of prehypertension, b) in the use of global cardiovascular risk in the decision to begin antihypertensive treatment, c) in the validity of beta-blockers as first-line drugs in treating uncomplicated hypertension, and d) the increase in the therapeutic goal of maintaining values between < 140/90 and < 150/90 mmHg in patients over 60 years of age with no history of diabetes or chronic kidney disease. All the factors in favor of and against accepting each of these four controversial criteria are analyzed critically and the observations made by the Society are included. The conclusion is that there are pros and cons for all controversial elements in the hypertension guides. However, the weight of the evidence and clinical judgment favor subdividing prehypertension into stages I and II, seeking a therapeutic goal of maintaining systolic blood pressure below 140 mmHg in all the hypertensive patients under 80 years of age, retaining beta-blockers as first-line drugs in uncomplicated hypertension, and not delaying the start of drug treatment for hypertension stage I with low global cardiovascular risk. Finally, seven recommendations by the Society based on the analysis are included.

  20. Qigong for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of qigong for hypertension. A systematic literature search was performed in 7 databases from their respective inceptions until April 2014, including the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang database, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials of qigong as either monotherapy or adjunctive therapy with antihypertensive drugs versus no intervention, exercise, or antihypertensive drugs for hypertension were identified. The risk of bias was assessed using the tool described in Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0. Twenty trials containing 2349 hypertensive patients were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was generally high. Compared with no intervention, qigong significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −17.40 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [CI] −21.06 to −13.74, P < 0.00001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (WMD = −10.15 mm Hg, 95% CI −13.99 to −6.30, P < 0.00001). Qigong was inferior to exercise in decreasing SBP (WMD = 6.51 mm Hg, 95% CI 2.81 to 10.21, P = 0.0006), but no significant difference between the effects of qigong and exercise on DBP (WMD = 0.67 mm Hg, 95% CI −1.39 to 2.73, P = 0.52) was identified. Compared with antihypertensive drugs, qigong produced a clinically meaningful but not statistically significant reduction in SBP (WMD = −7.91 mm Hg, 95% CI −16.81 to 1.00, P = 0.08), but appeared to be more effective in lowering DBP (WMD = −6.08 mm Hg, 95% CI −9.58 to −2.58, P = 0.0007). Qigong plus antihypertensive drugs significantly lowered both SBP (WMD = −11.99 mm Hg, 95% CI −15.59 to −8.39, P < 0.00001) and DBP (WMD = −5.28 mm Hg, 95% CI, −8.13 to −2.42, P = 0

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2011-01-01

    Female predominance in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been known for several decades and recent interest in the effects of sex hormones on the development of disease has substantially increased our understanding of this epidemiologic observation. Basic science data suggest a beneficial effect of estrogens in the pulmonary vasculature both acutely and chronically, which seems to contradict the known predilection in women. Recent human and rodent data have suggested that altered levels of estrogen, differential signaling and altered metabolism of estrogens in PAH may underlie the gender difference in this disease. Studies of the effects of sex hormones on the right ventricle in animal and human disease will further aid in understanding gender differences in PAH. This article focuses on the effects of sex hormones on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle on both a basic science and translational level. PMID:21090930

  2. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, H.J.; Kloek, J.J.; Bresser, P.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rapidly progressive and deadly disease, resulting from incomplete resolution of acute pulmonary embolism. Historically, the incidence of CTEPH was significantly underestimated but it may be as high as 3.8% following acute pulmonary embolism. Although the medical management of CTEPH may be supportive, the only curative treatment is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA). However, a careful screening programme is mandatory to select CTEPH patients who are likely to benefit from PEA. In this review we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic pitfalls, surgical treatment, outcome after surgery, and the potential benefit of medical treatment in inoperable CTEPH patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696637

  3. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kendall, M J

    1998-01-01

    In those aged 65-85 years, the major causes of death and disability are cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction, sudden death and stroke). Clinical trials in elderly patients have demonstrated unequivocally that effective blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients up to the age of 85 years significantly reduces this mortality and morbidity. The larger trials are referred to as the SHEP trial (chlorthalidone), the STOP trial (beta-blockers and/or diuretics), the MRC Elderly Trial (atenolol or diuretic) and the SYST-EUR trial (nitrendipine). Patients entered into clinical trials are a selected population; those with serious coexisting diseases and with a poor prognosis are usually excluded. For this reason one has to carefully consider whether the results of these trials would provide the best treatment for the next patient the doctor sees who would probably not meet the entry criteria. Elderly hypertensives may fall into one of three categories. The sick elderly with serious disorders such as cancer or dementia have a poor quality of life and a bad prognosis. They should not be given antihypertensive drugs. The medically complicated elderly have serious disorders, which usually require drug therapy and the medical condition and the drugs used in treatment may complicate the choice of antihypertensive drugs. The potential adverse effects of adding another form of drug treatment may outweigh the potential benefits. The fit elderly do derive considerable benefit from adequate blood pressure control and need an effective, well-tolerated antihypertensive drug. The choice of drug to control blood pressure in the elderly is difficult. An effective, well-tolerated antihypertensive with little potential to interact with coexisting disorders and other drugs is needed.

  4. Hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kurukulasuriya, L Romayne; Stas, Sameer; Lastra, Guido; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2011-09-01

    Obesity and HTN are on the rise in the world. HTN seems to be the most common obesity-related health problem and visceral obesity seems to be the major culprit. Unfortunately, only 31% of hypertensives are treated to goal. This translates into an increased incidence of CVD and related morbidity and mortality. Several mechanisms have been postulated as the causes of obesity-related HTN. Activation of the RAAS, SNS, insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin, dysfunctional fat, FFA, resistin, 11 Beta dehydrogenase, renal structural and hemodynamic changes, and OSA are some of the abnormalities in obesity-related HTN. Many of these factors are interrelated. Treatment of obesity should begin with weight loss via lifestyle modifications, medications, or bariatric surgery. According to the mechanisms of obesity-related HTN, it seems that drugs that blockade the RAAS and target the SNS should be ideal for treatment. There is not much evidence in the literature that one drug is better than another in controlling obesity-related HTN. There have only been a few studies specifically targeting the obese hypertensive patient, but recent trials that emphasize the importance of BP control have enrolled both overweight and obese subjects. Until we have further studies with more in-depth information about the mechanisms of obesity-related HTN and what the targeted treatment should be, the most important factor necessary to control the obesity-related HTN pandemic and its CVD and CKD consequences is to prevent and treat obesity and to treat HTN to goal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Hemorheological alterations in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Foresto, Patricia; D'Arrigo, Mabel; Filippini, Fernando; Gallo, Roberto; Barberena, Liliana; Racca, Liliana; Valverde, Juana; Rasia, Rodolfo J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the blood viscosity profile and to evaluate the influence of plasmatic (fibrinogen) and cellular (erythrocyte aggregation) factors in a group of hypertensive patients, compared with a normotensive group. We worked with anticoagulated blood of both non diabetic hypertensive patients (n=31), and healthy individuals (n=40). The plasmatic viscosity and whole blood determination were obtained with a cone-plate viscometer. Erythrocyte aggregation was studied by microscopical observation and quantified by an Aggregate Shape Parameter (ASP), defined as the relation projected area/perimeter. Fibrinogen was determined by the Clauss method with a coagulometer. A comparison between these groups led us to assert that whole blood viscosity was significantly higher in hypertensive patients than in the controls at all shear rates. Plasma viscosity values only showed significant differences between both groups at low shear rate (1.15 a 11.56 seg(-1)). The hypertensive patients showed irregular and amorphous aggregates so that ASP appeared significantly higher (p< 0.001) in patients with hypertension (0.69 +/- 0.11) than in healthy subjects (0.25 +/- 0.12). Fibrinogen appeared slightly higher (p<0.01) in the hypertensive group than in the normal group. Several hemorheological parameters play important roles in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Among these factors, several hemorheological parameters could be altered in hypertension (hematocrit, plasma fibrinogen level, erythrocyte deformability and aggregability, plasma and whole blood viscosity). An increased RBC aggregation has been identified as an important factor responsible for disturbing blood rheological behavior in the microcirculation. The present study demonstrates an abnormal erythrocyte aggregation, which was detected by increased ASP values that could be responsible for vascular complications in hypertension.

  6. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Harrison, David G

    2014-03-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We and others have shown that mice lacking adaptive immune cells, including recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice and rats and mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension to stimuli such as ANG II, high salt, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Agonistic antibodies to the ANG II receptor, produced by B cells, contribute to hypertension in experimental models of preeclampsia. The central nervous system seems important in immune cell activation, because lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle block hypertension and T cell activation in response to ANG II. Likewise, genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and immune cell activation. Current evidence indicates that the production of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-6, contribute to hypertension, likely via effects on both the kidney and vasculature. In addition, the innate immune system also appears to contribute to hypertension. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, production of cytokines, and, ultimately, vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to the augmentation of hypertension. Studies of immune cell activation will clearly be useful in understanding this common yet complex disease.

  7. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  8. [The magnetotherapy of hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S G; Smirnov, V V; Solov'eva, F V; Liashevskaia, S P; Selezneva, L Iu

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of the constant MKM2-1 magnets on patients suffering from essential hypertension. Continuous action of the magnetic field, created by such magnets, on the patients with stage II essential hypertension was noted to result in a decrease of arterial pressure without the occurrence of any side effects and in a simultaneous reduction of the scope of drug administration. Apart from that fact, magnetotherapy was discovered to produce a beneficial effect on the central hemodynamics and microcirculation. The use of the MKM2-1 magnets may be regarded as a feasible method of the treatment of essential hypertension patients at any medical institution.

  9. Maternal distress and the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garza-Veloz, Idalia; Castruita-De la Rosa, Claudia; Ortiz-Castro, Yolanda; Flores-Morales, Virginia; Castañeda-Lopez, Maria E; Cardenas-Vargas, Edith; Hernandez-Delgadillo, Gloria P; Ortega-Cisneros, Vicente; Luevano, Martha; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P; Trejo-Vazquez, Fabiola; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Cid-Baez, Miguel A; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla M; Ramos-Del Hoyo, Maria G; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L

    2017-11-01

    Despite the implementation of programmes to improve maternal health, maternal and foetal mortality rates still remain high. The presence of maternal distress and its association with the development of pregnancy hypertensive disorders is not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal distress and the development of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in a prospective cohort of 321 Mexican women. Symptoms of maternal distressing were evaluated at week 20th of gestation using the General Health Questionnaire. The presence of acute somatic symptoms, social dysfunction, anxiety and insomnia increased the odds of developing a pregnancy hypertensive disorder by 5.1-26.4 times in study population (p values < .05). Our results support the participation of maternal distress in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The implementation of effective programmes prioritising risk factors during pregnancy including the presence of maternal distressing factors is recommended. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: Changes in the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems have been observed in pregnant women with distress conditions leading to gestational disorders. What do the results of this study add: The presence of acute somatic symptoms, social dysfunction, anxiety and insomnia increased the developing of hypertensive disorders in Mexican population. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the role of the maternal stress in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and in the implementation of effective programmes for clinical practice prioritising risk factors during pregnancy, including the presence of maternal distressing factors.

  10. Validity and applicability of a new recording method for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mas-Heredia, Minerva; Molés-Moliner, Eloisa; González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; Ortiz-Molina, Jacinto; Mauri-Vázquez, Vanesa; Menacho-Pascual, Ignacio; Cararach-Salami, Daniel; Sierra-Benito, Cristina; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    Blood pressure measurement methods and conditions are determinants of hypertension diagnosis. A recent British guideline recommends systematic 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. However, these devices are not available at all health centers and they can only be used by 1 patient per day. The aim of this study was to test a new blood pressure recording method to see if it gave the same diagnostic results as 24-h blood pressure monitoring. One-hour blood pressure monitoring under routine clinical practice conditions was compared with standard method of day time recording by analyzing the coefficient of correlation and Bland-Altman plots. The Kappa index was used to calculate degree of agreement. Method sensitivity and specificity were also analyzed. Of the 102 participants, 89 (87.3%) obtained the same diagnosis regardless of method, with high between-method agreement (κ= 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.91). We observed robust correlations between diastolic (r=0.85) and systolic blood pressure (r=0.76) readings. Sensitivity and specificity for the new method for diagnosing white coat hypertension were 85.2% (95% confidence interval 67.5%-94.1%) and 92% (95% confidence interval, 83.6%-96.3%), respectively. One-hour blood pressure monitoring is a valid and reliable method for diagnosing hypertension and for classifying hypertension subpopulations, especially in white coat hypertension and refractory hypertension. This also leads to a more productive use of monitoring instruments. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. SMFM Statement: benefit of antihypertensive therapy for mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension during pregnancy remains uncertain.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Chronic hypertension is present in up to 5% of pregnant women and constitutes a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this document is to summarize the current recommendations regarding use of antihypertensive medications during pregnancy for women with mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension in the setting of the recently published Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study (CHIPS). The recently published CHIPS trial was a multicenter international randomized controlled trial comparing "less tight control" to "tight control" of blood pressure for pregnant women with hypertension. The most updated recommendations regarding management of pregnant women with hypertension are found from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Task Force on Hypertension in Pregnancy, which are endorsed by the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). SMFM recommends that clinicians continue to follow existing guidelines for management of pregnant women with mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension due to the fact that the benefits and risks of pharmacologic treatment for these women remain uncertain, and adequately powered randomized controlled trials are needed to address the less common but clinically significant nonsurrogate perinatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimal blood pressure targets in 2014 - Does the guideline recommendation match the evidence base?

    PubMed

    Alviar, C L; Bangalore, S; Messerli, F H

    2015-01-01

    Various scientific societies have recently published practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of arterial hypertension with no clear consensus on a blood pressure target. This article reviews those recommendations and critically examines if they are based on sound evidence. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Uncertainties and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Terry V; Björn, Lars Olof; Chernov, Yuri; Chapin, Terry; Christensen, Torben R; Huntley, Brian; Ims, Rolf A; Johansson, Margareta; Jolly, Dyanna; Jonasson, Sven; Matveyeva, Nadya; Panikov, Nicolai; Oechel, Walter; Shaver, Gus

    2004-11-01

    An assessment of the impacts of changes in climate and UV-B radiation on Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, made within the Arctic Climate Impacts Assessment (ACIA), highlighted the profound implications of projected warming in particular for future ecosystem services, biodiversity and feedbacks to climate. However, although our current understanding of ecological processes and changes driven by climate and UV-B is strong in some geographical areas and in some disciplines, it is weak in others. Even though recently the strength of our predictions has increased dramatically with increased research effort in the Arctic and the introduction of new technologies, our current understanding is still constrained by various uncertainties. The assessment is based on a range of approaches that each have uncertainties, and on data sets that are often far from complete. Uncertainties arise from methodologies and conceptual frameworks, from unpredictable surprises, from lack of validation of models, and from the use of particular scenarios, rather than predictions, of future greenhouse gas emissions and climates. Recommendations to reduce the uncertainties are wide-ranging and relate to all disciplines within the assessment. However, a repeated theme is the critical importance of achieving an adequate spatial and long-term coverage of experiments, observations and monitoring of environmental changes and their impacts throughout the sparsely populated and remote region that is the Arctic.

  14. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  15. Recognition and Management of Hypertension in Older Persons: Focus on African Americans.

    PubMed

    Still, Carolyn H; Ferdinand, Keith C; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Wright, Jackson T

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is the most commonly diagnosed condition in persons aged 60 and older and is the single most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and stroke), kidney disease, and dementia. More than half of individuals with hypertension in the United States are aged 60 and older. Hypertension disproportionately affects African Americans, with all age groups, including elderly adults, having a higher burden of hypertension-related complications than other U.S. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of blood pressure (BP) reduction on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with most of the evidence in individuals aged 60 and older. Several guidelines have recently been published on the specific management of hypertension in individuals aged 60 and older, including in high-risk groups such as African Americans. Most recommend careful evaluation, thiazide diuretics and calcium-channel blockers for initial drug therapy in most African Americans, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in those with chronic kidney disease or heart failure. Among the areas of controversy is the recommended target BP in African Americans aged 60 and older. A recent U.S. guideline recommended raising the systolic BP target from less than 140 mmHg to less than 150 mmHg in this population. This article will review the evidence and current guideline recommendations for hypertension treatment in older African Americans, including the rationale for continuing to recommend a SBP target of less than 140 mmHg in this population. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Management of hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Falkner, B

    1986-11-01

    Secondary causes of hypertension are more frequent in children than in adults; however, essential hypertension does occur in the young. The decision to search for secondary causes rests on the age of the child, the severity of hypertension, the presence of clues in the history or physical examination, and the family history. If nonpharmacologic measures fail to control hypertension and if acute hypertension is not present, a stepped-care approach is suggested.

  17. Intussusception Presenting with Malignant Hypertension and Lethargy

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Andra; Ashtiani, Nilou; Ahmadi, Nazanin; Bakx, Roel; de Vaate, Annelies Walrave-bij; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2013-01-01

    The most common cause of malignant hypertension in children is renal or renovascular pathology. The combination with lethargy suggests a diagnosis of hypertensive crisis with hypertensive encephalopathy. Here, we present a case of severe hypertension with lethargy as the sole presenting symptoms of ileocecal intussusception. Both normalized following surgical repositioning. We conclude that malignant hypertension and lethargy can be presenting symptoms of intussusception. PMID:23914204

  18. Sex differences in hypertension prevalence and control: Analysis of the 2010-2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hayon Michelle; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Although not fully understood, sex may affect both the prevalence and control rate of hypertension. The present study was designed to investigate factors associated with hypertension prevalence and control among Korean adults. We analyzed 27,887 individuals (12,089 males and 15,798 females) aged 30 years or older who participated in the fifth (2010-2012) and sixth (2013-2014) Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to delineate factors associated with the prevalence and control of hypertension separately for men and women. Overall, the prevalence of hypertension was higher in men (34.6%) than in women (30.8%). However, after the age of 60 years, hypertension was more prevalent in females than in males. Regardless of sex, the older the participants were, the more likely they were to have hypertension. Factors positively associated with hypertension prevalence were old age, low education, and high BMI in women (p<0.001) and increasing age, low income, alcohol intake, and high BMI in men (p<0.001). The overall control rate of hypertension was higher in women (51.3%) than in men (44.8%). However, after the age of 60 years, hypertension control rates were higher in men than in women. Factors decreasing hypertension control were white-collared women and young age, alcohol consumption in men. Sex differences in hypertension prevalence and control were discovered among Korean adults. After the age of 60, females were more likely to have hypertension and less likely to maintain hypertension control than males of the same age range. Accordingly, sex-specific approaches are recommended for effective blood pressure management.

  19. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with their PH specialist prior to starting any exercise program. Current members: first time on our new PHPN/PHCR or Support Group ... Pulmonary Hypertension Association 801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, ...

  20. Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Stanford in 1981 for a patient with primary pulmonary hypertension, and over the next decade, single ... While some testing is performed by the patient’s primary care physician (routine cancer screening and vaccinations, for ...

  1. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  2. [Hypertension in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M

    2001-05-01

    Normal blood pressure and hypertension were defined according to age and sex based on the data on Japanese children. When high blood pressure is found, both white-coat and secondary hypertension should be excluded. Subsequently lifestyle modifications should be initiated in children and adolescents with essential hypertension. These modifications include: weight reduction, reduction of dietary salt intake, high dietary potassium intake and increased physical activity. When nonpharmacologic treatment is not effective after 3 to 6 months, or when there is an evidence of target organ injury, antihypertensive drugs such as ACE inhibitors and Ca antagonists will be started to control blood pressure. Lifestyle modifications are also important for primary prevention of hypertension in normotensive children.

  3. A case of hypertensive urgency.

    PubMed

    Baum, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    A 41-year-old male Nepalese soldier presented to the primary care medical centre with a 1-week history of fatigue and muscle aches following a trip to Nepal. His BP was 164/98 but was otherwise normal. Four days later he presented with new symptoms of sweating and palpitations and a BP of 200/127 whereupon he was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of hypertensive crisis. Appropriate investigation and initial management were undertaken, and he was discharged after 12 h on antihypertensive treatment. This case highlights the risk of hypertensive crisis in both diagnosed and silent hypertensive disease, and the review highlights the presentations, initial investigation and different management of hypertensive crisis.

  4. Hypertension, hypertrophy, and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasquale; Penna, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The heart of patients with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy is more vulnerable to ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Here we discuss the main mechanisms of IRI and possible targets for cardioprotection. In particular, we consider the viewpoint that hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy may act synergistically in increasing the predisposition to cardiovascular accidents and in worsening IRI. There is no doubt that hypertrophic hearts may be redirected to be less vulnerable to IRI. Some experimental evidences suggest that antihypertensive drugs may have beneficial effects, some of which are not directly related to hypertension-lowering effect. However, more thorough experimental and clinical studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms and to maximize the beneficial effects of reperfusion after a heart attack in the presence of comorbidities, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. Contemporary practice patterns in the management of newly diagnosed hypertension

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, F A; Teo, K K; Lewanczuk, R Z; Wells, G; Montague, T J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine what proportion of patients with hypertension are managed in accordance with guidelines established by the Canadian Hypertension Society. DESIGN: Retrospective medical record review. SETTING: Outpatients seen in primary care offices and internal medicine referral clinics in Edmonton. PATIENTS: All 969 adults who presented with a new diagnosis of essential hypertension from Sept. 1, 1993, to Dec. 31, 1995. OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial laboratory tests performed, advice concerning nonpharmacologic treatment given, antihypertensive drugs prescribed and any contraindications to thiazide diuretics or beta-adrenergic blocking agents documented. RESULTS: The mean age of the 969 patients in the sample was 52.5 years; 129 (13%) of the patients were older than 70 years of age; and 500 (52%) were women. Most of the patients (704, 73%) had mild or moderate diastolic hypertension. In the 617 patients who underwent laboratory tests related to hypertension, the creatinine level was determined in 466 (76%), the cholesterol level in 372 (60%), a urinalysis was conducted in 378 (61%), the serum potassium level was checked in 343 (56%), the sodium level in 323 (52%) and an electrocardiogram was performed in 303 (49%). Liver function tests, which are not recommended in the guidelines, were performed in 338 patients (55%). Although there were differences in prescribing among physicians in the 711 patients given first-line therapy, most (238, 34%) were prescribed angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Lifestyle modification, without drug therapy, was suggested for 180 (25%) of the patients. Although the guidelines recommend their use for first-line drug therapy, only 82 patients (12%) were given beta-adrenergic blocking agents and only 75 (11%) were given thiazide diuretics. Of the patients who were prescribed an antihypertensive other than a thiazide or beta-adrenergic blocking agent as first-line drug therapy, only 161 (43%) had a documented

  6. Novel approaches for treating hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Andrew J.; Vinh, Antony; Widdop, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a prevalent yet modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While there are many effective treatments available to combat hypertension, patients often require at least two to three medications to control blood pressure, although there are patients who are resistant to such therapies. This short review will briefly update on recent clinical advances and potential emerging therapies and is intended for a cross-disciplinary readership. PMID:28184289

  7. Pediatric hypertension: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Debra; Dixon, Emily

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents, once thought to be rare, has been estimated at a current prevalence of between 1% and 5% in the United States. The prevalence of primary hypertension continues to increase with the increasing body mass index of the pediatric population. Who is at risk? If and when to screen? When and how to treat? These controversial questions are important to the physician in primary care practice.

  8. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is generally attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, the kidney, and the central nervous system. During the past several years, it has become apparent that cells of the innate and adaptive immune system also contribute to this disease. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension, and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We have shown that mice lacking lymphocytes, such as recombinase-activating gene-deficient (RAG-1(-/-)) mice, have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II, increased salt levels, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Others have shown that mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II. Deletion of the RAG gene in Dahl salt-sensitive rats reduces the hypertensive response to salt feeding. The central nervous system seems to orchestrate immune cell activation. We produced lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle and showed that these block T cell activation in response to angiotensin II. Likewise, we showed that genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and T cell activation. Current evidence indicates that production of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 17, and interleukin 6 contribute to hypertension, likely by promoting vasoconstriction, production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, the production of cytokines, and ultimately vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to augmentation of hypertension.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Kartikey A; Puligandla, Pramod S

    2015-02-01

    The management of pulmonary hypertension is multi-faceted, with therapies directed at supporting cardiovascular and pulmonary function, treating the underlying cause (if feasible), and preventing irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Recently, manipulation of signaling pathways and mediators contained within the pulmonary vascular endothelial cell has become a new target. This article will review the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and the broad principles involved in its management, with specific emphasis on pharmacological therapies directed at the pulmonary vascular endothelium.

  10. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B

    1997-01-01

    Progress in treatment of pulmonary hypertension has been impaired by the lack of formal clinical trials. This is now beginning to change, and the impact on our approach to treating patients with pulmonary hypertension in substantial. As with other relatively uncommon medical disorders, randomized, controlled, multi-center trials are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of potential therapeutic modalities. Treatments showing promise at the level of small pilot studies within a single center should be studied more rigorously.

  11. Radiological imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baruah, Manash P.; Baruah, Upasana M.

    2011-01-01

    While different generations of assays have played important role in elucidating causes of different endocrine disorders, radiological techniques are instrumental in localizing the pathology. This statement cannot be truer in any disease entity other than endocrine hypertension. This review makes an effort to highlight the role of different radiological modalities, especially ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the evaluation of different causes of endocrine hypertension. PMID:22145144

  12. Current status of β-blockers for the treatment of hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, S G; Chrysant, G S

    2012-05-01

    β-Adrenoceptor blockers (β-blockers) are one of the oldest classes of cardiovascular drugs still in use. Several short- and long-term clinical outcomes studies have demonstrated their effectiveness and safety for the treatment of hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Due to their safety and efficacy, β-blockers have been recommended by several national and international committees as first-line therapy of hypertension. However, despite their proven benefits, their use as first-line treatment for hypertension has come under criticism lately. Because of these recent developments, several authors have recommended that β-blockers no longer be used as first-line therapy for hypertension. In this review, evidence-based information will be presented, which will demonstrate that β-blockers are an effective and safe class of antihypertensive and cardiovascular drugs for most patients with the exception of black and elderly hypertensive patients in whom the β-blockers are less effective compared to other classes of drugs. In addition, evidence will be presented from several major meta-analyses that β-blockers are equally effective in reducing blood pressure and cardiovascular complications. This review will also discuss differences in the mechanism of action of older and newer (third-generation) β-blockers and provide evidence that newer agents should be preferred over the older ones in the treatment of hypertensive patients with certain comorbidities. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  13. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  14. Prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ana Luz; Collins, Marie A; Downey, Mary Cannon; Herman, Wayne W; Konzelman, Joseph Louis; Ward, Sue Tucker; Hughes, Cynthia T

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic and evaluate factors related to the disease. Records of 615 patients, treated by dental hygiene students during 2003, were reviewed. Data collected included systolic and diastolic blood pressure, presence of diabetes and renal disease, non-modifiers (race, gender, and age), and modifiers (marital status, smoking habits, and occupation). According to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7) classification, 154 (25%) of the subjects had normal blood pressure readings, 374 (60.8%) had prehypertension, and 87 (14.1%) had stage 1 hypertension. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the JNC7 classification between groups when considering the non-modifiers' race (p=.02) and the modifiers' smoking habits (p=.03) and occupation (p=.01). A statistically significant difference in the JNC7 classification existed between groups with diabetes (p=.00). The majority of patients had blood pressure readings in the prehypertension stage. Based on these results, the researchers recommend clinical policy modifications which include: additional documentation for blood pressure readings in the prehypertension stage, lowering the systolic reading from 160 mmHg to 140 mmHg when adding hypertension alert labels, and noting prehypertension/hypertension on the dental hygiene care plan with the appropriate interventions.

  15. Latin American guidelines on hypertension. Latin American Expert Group.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Ayala, Miryam; Baglivo, Hugo; Velazquez, Carlos; Burlando, Guillermo; Kohlmann, Oswaldo; Jimenez, Jorge; Jaramillo, Patricio López; Brandao, Ayrton; Valdes, Gloria; Alcocer, Luis; Bendersky, Mario; Ramirez, Agustín José; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the world and particularly overwhelming in low and middle-income countries. Recent reports from the WHO and the World Bank highlight the importance of chronic diseases such as hypertension as an obstacle to the achievement of good health status. It must be added that for most low and middle-income countries, deficient strategies of primary healthcare are the major obstacles for blood pressure control. Furthermore, the epidemiology of hypertension and related diseases, healthcare resources and priorities, the socioeconomic status of the population vary considerably in different countries and in different regions of individual countries. Considering the low rates of blood pressure control achieved in Latin America and the benefits that can be expected from an improved control, it was decided to invite specialists from different Latin American countries to analyze the regional situation and to provide a consensus document on detection, evaluation and treatment of hypertension that may prove to be cost-utility adequate. The recommendations here included are the result of preparatory documents by invited experts and a subsequent very active debate by different discussion panels, held during a 2-day sessions in Asuncion, Paraguay, in May 2008. Finally, in order to improve clinical practice, the publication of the guidelines should be followed by implementation of effective interventions capable of overcoming barriers (cognitive, behavioral and affective) preventing attitude changes in both physicians and patients.

  16. Pathogenesis of hypertension: interactions among sodium, potassium, and aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Büssemaker, Eckhart; Hillebrand, Uta; Hausberg, Martin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Oberleithner, Hans

    2010-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a major cause of disease-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is nearly absent in populations that consume natural foods low in sodium. However, in industrial countries, where the individual intake of sodium is at least 10 times higher, the prevalence of hypertension is approximately 40%. Major population-based studies link a high-sodium and low-potassium diet to an increase in blood pressure. A hallmark of arterial hypertension is endothelial dysfunction characterized by decreased synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). Plasma sodium and potassium are major determinants for the mechanical stiffness of endothelial cells. High plasma sodium levels stiffen endothelial cells and block NO synthesis. Aldosterone is a prerequisite for this action. However, high plasma potassium levels soften endothelial cells and activate NO release. There is increasing evidence that sodium can be stored transiently in considerable amounts and osmotically inactive in the interstitium. Taken together, it is recommended to maintain plasma sodium levels in the low physiologic range and potassium levels in the high physiologic range while suppressing plasma aldosterone as much as possible. A restriction in sodium intake that is accompanied by increased intake of potassium can profoundly improve the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  17. Detection of renovascular hypertension. State of the art: 1992.

    PubMed

    Mann, S J; Pickering, T G

    1992-11-15

    To review recent advances in detecting renovascular hypertension. Original English-language reports obtained through a MEDLINE search for the years 1987 to 1991. Also, a manual search through Index Medicus as well as bibliographies of original reports and selected review articles. Cited studies were critically reviewed with emphasis on study size, patient sample, methods, diagnostic criteria, and reproducibility of results. Where applicable, reviews that combined the results of smaller studies are cited. A sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 89% have been reported for the captopril test and of 93% and 95%, respectively, for captopril scintigraphy with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The sensitivity and specificity of renal vein renin determination are 80% and 62%, respectively and may increase with the use of stricter technical criteria and maneuvers to stimulate renin secretion. These tests differentiate renovascular hypertension from essential hypertension more reliably than from asymmetric renal parenchymal disease; however, they do not reliably distinguish unilateral from bilateral stenosis. Other tests are less widely used. Intravenous pyelography (sensitivity, 74.5%; specificity, 86.2%) has the disadvantages of radiation and dye load exposure. Intravenous angiography is expensive and invasive and does not always enable visualization of the origin of the renal artery. The roles of duplex ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography remain to be clarified. Noninvasive tests are cost effective and have a high predictive value in patients with clinical clues suggestive of renovascular hypertension. These tests are not recommended for use in patients with a low likelihood of disease.

  18. The future of renal denervation in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Sandeep; Bakris, George L

    2014-12-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as inadequate blood pressure control despite three or more antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses, is strongly linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Increased renal afferent and efferent sympathetic activity carried by nerves which arborize the adventitia of the renal arteries, appears to be central to the pathobiology of resistant hypertension. Historical experience indicates that surgical denervation and/or sympathectomy often dramatically reduced blood pressure in patients with malignant hypertension. Catheter-based radio-frequency renal denervation was developed in the past decade as a percutaneous adaptation of surgical denervation. Percutaneous renal denervation using a variety of systems has demonstrated to date, in non-randomized and unblinded studies, dramatic reductions in office-based blood pressure, but more modest impact on ambulatory blood pressure. The only single, appropriately powered, blinded, sham-controlled study of renal denervation conducted to date, however, failed to meet its primary endpoint, casting doubt on the value of the therapy. Ancillary benefits of renal denervation have been described in such conditions as diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and sleep apnea but require further study. While renal denervation is already widely available outside of the USA for commercial use, its utility in resistant hypertension must be vetted by further rigorous investigation before its use can be routinely recommended.

  19. The medieval origins of the concept of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Dalfardi, Behnam; Golzari, Samad E J; Habibi, Hamzeh; Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Despite the well-known history of hypertension research in the modern era, like many other cardiovascular concepts, main points in the medieval concept of this disease and its early management methods remain obscure. This article attempts to make a brief review on the medieval origin of the concept of this disease from the Hidayat of Al-Akhawayni (?-983 AD). This article has reviewed the chapter of "Fi al-Imtela" (About the Fullness) from the Hidβyat al-Muta'allimin fi al-Tibb (The Students' Handbook of Medicine) of Al-Akhawayni. The definition, symptoms and treatments presented for the Imtela are compared with the current knowledge on hypertension. Akhawayni believed that Imtela could result from the excessive amount of blood within the blood vessels. It can manifest with symptoms including the presence of a pulsus magnus, sleepiness, weakness, dyspnea, facial blushing, engorgement of the vessels, thick urine, vascular rupture, and hemorrhagic stroke. He also suggested some ways to manage al-Imtela'. These include recommendations of changes in lifestyle (staying away from anger and sexual intercourse) and dietary program for patients (avoiding the consumption of wine, meat, and pastries, reducing the volume of food in a meal, maintaining a low-energy diet and the dietary usage of spinach and vinegar). Al-Akhawayni's description of "Imtela," despite of its numerous differences with current knowledge of hypertension, can be considered as medieval origin of the concept of hypertension.

  20. The Medieval Origins of the Concept of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Dalfardi, Behnam; Golzari, Samad E. J.; Habibi, Hamzeh; Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Despite the well-known history of hypertension research in the modern era, like many other cardiovascular concepts, main points in the medieval concept of this disease and its early management methods remain obscure. This article attempts to make a brief review on the medieval origin of the concept of this disease from the Hidayat of Al-Akhawayni (?-983 AD). This article has reviewed the chapter of “Fi al-Imtela” (About the Fullness) from the Hidβyat al-Muta’allimin fi al-Tibb (The Students' Handbook of Medicine) of Al-Akhawayni. The definition, symptoms and treatments presented for the Imtela are compared with the current knowledge on hypertension. Akhawayni believed that Imtela could result from the excessive amount of blood within the blood vessels. It can manifest with symptoms including the presence of a pulsus magnus, sleepiness, weakness, dyspnea, facial blushing, engorgement of the vessels, thick urine, vascular rupture, and hemorrhagic stroke. He also suggested some ways to manage al-Imtela'. These include recommendations of changes in lifestyle (staying away from anger and sexual intercourse) and dietary program for patients (avoiding the consumption of wine, meat, and pastries, reducing the volume of food in a meal, maintaining a low-energy diet and the dietary usage of spinach and vinegar). Al-Akhawayni's description of “Imtela,” despite of its numerous differences with current knowledge of hypertension, can be considered as medieval origin of the concept of hypertension. PMID:25538828

  1. Baroreflex stimulation: A novel treatment option for resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Lohmeier, Thomas E.; Bisognano, John D

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Despite the increasing awareness of hypertension and its implications among patients and the treating physicians, the prevalence of resistant hypertension remains high and expected to increase. Many patients fail to reach their target blood pressure despite the wide availability of several antihypertensive agents and the continued recommendation of dietary and lifestyle modifications. Stimulation of the carotid sinus results in lowering of blood pressure by initiating the baroreflex and, in so doing, reducing sympathetic tone and increasing renal excretory function, in part, by exerting inhibitory effects on renin secretion. . Recent evidence from experimental studies suggests that the baroreflex may be more important in the setting of chronic hypertension than originally believed. In early phase clinical trials that did not include control arms, implantation of a baroreflex stimulator yielded a sustained decrease in blood pressure. An ongoing larger clinical trial with appropriate control arms is further exploring the safety and efficacy of the device. This article describes the history and potential mechanisms of action of this device including its extensive pre-clinical development and movement to human clinical trials. PMID:20409946

  2. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  3. [Hypertension during pregnancy: Epidemiology, definition].

    PubMed

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy has several forms that differ by their mechanisms and their consequences for mothers and fetus. Chronic hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg before pregnancy or before the 20th week of amenorrhea. Gestational hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg during or after the 20th week of amenorrhea. Preeclampsia is the occurrence of hypertension and proteinuria after 20weeks of amenorrhea. Severe preeclampsia is accompanied by clinical signs and symptoms indicating visceral pain. The HELLP syndrome is a severe preeclampsia accompanied by intravascular hemolysis and hepatic cytolysis. Eclampsia is characterized by seizures of the tonic-clonic type. A chronic hypertension is observed in 1-5% of pregnancies. Gestational hypertension without proteinuria appears in 5-6% of pregnancies. A preeclampsia develops in 1-2% of pregnancies, but much more frequently (up 34%) in the presence of risk factors. High blood pressure during pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality.

  4. The hidden epidemic of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Robert; Lee, Rebecca; Stavreski, Bill; Page, Karen

    2014-04-01

    The majority of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is caused by risk factors that can be controlled, treated or modified. In terms of attributable deaths, the leading cardiovascular disease risk factor is hypertension. The Australian Health Survey results showed some startling figures-4.6 million adult Australians are hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg). Further, a fifth of the adult population experience hypertension, with more than two out of three not attaining blood pressure target levels. This is despite an estimated cost of $1 billion per annum spent on managing hypertension. It is now well recognised that the level of risk for coronary heart disease is linked to an individual's risk profile. Results indicate that many Australians have multiple risk factors, including hypertension. It could be considered that these numbers provide a proxy indicator of secondary prevention failure. Considerable attention needs to be given to the assessment of the combined risk of those with hypertension enabling effective management of identified, modifiable risk factors. We look forward to presenting the absolute risk profiles when the Australian Health Survey biometric results are released. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  6. Outpatient hypertension treatment, treatment intensification, and control in Western Europe and the United States.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Richard; Alexander, G Caleb; Stafford, Randall S

    2007-01-22

    Hypertension guidelines in the United States tend to have more aggressive treatment recommendations than those in European countries. To explore international differences in hypertension treatment, treatment intensification, and hypertension control in western Europe and the United States, we conducted cross-sectional analyses of the nationally representative CardioMonitor 2004 survey, which included 21 053 hypertensive patients visiting 291 cardiologists and 1284 primary care physicians in 5 western European countries and the United States. The main outcome measures were latest systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) levels, hypertension control (latest BP level, <140/90 mm Hg), and medication increase (dose escalation or an addition to or switch of drug therapy) for inadequately controlled hypertension. At least 92% of patients in each country received antihypertensive drug treatment. The initial pretreatment BP levels were lowest and the use of combination drug therapy (>or=2 antihypertensive drug classes) was highest in the United States. Multivariate analyses controlling for age, sex, current smoking, and physician specialty indicated that, compared with US patients, European patients had higher latest systolic BP levels (by 5.3-10.2 mm Hg across countries examined) and diastolic BP levels (by 1.9-5.3 mm Hg), a smaller likelihood of hypertension control (odds ratios, 0.27-0.50), and a smaller likelihood of medication increase for inadequately controlled hypertension (odds ratios, 0.29-0.65) (all P<.001). In addition, controlling for initial pretreatment BP level attenuated the differences in latest systolic and diastolic BP levels and the likelihood of hypertension control. Lower treatment thresholds and more intensive treatment contribute to better hypertension control in the United States compared with the western European countries studied.

  7. Primary care guidelines: Senior executives’ views on changing health centre practices in hypertension treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna; Ketola, Eeva; Nyberg, Solja; Välimäki, Maritta A.; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. Design A cross-sectional telephone survey. Setting All municipal health centres in Finland. Subjects Health centres where both the head physician and the senior nursing officer responded. Main outcome measures Agreement in views of the senior executives on the adoption of clinical practices as recommended in the Hypertension Guideline. Results Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p < 0.001) reported that no agreements on recording target blood pressure in patient records existed. A similar discrepancy was seen in recording cardiovascular risk (64% vs. 44%, p < 0.001). Senior executives agreed best on the calibration of sphygmomanometers and the provision of weight-control group counselling. Conclusions Hypertension Guideline recommendations that require joint agreements between professionals are less often adopted than simple, precise recommendations. More emphasis on effective multidisciplinary collaboration is needed. PMID:19929184

  8. Prevalence rates of hypertension self-care activities among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Warren-Findlow, Jan; Seymour, Rachel B

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the self-care activities that contribute to blood pressure control may explain health disparities experienced by African Americans with hypertension. This study assessed the prevalence of self-care activities among African Americans with high blood pressure and examined differences between adherers and nonadherers to self-care activities. Interviews were conducted with 186 African Americans. Self-care activities were measured using the H-SCALE (Hypertension Self-Care Activity Level Effects), which was developed to assess the behavioral activities recommended for optimal management of high blood pressure. More than half of participants reported adhering to me