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Sample records for hypertension pregnancy-induced

  1. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  2. Oxidative Stress Marker and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Draganovic, Dragica; Lucic, Nenad; Jojic, Dragica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. Hence, research and test of role and significance of oxidative stress in hypertensive disturbance in pregnancy is very important. Aim: Aims of this research were to determine a level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as oxidative stress marker in blood of pregnant woman with pregnancy induced hypertension and to analyze correlation of TBARS values with blood pressure values in pregnancy induced hypertensive pregnant women. Patients and methods: Research has been performed at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Clinical Centre in the Republic of Srpska. It covered 100 pregnant women with hypertension and 100 healthy pregnant women of gestation period from 28 to 40 weeks. Level of TBARS is determined as an equivalent of malondialdehyde standard, in accordance with recommendations by producer (Oxi Select TBARS Analisa Kit). Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. All pregnant women experiencing hypertension had increased TBARS values in medium value interval over 20 µmol, 66%, whereas in group of healthy pregnant women, only 1% experienced increased TBARS value. Pregnant women with difficult preeclampsia (32%) had high TBARS values, over 40 µmol, and with mild PIH, only 4.9% pregnant women. Conclusion: Pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension have extremely increased degree of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. TBARS values are in positive correlation with blood pressure values, respectively the highest TBARS value were present in pregnant women with the highest blood pressure values. PMID:28210016

  3. Cardiac size and function in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Hosenpud, J D; Morton, M J

    1984-11-01

    The physiologic cardiac enlargement characteristic of normal pregnancy could result in important left ventricular dysfunction in the presence of elevated blood pressure. Using M-mode echocardiography, we measured left ventricular dimensions, fractional shortening, and radius-to-wall thickness ratio in 23 patients who had a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension at rest and during isometric exercise. Seventeen subjects with normal pregnancies were similarly studied and served as controls. The average gestation of patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension was 38 +/- 2 weeks, and that of control subjects was 37 +/- 1 weeks. The average age was 25 +/- 5 years for patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension, and that for control subjects was 29 +/- 4 years. The patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension did not show the normal eccentric cardiac enlargement observed during pregnancy; the average radius-to-wall thickness ratio was reduced in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension. Fractional shortening, a reflection of ventricular performance, was maintained both at rest and during exercise in the hypertensive group. One patient, who did not show a reduced radius-to-wall thickness ratio, had marked reduction of left ventricular performance in the presence of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. Left ventricular performance in most subjects with pregnancy-induced hypertension is normal. Preservation of left ventricular performance despite increased arterial pressure may be related to the absence of eccentric gestational cardiac enlargement.

  4. [Pregnancy experiences of women with pregnancy-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Rauchfuß, Martina; Enderwitz, Judith; Klapp, Burghard; Maier, Barbara; Bölter, Annette; Frommer, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The study assesses the experience of pregnancy of women who have pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) compared to women with an uncomplicated course of pregnancy. 21 women were retrospectively investigated between 5 and 13 months after giving birth via a semistandardised interview focussing on the personal experience of pregnancy. The interviews were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. The categories "development and course," "coping with anxiety," "image of one's mother" and "relationship with partner" were determined and described. Finally, we developed data-driven, ideal-type models of pregnancies with pregnancy-induced hypertension versus normal pregnancies by detecting the similarities and contrasts between the groups. Interviewees with pregnancy-induced hypertension showed an ambivalence with regard to their pregnancy, which was more often than not unplanned and/or unwanted. Conflicts with significant others, especially with their partners, were also reported more often. Emotions tended to be understated. The results can be employed in the operationalisation of future projects in a hitherto unclear research field. They should also be considered in the care of patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  5. Snoring, witnessed sleep apnoeas and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Chada, Daniel; Videla, Alejandro J; O'Flaherty, Martin E; Majul, Claudio; Catalini, Ana M; Caballer, Carlos A; Franklin, Karl A

    2007-01-01

    Snoring is common in pregnancy, but there are only a few studies that have investigated the relationship of snoring and pregnancy complications. We aimed to investigate the relationship of snoring and witnessed sleep apnoeas with pregnancy-induced hypertension. A questionnaire was administered on the day of delivery to 456 women at the Department of Obstetrics, Hospital Donación F. Santojanni, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Pregnancy complications and blood pressure measurements were recorded from each woman's medical chart. Some 156 (35%) of 447 women with singleton pregnancies who answered the questionnaire, snored at some time during their pregnancy. Snoring was related to pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia combined, with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.82 (95% CI: 1.16-2.84; p <0.01), independent of body mass index before pregnancy, weight gain during pregnancy, neck circumference, smoking, alcohol and age. Witnessed sleep apnoeas were also related to pregnancy-induced hypertensive disease, with an adjusted odds ratio of 8.00 (95% CI: 2.71-23.55; p <0.001). Daytime sleepiness was more prevalent in snoring women. Snoring and witnessed sleep apnoeas are independently related to pregnancy-induced hypertensive disease.

  6. Relationship between lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Sagawa, N; Ihara, Y; Kobayashi, F; Itoh, H; Mori, T

    1995-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a serum antiphospholipid autoantibody, is believed to be one of the causes of infertility or fetal loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of LAC in the pathogenesis of hypertension during pregnancy. In this study, 20 pregnant women with hypertension were classified into two groups: 14 patients who did not have hypertension before the pregnancy but developed it during the pregnancy (pregnancy-induced hypertension; Group A) and 6 patients who had hypertensive or renal disease before the pregnancy, and developed further hypertension during the pregnancy (pregnancy-aggravated hypertension; Group B). A LAC coagulation assay was performed, and the presence of LAC in each group was compared. All 14 patients in group A were LAC-negative. In contrast, 3 of the 6 patients in group B were LAC-positive, and had clinical autoimmune diseases. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was also examined in 15 pregnancies from 9 LAC-positive women who had a history of repeated fetal loss but no systemic autoimmune disease (Group C). None of these 15 pregnancies had hypertensive complications, even when they reached term. In the placentas of LAC-positive women, no characteristic changes other than fibrinoid degeneration and microscopic infarction were observed upon histological examination. These results suggest that LAC does not relate with the onset of hypertension during pregnancy.

  7. Association of early maternal hypertriglyceridemia with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chandi, Anadeep; Sirohiwal, Daya; Malik, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    Hypertensive diseases are directly responsible for 24 % of maternal deaths in India. A screening method is yet to be discovered to reduce the morbidity and mortality related to it. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels are reported to increase in hypertensive pregnant women. To predict pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) by serum triglyceride values. This study is a prospective cohort study that was conducted over three hundred normotensive, primigravida women with singleton pregnancy at 14-20 weeks of gestation. These were divided into two groups on the basis of their TG concentration estimated at 14-20 weeks of gestation. The pregnancy was then followed till delivery and, signs and symptoms of PIH were noted in both the groups. Out of 300 women, 210 women completed the study. Fifty-nine women developed PIH and 151 women remained normotensive. Among 59 women, 45 women had raised TG values i.e., ≥160 mg/dL and 14 women were with normal TG levels i.e., <160 mg/dL. A significant positive correlation was found between serum TG concentration and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It was observed that a cutoff of 162.50 mg/dL for TG could reliably predict PIH with sensitivity of 76 % and specificity of 85 %. Also, the mothers with hypertriglyceridemia were found to be at higher risk of developing early-onset PIH. Our study supports the evidence that early pregnancy hypertriglyceridemia is associated with an increased risk of PIH.

  8. Ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Marie; Stayner, Leslie; Slama, Rémy; Sørensen, Mette; Figueras, Francesc; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Dadvand, Payam

    2014-09-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders can lead to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, but the cause of these conditions is not well understood. We have systematically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association between exposure to ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders including gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. We searched electronic databases for English language studies reporting associations between ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders published between December 2009 and December 2013. Combined risk estimates were calculated using random-effect models for each exposure that had been examined in ≥4 studies. Heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated. A total of 17 articles evaluating the impact of nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOX), particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), proximity to major roads, and traffic density met our inclusion criteria. Most studies reported that air pollution increased risk for pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. There was significant heterogeneity in meta-analysis, which included 16 studies reporting on gestational hypertension and preeclampsia as separate or combined outcomes; there was less heterogeneity in findings of the 10 studies reporting solely on preeclampsia. Meta-analyses showed increased risks of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy for all pollutants except CO. Random-effect meta-analysis combined odds ratio associated with a 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was 1.57 (95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.96) for combined pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders and 1.31 (95%confidence interval, 1.14-1.50) for preeclampsia [corrected]. Our results suggest that exposure to air pollution increases the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders.

  9. Adipokine Serum visfatin level in pregnancy induced hypertension and uncomplicated pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Asmat; Nazli, Rubina; Fatima, Sadia; Ali, Roshan; Khan, Ihsanullah; Khattak, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hypertensive disorder in pregnancy is the significant disease that badly affects the maternal and fetal prognosis and lead to higher mortality and morbidity in the prenatal period. Visfatin, potentially a new adipokine has emerged having high contribution in pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. The objective of the study was to find the level of Visfatin in pregnancy induced hypertension and normal pregnant women. Methods: This study was carried out in tertiary care hospitals, Peshawar from March-October 2014. A total of 234 pregnant women (gestational age >20 weeks) were included in the study with distribution as Preeclampsia (PE=86), Eclampsia (E=74) and control (N=74). Blood was taken for measuring Visfatin level by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. SPSS version 19 was used for statistical analysis. Student’s t test was performed to evaluate the mean differences in patients and control. Results: Serum level of visfatin was significantly higher in pregnancy induced hypertension when compared with control (P value<0.001).: Comparisons of mean value of visfatin with age group of 21-40 years, body mass index (BMI), primary parous and parity 2-4, gestational age of >36 weeks and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were highly significant in pregnancy induced hypertension when compared with control (p value<0.001). Conclusion: Pregnancy induced hypertensive women showed increased level of serum Visfatin than normal pregnant women. PMID:28083037

  10. [Thrombotic microangiopathy and intravascular hemolysis in pregnancy-induced hypertension. The lie of HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Díaz de León-Ponce, Manuel Antonio; Briones-Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Meneses-Calderón, José; Moreno-Santillán, Armando Alberto

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the literature regarding pregnancy-induced hypertension and its relation with thrombotic microangiopathy and intravascular hemolysis (TMIH). In the present work we described the background, frequency, mortality, clinical picture, classification, diagnosis, complications and treatment. In addition, we analyzed Weinstein's report of 1982, and we concluded that the reported data of the HELLP syndrome is not conclusive because the presence of TMIH is not demonstrable in his group of patients. Also, we retrospectively reviewed the medical charts from three Intensive Care Units from two specialized gyneco-obstetrics hospitals and from one General Hospital. From all the patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension and who developed TMIH confirmed clinically and by laboratory findings, we described the incidence of acute renal failure and the mortality in this group of patients.

  11. Pregnancy-induced hypertension caused by all-trans retinoic acid treatment in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN

    2015-01-01

    A 23-year-old pregnant female presented with fever and diarrhea during the sixth month of gestation. The patient was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) at 26 weeks gestation and was treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at an initial dose of 45 mg/m2/day, which was reduced to 25 mg/m2/day 14 days later. The patient experienced chest distress, polypnea, hypertension, general dropsy and dysfunction of the kidneys and heart on day 3 of the treatment, which suggested pregnancy-induced hypertension. Intrauterine fetal demise was apparent on day 8. A cesarean delivery was performed, however, intrauterine fetal mortality had occurred. A favorable outcome was achieved for the patient following treatment, although hematological complete remission was slow. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe an APL patient with pregnancy-induced hypertension following treatment with ATRA, and thus ATRA remains a suitable for therapy for APL during pregnancy. PMID:26171031

  12. Comparison of foetomaternal circulation in normal pregnancies and pregnancy induced hypertension using color Doppler studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Misra, R; Ghosh, U K; Gupta, V; Srivastava, D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to assess fetomaternal blood flows in normal and abnormal pregnancies using color Doppler indices. Subjects were divided into two groups as: Group A of 25 subjects of normal pregnancy as controls and group B of 25 subjects of pregnancy induced hypertension. All the subjects were lying in the age-group of 25-35 years and having 28 to 34 weeks of gestation; the patients were evaluated by detailed history and were subjected to complete general examination. Blood pressure was taken on two occasions at least 6 hours apart. Systemic examination and obstetrical examination was done in all subjects. All cases were subjected to pathological tests- Haemogram, Test for proteins in urine. Ultrasound assessment of fetal growth was done by measuring BPD (Biparietal diameter), HC (Head circumference), FL (Femur length) and AC (Abdominal circumference): Average gestational age and effective fetal weight was then calculated by ultrasound machine. Color Doppler was used to assess the various Doppler indices indices: Pulsatility index (PI), Resistive index (RI) and Systolic diastolic ratio (S/D ratio) in bilateral uterine, umbilical and middle cerebral arteries and compared to the standard normograms. Percentage of subjects having abnormal Doppler indices were calculated. Assessment of percentage of SGA (small for gestational age) fetuses was done in all the three groups. Decline in mean values of all Doppler indices was found with advancing gestational age in normal pregnancy suggesting decreased vascular resistance and increased blood flow in fetomaternal circulation. In pregnancy induced hypertensives, the mean values of Doppler indices showed a decline as in normal pregnancy but showed an increase (more than 2 S.D. of the mean) for that gestational age in comparison to the control group suggesting increased impedance to blood flow in uteroplacental and fetomaternal circulation. Umbilical artery Doppler indices were found to be the most sensitive

  13. Choroidal thickening and macular serous retinal detachment in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Ranko; Hayashi, Takaaki; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to report optical coherence tomography (OCT) and angiographic findings in a patient with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Case report A 39-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with PIH, reported blurred and distorted vision at 5 days after an emergency cesarean delivery. OCT revealed a large serous retinal detachment (SRD) that included areas in the macula, along with an increased choroidal thickness noted in both eyes. Indocyanine green angiograms indicated delayed filling of the choroidal circulation in the early phase but choroidal hyperpermeability in the mid-phase. The SRD was gradually resolving without any treatment except for antihypertensive drugs. At 40 days after the initial examination, OCT revealed both the disappearance of the SRD and marked improvement of the choroidal thickening. Conclusion Ophthalmologists need to be aware that PIH can cause choroidal ischemia, a breakdown of the outer blood–retinal barrier, and lead to the development of SRD. PMID:26635487

  14. Assessment of Serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels in Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vibha; Hiwale, Swati; Amle, Dnyanesh; Nagaria, Tripti

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to assess the serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in peripheral blood of patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and find association between serum VEGF levels and PIH. Methods. Thirty-five PIH subjects, 35 normal pregnant females, and 20 normal healthy females were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant biochemical parameters were assessed; serum VEGF levels were estimated using Double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The study groups were found to be age matched (p = 0.38). VEGF level in the pregnancy-induced hypertensive group (median = 109.19 (3.38 ± 619)) was significantly higher than the normal pregnant (median = 20.82 (1.7–619)) and control (median = 4.92 (1.13–13.07)) group and the difference between these three groups was significant (p < 0.0001). The 3 groups are found to be significantly different in terms of RBS (p = 0.01), urea (p < 0.0001), creatinine (p = 0.0005), AST (p = 0.0032), ALT (p = 0.0007), total protein (p = 0.0004), albumin (p < 0.0001), calcium (p = 0.001), and sodium (p = 0.02), while no statistically significant difference was found between total bilirubin (p = 0.167), direct bilirubin (p = 0.07), uric acid (p = 0.16), and potassium (p = 0.14). Conclusion. Significantly higher levels of serum VEGF were noted in PIH subjects compared to normal pregnant and control subjects. PMID:28133548

  15. Concentration of chosen oxycholesterols in plasma of pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bodzek, Piotr; Janoszka, Beata; Wielkoszyński, Tomasz; Bodzek, Danuta; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2002-02-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was applied for isolation of oxycholesterols from plasma lipid extract from pregnant women with hypertension and from a control group. Separation of oxycholesterols fraction was performed in an SD II horizontal chamber (Chromdes, Poland) using silica gel and octadecyl RPC18 silica gel TLC plates (Merck and Machery Nagel). Visualization was carried out under UV light after Liebermann-Burchard reaction specific for cholesterol and its derivatives. The oxycholesterols (5-cholestene-3beta-ol-7-one, sum of 5-cholestene-3beta, 7beta-diol and 5-cholestene-3beta, 7alpha-diol and sum of 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholestan-3beta-ol and 5beta, 6beta-epoxycholestan-3beta-ol) were quantified by chromatograms scanning in reflectance and fluorescence mode using a CS 9301 densitometer (Shimadzu). The total concentration of the investigated oxycholesterols in the plasma of pregnant women was up to 5000 ng/mL and was statistically significantly higher in women with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH).

  16. PP142. Independent effects of pregnancy induced hypertension on childhood development: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Love, E; Crum, J; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-07-01

    The effect of maternal pre-eclampsia on neurological and cognitive development of children is not well known. A literature search of Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL revealed differing opinions in the current literature. It would appear that there is uncertainty regarding the independent effects of preterm birth, birth weight and pre-eclampsia on early childhood development, complicated by the fact that most pre-eclamptic mothers are delivered preterm, and many such babies are growth restricted. To assess whether maternal hypertension in pregnancy was independently associated with additional support needs in children Retrospective cohort study Setting: Grampian region of Scotland Main outcome measure: The primary outcome of interest was whether a child had developed a record in the Support Needs System (Grampian). Secondary outcomes included the development of a particular disorder or deficiency for example, autism. Linkage of birth records of all singleton deliveries occurring in primigravidae between 1995 and 2008 in Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank with the Support Needs System (SNS) dataset in Grampian. The database from which the study population is derived - the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) has been in existence since 1950 The Support Needs System (SNS) is part of a Scottish-wide database recording information about children who have additional support needs for more than six months and has been utilised in Grampian since 1998. The first exposed cohort comprised children whose mothers had pre-eclampsia or eclampsia and the second, those whose mothers had gestational hypertension. Children with normotensive mothers formed the unexposed cohort. Hypertensive status in pregnancy was based on Davey and MacGillivray's classification of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence Intervals of having a record in SNS in the presence of maternal pregnancy induced hypertension were calculated using

  17. The Relationship of Restless Legs Syndrome to History of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kandati, Sahiti; Flack, Kathryn L.; Agarwal, Parul; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a burdensome sleep disorder, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, diabetes, and related disorders. However, the relationship of RLS to history of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), a predictor of subsequent CVD, diabetes, and associated conditions, remains little explored. In this study, we investigated the relationship of RLS to history of PIH in a sample of primary care patients. Methods: Participants were women aged ≥40 years drawn from an anonymous survey study of West Virginia primary care patients. Data collected included detailed information on demographics, lifestyle factors, sleep patterns, and reproductive/medical history; the survey also included an RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Women who were pregnant or unsure about their pregnancy status were excluded from the analyses. Results: Of the 498 participants in the final analytic sample, 24.5% met diagnostic criteria for RLS (17.9% with symptoms ≥once/week, 11.9% with symptoms ≥3 times/week); 73 (16.5% of parous women) reported a history of PIH, defined as physician-diagnosed preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle characteristics, obesity, reproductive history, health conditions, and other factors, those reporting a history of PIH were approximately twice as likely to meet criteria for RLS (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.6). These associations increased in magnitude with increasing symptom frequency (adjusted OR for RLS with symptoms ≥3 times/week = 3.8; CI 1.9, 7.6; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusions: History of PIH was strongly and positively related to current RLS in this study of primary care patients; these findings further support a possible role for metabolic dysregulation in RLS etiology. PMID:26913940

  18. Cardiovascular disease risk factors after early-onset preeclampsia, late-onset preeclampsia, and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Jan H W; Hermes, Wietske; Breimer, Anath Y; van Rijn, Bas B; Koenen, Steven V; Mol, Ben W; Franx, Arie; de Groot, Christianne J M; Koster, Maria P H

    2015-03-01

    Observational studies have shown an increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women who experienced a hypertensive disorder in pregnancy. This risk is related to the severity of the pregnancy-related hypertensive disease and gestational age at onset. However, it has not been investigated whether these differences in CVD risk factors are already present at postpartum cardiovascular screening. We evaluated postpartum differences in CVD risk factors in 3 subgroups of patients with a history of hypertensive pregnancy. We compared the prevalence of common CVD risk factors postpartum among 448 women with previous early-onset preeclampsia, 76 women with previous late-onset preeclampsia, and 224 women with previous pregnancy-induced hypertension. Women with previous early-onset preeclampsia were compared with women with late-onset preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension and had significantly higher fasting blood glucose (5.29 versus 4.80 and 4.83 mmol/L), insulin (9.12 versus 6.31 and 6.7 uIU/L), triglycerides (1.32 versus 1.02 and 0.97 mmol/L), and total cholesterol (5.14 versus 4.73 and 4.73 mmol/L). Almost half of the early-onset preeclampsia women had developed hypertension, as opposed to 39% and 25% of women in the pregnancy-induced hypertension and late-onset preeclampsia groups, respectively. Our data show differences in the prevalence of common modifiable CVD risk factors postpartum and suggest that prevention strategies should be stratified according to severity and gestational age of onset for the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

  19. [Observation on treatment of mailuoning injection for 46 pregnancy induced hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Luan, F; Yin, H Y; Dong, P Y

    1995-03-01

    In order to observe the effect of treatment of Mailuoning Injection (MI) for pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), 46 PIH patients in treated group were treated with intravenous dripping of MI and 40 patients in control group were treated with intravenous dripping of 25% magnesium sulfas. The result showed: The headache and edema ameliorated significantly in treated group in comparison with control (P < 0.05). Both methods could decrease the levels of mean arterial pressure, but the former's lowering arterial pressure was better than that of latter's (P < 0.05-0.01). The improvements of hemorheology in both groups after treatment were found, but the decrease of hematocrit was more significant in treated group (P < 0.05). No difference was found in albuminuria, delivery pattern, postpartum bleeding and neonatal Apgar Score between the two groups. The result suggested that the MI could prevent the progress of pathological process of the PIH, and relieve the systemic arteriolospasm, improve the microcirculation, change the hypercoagulability of the patients' blood and increase the blood flow in the patient of PIH.

  20. [Analysis of the causes of neonatal deaths at term in pregnancy induced hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Du, X

    1997-07-01

    To study the neonatal developmental status, its causes of death and their possible correlation in women complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). 46 autopsies of neonatal death at term with PIH and their clinical data were collected. The developmental status was evaluated by body weight, body length, and the weights of lungs, kidneys, liver and brain. The causes of death were reviewed by the clinicopathologic findings. The neonatal development features for mild PIH in term pregnancy approached to the normal levels of 37 to 38 gestation weeks. In the infants with moderate and severe PIH, the body weights, the weights of lungs and liver were significantly decreased in comparison with those of the mild PIH, respectively (P < 0.05), while the weights of kidneys and brain were not significantly decreased. The causes of death showed that pulmonary hypoplasia accounted for 23.9%, primary pulmonary atelectasis 10.9%, pulmonary hyaline membrane disease 21.7%, massive pulmonary hemorrhage 13.0%, the meconium aspiration 19.6% and others 10.9%. There was no difference in sex among the dead infants. The PIH syndrome had retarded the process of fetal growth and development, and associated with the severity of PIH, mostly involving the lung and the liver. The pulmonary hypoplasia and immaturity were the primary causes for neonatal death in PIH women.

  1. Does palm oil vitamin E reduce the risk of pregnancy induced hypertension?

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini Abdul; Azwar, Muhammad Hatta; Wahab, Marianah Abdul; Dali, Ahmad Zailani Hatta Md; Jaafar, Rohana; Ismail, Nor Azlin Mohd; Jamil, Muhammad Abdul; Adeeb, Nafisah

    2013-01-01

    In view of the high anti-oxidative potential oftocotrienol, the role of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) of palm oil in preventing pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) was explored in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in an urban teaching hospital. Healthy primigravidae were randomized to receive either oral TRF 100 mg daily or placebo, from early second trimester until delivery. Out of 299 women, 151 were randomized into the TRF arm and 148 into the placebo arm. A total of 15 (5.0%) developed PIH. Although there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of PIH (4/151 or 2.6% in the TRF arm vs. 11/148 or 7.4% in the placebo arm, p = 0.058) between the two arms, there was a tendency towards a lower incidence of PIH in the TRF arm compared to the placebo arm. With TRF supplementation, the relative risk (RR) of PIH was 0.36 (95% CI 0.12-1.09). In conclusion, although TRF from palm oil does not statistically significantly reduce the risk of development of PIH in the population studied, the 64% reduction in incidence of PIH is substantial. The findings warrant further clinical trials, particularly in high risk populations.

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephelopathy Syndrome Presenting as Quadriparesis in Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pranita; Kumar, Ajit; Shahi, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) is a condition characterised by raised blood pressure in pregnancy. It affects approximately one out of every 14 pregnant women. Although PIH more commonly occurs during first pregnancy, it can also occur in subsequent pregnancies. It can present with variable complications related to vasospasm. But focal neurologic deficits are extremely rare in patients with PIH. We report a case of quadriparesis due to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). A 36 year old full term pregnant female was admitted for emergency lower segment caesarean section (LSCS) as a result of uncontrolled PIH with early clinical signs of left ventricular failure. She was recovering well from pulmonary oedema after being provided with mechanical ventilation. However on 4th day she developed sudden onset quadriparesis without any alteration in sensorium, bladder & bowel disturbance or any sensory deficit. Diffusion weighted neuroimaging (DWI) was carried out which revealed finding suggestive of PRES. The patient was treated with antihypertensive which followed improvement in neurological deficit. Although rare, PRES should be considered as a potential cause of acute onset focal neurological deficit in pregnant females with PIH. With this case report we have tried to create awareness and vigilance about rare but potentially serious yet salvageable condition like PRES. PMID:26023585

  3. The association of exposure to cadmium through cigarette smoke with pregnancy-induced hypertension in a selenium deficient population.

    PubMed

    Kosanovic, Melita; Jokanovic, Milan

    2007-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been postulated as major contributor to endothelial dysfunction and pregnancy-induced hypertension. We have examined the association of exposure to cadmium through cigarette smoke with hypertension disorders during pregnancy in the selenium deficient population. Markers of lipid peroxidation and antioxidative defense were measured and correlated with cadmium blood concentration in normotensive and hypertensive pregnant smokers and nonsmokers. We have observed significantly higher blood Cd in hypertensive smokers and significant differences in all other parameters. Se concentrations were lower in smokers, both in normotensive and hypertensive group as well as values of nonenzymatic (Zn, Cu, and glutathione) and enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) parameters of antioxidative defense. Results of the study indicate that exposure to cadmium through cigarette smoke in pregnant women, living in Se deficient areas is associated with significantly higher cadmium concentrations and lower levels of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants and that it can be considered as a risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension. Selenium supplementation should be considered for recommendation in such condition. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Onset and Regression of Pregnancy-Induced Cardiac Alterations in Gestationally Hypertensive Mice: The Role of the Natriuretic Peptide System.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Li, Terry Y; Tse, M Yat; Andrew, R David; Tayade, Chandrakant; Jin, Albert Y; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy induces cardiovascular adaptations in response to increased volume overload. Aside from the hemodynamic changes that occur during pregnancy, the maternal heart also undergoes structural changes. However, cardiac modulation in pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension is incompletely understood. The objectives of the current investigation were to determine the role of the natriuretic peptide (NP) system in pregnancy and to assess alterations in pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy between gestationally hypertensive and normotensive dams. Previously we have shown that mice lacking the expression of atrial NP (ANP; ANP(-/-)) exhibit a gestational hypertensive phenotype. In the current study, female ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) mice were mated with ANP(+/+) males. Changes in cardiac size and weight were evaluated across pregnancy at Gestational Days 15.5 and 17.5 and Postnatal Days 7, 14, and 28. Nonpregnant mice were used as controls. Physical measurement recordings and histological analyses demonstrated peak cardiac hypertrophy occurring at 14 days postpartum in both ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) dams with little to no change during pregnancy. Additionally, left ventricular expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and NP system was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Up-regulation of Agt and AT(1a) genes was observed late in pregnancy, while Nppa and Nppb genes were significantly up-regulated postpartum. Our data suggest that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy may be influenced by the RAS throughout gestation and by the NP system postpartum. Further investigations are required to gain a complete understanding of the mechanistic aspects of pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. In vitro vascular effects of cicletanine in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Ebeigbe, A. B.; Cabanie, M.

    1991-01-01

    1. The vascular effects of cicletanine have been studied in vitro on ring preparations of inferior epigastric arteries from normotensive human females and human females with pregnancy-induced hypertension (preeclampsia). 2. Cicletanine (10(-7)-10(-3) M) elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of vessels precontracted with 10(-7) M noradrenaline (NA) or 60 mM K+ but was more potent in the former. Relaxation was significantly greater in rings from preeclamptic patients and was uninfluenced by endothelium removal. 3. The intracellular Ca-dependent contractile responses to 10(-5) M NA in Ca-free medium as well as the subsequent extracellular Ca-dependent contractions (on restoration of external Ca) were significantly attenuated dose-dependently by cicletanine (10(-5) M, 3 x 10(-4) M) in arterial rings from both normotensive and preeclamptic patients. Cicletanine also relaxed rings precontracted by 25 mM K+ but was ineffective against 80 mM K(+)-induced contractions. 4. The inhibition of intracellular Ca-dependent contractions was significantly greater in rings from preeclamptic than from normotensive patients whereas extracellular Ca-dependent contractions were comparably inhibited in both groups. Nifedipine, on the other hand, had little effect on the intracellular Ca-dependent contractions but significantly depressed extracellular Ca-dependent contractions. 5. Cicletanine-induced relaxation was uninfluenced by pretreatment with propranolol, ouabain, tetraethylammonium, procaine, indomethacin, cimetidine or tetrodotoxin but was antagonized by glibenclamide. 6. The results show that cicletanine inhibits contractile responses of human isolated inferior epigastric arteries by a mechanism unrelated to endothelial factors but associated with inhibition of calcium metabolism. An action of cicletanine on glibenclamide-sensitive K+ channels is also suggested. Cicletanine-induced inhibition was significantly greater in arteries from preclamptic patients. PMID:1912987

  6. Increased Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients With Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Liou, Wen-Shiung; Tang, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) may be a major predictor of pregnancy-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, the relationship between PIH and long-term ICH risk is unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the association between PIH and ICH and to identify the predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. PIH patients were divided into gestational hypertension (GH) and preeclampsia groups. The 2 groups were separately compared with matched cohorts of patients without PIH based on age and date of delivery. The occurrence of ICH was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database, 28,346 PIH patients, including 7390 with GH and 20,956 with preeclampsia, were identified. The incidences of ICH were increased in both groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 3.72 in the GH group, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.63–3.81, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 8.21 in the preeclampsia group, 95% CI 8.12–8.31, P < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, according to the results of stratification of follow-up years, both groups were associated with a highest risk of ICH at 1 to 5 years of follow-up (IRR = 11.99, 95% CI 11.16–12.88, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 21.83, 95% CI 21.24–22.44, P < 0.0001, respectively). After adjusting for age, parity, severity of PIH, number of PIH occurrences, gestational age, and comorbidities in the multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model, age ≥30 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, 95% CI 1.27–3.10, P = 0.0026), patients with preeclampsia (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.22–3.90, P = 0.0089), multiple PIH occurrences (HR 4.08, 95% CI 1.85–9.01, P = 0.0005), hypertension (HR 4.51, 95% CI 1.89–10.74, P = 0.0007), and obesity (HR 7.21, 95

  7. Increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Hu, Li-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysregulation of the immune system plays a role in the pathogenesis of both, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is well known that SLE predisposes to be complicated with PIH. However, few studies have attempted to investigate whether PIH increased subsequent SLE risk. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between PIH and subsequent SLE risk and identify predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) and compared with a matched cohort without PIH based on age and the year of delivery. The incidence of new-onset SLE was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the NHIRD, 29,091 patients with PIH and 116,364 matched controls were identified. The incidence of SLE was higher among patients with PIH than in the matched controls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98–4.05, P < 0.0001). The IRR for subsequent SLE development remained significantly higher in all stratifications during the follow-up years. The multivariate Cox regression model was performed and the results showed that PIH may be an independent risk factors for the development of subsequent SLE (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.87, 95% CI 2.07–3.98, P < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate Cox regression model was used again among the PIH cohort only in order to identify the possible risk factors for subsequent SLE in the population with PIH. Patients with PIH may have higher risk of developing newly diagnosed SLE than those without PIH. In addition, among individuals who have experienced PIH, those younger than 30 years, having experienced preeclampsia/eclampsia, single parity, preterm birth, or chronic kidney disease, may display an increased subsequent risk of SLE. PMID:27472738

  8. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertensive Disorders before and after a National Economic Collapse: A Population Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Eiríksdóttir, Védís Helga; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur Anna; Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey; Hauksdóttir, Arna; Lund, Sigrún Helga; Bjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður Ingibjörg; Cnattingius, Sven; Zoëga, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on the potential influence of macroeconomic recessions on maternal diseases during pregnancy are scarce. We aimed to assess potential change in prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders (preeclampsia and gestational hypertension) during the first years of the major national economic recession in Iceland, which started abruptly in October 2008. Methods and Findings Women whose pregnancies resulted in live singleton births in Iceland in 2005–2012 constituted the study population (N = 35,211). Data on pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders were obtained from the Icelandic Medical Birth Register and use of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy, including β-blockers and calcium channel blockers, from the Icelandic Medicines Register. With the pre-collapse period as reference, we used logistic regression analysis to assess change in pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders and use of antihypertensives during the first four years after the economic collapse, adjusting for demographic and pregnancy characteristics, taking aggregate economic indicators into account. Compared with the pre-collapse period, we observed an increased prevalence of gestational hypertension in the first year following the economic collapse (2.4% vs. 3.9%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.47; 95 percent confidence interval [95%CI] 1.13–1.91) but not in the subsequent years. The association disappeared completely when we adjusted for aggregate unemployment rate (aOR 1.04; 95% CI 0.74–1.47). Similarly, there was an increase in prescription fills of β-blockers in the first year following the collapse (1.9% vs.3.1%; aOR 1.43; 95% CI 1.07–1.90), which disappeared after adjusting for aggregate unemployment rate (aOR 1.05; 95% CI 0.72–1.54). No changes were observed for preeclampsia or use of calcium channel blockers between the pre- and post-collapse periods. Conclusions Our data suggest a transient increased risk of gestational hypertension and use of

  9. Maternal supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients reduces cardiometabolic variables in pregnancy induced hypertension rats.

    PubMed

    Kemse, N; Kale, A; Joshi, S

    2016-06-15

    Reports indicate that during pregnancy hypertension is known to have long term adverse effects both in the mother and offspring. However, the effect of maternal micronutrient supplementation on this association of in utero exposure and risk of non-communicable diseases in the later life remains unclear. The present study examines the effect of maternal micronutrient and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation either individual or in combination on cardiometabolic risk factors both in the mother and offspring using an animal model of hypertension. Pregnant Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups; control, PIH (Pregnancy induced hypertention) Induced, PIH+vitamin B12, PIH+ folic acid, PIH+omega-3 fatty acids and PIH+combined smicronutrient supplementation (vitamin B12+folic acid + omega-3 fatty acids). The dams and their offspring were shifted to a control diet after delivery and the offspring continued on these diets till 3mo of age. Hypertension during pregnancy was induced using l-Nitroarginine methylester (50mg/kgbody weight/day). Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy demonstrated lower levels (p<0.05) of plasma cholesterol while a combined supplementation of folic acid, vitamin B12 and omega 3 fatty acids demonstrated lower (p<0.05) triglyceride levels as compared to PIH induced dams. PIH induction increased (p<0.01) the triglyceride levels in the offspring at 3mo of age and maternal supplementation of either individual or combined micronutrients demonstrated lower (p<0.01) triglyceride levels. Our findings have implications for planning intervention studies in women with pregnancy induced hypertension. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Clinical study on the influence of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-Dimer index in patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ai, Liang; Lan, Xinzhi; Wang, Limin; Xu, Yanjie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    To observe the effect of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index when it was applied to patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. 212 cases of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients diagnosed clinically were selected to be randomly divided into the research group and the control group. The research groups were given phloroglucinol, while the control groups were given magnesium sulfate. The plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index in patients were detected before treatment and after 7 days respectively with statistical analysis of results. The diffidence after treatment was statistically significant (P<0.05). Compared within the same group, the difference of each index before and after treatment in the research group was statistically significant (P<0.05), while the control group was not statistically significant (P>0.05). It showed that the research group could reduce the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients, and its effect was significantly better than the control group according to the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index changes in patients, it indicated that it was effective of phloroglucinol treatment for patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension disease and superior to the western medicine conventional treatment, worth clinical promotion.

  11. [Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Eclampsia, Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Pulmonary Edema due to Pregnancy-induced Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Aida, Junko; Okutani, Hiroai; Oda, Yutaka; Okutani, Ryu

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with mental retardation was admitted to a nearby hospital for an abrupt onset of seizure. Physical examination revealed remarkable hypertension and pregnancy with estimated gestational age of 28th week. Severe pulmonary edema and hypoxia led to a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) accompanied by eclampsia. She was orotracheally intubated because of refractory seizure and hypoxemia, and transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Besides severe hypoxia and hypercapnea, an enhanced lesion was detected in the left posterior cerebrum by brain MRI. No abnormal findings were detected in the fetus, with heart rate of 150 beats x min. She was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) caused by PIH and emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia was scheduled. A male newborn was delivered with Apgar score of 1/4 (1/5 min), followed by starting continuous infusion of nicardipine for controlling hypertension. Chest X-P on completion of surgery revealed remarkably alleviated pulmonary edema. She received intensive treatment and continued positive pressure ventilation for four days after delivery. She recovered with no neurological deficits and her child was well without any complications.

  12. Diets rich in vegetables and physical activity are associated with a decreased risk of pregnancy induced hypertension among rural women from Kimpese, DR Congo.

    PubMed

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Kadima-Tshimanga, B; Buassa-bu-Tsumbu, B; M'buyamba, K

    2008-01-01

    To assess whether the frequency pf pregnancy-induced hypertension is low, and vegetables intake and physical activity are protective against pregnancy-induced hypertension onset among rural women from Democratic republic of Congo. This hospital-based and longitudinal study was carried out within the rural hospital of Kimpese, DR Congo were monitored from January 1st to March 31st 2003 on basis of demographic, diet, physical activity, anthropometry and blood pressure till the onset of types of pregnancy-induced hypertension and delivery. Out of 238 black pregnants, the incidence risk of arterial hypertension was 4.6% (n=11) whose 2.9% with Pre-Eclampsia and 1.7% with transient hypertension. Gestity, parity and birth weight of infants were significantly lower among hypertensive mothers, while positive family history and presence of oedemas were more elevated among hypertensive pregnants. The onset of Pre Eclampsia was higher within vendors and inactive women as well as among vegetarians (3.1%) than women with diet high in meat (9.7%). Pre Eclampsia occurred more (p<0.05) among pregnants with rare daily servings of vegetables (33.3%) than pregnants with 3 or more daily servings of vegetables (3.7%). Physical activity (RR=0.63 CI 95% 0.33 to 0.94) and = 3 daily servings of vegetables (RR=8.8 CI 95% 0.6 to 0.98) were significant (p<0.01) protective factors against Pre Eclampsia. Eclampsia was not observed. It is timely to promote diet rich in vegetables overweight reduction and physical activity among pregnants for the prevention of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  13. Prediction of pregnancy-induced hypertension by a shift of blood pressure class according to the JSH 2009 guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jwa, Seung Chik; Arata, Naoko; Sakamoto, Naoko; Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Aoki, Hiroaki; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Dongmei, Qiu; Ohya, Yukihiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Kitagawa, Michihiro

    2011-11-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) at early or mid pregnancy is a known risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). However, the association between BP changes during the first half of pregnancy and subsequent PIH development is unknown. We used changes in maternal BP between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation to evaluate the risk of PIH. A total of 976 pregnant women with BP estimations recorded before 16 weeks and at 20 weeks of gestation participated in this study. BPs were classified by the Japanese Society of Hypertension 2009 Hypertension Treatment Guidelines (JSH 2009). There was a significant trend for future PIH in women whose JSH 2009 BP class increased between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation, and the risk of PIH was highest among women whose BP was Class IV Hypertension (systolic BP≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP≥90 mm Hg). The risk of PIH increased in women whose BPs shifted from Classes I Optimal (systolic BP<120 mm Hg and diastolic BP<80 mm Hg) and II Normal (systolic BP 120-129 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP 80-84 mm Hg) before 16 weeks to Class III High-Normal (systolic BP 130-139 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP 85-89 mm Hg) at 20 weeks of gestation. These shifts in BP class were significantly correlated with the risk of PIH after adjustments for variables (P-value for trend <0.05). Within JSH 2009 Classes I, II and III, a shift in BP from a low to a high class between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation predicts the subsequent development of PIH.

  14. The relationship between preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension and maternal risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Sun; Kang, Eun Joo; Woo, Ok Hee; Park, Kyong Hwa; Woo, Sang Uk; Yang, Dae Sik; Kim, Ae-Ree; Lee, Jae-Bok; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Jun Suk; Seo, Jae Hong

    2013-11-01

    It has long been recognized that some human breast cancers are hormone dependent. Preeclampsia is a syndrome of pregnancy defined by the onset of hypertension and proteinuria and characterized by dysfunction of the maternal endothelium. Many hormonal changes occur with preeclampsia, and we hypothesize that these changes may influence the risk of maternal breast cancer. We also analyzed the relation between pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and maternal risk of breast cancer. Among 13 relevant publications about preeclampsia and six relevant publications about PIH, some studies find preeclampsia associated with a lower risk of breast cancer, but others did not. Therefore, these results are inconclusive. We conducted meta-analysis to evaluate more precisely the relationship between preeclampsia, PIH and maternal risk of breast cancer. The pooled estimate of the hazard ratio (HR) associated with preeclampsia was 0.86 (95% CI 0.73-1.01), and that associated with PIH was 0.83 (0.66-1.06), both based on the random effects model. Some suggestive but not entirely consistent nor conclusive evidence was found on the association between the history of preeclampsia or PIH with the subsequent risk of breast cancer.

  15. Intrathecal Midazolam as an Adjuvant in Pregnancy-Induced Hypertensive Patients Undergoing an Elective Caesarean Section: A Clinical Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dodawad, Ravichandra; G. B., Sumalatha; Pandarpurkar, Sandeep; Jajee, Parashuram

    2016-01-01

    Background A pain-free postoperative period is essential following a caesarean section so new mothers may care for and bond with their neonates. Intrathecal adjuvants are often administered during this procedure to provide significant analgesia, but they may also have bothersome side effects. Intrathecal midazolam produces effective postoperative analgesia with no significant side effects. Objectives This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of intrathecal midazolam vs. plain bupivacaine as an adjunct to bupivacaine in pregnancy-induced hypertension patients scheduled for elective caesarean section. Methods Sixty patients diagnosed with pregnancy-induced hypertension on regular treatment who were scheduled for a caesarean section were randomly allocated into two groups: a control group (Group BC, n = 30) and a midazolam group (Group BM, n = 30). Both groups received 10 mg (2 mL) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Group BC received 0.4 mL of distilled water, while group BM received 0.4 mL (2 mg) of midazolam intrathecally. The duration of postoperative analgesia, analgesic requirements during the first 24 hours after surgery, onset times and durations of sensory and motor blocks, incidence of hypotension, vasopressor requirements, and side effects were recorded. Results Postoperative analgesia was significantly longer in the midazolam group compared to the control group (201.5 minutes vs. 357.6 minutes). The mean onset times of the sensory and motor blocks were significantly faster (P < 0.01) in the midazolam group compared to the control group. The mean times to attain the maximum sensory level and motor blocks were also significantly faster in the midazolam group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of hypotension was 6.6% in the midazolam group and 36.6% in the control group, which was highly significant. In addition, the number of patients with side effects was significantly lower

  16. Dramatic response of a patient with pregnancy induced idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension to sildenafil treatment.

    PubMed

    Taçoy, Gülten; Ekim, Numan Nadir; Cengel, Atiye

    2010-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, which may lead to right ventricular failure and death. Major cardiovascular and pulmonary alterations occur during pregnancy and therefore worsen or increase the complications of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). A patient diagnosed with IPAH after a successful full-term pregnancy and cesarean section with epidural anesthesia is presented. The postoperative course was complicated by progressive dyspnea, and lower limb edema. The outcome of treatment with sildenafil during puerperium was favorable in this patient. The clinical course was complicated by an unexpected spontaneous pregnancy after primary infertility.

  17. Complement split product C4d deposition in placenta in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Mikami, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Naoki; Salah, Adeeb; Kondoh, Eiji; Tatsumi, Keiji; Konishi, Ikuo; Haga, Hironori

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) are related to premature delivery and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and share histological findings of the placenta. Association with complement dysregulation has been reported in pregnancy for both disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of C4d immunohistochemistry for placentas with SLE- and PIH-associated pregnancy. C4d staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue of placentas from 26 patients with SLE, 26 with PIH, and 25 control cases. We used the H-score with a range of 0-300 for the evaluation of C4d immunoreactivity. Placentas of SLE and PIH cases showed a higher H-score than control cases (average, SLE, 38.3 (P < 0.05); PIH, 17.8; control, 1.68), with linear staining on the membrane of syncytiotrophoblast. C4d-high groups comprised 50% (12/26) of SLE and 35% (9/26) of PIH cases, with H-scores ranging 14-270 and 15-170. C4d-high groups were significantly associated with low-placental weights and low birth weight in both SLE and PIH (P < 0.05), and lower gestational age (P < 0.05) in PIH cases. These results suggest that C4d might be utilized as a biomarker evaluating the subsequent risk for IUGR and disease control during the gestation period in these patients.

  18. [Postpartum hemorrhage and pregnancy induced hypertension during emergency lower segment cesarean section: dexmedetomidine to our rescue].

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Uma

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α-2 agonist which has recently revolutionized our anesthesia and intensive care practice. An obstetric patient presented for emergency cesarean delivery under general anesthesia, with pre-eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage. In carefully selected cases with refractory hypertension and postpartum hemorrhage, dexmedetomidine can be used for improving overall patient outcome. It was beneficial in controlling both the blood pressure and uterine bleeding during cesarean section in our patient. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. A fetal variant in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension in a predominantly hispanic population.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa L; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Desmond, Daniel H; Mandeville, John E; Goodwin, T Murphy; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-08-30

    The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphism in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in a case-control study of mother-baby dyads. Predominantly Hispanic women, ages 15-45, with (n=136) and without (n=169) PIH were recruited. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the GCM1 gene and examined the association with PIH using both logistic regression and likelihood expectation maximization (LEM) to adjust for intra-familial correlation between genotypes. Maternal genotype was not associated with PIH for any polymorphisms examined. Fetal genotype, however, was associated with maternal risk of PIH. Mothers carrying a fetus with ≥1 copy of the minor (C) allele for rs9349655 were less likely to develop PIH than women carrying a fetus with the GG genotype (parity-adjusted OR=0.44, 95% Cl: 0.21, 0.94). The trend of decreasing risk with increasing C alleles was also statistically significant (OR(trend)=0.41 95% Cl: 0.20, 0.85). The minor alleles for the other three SNPs also appear to be associated with protection. Multilocus analyses of fetal genotypes showed that the protective effect of carrying minor alleles at rs9349655 and rs13200319 (non-significant) remained unchanged when adjusting for genotypes at the other loci. However, the apparent (non-significant) effect of rs2816345 and rs2518573 disappeared when adjusting for rs9349655. In conclusion, we found that a fetal GCM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population. These results suggest that GCM1 may represent a fetal-effect gene, where risk to the mother is conferred only through carriage by the fetus.

  20. A fetal variant in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension in a predominantly hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Melissa L; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Desmond, Daniel H; Mandeville, John E; Goodwin, T Murphy; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphism in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in a case-control study of mother-baby dyads. Predominantly Hispanic women, ages 15-45, with (n=136) and without (n=169) PIH were recruited. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the GCM1 gene and examined the association with PIH using both logistic regression and likelihood expectation maximization (LEM) to adjust for intra-familial correlation between genotypes. Maternal genotype was not associated with PIH for any polymorphisms examined. Fetal genotype, however, was associated with maternal risk of PIH. Mothers carrying a fetus with ≥1 copy of the minor (C) allele for rs9349655 were less likely to develop PIH than women carrying a fetus with the GG genotype (parity-adjusted OR=0.44, 95% Cl: 0.21, 0.94). The trend of decreasing risk with increasing C alleles was also statistically significant (ORtrend=0.41 95% Cl: 0.20, 0.85). The minor alleles for the other three SNPs also appear to be associated with protection. Multilocus analyses of fetal genotypes showed that the protective effect of carrying minor alleles at rs9349655 and rs13200319 (non-significant) remained unchanged when adjusting for genotypes at the other loci. However, the apparent (non-significant) effect of rs2816345 and rs2518573 disappeared when adjusting for rs9349655. In conclusion, we found that a fetal GCM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population. These results suggest that GCM1 may represent a fetal-effect gene, where risk to the mother is conferred only through carriage by the fetus. PMID:21915358

  1. Decreased baroreflex sensitivity is linked to sympathovagal imbalance, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Subha, M; Pal, Pravati; Pal, G K; Habeebullah, S; Adithan, C; Sridhar, M G

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) has been reported as a cardiovascular (CV) risk. We assessed the sympathovagal imbalance (SVI) and the association of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) with CV risks in PIH. A total of 125 pregnant women having a risk factor for PIH were followed till term and the incidence of PIH was observed. Retrospectively, they were divided into two groups: Group I (those who did not develop PIH, n = 82) and Group II (those who developed PIH, n = 43). Blood pressure variability (BPV) parameters including baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), spectral heart rate variability (HRV), autonomic function tests (AFTs), inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, TNF-α, interferon-γ), and OS markers were measured in both the groups. Alterations in parasympathetic and sympathetic components of AFTs were analyzed. Link of various parameters to BRS was assessed by correlation and multiple regression analysis. Parasympathetic components of AFTs were decreased from the early part of pregnancy and sympathetic components were increased toward the later part of pregnancy. Decreased BRS, the marker of CV risk, was more prominent in Group II subjects. Independent contribution of interleukin-6 (β = 0.276, P = 0.020), TNF-α (β = 0.408, P = 0.002), interferon-γ (β = 0.355, P = 0.008), and thiobarbituric-acid reactive substance (β = 0.287, P = 0.015) to BRS was found to be significant. It was concluded that sympathetic overactivity that develops more in the later part (third trimester) of pregnancy contributes to SVI and genesis of PIH. In PIH women, CV risks are present from the beginning of pregnancy that intensifies in the later part of pregnancy. Retrograde inflammation and oxidative stress contribute to the decreased BRS in PIH.

  2. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women. We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed. Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05–1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM. ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM. PMID:27258493

  3. High levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) are inversely correlated with low levels of maternal CRF-binding protein in pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, F; Florio, P; Benedetto, C; Gallo, C; Woods, R J; Genazzani, A R; Lowry, P J

    1996-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein (CRF-BP) is suggested to play a role in modulating the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis during pregnancy, counteracting the actions of circulating or locally acting CRF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether maternal levels of CRF-BP and CRF are modified in pregnant women with a high risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension (n = 21). A group of nine patients developed the disease between 25-35 weeks gestation, and sequential blood samples were taken every 5 weeks throughout the pregnancy. As a control group, healthy pregnant women were studied (n = 9) using the same protocol; a group of women with pregnancy-induced hypertension (n = 5) was studied starting from the time of diagnosis. In a subgroup of patients (n = 10), CRF-BP and CRF levels were studied after 5 weeks of antihypertensive treatment. Levels of CRF-BP were determined using a specific RIA, whereas CRF was evaluated by a two-site immunoradiometric assay. In patients at risk, circulating levels of CRF-BP followed the same pattern as that in healthy controls, showing a significant decrease at term (36-40 weeks; P < 0.05). A significant and progressive increase in plasma CRF levels was observed in both groups of pregnant women; the highest values were found at term (P < 0.01). In the nine patients who developed pregnancy-induced hypertension, maternal levels of CRF-BP at the onset of signs and symptoms were lower than control values, and CRF levels were significantly higher at the onset of the disease (P < 0.01). Similarly, in these hypertensive patients studied at the time of hospitalization, CRF-BP levels were lower whereas those of CRF were higher than levels in healthy patients (P < 0.01). No effect of antihypertensive therapy on either CRF-BP or CRF levels was observed. The present study shows an inverse correlation between reduced plasma CRF-BP levels and increased CRF levels in the maternal circulation of

  4. Increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy-induced hypertension: A nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Hu, Li-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system plays a role in the pathogenesis of both, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is well known that SLE predisposes to be complicated with PIH. However, few studies have attempted to investigate whether PIH increased subsequent SLE risk.The objectives of this study were to assess the association between PIH and subsequent SLE risk and identify predictive risk factors.Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) and compared with a matched cohort without PIH based on age and the year of delivery. The incidence of new-onset SLE was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013.Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the NHIRD, 29,091 patients with PIH and 116,364 matched controls were identified. The incidence of SLE was higher among patients with PIH than in the matched controls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98-4.05, P < 0.0001). The IRR for subsequent SLE development remained significantly higher in all stratifications during the follow-up years. The multivariate Cox regression model was performed and the results showed that PIH may be an independent risk factors for the development of subsequent SLE (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.87, 95% CI 2.07-3.98, P < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate Cox regression model was used again among the PIH cohort only in order to identify the possible risk factors for subsequent SLE in the population with PIH.Patients with PIH may have higher risk of developing newly diagnosed SLE than those without PIH. In addition, among individuals who have experienced PIH, those younger than 30 years, having experienced preeclampsia/eclampsia, single parity, preterm birth, or chronic kidney disease, may display an increased subsequent risk of SLE.

  5. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ... Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ...

  6. Maternal and Fetal Variants in the TGF-beta3 Gene and Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension in a Predominantly Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    WILSON, Melissa L.; DESMOND, Daniel H.; GOODWIN, T. Murphy; MILLER, David A.; INGLES, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine if polymorphisms in the Transforming Growth Factor Beta-3 (TGF-β3) gene are associated with risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) in case-control mother-baby dyads. Study Design Cases (N=136) and controls (N=169) were recruited from the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Women's and Children's Hospital. We genotyped four TGF-β3 polymorphisms and examined association with PIH using logistic regression, adjusting for parity, maternal age, gestational age at delivery, fetal (or maternal) genotypes for the polymorphism in question, and for the three other polymorphisms within the TGF-β3 gene. Results Only one of the TGF-β3 polymorphisms (rs11466414) was associated with PIH. Mothers who carried a baby with a minor allele were at decreased risk (ORmulti-locus adj= 0.32, 95% CI: 0.14, 0.77). Maternal TGF-β3 variants had no effect on risk of PIH. Conclusion A fetal TGF-beta3 polymorphism (rs11466414) is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension in a predominantly Hispanic population. PMID:19628198

  7. The impact of ovulation induction and ovarian stimulation on the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension and on neonatal outcomes: A case/control study.

    PubMed

    Carbillon, Lionel; Gronier, Heloise; Cedrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Pharisien, Isabelle; Nguyen, Minh T; Valensi, Paul; Cosson, Emmanuel

    2017-10-01

    To study the role of ovarian stimulation procedures on the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus and neonatal outcomes according to women's characteristics and the causes of infertility. Retrospective, observational, case/control study. Spontaneous pregnancies (group A, n=8107), pregnancies achieved after mild ovarian ovulation induction without other Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) procedures (group B, n=44), pregnancies after mild ovarian stimulation and ART procedures (group C, n=53) or pregnancies after multi (>2) follicular stimulation with gonadotrophin therapy and ART procedures (group D, n=133); all of the groups had identical protocols for prenatal care. Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), fetal macrosomia (estimated fetal weight >90th percentile), gestational diabetes mellitus, caesarean section, and neonatal outcomes. The incidence rates of PIH (2.7, 11.6, 4.2, and 2.5%) in groups A, B, C and D, respectively, (p=0.004), fetal macrosomia (4.7, 7.0, 20.8, and 7.6%, respectively, p<0.001), caesarean section (21.8, 37.2, 21.7, and 17.6%, respectively, p=0.048), differed among the groups. The high incidence of PIH in pregnancies following ovulation induction was driven by polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) per se. PCOS per se was associated with more PIH, and ART procedures after mild mono/bi follicular ovarian stimulation were associated with more fetal macrosomia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sex differences in early growth during the first three years of life in offspring from mothers with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takashi; Masuyama, Hisashi; Eguchi, Takeshi; Tamada, Shoko; Eto, Eriko; Hayata, Kei; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    Newborns born to mothers with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) are thought to be at high risk for lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity and hypertension, in adulthood. A longitudinal study of 78 pregnant women with PIH and their newborns, who visited Okayama University Hospital from 2009 to 2013. We investigated the change in growth of offspring born to mothers with PIH and compared it with the standard growth curve in Japanese to examine whether there was rapid catch-up growth during the first 3years of life. Subjects were 78 pregnant women with PIH and their offspring, who visited Okayama University Hospital from 2009 to 2013. Valid responses were obtained from 29 of 78 (37.1%) women. Body weight and length at birth were at the third percentile or less in females, and at the 10th percentile or less, in males. When body weight and length were compared at 6months, 18months, and 3years old between male and female toddlers, male toddlers slowly caught up until 3years old, but female toddlers rapidly caught up in the first 6months. Furthermore, in newborns with fetal growth restriction caused by the intrauterine environment of PIH, differences in physical development between male and female toddlers were more remarkable. There is a significant sex difference in catch-up growth during the first 3years, which might be involved in lifestyle-related diseases in adulthood, suggesting continuous follow-up is necessary, especially for female offspring. Copyright © 2016 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of serum zinc, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension and healthy pregnant women: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lianping; Lang, Lin; Li, Yijun; Liu, Qingqing; Yao, Yingshui

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between serum zinc, magnesium, and calcium levels and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is controversial. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not serum zinc, magnesium, and calcium levels are associated with PIH. In our study, we searched databases, including Wangfang, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and PubMed, to find literature regarding the relationship between PIH and serum trace elements. Meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager5.3 software. A total of 14 articles were included in our study. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that patients with PIH had lower serum zinc (SMD = -1.14; 95% CI] = -1.69, -0.59; P < 0.05), calcium (MD = -0.26; 95% CI = -0.36, -0.15; P < 0.05), and magnesium concentration (MD = -0.0.06; 95% CI = -0.08, -0.05; P < 0.05) than healthy gravidas. Our research suggests that serum zinc, calcium, and magnesium concentrations may have an effect on PIH. Thus, the serum zinc, calcium, and magnesium levels could be measured for PIH patients.

  10. Measuring regional and district variations in the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in Ghana: challenges, opportunities and implications for maternal and newborn health policy and programmes.

    PubMed

    Antwi, Edward; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Quansah Asare, Gloria; Koram, Kwadwo A; Grobbee, Diederick; Agyepong, Irene A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the quality of health management information system (HMIS) data needed for assessment of local area variation in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) incidence and to describe district and regional variations in PIH incidence. A retrospective review of antenatal and delivery records of 2682 pregnant women in 10 district hospitals in the Greater Accra and Upper West regions of Ghana was conducted in 2013. Quality of HMIS data was assessed by completeness of reporting. The incidence of PIH was estimated for each district. Key variables for routine assessment of PIH such as blood pressure (BP) at antenatal visits, weight and height were 95-100% complete. Fundal height, gestational age and BP at delivery were not consistently reported. The incidence of PIH differed significantly between Greater Accra region (6.1%) and Upper West region (3.2%). Prevalence of obesity among pregnant women in Greater Accra region (13.9%) was significantly higher than that of women in Upper West region (2.2%). More attention needs to be given to understanding local area variations in PIH and possible relationships with urbanisation and lifestyle changes that promote obesity, to inform maternal and newborn health policy. This can be done with good quality routine HMIS data. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Maternal and fetal variants in the TGF-beta3 gene and risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension in a predominantly Latino population.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa L; Desmond, Daniel H; Goodwin, T Murphy; Miller, David A; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2009-09-01

    We sought to determine whether polymorphisms in the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta3 gene are associated with risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) in case-control mother-baby dyads. Patients (n = 136) and control subjects (n = 169) were recruited from our hospital. We genotyped 4 TGF-beta3 polymorphisms and examined association with PIH using logistic regression, adjusting for parity, maternal age, gestational age at delivery, fetal (or maternal) genotypes for the polymorphism in question, and the 3 other polymorphisms within the TGF-beta3 gene. Only 1 of the TGF-beta3 polymorphisms (rs11466414) was associated with PIH. Mothers who carried a baby with a minor allele were at decreased risk (odds ratio(multi-locus adj), 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.77). Maternal TGF-beta3 variants had no effect on risk of PIH. A fetal TGF-beta3 polymorphism (rs11466414) is associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population.

  12. Dietary fructose in pregnancy induces hyperglycemia, hypertension, and pathologic kidney and liver changes in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Shortliffe, Linda M Dairiki; Hammam, Olfat; Han, Xiaoyuan; Kouba, Erik; Tsao, Philip S; Wang, Bingyin

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia and hypertension is increasing along with associated morbidities to mother and offspring. The high fructose diet is a well-studied model that induces hyperglycemia and hypertension in male rodents, but may not affect females. We hypothesized that the physiologic stress of pregnancy may alter metabolic responses to dietary fructose. In this study female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two gestational dietary groups: (1) 60% carbohydrate standard rat chow (Pregnant-S-controls) and (2) 60% fructose enriched chow (Pregnant-F). Body weight, blood pressure, blood glucose, triglycerides, and insulin were measured in pregnancy and during the post-partum period. Maternal organ weight and histological changes were also assessed after delivery. By midpregnancy Pregnant-F rats had increased weight, elevated blood pressure, higher fasting glucose, and elevated triglycerides compared with Pregnant-S rats. Both groups demonstrated elevated gestational insulin levels with signs of insulin resistance (increased HOMA-IR). Pregnant-F rats showed significant histopathologic hepatic steatosis and renal tubular changes characterized by tubular dilation and glomerulosclerosis. Our study provides a model in which dietary change during pregnancy can be examined. We demonstrate, moreover, that high dietary fructose ingestion in pregnant rats may result in profound systemic and pathologic changes not appreciated during routine pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Further evidence for the role of pregnancy-induced hypertension and other early life influences in the development of ADHD: results from the IDEFICS study.

    PubMed

    Pohlabeln, Hermann; Rach, Stefan; De Henauw, Stefaan; Eiben, Gabriele; Gwozdz, Wencke; Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos; Molnár, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Russo, Paola; Veidebaum, Toomas; Pigeot, Iris

    2017-03-03

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether in addition to established early risk factors other, less studied pre-, peri-, and postnatal influences, like gestational hypertension or neonatal respiratory disorders and infections, may increase a child's risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD). In the IDEFICS study more than 18,000 children, aged 2-11.9 years, underwent extensive medical examinations supplemented by parental questionnaires on pregnancy and early childhood. The present analyses are restricted to children whose parents also completed a supplementary medical questionnaire (n = 15,577), including the question whether or not the child was ever diagnosed with ADHD. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between early life influences and the risk of ADHD. Our study confirms the well-known association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and a child's risk of ADHD. In addition, our study showed that children born to mothers younger than 20 years old were 3-4 times more likely to develop ADHD as compared to children born to mothers aged 25 years and older. Moreover, we found that children whose mothers suffered from pregnancy-induced hypertension had an approximately twofold risk of ADHD (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.48). This also holds true for infections during the first 4 weeks after birth (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.05-4.04). In addition, although not statistically significant, we observed a noticeable elevated risk estimate for neonatal respiratory disorders (OR 1.76; 95% CI 0.91-3.41). Hence, we recommend that these less often studied pre-, peri, and postnatal influences should get more attention when considering early indicators or predictors for ADHD in children. However, special study designs such as genetically sensitive designs may be needed to derive causal conclusions.

  14. A Combined Supplementation of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Micronutrients (Folic Acid, Vitamin B12) Reduces Oxidative Stress Markers in a Rat Model of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kemse, Nisha G.; Kale, Anvita A.; Joshi, Sadhana R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our earlier studies have highlighted that an altered one carbon metabolism (vitamin B12, folic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) is associated with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is also known to be associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The current study examines whether maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation given either individually or in combination can ameliorate the oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). Materials and Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned to control and five treatment groups: PIH; PIH + vitamin B12; PIH + folic acid; PIH + Omega-3 fatty acids and PIH + combined micronutrient supplementation (vitamin B12 + folic acid + omega-3 fatty acids). L-Nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg body weight/day) was used to induce hypertension during pregnancy. Blood Pressure (BP) was recorded during pregnancy and dams were dissected at d20 of gestation. Results Animals from the PIH group demonstrated higher (p<0.01 for both) systolic and diastolic BP; lower (p<0.01) pup weight; higher dam plasma homocysteine (p<0.05) and dam and offspring malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.01), lower (p<0.05) placental and offspring liver DHA and higher (p<0.01) tumor necrosis factor–alpha (TNF–ά) levels as compared to control. Individual micronutrient supplementation did not offer much benefit. In contrast, combined supplementation lowered systolic BP, homocysteine, MDA and placental TNF-ά levels in dams and liver MDA and protein carbonyl in the offspring as compared to PIH group. Conclusion Key constituents of one carbon cycle (folic acid, vitamin B12 and DHA) may play a role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in preeclampsia. PMID:25405347

  15. A combined supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) reduces oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kemse, Nisha G; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2014-01-01

    Our earlier studies have highlighted that an altered one carbon metabolism (vitamin B12, folic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) is associated with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is also known to be associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The current study examines whether maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation given either individually or in combination can ameliorate the oxidative stress markers in a rat model of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned to control and five treatment groups: PIH; PIH + vitamin B12; PIH + folic acid; PIH + Omega-3 fatty acids and PIH + combined micronutrient supplementation (vitamin B12 + folic acid + omega-3 fatty acids). L-Nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg body weight/day) was used to induce hypertension during pregnancy. Blood Pressure (BP) was recorded during pregnancy and dams were dissected at d20 of gestation. Animals from the PIH group demonstrated higher (p<0.01 for both) systolic and diastolic BP; lower (p<0.01) pup weight; higher dam plasma homocysteine (p<0.05) and dam and offspring malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.01), lower (p<0.05) placental and offspring liver DHA and higher (p<0.01) tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-ά) levels as compared to control. Individual micronutrient supplementation did not offer much benefit. In contrast, combined supplementation lowered systolic BP, homocysteine, MDA and placental TNF-ά levels in dams and liver MDA and protein carbonyl in the offspring as compared to PIH group. Key constituents of one carbon cycle (folic acid, vitamin B12 and DHA) may play a role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in preeclampsia.

  16. Maternal chronic HBV infection would not increase the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension--results from pregnancy cohort in Liuyang rural China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Tan, Hongzhuan; Li, Xun; Zhou, Shujin; Wen, Shi Wu; Luo, Meiling

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between maternal HBV (hepatitis B virus) infection and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is inconclusive. Few studies have been conducted in rural areas of China. In order to examine the association between maternal chronic HBV infection and risk of PIH in Liuyang rural area China, we enrolled 6,195 eligible pregnant women in 2010-2011 in selected 14 towns of Liuyang on their first prenatal visit to local maternity care unit. A total of 461 subjects (7.44% (95%CI: 6.79%, 8.10%)) were identified with positive HBsAg status (exposed group) and 5734 were non-HBV carriers (unexposed group). Multivariate log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the risk of PIH, gestational hypertension (GH), and preeclampsia (PE) in relation to maternal chronic HBV infection. There are total of 455 subjects diagnosed with PIH (7.34% (95%CI: 6.70%, 7.99%)), including 371 GH (5.99% (95%CI: 5.40%, 6.58%)) and 81 PE (1.31% (95%CI: 1.07%, 1.64%)). The crude risk ratio between PIH, GH, PE and maternal HBV infection were 1.20 (95%CI: 0.88, 1.64), 1.30(95%CI: 0.93, 1.81) and 0.79 (95%CI: 0.32, 1.93), respectively. After adjustment for gravidity history, abortion history, family history of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and family history of hypertension, positive HBsAg status was still not significantly associated with PIH (RR = 1.18, 95%CI: 0.87, 1.62), GH (RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 0.91, 1.78) or PE (RR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.32, 1.95). Additional adjustment for maternal age, marital status, parity history, family history of DM, Body Mass Index at first antenatal visit, folic acid supplementation, smoking status during pregnancy and economic status of living area, multivariate analysis provided similar results. In conclusion, our study found that maternal chronic HBV infection prevalence rate is 7.4% among Liuyang rural area and there is no significant association between maternal HBV infection and the risk of PIH, GH or PE.

  17. Sustained Endocrine Gland-Derived Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels Beyond the First Trimester of Pregnancy Display Phenotypic and Functional Changes Associated With the Pathogenesis of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sergent, Frédéric; Hoffmann, Pascale; Brouillet, Sophie; Garnier, Vanessa; Salomon, Aude; Murthi, Padma; Benharouga, Mohamed; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension diseases are classified as gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, or eclampsia. The mechanisms of their development and prediction are still to be discovered. Endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) is an angiogenic factor secreted by the placenta during the first trimester of human pregnancy that was shown to control trophoblast invasion, to be upregulated by hypoxia, and to be abnormally elevated in pathological pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. These findings suggested that sustaining EG-VEGF levels beyond the first trimester of pregnancy may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. To test this hypothesis, osmotic minipumps delivering EG-VEGF were implanted subcutaneously into gravid OF1 (Oncins France 1) mice on day 11.5 post coitus, which is equivalent to the end of the first trimester of human pregnancy. Mice were euthanized at 15.5 and 18.5 days post coitus to assess (1) litter size, placental, and fetal weights; (2) placental histology and function; (3) maternal blood pressure; (4) renal histology and function; and (5) circulating soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin. Increased EG-VEGF levels caused significant defects in placental organization and function. Both increased hypoxia and decreased trophoblast invasion were observed. Treated mice had elevated circulating soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin and developed gestational hypertension with dysregulated maternal kidney function. EG-VEGF effect on the kidney function was secondary to its effects on the placenta as similarly treated male mice had normal kidney functions. Altogether, these data provide a strong evidence to confirm that sustained EG-VEGF beyond the first trimester of pregnancy contributes to the development of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  18. Associations of ACE I/D, AGT M235T gene polymorphisms with pregnancy induced hypertension in Chinese population: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Jie; Nie, Shaofa; Yan, Weirong

    2012-09-01

    There have been many studies concerning the associations of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D, angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T polymorphisms with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) among Chinese populations. However, the results were inconsistent, prompting the necessity of meta-analysis. Studies published in English and Chinese were mainly searched in EMbase, PubMed and CBM up to January 2012. Twenty-three studies with 3,551 subjects for ACE I/D and seven studies with 1,296 subjects for AGT M235T were included. Significant associations were found between ACE I/D and PIH under dominant, recessive and allelic models. A separate analysis confined to preeclampsia suggested that ACE I/D was associated with preeclampsia under recessive model and allelic model, but not dominant model. Stratified analyses were conducted as meta-regression analysis indicated that the sample size of case group was a significant source of heterogeneity, which suggested no significant association between ACE I/D and PIH in the subgroup of more than 100 cases. Associations were found between AGT M235T and PIH under dominant genetic model (OR = 1.59; 95 %CI: 1.04-2.42), recessive genetic model (OR = 1.60; 95 %CI: 1.07-2.40), and allelic model (OR = 1.40; 95 %CI: 1.17-1.68). No publication bias was found in either meta-analysis. The present meta-analysis suggested significant associations between ACE I/D, AGT M235T and PIH in Chinese populations. However, no significant association was found between ACE I/D and PIH in the subgroup of more than 100 cases. Studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to investigate the associations between gene polymorphisms and PIH in Chinese populations.

  19. A Retrospective Study of the Health Profile of Neonates of Mothers with Anemia in Pregnancy and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Sanni, Silifat Ajoke; Onabanjo, Oluseye Olusegun; Olayiwola, Ibiyemi O.; Agbonlahor, Mure

    2014-01-01

    Our study assessed the health profile of neonates in relation to anemia in pregnancy and pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). This was a retrospective study where a systematic random sampling technique was used to select a total of 1046 case records of pregnant women registered for ante-natal care at Lagos Island Maternity Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, between 2005 and 2009. Socio-demographic characteristics of the mothers, prevalence of anemia and PIH, and neonatal health profile were obtained from the case records and were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Pearson product moment correlation was used to show the relationship (P≤0.05) between maternal complications and neonatal health profile. Majority (68.8%) of the mothers had anemia and 6.7 % had PIH. Majority (97.12%) of the neonates were live births and 2.88% of the neonates were still births, 65.4% of the women with still birth pregnancy outcome had anemia, and 34.6% had PIH. Majority (74%) of the neonates had birth weight within normal range (2.5-4.0 kg) and majority (68%) had normal Apgar score at 5 min of birth (7-10). A positive correlation existed between the packed cell volume of the mother and the birth weight of the neonates (r=0.740, P≤0.05). A negative correlation existed between the incidence of PIH and the birth weight of the neonates (r= 0.781, P≤0.05), head circumference (r=–0.491, P≤0.05) and the length of the neonates(r=–0.480, P≤0.05). We conclude that nutritional and health care intervention programmes for pregnant women should be intensified especially during ante-natal visits to hospitals. PMID:28299124

  20. 4G/5G variant of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene and severe pregnancy-induced hypertension: subgroup analyses of variants of angiotensinogen and endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Gen; Ohta, Kaori; Yamada, Hideto; Hata, Akira; Minakami, Hisanori; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Tamashiro, Hiko; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is a common cause of perinatal mortality. It is believed to result from the interaction of several factors, including those related to the blood coagulation system. We performed genotyping and subgroup analyses to determine if the 4G/5G genotypes of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene (PAI-1) play a role in the pathogenesis of PIH, and to evaluate possible interactions of the PAI-1 polymorphisms with those of the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3). An association study of PAI-1 polymorphism, and subgroup analyses of common variants of AGT and NOS3, among 128 patients with PIH and 376 healthy pregnant controls. No significant differences were found between the cases and controls in the frequencies of allele 4G or the 4G/4G genotype. In subgroup analyses, after adjustment for multiple comparison, a significant association with the AGT TT genotype was found among women with the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype, and an association with the NOS3 GA+AA genotype was found among women with the 5G/5G or 4G/5G genotypes. Our findings suggest that there are at least 2 pathways in the pathogenesis of severe PIH. However, with respect to early prediction and prevention of severe PIH, although the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype alone was not a risk factor for severe PIH, the fact that PAI-1 genotypes are associated with varying risks for severe PIH suggests that PAI-1 genotyping of pregnant women, in combination with other tests, may be useful in the development of individualized measures that may prevent severe PIH.

  1. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Two Nested Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-05-01

    There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women.We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed.Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05-1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM.ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM.

  2. [Value of quantitative measurement of placenta with three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasonography in pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Jialing; Zhu, Chonglei; Wang, Fei; Fan, Limei

    2015-08-18

    To evaluate the intrauterine state of fetuses with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) through quantitative measurement of placenta by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasonography, and to judge the value of three-dimensional power Doppler in PIH fetuses. A total of 50 pregnant women with PIH in our hospital from November 2012 to August 2014 were enrolled into the observation group, while 50 cases were randomly selected into the control group to match the former group's gestational week (GA). The placental vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI) and vascularization flow index (VFI) were quantitatively measured by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasonography in the two groups. SPSS 19 statistics software was used to do the linear regression for the above parameters.And those parameters of the two groups were compared by t test. P<0.05 was deemed significant. The detection ratio of fetal placental VI, FI and VFI of the whole 100 cases was 100%. The regression equation of VI and GA was: Y=0.394X-5.358, R² = 0.694, P<0.05; the regression equation of FI and GA was: Y=0.801X+5.61, R² = 0.807, P<0.05; the regression equation of VFI and GA was: Y=0.225X-4.148, R² = 0.691, P<0.05. t tests showed the differences of the means of placental VI, FI and VFI between the observation group and the control group were statistically significant (all P<0.05). VI, FI and VFI of placenta measured by three-dimensional power Doppler examination increase with the increase of GA, and the means of placental VI, FI and VFI in PIH patients are less than those in normal cases. Quantitative measurement of placenta with three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound has its own advantages, and can evaluate the status of placenta of PIH fetus accurately.

  3. Increased risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension and operative delivery after conception induced by in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection in women aged 40 years and older.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Masatake; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Nagasaka, Takaaki; Iwasawa-Kawai, Yuki; Komatsu, Atsushi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2014-10-01

    To clarify the association between preconception fertility status and obstetric outcomes in women aged 40 years and older. Retrospective study by reviewing medical records. Tertiary perinatal center in a university hospital. 330 women aged 40 years and older who delivered a singleton from 2006 to 2010, and 450 women aged 30 to 34 years who delivered at the same facility as controls. None. Incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, low birth weight, and mode of delivery assessed based on the mode of conception; spontaneous conception (SC) and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection conception (IVF-ICSI). The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was statistically significantly higher in IVF-ICSI group than the SC group. This gap was commonly observed in both the women aged 40 years and older and those in the 30 to 34 age group. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, or low birth weight. As a characteristic of nulliparous women of advanced age, the rate of operative delivery, which includes emergency cesarean section and instrumental delivery, was statistically significantly higher in IVF-ICSI group than in the SC group. Detailed investigation into the medical indications for operative delivery revealed that the difference was attributable to the elevated incidence of labor protraction and arrest. Preconception fertility status can be a predicting factor of the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension and labor outcome, especially for women aged 40 years and older. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative peptidomic analysis by a newly developed one-step direct transfer technology without depletion of major blood proteins: its potential utility for monitoring of pathophysiological status in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshihiko; Nonaka, Daisuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Maruyama, Mayuko; Nitto, Takeaki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Emiko; Kuronaka, Noriko; Asada, Kyoichi; Yanagida, Mitsuaki; Nojima, Michio; Yoshida, Koyo; Takamori, Kenji; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Lee, Lyang-Ja; Tanaka, Kenji

    2011-07-01

    We have recently developed a new target plate (BLOTCHIP®) for MALDI-MS. An advantage of this procedure is that it does not require the lowering of protein concentrations in test samples prior to analysis. Accordingly, this new technology enables the detection of peptides present in blood samples, including those that would otherwise be adsorbed to abundant blood proteins and would thus escape detection. Using this technology, we analyzed the peripheral blood of patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH; the most common serious complication of pregnancy) to test a potential utility of the technology for monitoring of the pathophysiological status. In the present study, we found 23 characteristic peptides for PIH in the blood serum of pregnant women. Offline LC-MALDI MS/MS identified 7 of the 23 peptides as fragments derived from kininogen-1 (three peptides), fibrinogen-α, complement component C4-A/B, α-2-HS-glycoprotein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4. 2-D scatter plots with combinations of the peptides found in the present study can be grouped for pregnant women with/without PIH, which would be satisfactory reflected for their status. Additionally, the levels of most of these peptides found were significantly decreased by albumin/IgG depletion prior to BLOTCHIP® analysis in accordance with conventional proteomics procedures. These results indicated that BLOTCHIP® analysis can be applied for discovery study of PIH biomarker candidates.

  5. Pregnancy-induced hypertension and diabetes and the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes hospitalization in the year following delivery.

    PubMed

    Savitz, David A; Danilack, Valery A; Elston, Beth; Lipkind, Heather S

    2014-07-01

    Although pregnancy events predict the long-term risk of chronic disease, little is known about their short-term impact because of the rarity of clinical events. We examined hospital discharge diagnoses linked to birth certificate data in the year following delivery for 849,639 births during 1995-2004 in New York City, New York. Adjusted odds ratios characterized the relationship between pregnancy complications and subsequent hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes. Gestational hypertension was related to heart failure (adjusted odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.5, 4.5). Preeclampsia was related to all of the outcomes considered except type 1 diabetes, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 2.0 to 4.1. Gestational diabetes was strongly related to the risk of subsequent diabetes (for type 1 diabetes, adjusted odds ratio = 40.4, 95% confidence interval: 23.8, 68.5; for type 2 diabetes, adjusted odds ratio = 22.6, 95% confidence interval: 16.9, 30.4) but to no other outcomes. The relationship of pregnancy complications to future chronic disease is apparent as early as the year following delivery. Moreover, elucidating short-term clinical outcomes offers the potential for etiological insights into the relationship between pregnancy events and chronic disease over the life course.

  6. [Pregnancy-induced haemolytic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Karagiozova, J; Masseva, A; Ivanov, St; Marinov, B; Kulinska, R; Boiadjiev, D; Jordanova, D

    2014-01-01

    This is the clinical case of a primiparous eight month pregnant female, presenting with symptoms of pregnancy-induced acute haemolytic anaemia (haemolytic aneamia provoked by an immune mechanism, intra- and extra-erythrocyte defects, and HELLP syndrome were excluded). The anaemia progressed to become life-threatening for both the pregnant women and the foetus, which brought the following questions into consideration: diagnosis of anaemia during pregnancy; dosing of corticosteroid therapy; possibility of giving birth to a viable foetus and prognosis for next pregnancies. Owing to the inter-disciplinary efforts, the life and health of this pregnant woman were preserved, but the foetus was lost.

  7. [Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is well known to one of the risk factors to reduce cognitive function, however, it is still unclear whether anti-hypertensive therapy is effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological studies suggested antihypertensive therapy from the middle-age could reduce risk of dementia. The meta-analysis including HYVET also suggested blood pressure lowering from the elderly might be also effective to prevent development of dementia. The network meta-analysis and the cohort study using mega-data bank suggested ARB might be effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to administration with other anti-hypertensive drugs. Although the further major clinical investigation is required, anti-hypertensive treatment might be useful to manage hypertensive patients with dementia.

  8. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Lepine, Todd

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death.(1) Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension.(2,3) In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system.(4) The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of people 60 to 69 years of age and at least three-fourths of those 70 years of age and older are affected.(5) Most individuals with hypertension do not have it adequately controlled.(1,6) Medication noncompliance due to avoidance of side effects is suggested to be a primary factor.(6) The epidemic incidence of hypertension and its significant cost to society indicate that a well-tolerated, cost-effective approach to treatment is urgently needed.

  9. [Hypertension In pregnancy: practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Jaafar; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Ditisheim, Agnès

    2014-09-10

    Hypertension is the most frequent medical disorder of pregnancy. Whether in the form of a chronic hypertension or a pregnancy induced-hypertension, or preeclampsia, it is associated with major maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Improvement of prenatal care allowed a reduction in the number of poor outcomes. However, our partial understanding of the origin of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia limits the establishment of robust prediction models and efficient preventive interventions. This review discusses actual considerations on the clinical approach to hypertension in pregnancy.

  10. Isolated pregnancy-induced anti-thrombin deficiency in a woman with twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Kosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    A woman with twin pregnancy had a gradual decline in anti-thrombin (AT) activity from 72% at gestational week (GW) 29(-3/7) , to 53% at GW31(-2/7) , and to 41% at GW32(-2/7) , at which time hypertension (148/90 mmHg) and proteinuria (protein-to-creatinine ratio [P/Cr], 0.79 mg/mg) developed in the presence of normal platelet count (159 × 10(9) /L) and serum aspartate aminotransferase/lactate dehydrogenase (22/164 IU/L). AT product was given three times to maintain AT activity >50% and blood pressure was maintained below 155/95 mmHg with no treatment, but generalized edema with a weekly weight gain of 4.9 kg and increased proteinuria (to P/Cr, 7.6 mg/mg) required cesarean section at GW33(-3/7) . This case highlights the occurrence of pregnancy-induced AT deficiency alone in the absence of any other abnormality, including hypertension, proteinuria, or thrombocytopenia. Measurement of AT activity was considered helpful for determination of the appropriate time for delivery in this patient.

  11. Pharmacogenetics of pregnancy-induced changes in efavirenz pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Olagunju, A; Bolaji, O; Amara, A; Else, L; Okafor, O; Adejuyigbe, E; Oyigboja, J; Back, D; Khoo, S; Owen, A

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy-induced physiological changes alter many drugs' pharmacokinetics. We investigated pregnancy-induced changes in efavirenz pharmacokinetics in 25 pregnant and 19 different postpartum women stratified from 211 HIV-positive women in whom a preliminary pharmacogenetic study had been undertaken. Despite significant changes in CL/F during pregnancy (42.6% increase; P = 0.023), median (range) Cmin was 1,000 ng/mL (429-5,190) with no significant change in Cmax (P = 0.072). However, when stratified for CYP2B6 516G>T (rs3745274) genotype, efavirenz AUC0-24 , Cmax and Cmin were 50.6% (P = 0.0013), 17.2% (P = 0.14), and 61.6% (P = 0.0027) lower during pregnancy (n = 8) compared with postpartum (n = 6) in 516G homozygotes, with values of 25,900 ng.h/mL (21,700-32,600), 2,640 ng/mL (1,260-3,490), and 592 ng/mL (429-917), respectively, and CL/F was 100% higher (P = 0.0013). No changes were apparent in CYP2B6 516 heterozygotes (14 pregnant vs. 7 postpartum). The clinical implications of these findings warrant further investigation.

  12. [Pregnancy induced erythroblastopenia: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Jihad, Drissi; Jaouad, Kouach; Driss, Moussaoui; Mohamed, Dehayni

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy induced erythroblastopenia is an exceptional pathologic entity. Only isolated cases have been described in English literature. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of this extremely rare disease through the description of a new case of pregnancy induced erythroblastopenia and through the study of the 17 cases reported before.

  13. Oral nifedipine vs. intravenous labetalol for treatment of pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Shi, D-D; Yang, F-Z; Zhou, L; Wang, N

    2016-12-01

    Pre-eclampsia is one of the most challenging diseases of pregnancy. Both nifedipine and labetalol have been used for treatment of pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia. In the present study, the efficacy and safety of oral nifedipine and intravenous labetalol for severe pre-eclampsia therapy were compared. Eligible pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia (n = 147) were allocated to receive either oral nifedipine or intravenous labetalol. The primary endpoint of the study was the time needed to achieve target blood pressure. Secondary outcomes were the time interval before a new hypertensive crisis following effective blood pressure control, number of doses and adverse effects. We found that the time taken to achieve effective blood pressure control was 35 vs. 42 min for oral nifedipine and intravenous labetalol, respectively (P = 0·37). Compared with labetalol group, no significant difference was observed regarding time interval and drug dosages in nifedipine arm. Moreover, no serious side effects on maternal or perinatal were observed in either group. These findings suggest that both oral nifedipine and intravenous labetalol are effective for safely reducing blood pressure to target levels in patients with severe pre-eclampsia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Laužikienė, D; Ramašauskaitė, D; Lūža, T; Lenkutienė, R

    2015-11-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied.

  15. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laužikienė, D.; Ramašauskaitė, D.; Lūža, T.; Lenkutienė, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied. PMID:26719601

  16. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-05-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways.

  17. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. PMID:22345431

  18. Beat-to-beat heart rate and blood pressure variability and hypertensive disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Flood, Pamela; McKinley, Paula; Monk, Catherine; Muntner, Paul; Colantonio, Lisandro D; Goetzl, Laura; Hatch, Maureen; Sloan, Richard P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between heart rate and/or blood pressure variability, measured at 28 weeks' gestation, and the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension or preeclampsia. Secondary analysis of data from a prospectively enrolled cohort of 385 active military women in whom spectral analysis of continuous heart rate and variability was measured at 28 weeks' gestation. The primary outcome was the predictive value of spectral analysis of heart rate and blood pressure for hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. High-frequency heart rate variability was reduced and low-frequency variability of systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased in women who would develop pregnancy-induced hypertension but not preeclampsia. Low-frequency variability of diastolic blood pressure remained a significant predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension but not preeclampsia after adjustment for age, weight, and blood pressure in a multivariate model. Early identification of pregnancy-induced hypertension can facilitate treatment to avoid maternal morbidity. Understanding the physiological underpinnings of the two very different diseases may lead to improved treatment and prevention. If proven effective in a broader population, the ability to differentiate pregnancy-induced hypertension from preeclampsia may reduce unnecessary iatrogenic interventions or inappropriate preterm delivery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  20. Oral magnesium for relief in pregnancy-induced leg cramps: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Supakatisant, Chayanis; Phupong, Vorapong

    2015-04-01

    Leg cramps are common in pregnant women. Currently, there is no standard treatment for pregnancy-induced leg cramps. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of oral magnesium in pregnant women with leg cramps. This double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled trial included 86 healthy pregnant women, 14-34 weeks of gestation who had leg cramps at least twice per week. The study period was 4 weeks. Eighty women completed the study. Forty-one women were assigned to magnesium bisglycinate chelate (300 mg per day) and 39 women to placebo. Details of leg cramps were recorded before beginning the treatment and the fourth week of study. Outcome measure was the reduction of cramp frequency after treatment and cramp intensity measured by 100-mm visual analogue scale. Fifty per cent reduction of cramp frequency was significantly higher in the magnesium group than the placebo group (86.0% vs. 60.5%, P=0.007). The 50% reduction of cramp intensity was also significantly higher in the treatment group than in the placebo group (69.8% vs. 48.8%, P=0.048). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of side effects such as nausea and diarrhoea. These results demonstrated that oral magnesium supplement can improve the frequency and intensity of pregnancy-induced leg cramps. Therefore, oral magnesium may be a treatment option for women suffering from pregnancy-induced leg cramps.

  1. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Body Fat, Physical Fitness and Energy Requirements in Military and Civilian Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    at 6 mo postpartum. The effect of gestational weight gain, fat accretion and deconditioning would affect a woman’s ability to return to weight , body ...military. 8 UNPUBLISHEE Pregnancy-induced changes in body weight In the Institute of Medicine (9) appointed a Subcommittee to review the effect of...examined in this data set of healthy women. The effects of physical activity level on pregnancy-induced changes in weight , body composition, physical

  2. Pregnancy-induced up-regulation of aquaporin-4 protein in brain and its role in eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Quick, Allison M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2005-02-01

    Neurologic complications of eclampsia are thought to be similar to hypertensive encephalopathy in which an acute, excessive elevation in blood pressure causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and edema formation. Because women who develop eclampsia are in general normotensive and asymptomatic prior to pregnancy, we hypothesized that pregnancy alone predisposes the brain to edema formation by up-regulation of aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel in the brain that has been shown to positively correlate with edema formation. To test this hypothesis, we compared localization (immunohistochemistry), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein levels (Western analysis) of AQP4 in brains from Sprague Dawley rats that were nonpregnant (NP, proestrous), mid-pregnant (MP, days 9-10), late-pregnant (LP, days 19-20), and postpartum (PP, days 3-4). AQP4 mRNA was detected in the brains of all the animals and was localized primarily around the brain parenchymal blood vessels, strongly implicating its role in BBB function. Western analysis revealed that the major AQP4 band at approximately 32 kDa was significantly elevated in MP, LP, and PP animals compared with NP by 9-, 22-, and 17-fold, respectively. These results suggest that pregnancy and the postpartum state up-regulate AQP4 protein located around the intraparenchymal blood vessels, a consequence that could promote edema formation when blood pressure is acutely and excessively elevated, as during eclampsia.-Quick, A. M., Cipolla, M. J. Pregnancy-induced up-regulation of aquaporin-4 protein in brain and its role in eclampsia.

  3. C/EBPβ is required in pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Angulo, I; Mas-Stachurska, A; Sitges, M; Giralt, M; Villarroya, F; Planavila, A

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological model of adaptive and reversible heart enlargement, but the molecular mechanisms determining this kind of physiologic cardiac hypertrophy are poorly known. Here, we analyzed the role of the transcription factor C/EBPβ in the development of pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy. C/EBPβ+/- mice at day 18 of gestation were used as happloinsufficiency model of late pregnancy. We found that C/EBPβ expression was specifically increased in hearts from Wt pregnant mice whereas expression of other C/EBP subtypes (α and δ) was not affected by gestation. Pregnancy-induced changes in systemic metabolic and hormonal profiles were not essentially different in Wt versus C/EBPβ+/- mice. However, C/EBPβ+/- mice developed pregnancy-induced heart hypertrophy to a lower extent relative to Wt mice. Furthermore, hearts from C/EBPβ+/- mice have alterations in fatty acid oxidation genes and reductions in the expression levels of glucose transporters that may compromise metabolic cardiac function during pregnancy. Among marker genes of inflammation, interleukin-6 (Il-6) showed a marked differential behavior in C/EBPβ+/- pregnant mice: pregnancy strongly induced cardiac Il-6 expression in wt, a phenomenon that did not occur in C/EBPβ+/- mice. Moreover, marker genes for M2 macrophages were decreased in C/EBPβ+/- pregnant mice and in C/EBPβ-/- mice subjected to LPS stimulus. Here we found that normal levels of C/EBPβ are required for hypertrophy development during pregnancy. Events such as the increase in IL-6 in the heart of pregnant mice are prevented in C/EBPβ+/- animals. Moreover, C/EBPβ controls M2-macrophage gene expression in the heart. Thus, C/EBPβ appears as a transcription factor required for cardiac hypertrophy response to gestation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigallocatechin gallate enhances treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia: A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Shi, D-D; Guo, J-J; Zhou, L; Wang, N

    2017-07-20

    Oral nifedipine is commonly used to treat pre-eclampsia, one of the most severe complications during pregnancy, but its clinical efficacy is less than ideal. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a natural compound from green tea, could benefit cardiovascular health especially hypertension. We investigated the clinical efficacy of EGCG, when complemented with oral nifedipine, in treating pre-eclampsia. A total of 350 pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia were recruited and randomized to receive oral nifedipine, together with placebo (NIF+placebo) or EGCG (NIF+EGCG). The primary treatment outcome was the time needed to control blood pressure and interval time before a new hypertensive crisis, whereas the secondary treatment outcome was the number of treatment doses to effectively control blood pressure, maternal adverse effects and neonatal complications. Comparing NIF+EGCG group to NIF+placebo group, the time needed to control blood pressure was significantly shorter (NIF+EGCG 31.2±16.7 minutes, NIF+placebo 45.3±21.9 minutes; 95% CI 9.7-18.5 minutes), whereas interval time before a new hypertensive crisis was significantly prolonged (NIF+EGCG 7.2±2.9 hours, NIF+placebo 4.1±3.7 hours; 95% CI 2.3-3.9 hours), and the number of treatment dosages needed to effectively control blood pressure was also lower. Between the two treatment groups, no differences in incidence rates of maternal adverse effects or neonatal complications were observed. EGCG is both safe and effective in enhancing treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia, but formal validation is required prior to its recommendation for use outside of clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy: Cardiovascular long-term outcomes].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alvarez, B; Martell-Claros, N; Abad-Cardiel, M; García-Donaire, J A

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) induces maternal and fetal damage, but it can also be the beginning of future metabolic and vascular disorders. The relative risk of chronic hypertension after PIH is between 2.3 and 11, and the likelihood of subsequent development of type 2 diabetes is multiplied by 1.8. Women with prior preeclampsia/eclampsia have a twofold risk of stroke and a higher frequency of arrhythmias and hospitalization due to heart failure. Furthermore, a tenfold greater risk for long-term chronic kidney disease is observed as well. The relative risk of cardiovascular death is 2.1 times higher compared to the group without pregnancy-induced hypertension problems, although the risk is between 4 and 7 times higher in preterm birth associated with gestational hypertension or pre-existing hypertension The postpartum period is a great opportunity to intervene on lifestyle, obesity, make an early diagnosis of chronic hypertension and DM and provide the necessary treatments to prevent cardiovascular complications in women. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in the intrinsic structure of rat pelvic floor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marianna; Lawley, Danielle M.; Esparza, Mary C.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Maternal birth trauma to the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Modeling and imaging studies suggest that demands placed on PFMs during childbirth exceed their physiologic limits; however many parous women do not sustain PFM injury. Here we determine whether pregnancy induces adaptations in PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function, and/or intramuscular extracellular matrix (ECM), responsible for load bearing. To establish if parallel changes occur in muscles outside of the PFM, we also examined a hind limb muscle. STUDY DESIGN Coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior of 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley virgin, mid-pregnant, and late-pregnant; 6-month-old virgin; and 4- and 12-week postpartum rats (N = 10/group) were fixed in situ and harvested. Major architectural parameters determining muscle’s excursion and force-generating capacity were quantified, namely, normalized fiber length (Lfn), physiologic cross-sectional area, and sarcomere length. Hydroxyproline content was used as a surrogate for intramuscular ECM quantity. Analyses were performed by 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc testing at a significance level of .05. RESULTS Pregnancy induced a significant increase in Lfn in all PFMs by the end of gestation relative to virgin controls. Fibers were elongated by 37% in coccygeus (P < .0001), and by 21% in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis (P < .0001). Importantly, no Lfn change was observed in the tibialis anterior. Physiologic cross-sectional area and sarcomere length were not affected by pregnancy. By 12 weeks’ postpartum, Lfn of all PFMs returned to the prepregnancy values. Relative to virgin controls, ECM increased by 140% in coccygeus, 52% in iliocaudalis, and 75% in pubocaudalis in late-pregnant group, but remained unchanged across time in the tibialis anterior. Postpartum, ECM collagen content returned to prepregnancy levels in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis

  8. Molecular Pathways Involved in Pregnancy-Induced Prevention Against Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Maria; Santucci-Pereira, Julia; Russo, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy produces a protective effect against breast cancer in women who had their first full term pregnancy (FTP) in their middle twenties. The later in life the first delivery occurs, the higher the risk of breast cancer development. Also, transiently during the postpartum period, the risk of developing breast cancer increases. This transient increased risk is taken over by a long-lasting protective period. The genomic profile of parous women has shown pregnancy induces a long-lasting “genomic signature” that explains the preventive effect on breast cancer. This signature reveals that chromatin remodeling is the driver of the differentiation process conferred by FTP. The chromatin remodeling process may be the ultimate step mediating the protection of the breast against developing breast cancer in post-menopausal years. PMID:25540638

  9. Mas receptor contributes to pregnancy-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Carmos-Silva, Cintia; Almeida, Jônathas Fernandes Queiroz de; Macedo, Larissa Matuda; Melo, Marcos Barrouin B; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Santos, Fernanda Fernanda Cristina Alcantara; Biancardi, Manoel Francisco; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza Dos Augusto Souza; Carvalho, Adryano Augustto; Mendes, Elizabeth Pereira; Colugnati, Diego Basile; Mazaro-Costa, Renata; Castro, Carlos Henrique de

    2016-09-13

    Previous studies have demonstrated a protective effect of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis on pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Also, the involvement of Mas receptor in the exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy has been suggested. However, the role of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor on pregnancy-induced cardiac remodeling remains unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the participation of the Mas receptor in the development of the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by gestation. Female Wistar rats were shared in 3 groups: control , pregnant , and pregnant treated with Mas receptor antagonist A-779 . Wild type (WT) and Mas-knockout mice (KO) were distributed in non-pregnant  and pregnant  groups. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured by tail-cuff plethysmography. The medial part of the left ventricle (LV) was collected for histological analysis. Echocardiographic analysis was used to evaluate the cardiac function. SBP was not changed by pregnancy or A-779 treatment in the Wistar rats. Pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of Mas receptor attenuates the pregnancy-induced myocyte hypertrophy. The treatment with A-779 or genetic deletion of the Mas receptor increased the collagen III deposition in LV from pregnant animals without changing the fibroblast proliferation. KO mice presented a lower ejection fraction, fraction shortening, stroke volume and higher end systolic volume compared to WT. Interestingly, the pregnancy restored these parameters. In conclusion, these data show that while Mas receptor blockade or deletion decreases physiological hypertrophy of pregnancy, it is associated with more extracellular matrix deposition. These alterations are associated with improvement of the cardiac function through Mas-independent mechanism. ©2016 The Author(s).

  10. Impact of caesarean section on mode of delivery, pregnancy-induced and pregnancy-associated disorders, and complications in the subsequent pregnancy in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Louis; Taskan, Sevil; Macharey, George; Sechet, Ingeborg; Ziller, Volker; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the impact of caesarean section (CS) on mode of delivery, pregnancy-induced and pregnancy-associated disorders, as well as complications in the subsequent pregnancy within German gynecological practices. Methods: 1,801 women with CS and 1,801 matched women with vaginal delivery (VD) from the IMS Disease Analyzer database were included. The impact of previous CS on the mode of delivery and pregnancy-associated disorders as well as complications prior to or during birth in the subsequent pregnancy were analyzed. Cox regressions were used to determine the influence of CS with regard to these outcomes. Results: Medical abortion and single spontaneous delivery were significantly less frequent in women with a history of CS compared to VD (OR equal to 0.52 and 0.04 respectively), whereas CS after CS was the significantly more common mode of delivery (79.0% versus 9.3%, OR=36.47). Gestational hypertension without significant proteinuria, gestational hypertension with significant proteinuria, and polyhydramnios were more frequent in women with CS than in women with VD (OR equal to 6.80, 1.71, and 2.29). Hemorrhage and maternal care for known or suspected disproportion were more common in the CS group than in the VD group (OR equal to 1.34 and 3.75). Prolonged pregnancy, preterm labor, abnormalities arising from forces of labor, and perineal laceration during delivery were significantly less frequent in women with CS than in women with VD (OR between 0.32 and 0.75), whereas long labor was more common (OR=2.09). Conclusion: Women with CS were more likely to undergo further CS and to develop major pregnancy-associated diseases in the following pregnancy compared to women with VD. PMID:27346991

  11. [Hypertension during pregnancy--how to manage effectively?].

    PubMed

    Klocek, Marek; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension affects 5-10% of all pregnant women and may be present in women with pre-existing primary or secondary chronic hypertension, and in women who develop newonset hypertension in the second half of pregnancy. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy carry risks for the woman and the baby. Hypertension in pregnancy is diagnosed when SBP is > or = 140 or/and DBP > or = 90 mmHg. According to the guidelines, the decision to start pharmacological treatment of hypertension in pregnancy depends on the type of hypertension: in pregnancy-induced hypertension, developing after 20 weeks of pregnancy (with or without proteinuria) drug treatment is indicated when BP is > or = 140/90 mmHg, in chronic hypertension observed before pregnancy pharmacotherapy is indicated when BP is > or = 150/95 mmHg. For pregnant women with severe hypertension (> or =160 / 110 mmHg) antihypertensive therapy should be initiated immediately. Oral methyldopa, labetalol, other beta-adrenoreceptor blockers and calcium channel blockers are used most commonly. In pre-eclampsia parental labetalol, nitroglycerine, urapidyl and other drugs may also be needed.

  12. Pregnancy-induced gene expression changes in vivo among women with rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goin, Dana E; Smed, Mette Kiel; Pachter, Lior; Purdom, Elizabeth; Nelson, J Lee; Kjærgaard, Hanne; Olsen, Jørn; Hetland, Merete Lund; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Ottesen, Bent; Jawaheer, Damini

    2017-05-25

    Little is known about gene expression changes induced by pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy women because the few studies previously conducted did not have pre-pregnancy samples available as baseline. We have established a cohort of women with RA and healthy women followed prospectively from a pre-pregnancy baseline. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pregnancy-induced changes in gene expression among women with RA who improve during pregnancy (pregDASimproved) overlap substantially with changes observed among healthy women and differ from changes observed among women with RA who worsen during pregnancy (pregDASworse). Global gene expression profiles were generated by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) from 11 women with RA and 5 healthy women before pregnancy (T0) and at the third trimester (T3). Among the women with RA, eight showed an improvement in disease activity by T3, whereas three worsened. Differential expression analysis was used to identify genes demonstrating significant changes in expression within each of the RA and healthy groups (T3 vs T0), as well as between the groups at each time point. Gene set enrichment was assessed in terms of Gene Ontology processes and protein networks. A total of 1296 genes were differentially expressed between T3 and T0 among the 8 pregDASimproved women, with 161 genes showing at least two-fold change (FC) in expression by T3. The majority (108 of 161 genes) were also differentially expressed among healthy women (q<0.05, FC≥2). Additionally, a small cluster of genes demonstrated contrasting changes in expression between the pregDASimproved and pregDASworse groups, all of which were inducible by type I interferon (IFN). These IFN-inducible genes were over-expressed at T3 compared to the T0 baseline among the pregDASimproved women. In our pilot RNA-seq dataset, increased pregnancy-induced expression of type I IFN-inducible genes was observed among women with RA who improved during pregnancy

  13. Pregnancy-Induced Sensitization Promotes Sex Disparity in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bromberger, Bianca; Spragan, Danielle; Hashmi, Sohaib; Morrison, Alexander; Thomasson, Arwin; Nazarian, Susanna; Sawinski, Deirdre; Porrett, Paige

    2017-10-01

    The presence of sex disparity in living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) remains controversial. To determine if women fall behind men in LDKT evaluation, we performed an intention to treat study of 2587 candidates listed for kidney transplant at a single transplant center over 7 years. We found that women and men kidney transplant candidates engaged an equivalent type and number of prospective living donors. However, sex-specific differences in sensitization history and histocompatibility reduced the rate of LDKT for women by 30%. Pregnancy-induced incompatibility with spouse donors was limiting given that spouses were among the individuals most likely to complete donation. Notably, participation in a kidney paired exchange program eliminated sex-based differences in LDKT. Collectively, these data suggest that pregnancy is a formidable biologic barrier for women and contributes uniquely to sex disparity in LDKT. Targeted efforts to improve transplant center participation in paired kidney exchanges may increase sex equity in LDKT. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. A case report: pregnancy-induced severe osteoporosis with eight vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ofluoglu, Onder; Ofluoglu, Demet

    2008-12-01

    Osteoporosis associated with pregnancy and lactation is a rare condition. The prevalence, etiology and its pathogenesis is unknown. It causes one or more vertebral fractures with severe, prolonged back pain and height loss in affected women. Majority of the cases are seen in the third trimester or just after delivery in primagravid women. In this case report, a 30-year-old woman who had severe pregnancy-induced osteoporosis with 8 vertebral fractures was presented. During last month of her first pregnancy she had moderate back pain. After delivery, the back pain has gotten worse. The radiological examinations have shown that there was 50% in T6, T8 and T10; 30% in L2; 20% in L1 height loss and biconcave vertebral images in L3-5. In the bone mineral density, L2-4 T score was -4.7 and total femoral T score was -3.1. There was no abnormality in the laboratory findings except mild elevation in alkaline phosphates. Although pregnancy-associated osteoporosis is a rare condition, when pain occurs in the last trimester or early postpartum period, it should be considered in differential diagnosis.

  15. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Body Fat, Physical Fitness and Energy Requirements in Military and Civilian Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    military. Pregnancy-induced changes in body weight In the Institute of Medicine (9) appointed a Subcommittee to review the effect of gestational...women. Further, the effect of gestational weight gain and fat accretion on the ability to return to body fat standards in the 6 months following...Allen LH. The effects of lactation on energy and protein consumption, postpartum weight change and body composition of well nourished North American

  16. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Body Fat, Physical Fitness and Energy Requirements in Military and Civilian Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    discharged from the military. Pregnancy-induced changes in body weight In the Institute of Medicine (9) appointed a Subcommittee to review the effect of... effect of a given weight gain is greatest in thin women and least in overweight women. Pre-pregnancy BMI is also a determinant of fetal growth above and...use in postpartum women. Further, the effect of gestational weight gain and fat accretion on the ability to return to body fat standards in the 6

  17. Pesticide exposure and hypertensive disorders during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saldana, Tina M; Basso, Olga; Baird, Donna D; Hoppin, Jane A; Weinberg, Clarice R; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2009-09-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, including pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and preeclampsia (PE), complicate 2-8% of pregnancies. Few studies have examined environmental risk factors in relation to these conditions. Our goal was to examine whether pesticide exposure during pregnancy was associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. We analyzed self-reported data from 11,274 wives of farmers enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) between 1993 and 1997. Using logistic regression models, we estimated the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for PIH and PE associated with pesticide-related activities during the first trimester of pregnancy. First-trimester residential and agricultural activities with potential exposure to pesticides were associated with both PIH [residential AOR = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.60; agricultural AOR = 1.60; 95% CI, 1.05-2.45] and PE (residential AOR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.02-1.70; agricultural AOR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.34-3.21). Exposure to pesticides during pregnancy may increase the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Laboratory research may provide insights into relationships between pesticide exposure and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy.

  18. Evaluation of the use of continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia for hypertensive pregnant women in labor.

    PubMed

    Moore, T R; Key, T C; Reisner, L S; Resnik, R

    1985-06-15

    The use of continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 285 women with pregnancy-induced hypertension who were delivered in a 2-year period. Among 185 vaginally delivered patients who received continuous lumbar epidural or local anesthesia, there were no significant differences in the incidence of maternal hypotension, abnormal fetal heart rate tracings, low Apgar scores, or neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Of 100 patients delivered by cesarean section, the incidence of low Apgar scores, depressed umbilical cord pH values, and neonatal intensive care unit admission was increased among those who received general anesthesia (p less than 0.05). However, general anesthesia patients were more likely to have abnormal fetal heart rate tracings (27% versus 4%) requiring urgent delivery. Thus differences in outcome probably reflect poorer fetal condition prior to anesthesia induction rather than a specific anesthetic effect. These results demonstrate that continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia is safe and effective for both the fetus and the mother with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  19. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J. Lee; Smed, Mette Kiel; Gildengorin, Virginia L.; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hetland, Merete Lund; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Olsen, Jørn; Jawaheer, Damini

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA. Results In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters) over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR)-adjusted p value<0.05). These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256) showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data. PMID:26683605

  20. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of collagen architecture and content in the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Lee, J Michael; Amini, Rouzbeh; Sacks, Michael S; Wells, Sarah M

    2014-10-01

    Pregnancy produces rapid, non-pathological volume-overload in the maternal circulation due to the demands of the growing fetus. Using a bovine model for human pregnancy, previous work in our laboratory has shown remarkable pregnancy-induced changes in leaflet size and mechanics of the mitral valve. The present study sought to relate these changes to structural alterations in the collagenous leaflet matrix. Anterior mitral valve leaflets were harvested from non-pregnant heifers and pregnant cows (pregnancy stage estimated by fetal length). We measured changes in the thickness of the leaflet and its anatomic layers via Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining, and in collagen crimp (wavelength and percent collagen crimped) via picrosirius red staining and polarized microscopy. Collagen concentration was determined biochemically: hydroxyproline assay for total collagen and pepsin-acid extraction for uncrosslinked collagen. Small-angle light scattering (SALS) assessed changes in internal fiber architecture (characterized by degree of fiber alignment and preferred fiber direction). Pregnancy produced significant changes to collagen structure in the mitral valve. Fiber alignment decreased 17% with an 11.5° rotation of fiber orientation toward the radial axis. Collagen fiber crimp was dramatically lost, accompanied by a 53% thickening of the fibrosa, and a 16% increase in total collagen concentration, both suggesting that new collagen is being synthesized. Extractable collagen concentration was low, both in the non-pregnant and pregnant state, suggesting early crosslinking of newly-synthesized collagen. This study has shown that the mitral valve is strongly adaptive during pregnancy, with significant changes in size, collagen content and architecture in response to rapidly changing demands.

  1. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J Lee; Kjærgaard, Hanne; Smed, Mette Kiel; Gildengorin, Virginia L; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hetland, Merete Lund; Jewell, Nicholas P; Olsen, Jørn; Jawaheer, Damini

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA. In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters) over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR)-adjusted p value<0.05). These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256) showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA. Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data.

  2. High-sodium intake prevents pregnancy-induced decrease of blood pressure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beauséjour, Annie; Auger, Karine; St-Louis, Jean; Brochu, Michéle

    2003-07-01

    Despite an increase of circulatory volume and of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity, pregnancy is paradoxically accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure. We have reported that the decrease in blood pressure was maintained in pregnant rats despite overactivation of RAAS following reduction in sodium intake. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the opposite condition, e.g., decreased activation of RAAS during pregnancy in the rat. To do so, 0.9% or 1.8% NaCl in drinking water was given to nonpregnant and pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days (last week of gestation). Increased sodium intakes (between 10- and 20-fold) produced reduction of plasma renin activity and aldosterone in both nonpregnant and pregnant rats. Systolic blood pressure was not affected in nonpregnant rats. However, in pregnant rats, 0.9% sodium supplement prevented the decreased blood pressure. Moreover, an increase of systolic blood pressure was obtained in pregnant rats receiving 1.8% NaCl. The 0.9% sodium supplement did not affect plasma and fetal parameters. However, 1.8% NaCl supplement has larger effects during gestation as shown by increased plasma sodium concentration, hematocrit level, negative water balance, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. With both sodium supplements, decreased AT1 mRNA levels in the kidney and in the placenta were observed. Our results showed that a high-sodium intake prevents the pregnancy-induced decrease of blood pressure in rats. Nonpregnant rats were able to maintain homeostasis but not the pregnant ones in response to sodium load. Furthermore, pregnant rats on a high-sodium intake (1.8% NaCl) showed some physiological responses that resemble manifestations observed in preeclampsia.

  3. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that affect your kidneys, arteries, heart or endocrine system. Secondary hypertension can also occur during pregnancy. Secondary ... blood pressure, such as kidney, artery, heart or endocrine system problems. Complications Secondary hypertension can worsen the underlying ...

  4. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  5. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Rector's The Kidney . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 48. Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 67. Victor RG. Systemic hypertension: ...

  6. Hypertensive Crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... 18,2017 Know the two types of HBP crisis to watch for A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) ...

  7. Lower body nerve stretch: a role in essential hypertension or pre-eclampsia?

    PubMed

    Milne, B

    1996-10-01

    Despite the relatively high incidence of essential hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension, the etiologies of these disorders remain enigmatic. A link between stretching of neural structures in the lower body and the induction of hypertension in these disorders is hypothesized. Hypertension has been documented in patients undergoing femoral and tibial lengthening procedures; in experimental models the stretching of lower extremity nerves appeared to be responsible for the increase in blood pressure with bone lengthening. The upright posture of humans puts an added strain on nerves and an increased pressure on lumbar disks may put increasing tension on the nerve roots. The resultant nerve stretch in pregnant women may be exacerbated by the hormone relaxin. A possible link between the stretching of neural structures and the genesis of essential hypertension or pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is hypothesized.

  8. SOCS3 deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing cells mitigates the development of pregnancy-induced metabolic changesa

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Thais T.; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Pedroso, João A.B.; Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Donato, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Objective During pregnancy, women normally increase their food intake and body fat mass, and exhibit insulin resistance. However, an increasing number of women are developing metabolic imbalances during pregnancy, including excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes mellitus. Despite the negative health impacts of pregnancy-induced metabolic imbalances, their molecular causes remain unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for orchestrating the metabolic changes observed during pregnancy. Methods Initially, we investigated the hypothalamic expression of key genes that could influence the energy balance and glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. Based on these results, we generated a conditional knockout mouse that lacks the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) only in leptin receptor-expressing cells and studied these animals during pregnancy. Results Among several genes involved in leptin resistance, only SOCS3 was increased in the hypothalamus of pregnant mice. Remarkably, SOCS3 deletion from leptin receptor-expressing cells prevented pregnancy-induced hyperphagia, body fat accumulation as well as leptin and insulin resistance without affecting the ability of the females to carry their gestation to term. Additionally, we found that SOCS3 conditional deletion protected females against long-term postpartum fat retention and streptozotocin-induced gestational diabetes. Conclusions Our study identified the increased hypothalamic expression of SOCS3 as a key mechanism responsible for triggering pregnancy-induced leptin resistance and metabolic adaptations. These findings not only help to explain a common phenomenon of the mammalian physiology, but it may also aid in the development of approaches to prevent and treat gestational metabolic imbalances. PMID:25737950

  9. Risk factors of hypertensive disorders among Chinese pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Li, Ying-xue; Di, Hai-hong; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhang, Chun-hua; Shen, Xian-ping; Zhu, Jun-feng; Yan, Wei-rong

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in China was much higher than that in the United States. Considering the large population with wide geographic area of China, we aimed to add more information regarding the risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. A case-control study was performed on 373 hypertensive cases and 507 normotensive controls. Participants were recruited from 2008 to 2014 in Yichang Maternal and Child Health Care Center in Hubei province and Anyang Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital in Henan province, China. Socio-demographic factors, family- related factors, pregnancy-associated factors, factors related to daily life behaviors and psychosocial factors were investigated with respect to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy through well-designed questionnaire. Chi-square test, t-test, univariate logistic regression analysis, and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to find the possible risk factors behind hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The results showed that family history of cardiovascular diseases (OR=6.18, 95% CI, 2.37 to 16.14), history of pregnancy-induced hypertension (OR=16.64, 95% CI, 5.74 to 48.22), low maternal educational level (OR=2.81, 95% CI, 1.30 to 6.04), and poor relationship with their parents-in-law (OR=3.44, 95% CI, 1.55 to 7.59) had statistically significant associations with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy through multivariate logistic regression analysis. Increased maternal age, increased pre-pregnancy body mass index, living in rural area, low paternal education level, family history of hypertension, passive smoking one year before and/or in pregnancy, and poor sleeping quality were significantly associated with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy from univariate logistic regression analysis while the associations became uncertain when they were entered for multivariate logistic regression analysis. It was concluded that family history of cardiovascular diseases, history of pregnancy-induced

  10. Maternal early-pregnancy thyroid function is associated with subsequent hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: the generation R study.

    PubMed

    Medici, Marco; Korevaar, Tim I M; Schalekamp-Timmermans, Sarah; Gaillard, Romy; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Visser, W Edward; Visser, Willy; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M P F; Hofman, Albert; Hooijkaas, Herbert; Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J; Tiemeier, Henning; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Visser, Theo J; Peeters, Robin P; Steegers, Eric A P

    2014-12-01

    Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are associated with a wide range of maternal and fetal complications, and only a few risk factors are known for the development of these disorders during pregnancy. Conflicting and limited data are available on the relationship between thyroid (dys)function and the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The objective of the investigation was to study the associations between early-pregnancy thyroid dysfunction, thyroid function within the normal range, and the risk of hypertensive disorders. In early pregnancy, serum TSH, free T4 (FT4), and thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels were determined in 5153 pregnant women. No interventions were done. The associations of thyroid function with the risk of hypertensive disorders were studied. Mean blood pressures and hypertensive disorders, including pregnancy-induced hypertension (n = 209) and preeclampsia (n = 136), were measured. Hyperthyroid mothers had a higher risk of hypertensive disorders [odds ratio (OR) 3.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-7.91], P = .005], which was mainly due to an increased risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension [OR 4.18 (95% CI 1.57-11.1), P = .004]. Hypothyroidism and hypothyroxinemia were not associated with hypertensive disorders. Within the normal range, the high-normal FT4 levels were associated with an increased risk of hypertensive disorders [OR 1.62 (95% CI 1.06-2.47), P = .03], which was mainly due to an increased risk of preeclampsia [OR 2.06 (95% CI 1.04-4.08), P = .04]. The TPOAb status was not associated with hypertensive disorders. We show that biochemical hyperthyroidism and also high-normal FT4 levels during early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of hypertensive disorders. These data demonstrate that these associations are even seen for a mild variation in thyroid function within the normal range.

  11. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  12. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  13. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  14. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  16. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Get the Quick Facts For this topic NOTE: ... at least 6 months) Drinking large amounts of alcohol over a long period of time Portal hypertension ...

  17. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  18. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  19. Maternal serum ischemia modified albumin as a marker for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Vyakaranam, Sapna; Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Patlolla, Dakshayani; Chintapally, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypoxia driven oxidative stress of the placenta contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Serum Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) has recently emerged as an oxidative stress marker, used in diagnosis of cardiac ischemia. Aim: To determine the efficiency of serum IMA in differentiating hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pregnancy induced hypertension, preeclampsia) from normal pregnancy. Methods It was a case control study. Pregnant women ≥32 weeks of gestation. Study population were included 3 groups, 19 Normotensive Pregnant (NP) women as controls, 18 pregnant women with Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) and 19 with preeclampsia (PE). Serum IMA was estimated by Enzyme Linked Immune Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Results were analyzed by student ‘t’test. Critical values for serum IMA were obtained by Receiver Operation Characteristics (ROC) curves. Results Serum IMA levels were significantly elevated in PE (56.84 ± 21.57 ng/ml) when compared with PIH (36.24 ± 14.51 ng/ml) and NP (35.47 ± 11.58 ng/ml) (P value <0.001). With a cutoff of 38.33 ng/ml, sensitivity and specificity for preeclampsia was 88.9% and 73.7% respectively. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that serum IMA, an oxidative stress marker is elevated in PE & PIH. Hence serum IMA can undergo further evaluation as a marker of PE. PMID:26636109

  20. Exercise during pregnancy protects against hypertension and macrosomia: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ruben; Pelaez, Mireia; Cordero, Yaiza; Perales, Maria; Lopez, Carmina; Coteron, Javier; Mottola, Michelle F

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of all pregnancies with some form of hypertension can be up to 10%, with the rates of diagnosis varying according to the country and population studied and the criteria used to establish the diagnosis. Prepregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) of all body mass index (BMI) categories have been associated with maternal hypertensive disorders and linked to macrosomia (>4000 g) and low birthweight (<2500 g). No large randomized controlled trial with high adherence to an exercise program has examined pregnancy-induced hypertension and these associated issues. We investigated whether women adherent (≥80% attendance) to an exercise program initiated early showed a reduction in pregnancy-induced hypertension and excessive GWG in all prepregnancy BMI categories, and determined if maternal exercise protected against macrosomia and low birthweight. We sought to examine the impact of a program of supervised exercise throughout pregnancy on the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension. A randomized controlled trial was used. Women were randomized into an exercise group (N = 382) or a control group (N = 383) receiving standard care. The exercise group trained 3 d/wk (50-55 min/session) from gestational weeks 9-11 until weeks 38-39. The 85 training sessions involved aerobic exercise, muscular strength, and flexibility. High attendance to the exercise program regardless of BMI showed that pregnant women who did not exercise are 3 times more likely to develop hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-6.81, P = .01) and are 1.5 times more likely to gain excessive weight if they do not exercise (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.06-2.03, P = .02). Pregnant women who do not exercise are also 2.5 times more likely to give birth to a macrosomic infant (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.03-6.20, P = .04). Maternal exercise may be a preventative tool for hypertension and excessive GWG, and may control offspring size at birth while reducing

  1. The role of NGF in pregnancy-induced degeneration and regeneration of sympathetic nerves in the guinea pig uterus.

    PubMed

    Brauer, M M; Shockley, K P; Chávez, R; Richeri, A; Cowen, T; Crutcher, K A

    2000-02-14

    In the guinea pig, pregnancy is associated with a generalised depletion of noradrenaline in uterine sympathetic nerves and, in the areas of the uterus surrounding the foetus, by a complete degeneration of sympathetic nerve fibres. These pregnancy-induced changes have been interpreted as a selective effect of placental hormones on the system of short sympathetic fibres arising from the paracervical ganglia. An alternative explanation is that pregnancy affects the neurotrophic capacity of the uterus. We measured NGF-protein levels in the guinea pig uterine horn, tubal end and cervix at early pregnancy, late pregnancy and early postpartum, using a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For comparative purposes the distribution and relative density of noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerve fibres were assessed histochemically, and tissue levels of noradrenaline were measured biochemically, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. In all the uterine regions analysed, NGF-protein levels showed a decline at term pregnancy, but in no case was this change statistically significant. After delivery, NGF-protein levels showed a marked increase in the cervix as well as in both the fertile and empty horns. These results suggest that alterations in NGF-protein do not account for the impairment of uterine sympathetic innervation during pregnancy, but may contribute to their recovery after delivery.

  2. A Comparison of Physical Activity and Nutritional Practices in Hypertensive and Non- hypertensive Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Sehati Shafayi, Fahimeh; Akef, Maryam; Sadegi, Homayoon; sallakh Niknazhad, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is the most common medical problem affecting pregnant women during pregnancy contributing to one third of substantial maternal mortality and varieties of fetal and neonatal health problems, while representing health status of a society. This study aimed to investigate the links between a healthy life style and developing hypertension during pregnancy in order to improve healthier behaviors. Methods In a case-control study from October 2009 to April 2010, physical activity and nutritional practices of two groups of pregnant women (220 in each group) with gestational age of 20 weeks or more, single pregnancy, without any previous medical disorders were compared. Samples in case group had pregnancy induced hypertension. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire after obtaining informed written consents from mothers before enrollment; later the data were analyzed using the SPSS 13 and Stata software. Results Women in two groups did not differ regarding their socioeconomic characteristics. There were no significant differences in nutritional practices and level of physical activity in pregnant women of study groups; mean score of physical activity was 54.6±14.8 in test and 57.3±15.0 in control group (P=0.06) and it was 72.9±10.3 and 73.719.5 about nutritional habits in test and control group respectively. Mean pre-pregnancy BMI was higher in case group (P=0.02); these women also had a higher percentage of previous prenatal mortality and history of hypertension. Conclusion Results state that health during pregnancy is relevant to healthy life style especially preconceptional period; therefore employing proper strategies to improve women knowledge and attitude of the important dimensions of healthy life considering good and healthy diet and active life seem to solve the problem; this needs to unite all health workers to set proper educational programs and courses and support of health policy makers. PMID:24250984

  3. Resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  5. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary hypertension usually limit a person’s ability to exercise and do other activities. CausesWhat causes pulmonary hypertension?Many things can cause pulmonary hypertension. However, sometimes ...

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  8. [Hypertension and pregnancy. Diagnosis, physiopathology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Fievet, P; el Esper, I; el Esper, N; Vaillant, P; Gondry, J

    1995-11-25

    This review on hypertension in pregnancy focuses mainly on the pathophysiology and prevention of pregnancy induced hypertension which, when associated with proteinuria, is usually called preeclampsia. Rather than a genuine hypertensive disease, preeclampsia is mainly a systemic endothelial disease causing activation of platelets and diffuse ischemic disorders whose most obvious clinical manifestations involve the kidney (hence the proteinuria, edema and hyperuricemia), the liver (hence the hemolytic elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, or HELLP syndrome), and the brain (hence eclamptic convulsions). Hypertension is explained by increased vascular reactivity rather than by an imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating circulating hormones. This increased reactivity is due to endothelial dysfunction with imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 and possibly dysfunction of NO and endothelin synthesis. The aggressive substances for endothelium are thought to be of placentar origin and the cause of their release is explained by placentar ischemia related to a defect of trophoblastic invasion of the spiral arteries. The etiology of this latter defect is unknown but involves immunologic mechanisms with genetic predisposition. The only effective treatment for PIH is extraction of the baby with the whole placenta. The decision for extraction is often a very delicate obstetric problem. Antihypertensive drugs are mainly indicated in severe hypertension (> 160-100 mm Hg), with the aim of preventing cerebral hemorrhage in the mother, but have not been shown to improve fetal morbidity or mortality. Eclamptic seizures can be prevented and treated more effectively with magnesium sulfate than with diazepam or phenytoin. Prevention of preeclampsia remains the main challenge. Whereas antihypertensive drugs are ineffective, calcium supplementation and low dose aspirin have proven effective but mainly in selected populations with a relatively high incidence of

  9. Treating Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schlembach, Dietmar; Homuth, Volker; Dechend, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is present in about 10 % of all pregnancies. The frequency of chronic hypertension and that of gestational hypertension is increasing. The management of pregnant women with hypertension remains a significant, but controversial, public health problem. Although treatment of hypertension in pregnancy has shown to reduce maternal target organ damage, considerable debate remains concerning treatment. We review current evidence regarding treatment goals, the ideal treatment starting time, and which drugs are available for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  10. Essential hypertension vs. secondary hypertension among children.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E; Barratt, Michelle S; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Milewicz, Diane M; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents") from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3-17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08-19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The pregnancy-induced increase in baseline circulating growth hormone in rats is not induced by ghrelin.

    PubMed

    El-Kasti, M M; Christian, H C; Huerta-Ocampo, I; Stolbrink, M; Gill, S; Houston, P A; Davies, J S; Chilcott, J; Hill, N; Matthews, D R; Carter, D A; Wells, T

    2008-03-01

    The elevation in baseline circulating growth hormone (GH) that occurs in pregnant rats is thought to arise from increased pituitary GH secretion, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Distribution, Fourier and algorithmic analyses confirmed that the pregnancy-induced increase in circulating GH in 3-week pregnant rats was due to a 13-fold increase in baseline circulating GH (P < 0.01), without any significant alteration in the parameters of episodic secretion. Electron microscopy revealed that pregnancy resulted in a reduction in the proportion of mammosomatotrophs (P < 0.01) and an increase in type II lactotrophs (P < 0.05), without any significant change in the somatotroph population. However, the density of the secretory granules in somatotrophs from 3-week pregnant rats was reduced (P < 0.05), and their distribution markedly polarised; the granules being grouped nearest the vasculature. Pituitary GH content was not increased, but steady-state GH mRNA levels declined progressively during pregnancy (P < 0.05). In situ hybridisation revealed that pregnancy was accompanied by a suppression of GH-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the arcuate nuclei (P < 0.05) and enhanced somatostatin mRNA expression in the periventricular nuclei (P < 0.05), an expression pattern normally associated with increased GH feedback. Although gastric ghrelin mRNA expression was elevated by 50% in 3-week pregnant rats (P < 0.01), circulating ghrelin, GH-secretagogue receptor mRNA expression and the GH response to a bolus i.v. injection of exogenous ghrelin were all largely unaffected during pregnancy. Although trace amounts of 'pituitary' GH could be detected in the placenta with radioimmunoassay, significant GH-immunoreactivity could not be observed by immunohistochemistry, indicating that rat placenta itself does not produce 'pituitary' GH. Although not excluding the possibility that the pregnancy-associated elevation in baseline circulating GH could arise from alternative extra

  12. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  13. Antenatal coffee and tea consumption and the effect on birth outcome and hypertensive pregnancy disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven, Timothy; Browne, Joyce L; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Grobbee, Diederick E; Dalmeijer, Geertje W

    2017-01-01

    Coffee and tea are commonly consumed during pregnancy. While several of their components, like caffeine, have strong pharmacological effects, the effect on the unborn fetus remains unclear. Caffeine intake has been associated with abortion, preterm birth and fetal growth restriction, but a general consensus on caffeine restriction is still lacking. We aimed to investigate antenatal coffee, tea and caffeine consumption and the effect on birth weight and length, gestational age at birth and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. A total of 936 healthy pregnancies from the WHISTLER birth cohort with data on coffee and tea consumption were included. Maternal and child characteristics as well as antenatal coffee and tea consumption were obtained through postpartum questionnaires. Reported consumption was validated using available preconceptional data. Caffeine intake was calculated from coffee and tea consumption. Linear and logistic regression was used to assess the association with birth outcome and hypertensive disorders. After adjustment for smoking and maternal age, a daily consumption of more than 300mg of caffeine compared to less than 100mg of caffeine was significantly associated with an increased gestational age (linear regression coefficient = 2.00 days, 95%CI = 0.12-4.21, P = 0.03). Tea consumption was significantly related to a higher risk of pregnancy induced hypertension (OR = 1.13, 95%CI = 1.04-1.23, P = 0.004). No associations concerning coffee consumption or birth weight and birth length were observed. Daily caffeine consumption of more than 300mg is possibly associated with an increase in gestational age at birth. A possible relation between high tea consumption and increased risk for pregnancy induced hypertension warrants further research. For most outcomes, we found no significant associations with coffee or tea intake.

  14. The effects of smoking and hypertensive disorders on fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Svein; Irgens, Lorentz M

    2006-01-01

    Background It is well known that smoking and pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) are associated with decreased fetal growth. It has been reported that in preeclampsia the fetal growth deficit attributable to smoking is higher, which has been contradicted in other studies. We therefore evaluated the effects on fetal growth of early- and late onset PIH and chronic hypertension and how cigarette smoking modify these effects. We also quantified the proportion of small for gestational age (SGA) cases attributable to PIH, chronic hypertension, and smoking. Methods Population-based study based on record of 215598 singleton pregnancies from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Results In severe preeclampsia, mild preeclampsia, transient hypertension, and normotension in term birth, odds ratios (ORs) of SGA in smokers compared with non-smokers were 1.4 (95% confidence interval 0.9, 2.2), 1.6 (1.3, 1.9), 2.3 (1.8, 3.1), and 2.0 (1.9, 2.1), respectively. For preterm births, corresponding ORs were 1.3 (0.9, 2.0), 1.8 (1.1, 3.0), 4.1 (1.9, 9.0), and 1.7 (1.4, 2.0), respectively. The effect of early onset PIH was stronger than that in term births, while the effect of smoking was equal in preterm and term newborns. Only in non-smokers who delivered at term, the rates of SGA significantly increased with the severity of PIH (ORs = 1.3 (1.1, 1.5), 1.8 (1.7, 2.0), and 2.5 (2.2, 3.0) for transient hypertension, mild-, and severe preeclampsia, respectively). The combined effects of smoking and hypertension were generally not synergistic. The effect of smoking was not stronger in women who had chronic hypertension. Nor were the effects of chronic hypertension stronger in smokers. PIH explained 21.9 and 2.5% of preterm and term cases of SGA, respectively, while smoking explained 12% of SGA cases. Conclusion The effects of hypertensive disorder and smoking were generally not synergistic, which suggest that they may exert their main actions on separate sites or work through separate

  15. Is Gestational Hypertension Protective against Perinatal Mortality in Twin Pregnancies?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qi-Guang; Zhang, Ji-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Audibert, Francois; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnancy-induced or gestational hypertension is a common pregnancy complication. Paradoxically, gestational hypertension has been associated with a protective effect against perinatal mortality in twin pregnancies in analytic models (logistic regression) without accounting for survival time. Whether this effect is real remains uncertain. This study aimed to validate the impact of gestational hypertension on perinatal mortality in twin pregnancies using a survival analysis approach. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 278,821 twin pregnancies, using the U.S. 1995–2000 matched multiple birth dataset (the largest dataset available for multiple births). Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) of perinatal death (stillbirth and neonatal death) comparing gestational hypertensive vs. non-hypertensive pregnancies controlling for maternal characteristics and twin cluster-level dependence. Results Comparing births in gestational hypertensive vs. non-hypertensive twin pregnancies, perinatal mortality rates were significantly lower (1.20% vs. 3.38%), so were neonatal mortality (0.72% vs. 2.30%) and stillbirth (0.48% vs. 1.10%) rates. The aHRs (95% confidence intervals) were 0.34 (0.31–0.38) for perinatal death, 0.31 (0.27–0.34) for neonatal death, and 0.45 (0.38–0.53) for stillbirth, respectively. The protective effect of gestational hypertension against perinatal death became weaker over advancing gestational age; the aHRs in very preterm (<32 weeks), mild preterm (32–36 weeks) and term (37+ weeks) births were 0.29, 0.48 and 0.76, respectively. The largest risk reductions in neonatal mortality were observed for infections and immaturity-related conditions. Conclusions Gestational hypertension appears to be beneficial for fetal survival in twin pregnancies, especially in those ending more prematurely or for deaths due to infections and immaturity-related conditions. Prospective studies are

  16. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  17. [Hypertensive crisis: urgency and hypertensive emergency].

    PubMed

    Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Doménech Feria-Carot, Mónica; Morales Salinas, Alberto; Coca Payeras, Antonia

    2016-11-18

    Hypertensive crises lumped several clinical situations with different seriousness and prognosis. The differences between hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depends on if this situation involves a vital risk for the patient. This risk is defined more by the severity of the organ damage than for the higher values of blood pressure. The hypertensive urgency not involves an immediately risk for the patient, for these reason, the treatment can be completed after discharged. Otherwise, the hypertensive emergency is a critical clinical condition that requires hospital assistance. Faced with a patient, with severe hypertension, asymptomatic or with unspecific symptoms we must be careful. First, we need to confirm the values of blood pressure, with several measures of blood pressure and investigate and treat factors, which triggered this situation. The objective of medical treatment for hypertensive urgency is to reduce blood pressure values (at least 20% of baseline values) but to avoid sudden reduction of these values. In hypertensive urgencies rapid acting drug should not be used because of the risk of ischemic stroke and use drugs with longer half-life. The cardiovascular risk of these patients is higher than that do not suffer hypertensive crisis. The treatment must be personalized in each hypertensive emergency and intravenous it’s the best route to treat these patients.

  18. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Phan, David Giang; Dreyfuss-Tubiana, Céline; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disease, the most common chronic disease. Hypertensive emergency is much less frequent and only affects 1 to 2 % of all hypertensive patients. The true hypertensive emergency is characterized by the serious damage of one hypertensive target organ and requires an urgent intravenous treatment. Isolated blood pressure elevation should not be regarded as a hypertensive emergency if there is no target organ damage, even if the blood pressure is very high. These situations of "false hypertensive emergency", or hypertensive urgencies, often requires an immediate treatment, but oral. Signs of visceral pain of true hypertensive emergency often are a poor general condition, severe headache, decreased visual acuity, neurological deficit of ischemic or hemorrhagic cause, confusion, dyspnea with orthopnoea revealing heart failure, angina, chest pain revealing an aortic dissection, proteinuria, acute renal failure or eclampsia. True hypertensive emergencies include several entities, namely: severe hypertension, malignant hypertension and accelerated hypertension. If malignant hypertension is not treated, the prognosis is poor with 50 % death risk in the following year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Resistant hypertension and the Birmingham Hypertension Square.

    PubMed

    Felmeden, D C; Lip, G Y

    2001-06-01

    Recent guidelines for the treatment of hypertension place great emphasis on tighter blood pressure control, especially in the presence of hypertensive target organ damage and diabetes. In order to achieve these treatment targets, more patients will require a combination of antihypertensive medications. However, resistant hypertension may have many possible underlying causes, and clinicians should appreciate how to detect and tackle these potential problems. Effective and synergistic combinations are therefore of vital importance, especially in patients with resistant hypertension. The choice of rational first- and second-line drugs that act in synergy could lead to better blood pressure management as well as significant financial savings for health care resources. The use of the Birmingham Hypertension Square for the optimum choice of add-in drugs for the treatment of resistant hypertension may aid management.

  20. Hypertension in CKD Pregnancy: a Question of Cause and Effect (Cause or Effect? This Is the Question).

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Attini, Rossella; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Loi, Valentina; Gerbino, Martina; Biolcati, Marilisa; Pani, Antonello; Todros, Tullia

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly encountered in pregnancy, and hypertension is frequently concomitant. In pregnancy, the prevalence of CKD is estimated to be about 3%, while the prevalence of chronic hypertension is about 5-8%. The prevalence of hypertension and CKD in pregnancy is unknown. Both are independently related to adverse pregnancy outcomes, and the clinical picture merges with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia. Precise risk quantification is not available, but risks linked to CKD stage, hypertension, and proteinuria are probably multiplicative, each at least doubling the rates of preterm and early preterm delivery, small for gestational age babies, and related outcomes. Differential diagnosis (based upon utero-placental flows, fetal growth, and supported by serum biomarkers) is important for clinical management. In the absence of guidelines for hypertension in CKD pregnancies, the ideal blood pressure goal has not been established; we support a tailored approach, depending on compliance, baseline control, and CKD stages, with strict blood pressure monitoring. The choice of antihypertensive drugs and the use of diuretics and of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are still open questions which only future studies may clarify.

  1. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests. Once you have a diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, exercise testing can help your doctor determine its severity. ... so the doctor can rate your activity level. Exercise testing may be ongoing ... hypertension The World Health Organization has established five groups ...

  2. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  3. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no ... seek care right away. Emotional Issues and Support Living with PH may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and ...

  4. Pregnancy Induces Resistance to the Anorectic Effect of Hypothalamic Malonyl-CoA and the Thermogenic Effect of Hypothalamic AMPK Inhibition in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B.; Lage, Ricardo; González-García, Ismael; Ruíz-Pino, Francisco; Martins, Luís; Fernández-Mallo, Diana; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Señarís, Rosa; Saha, Asish K.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    During gestation, hyperphagia is necessary to cope with the metabolic demands of embryonic development. There were three main aims of this study: Firstly, to investigate the effect of pregnancy on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, a key pathway for the regulation of energy balance; secondly, to study whether pregnancy induces resistance to the anorectic effect of fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibition and accumulation of malonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) in the hypothalamus; and, thirdly, to study whether changes in hypothalamic AMPK signaling are associated with brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis during pregnancy. Our data suggest that in pregnant rats, the hypothalamic fatty acid pathway shows an overall state that should lead to anorexia and elevated BAT thermogenesis: decreased activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), FAS, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, coupled with increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase function with subsequent elevation of malonyl-CoA levels. This profile seems dependent of estradiol levels but not prolactin or progesterone. Despite the apparent anorexic and thermogenic signaling in the hypothalamus, pregnant rats remain hyperphagic and display reduced temperature and BAT function. Actually, pregnant rats develop resistance to the anorectic effects of central FAS inhibition, which is associated with a reduction of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression and its transcription factors phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and phospho-forkhead box O1. This evidence demonstrates that pregnancy induces a state of resistance to the anorectic and thermogenic actions of hypothalamic cellular signals of energy surplus, which, in parallel to the already known refractoriness to leptin effects, likely contributes to gestational hyperphagia and adiposity. PMID:25535827

  5. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with headache and extreme hypertension. Computed tomography showed diffuse brain stem hypodensity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse brain stem vasogenic edema. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hypertensive encephalopathy, which classically occurs at parietooccipital white matter. Because of its atypical location, the diagnosis can be challenging. Moreover, the coexistence of hypertension and brain stem edema could also direct clinicians toward a diagnosis of ischemic infarction, leading to a completely contradictory treatment goal.

  6. Economics of hypertension control. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key aspects of the problem of estimating the economic burden of hypertension and hypertension-related disease, the use of economic models, and the opportunities for containing the costs. More information is needed on the population-attributable risk of hypertension in various countries, which is indispensable to estimate the part of hypertension in the burden of stroke and heart disease. The population and high-risk approaches to hypertension control also have economic consequences, which may vary in different societies and must be assessed to ensure proper allocation of resources. Cost-containment can be achieved by more selective diagnostic investigations and by opting for cheaper drugs, though the choice of treatment is difficult owing to uncertainties in the quality-of-life estimates. PMID:7554012

  7. DEPRESSION IN HYPERTENSIVE SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V.; Parikh, G.J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY 168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed. The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level. Further hypertensives were classified into: 1. Hypertension without organ involvement 2. Hypertension with LVH only 3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement 4. Malignant hypertension Depression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  8. Hypertension in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tibazarwa, Kemi B; Damasceno, Albertino A

    2014-05-01

    The past 2 decades have seen a considerable global increase in cardiovascular disease, with hypertension remaining by far the most common. More than one-third of adults in Africa are hypertensive; as in the urban populations of most developing countries. Being a condition that occurs with relatively few symptoms, hypertension remains underdetected in many countries; especially in developing countries where routine screening at any point of health care is grossly underutilized. Because hypertension is directly related to cardiovascular disease, this has led to hypertension being the leading cause of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as a result of patients living, often unknowingly, with uncontrolled hypertension for prolonged periods of time. In Africa, hypertension is the leading cause of heart failure; whereas at global levels, hypertension is responsible for more than half of deaths from stroke, just less than half of deaths from coronary artery disease, and for more than one-tenth of all global deaths. In this review, we discuss the escalating occurrence of hypertension in developing countries, before exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different measures to control hypertension, and the challenges of adopting these measures in developing countries. On a broad level, these include steps to curb the ripple effect of urbanization on the health and disease profile of developing societies, and suggestions to improve loopholes in various aspects of health care delivery that affect surveillance and management of hypertension. Furthermore, we consider how the industrial sectors' contributions toward the burden of hypertension can also be the source of the solution.

  9. Maternal caffeine intake, blood pressure, and the risk of hypertensive complications during pregnancy. The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Rachel; Steegers, Eric A P; Raat, Hein; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2011-04-01

    Caffeine intake has been suggested to be associated with the risk of hypertension. Less is known about the associations of caffeine intake on maternal cardiovascular adaptations during pregnancy. We examined the associations of caffeine intake in different trimesters of pregnancy with repeatedly measured blood pressure and the risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in a population-based cohort of 7,890 pregnant women. In each trimester caffeine intake and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed by questionnaires and physical examinations, respectively. Information about hypertensive complications was obtained from medical records. Our longitudinal analyses revealed no significant differences for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The cross-sectional analyses showed that higher caffeine intake tended to be associated with higher systolic blood pressure in first and third trimester (P trend <0.05), but not in second trimester. Caffeine intake was not consistently associated with diastolic blood pressure levels, or the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension. As compared to women with caffeine intake of <2 units/day, those using 2-3.9 units/day had a lower risk of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 0.63 (95% confidence interval: 0.40, 0.96)). Higher caffeine intake during pregnancy seems to be associated with elevated systolic blood pressure levels in first and third trimester, but not with diastolic blood pressure levels. We did not find evidence of significant adverse associations of caffeine intake on maternal cardiovascular adaptations during pregnancy. The unexpected finding of a possible protective association with moderate caffeine intake deserves further investigation.

  10. Mode of delivery in pregnant women with hypertensive disorders and unfavorable cervix following induction of labor with vaginal application of prostaglandin E.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haroush, Avi; Yogev, Yariv; Glickman, Hagit; Kaplan, Boris; Hod, Moshe; Bar, Jacob

    2005-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the mode of delivery in pregnant women with hypertensive disorders and unfavorable cervix following induction of labor with vaginal application of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) near or at term, and to define the predictors of successful vaginal delivery in such women. In a retrospective case-controlled study, pregnant women with hypertension, who underwent labor induction with PGE(2) tablets (study group, n = 284), were compared with women, who underwent elective induction of labor (group 2, n = 115), and women with normal spontaneous onset of labor (group 3, n = 510). The rate of cesarean section (CS) was significantly higher in the study group (25.3%) than in group 2 (14.8%) and in group 3 (9%). Exclusion of the nulliparous women from the study and control groups yielded similar CS rates in the study group (16.9%) and in group 2 (11.1%). Women with pre-eclampsia and the women with chronic hypertension or pregnancy-induced hypertension had similar rates of CS. In logistic regression model, nulliparity, induction of labor with PGE(2), and maternal age, but not hypertensive disorders, were independently and significantly associated with increased risk of CS. PGE(2) induction of labor is successful in approximately 75% of patients with hypertensive disorders and unfavorable cervix, with apparently no serious maternal or fetal complications. The induction of labor by itself, and not the hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, is independent risk factor for CS.

  11. Metabolomics in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Sonja B; Sharman, James E; Adams, Murray J; Edwards, Lindsay M

    2014-06-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent chronic medical condition and a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In the majority of hypertensive cases, the underlying cause of hypertension cannot be easily identified because of the heterogeneous, polygenic and multi-factorial nature of hypertension. Metabolomics is a relatively new field of research that has been used to evaluate metabolic perturbations associated with disease, identify disease biomarkers and to both assess and predict drug safety and efficacy. Metabolomics has been increasingly used to characterize risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypertension, and it appears to have significant potential for uncovering mechanisms of this complex disease. This review details the analytical techniques, pre-analytical steps and study designs used in metabolomics studies, as well as the emerging role for metabolomics in gaining mechanistic insights into the development of hypertension. Suggestions as to the future direction for metabolomics research in the field of hypertension are also proposed.

  12. Secondary Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Malha, Line; August, Phyllis

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension is a common medical complication of pregnancy. Although 75-80 % of women with preexisting essential hypertension will have uncomplicated pregnancies, the presence of secondary forms of hypertension adds considerably to both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Renovascular hypertension, pheochromocytoma, and Cushing's syndrome in particular are associated with accelerating hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal loss. Primary aldosteronism is a more heterogeneous disorder; there are well-documented cases where blood pressure and hypokalemia are improved during pregnancy due to elevated levels of progesterone. However, superimposed preeclampsia, worsening hypertension, and early delivery are also reported. When possible, secondary forms of hypertension should be diagnosed and treated prior to conception in order to avoid these complications.

  13. Hypertension in young adults.

    PubMed

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  14. [Definition of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Degaute, J P

    1994-01-01

    Recent publication of several consensus by well-known international experts in the field of high blood pressure gives us the opportunity to update the definition of hypertension. For the first time, systolic blood pressure is taken into account to define hypertensives. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been recently developed for the evaluation and treatment of hypertensive patients. Due to the absence of world-wide recognized normative data and the lack of prospective studies assessing the superiority of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over casual blood pressure measurement for the prediction of cardiovascular events, the use of this new technique is to be restricted to a limited number of hypertensive patients.

  15. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  16. [Hypertension in women].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. [Melatonin production in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Rapoport, S I; Shatalova, A M; Malinovskaia, N K; Vettenberg, L

    2000-01-01

    Hypertensive subjects were examined for production of melatonin. In severe hypertension night levels of melatonin diminished, the day production is as in the controls. The role of melatonin in pathogenesis of essential hypertension is discussed.

  19. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  20. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  1. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  2. Epigenomics of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W.; Mattson, David L.; Kotchen, Theodore A.; Liu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension. Essential hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving multiple genetic and environmental factors and mediated by alterations in multiple biological pathways. Because the non-genetic mechanisms may involve epigenetic modifications, epigenomics is one of the latest concepts and approaches brought to bear on hypertension research. In this article, we summarize briefly the concepts and techniques for epigenomics, discuss the rationale for applying epigenomic approaches to study hypertension, and review the current state of this research area. PMID:24011581

  3. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  4. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  5. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  6. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  7. Hypertension in women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  8. Hypertension in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Extremera, Blas; Cía-Gómez, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hypertension in the Western countries is continuously increasing in the elderly population and remains the leading cause of cardiovascular and morbidity. Methods. we analysed some significant clinical trials in order to present the relevant findings on those hypertensive population. Results. Several studies (SYST-EUR, HYVET, CONVINCE, VALUE, etc.) have demonstrated the benefits of treatment (nitrendipine, hydrochrotiazyde, perindopril, indapamide, verapamil, or valsartan) in aged hypertensive patients not only concerning blood pressure values but also the other important risk factors. Conclusion. Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disorder in the Western countries, and the relevance of receiving pharmacological treatment of hypertension in aged patients is crucial; in addition, the results suggest that combination therapy—nitrendipine plus enalapril—could have more benefits than those observed with the use of nitrendipine alone. PMID:21876789

  9. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension.

  10. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  11. Hypertension burden in Luxembourg

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Schritz, Anna; Barré, Jessica; Delagardelle, Charles; Krippler, Serge; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it remains the main cause of death in Luxembourg. We aimed to estimate the current prevalence of hypertension, associated risk factors, and its geographic variation in Luxembourg. Cross-sectional, population-based data on 1497 randomly selected Luxembourg residents aged 25 to 64 years were collected as part of the European Health Examination Survey from 2013 to 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, self-report of a physician diagnosis or on antihypertensive medication. Standard and Bayesian regressions were used to examine associations between hypertension and covariates, and also geographic distribution of hypertension across the country. Nearly 31% of Luxembourg residents were hypertensive, and over 70% of those were either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled. The likelihood of hypertension was lower in men more physically active (odds ratio [95% credible region] 0.6 [0.4, 0.9]) and consuming alcohol daily (0.3 [0.1, 0.8]), and higher in men with a poor health perception (1.6 [1.0, 2.7]) and in women experiencing depressive symptoms (1.8 [1.3, 2.7]). There were geographic variations in hypertension prevalence across cantons and municipalities. The highest odds ratio was observed in the most industrialized region (South-West) (1.2 [0.9, 1.6]) with a positive effect at 90% credible region. In Luxembourg, the vast majority of people with hypertension are either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled, which constitutes a major, neglected public health challenge. There are geographic variations in hypertension prevalence in Luxembourg, hence the role of individual and regional risk factors along with public health initiatives to reduce disease burden should be considered. PMID:27603374

  12. Renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system gene polymorphisms in gestational hypertension and preeclampsia: A case–control gene-association study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xun; Tan, Hongzhuan; Zhou, Shujin; Hu, Shimin; Zhang, Tianyi; Li, Yangfen; Dou, Qianru; Lai, Zhiwei; Chen, Fenglei

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH, including preeclampsia [PE] and gestational hypertension [GH]) and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some metabolic changes and risk factors in common. Many studies have reported associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) genes and CVDs (particularly hypertension), and their findings have provided candidate SNPs for research on genetic correlates of PIH. We explored the association between hypertension-related RAAS SNPs and PIH in a Chinese population. A total of 130 cases with PE, 67 cases with GH, and 316 controls were recruited. Six candidate SNPs of the RAAS system were selected. Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for maternal age, fetal sex, and gestational diabetes mellitus showed significant associations between angiotensinogen (AGT) rs3789678 T/C and GH (p = 0.0088) and between angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) rs275645 G/A and PE (p = 0.0082). The study population was further stratified by maternal age (<30 and ≥30 years), and stratified and crossover analyses were conducted to determine genetic associations in different age groups. Our findings suggest that the impacts of different SNPs might be affected by maternal age; however, the effect of this potential gene–age interaction on PIH needs further exploration. PMID:27910864

  13. Racial differences in gestational weight gain and pregnancy-related hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jihong; Gallagher, Alexa E; Carta, Courtney M.; Torres, Myriam E.; Moran, Robert; Wilcox, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine racial differences in gestational weight gain (GWG) and pregnancy-related hypertension. Methods Logistic regression models tested racial differences in adequacy of GWG and pregnancy-induced hypertension in all singleton live births from the South Carolina 2004-2006 birth certificates. Results Compared to white women, black and Hispanic women had 16%-46% lower odds of gaining weight above the recommendations. However, the odds of inadequate GWG was ~50% higher in black and Hispanic women with a pregnancy body mass index (BMI) <25kg/m2. Furthermore, compared to women with adequate GWG, women with excessive GWG had higher odds of pregnancy-related hypertension (underweight: 2.35, 95% CI(1.66, 3.32); normal: 2.05, 95% CI(1.84, 2.27); overweight: 1.93, 95% CI(1.64, 2.27); obese: 1.46, 95% CI(1.30, 1.63)). Among women with a BMI <25 kg/m2, black women had higher odds of pregnancy-related hypertension than white women (underweight: 1.64, 95% CI(1.14, 2.36); normal weight: 1.28, 95% CI(1.15, 1.42)), while among women with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2, Hispanic women had 40% lower odds. Conclusion Programs are needed to curb excessive GWG in all racial groups and to help some sub-groups ensure adequate GWG. Maternal obesity and GWG are two factors that should be used in combination to reduce racial differences in pregnancy-related hypertension. PMID:24685832

  14. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Lillegard, Kathryn E.; Bauer, Ashley J.; Elmquist, Barbara J.; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  15. Hypertension in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Win, Ni Ni; Kuan, Lai Pei; Aung, Kyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension in Malaysia and to assess the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia. The distribution of hypertension in Malaysia was assessed based on available data in 3 National Health and Morbidity Surveys (NHMSs) and 1 large scale non-NHMS during the period of 1996 to 2011. Summary statistics was used to characterize the included surveys. Differences in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension between any 2 surveys were expressed as ratios. To assess the independent associations between the predictors and the outcome variables, regression analyses were employed with prevalence of hypertension as an outcome variable. Overall, there was a rising trend in the prevalence of hypertension in adults ≥30 years: 32.9% (30%–35.8%) in 1996, 42.6% (37.5%–43.5%) in 2006, and 43.5% (40.4%–46.6%) in 2011. There were significant increase of 32% from 1996 to 2011 (P < 0.001) and of 29% from 1996 to 2006 (P < 0.05), but only a small change of 1% from 2006 to 2011 (P = 0.6). For population ≥18 years, only a 1% increase in prevalence of hypertension occurred from the 2006 NHMS (32.2%) to the 2011 NHMS (32.7%) (P = 0.25). A relative increase of 13% occurred in those with primary education (P < 0.001) and a 15% increase was seen in those with secondary education (P < 0.001). The rate of increase in the prevalence of hypertension in the population with income level RM 3000–3999 was the highest (18%) during this period. In general, the older age group had higher prevalence of hypertension in the 2006 and 2011 NHMSs. The prevalence peaked at 74.1% among population aged 65 to 69 years in the 2011 NHMS. Both the proportion of awareness and the control of hypertension in Malaysia improved from 1996 to 2006. A change in the control of hypertension was 13% higher in women than in men. The findings suggest that

  16. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hansson, L

    1996-10-01

    TREATMENT OF ELDERLY HYPERTENSIVES: Treatment of hypertension in the elderly is nowadays an accepted and highly effective medical intervention following the positive reports on the benefits of lowering elevated arterial pressure in elderly patients. Most of the intervention studies an antihypertensive treatment in elderly patients have used diuretics or beta-blockers or the two in combination as the therapy by which blood pressure was lowered. However, from a theoretical point of view, novel therapies such as calcium antagonists could offer advantages that would translate into an even greater reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than has been obtained with the traditional antihypertensive therapies used so far. DATA ON CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN THE ELDERLY: Some of the studies in elderly hypertensives that are currently in progress are using calcium antagonists as one of the main therapies, e.g. the Swedish Trial in Old patients with hypertension (STOP-Hypertension)-2 study and the Systolic hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) study. Another source of information is a large database on nicardipine, a dihydropyridine-derived calcium antagonist, used in the treatment of elderly hypertensives.

  17. [Hypertension and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rosas, Martín; Lomelí, Catalina; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Méndez, Arturo; Férez Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that hypertension in pregnancy is an under recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Compared with women who have had normotensive pregnancies, those who are hypertensive during pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and have a less favorable overall risk profile for CVD years after the affected pregnancies. One factor that might underlie this relationship is that hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia, in particular) and CVD share several common risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes mellitus and renal disease). Alternatively, hypertension in pregnancy could induce long-term metabolic and vascular abnormalities that might increase the overall risk of CVD later in life. In both cases, evidence regarding risk-reduction interventions specific to women who have had hypertensive pregnancies is lacking. While awaiting results of large-scale studies, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy should be screened for during assessment of a woman's overall risk profile for CVD. Women at high risk must be monitored closely for conventional risk factors that are common to both CVD and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and treated according to current evidence-based national guidelines.

  18. [Turkish Hypertension Consensus Report].

    PubMed

    Arıcı, Mustafa; Birdane, Alparslan; Güler, Kerim; Yıldız, Bülent Okan; Altun, Bülent; Ertürk, Şehsuvar; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Özbakkaloğlu, Mert; Ersöz, Halil Önder; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Tükek, Tufan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Erdem, Yunus

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is a common and important public health problem in Turkey and worldwide. Recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension have been presented in many nationally and internationally agreed European and American guidelines. However, there are differences among these guidelines, and some of the recommendations are not consistent with clinical practice in our country. Consensus report preparation, with the participation of relevant associations, was considered necessary to merge recommendations by evaluating hypertension guidelines from the perspective of Turkey and to create a joint approach in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in adults. For this purpose, it was aimed to prepare a practical text in Turkey in which all physicians dealing with hypertensive patients, from family practitioners in primary care to specialists in tertiary care, could come to agreement on common concepts, and which would be used as a basic reference guideline. Considering health care practices and sociocultural structure in Turkey, this report aimed to enhance awareness on hypertension, provide a common basis for different definitions and values as well as therapeutic options in various guidelines, and establish a practical reference guide to improve clinical practices in Turkey. This report is not a document describing hypertension in every aspect, but a reference, including basic recommendations with outlines. Care was taken to ensure that recommendations were evidence-based and valid for a majority of patients in clinical practice. However, it should be kept in mind that an approach assessment should be made on an individual basis for each patient.

  19. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Slama, Michel; Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina; Frohlich, Edward D

    2002-07-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension is the most common cause of cardiac failure. Recent studies have shown that isolated diastolic dysfunction very often accompanies hypertensive heart disease. Ventricular diastolic function may be divided into an active relaxation phase and a passive compliance period. These two components have been investigated invasively, and they remain the gold standards for the study of diastolic function. However, in the routine clinical setting, echocardiographic and Doppler techniques are most useful for evaluating ventricular filling. Thus, analysis of E and A waves of mitral flow have provided important and useful information. Unfortunately, these indices depend on too many factors. Newer indices obtained from ventricular time intervals, tissue Doppler imaging, and color M-mode echocardiography have enhanced the means to assess diastolic function. In addition, new methods including MRI and cine CT have also provided better understanding of left ventricular filling in hypertension. Using these techniques, diastolic dysfunction has been found to be common in patients with hypertension, even before left ventricular hypertrophy is demonstrable and before hypertension in young, normotensive male offspring of hypertensive parents has developed. Furthermore, it has been made clear recently that myocardial ischemia and fibrosis are two important factors associated with diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

  20. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  1. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R S; Frohlich, E D

    1990-09-01

    The relationships between stress and hypertension have been evaluated extensively. Acutely, stress has been shown to increase blood pressure by increasing cardiac output and the heart rate without affecting total peripheral resistance. Acute stress has been found to increase levels of catecholamines, cortisol, vasopressin, endorphins and aldosterone, which may in part explain the increase in blood pressure. However, a primary role for the activation of the sympathetic nervous system has recently been suggested in several studies. Studies in the rat are beginning to determine specific central nervous system pathways which transform stressful stimuli into signals triggering a cardiovascular response without direct cortical participation. Furthermore, acute stress reduces renal sodium excretion, which contributes to an increase in blood pressure. Several studies suggest that prolonged stress may predispose people and animals to prolonged hypertension and certain populations are at risk for the development of stress-induced hypertension. It is likely that prolonged stress-induced hypertension is the result of neurohormonal trophic factors which cause vascular hypertrophy or atherosclerosis. Because stress can affect measurement of blood pressure due to the phenomenon of 'white-coat hypertension', ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is emerging as an important feature in the evaluation of patients with hypertension. Finally, relaxation techniques are being used increasingly in the treatment of patients with hypertension.

  2. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  3. Hypertension in special populations.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2005-07-01

    Hypertension is a multifaceted disease that may present somewhat differently in various populations. It is clear that hypertensive treatment reduces cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular outcomes for all patients, yet recent clinical trial data suggest that some groups may benefit more than others from specific drug intervention. Furthermore, these data justify specific approaches for some special populations. This article reviews important features of the presentation, rationale for treatment, and treatment recommendations for the treatment of hypertension in special populations. The special populations addressed include diabetic patients, the elderly, and women.

  4. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  5. Management of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Castillo, Leonardo; Gopinath, Shankar; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2008-01-01

    Effective management of intracranial hypertension involves meticulous avoidance of factors that precipitate or aggravate increased intracranial pressure. When intracranial pressure becomes elevated, it is important to rule out new mass lesions that should be surgically evacuated. Medical management of increased intracranial pressure should include sedation, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, and osmotherapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline. For intracranial hypertension refractory to initial medical management, barbiturate coma, hypothermia, or decompressive craniectomy should be considered. Steroids are not indicated and may be harmful in the treatment of intracranial hypertension resulting from traumatic brain injury. PMID:18514825

  6. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  7. Drug-induced hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... desipramine) Caffeine (including the caffeine in coffee and energy drinks) Corticosteroids Cyclosporine Ephedra and many other herbal products Erythropoietin Estrogens (including birth control pills) and other ... drugs Yohimbe Rebound hypertension occurs when blood ...

  8. Hypertensive Screening Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Douglas P.; Gillen, John C.

    1977-01-01

    Data derived from a health screening program conducted at Wright State University indicates that hypertensive screening is a justifiable procedure and one which can be carried out with minimum effort and expense. (MB)

  9. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  10. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  11. Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGE Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy ... e189 Downloaded from http:// circ. ahajournals. org/ by guest on April 13, 2017 TABLE 1. Types of ...

  12. Hypertensive emergencies of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wilson, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is commonly encountered in pregnancy and has both maternal and fetal effects. Acute hypertensive crisis most commonly occurs in severe preeclampsia and is associated with maternal stroke, cardiopulmonary decompensation, fetal decompensation due to decreased uterine perfusion, abruption, and stillbirth. Immediate stabilization of the mother including the use of intervenous antihypertensives is required and often delivery is indicated. With appropriate management, maternal and fetal outcomes can be excellent.

  13. [Hypertension in old age].

    PubMed

    García-Palmieri, M

    1995-09-01

    Hypertension occurs in 50% of the elderly persons in industrialized societies. This disorder of the regulation of the arterial blood pressure has different manifestations in different age groups. The young hypertensive usually has an increase in cardiac output and a normal peripheral vascular resistance. The elderly patient with hypertension exhibits a decreased cardiac output and an increased peripheral vascular resistance. In the elderly hypertensive there is a progressive anteriolar narrowing and there is hardening of the largest arteries. The vascular disease that contributes to the hypertension in the elderly also causes hypoperfusion of the target organs. During the aging process there is a decrease in cardiac output, glomerular filtration rate, vital capacity, renal plasma flow and maximal cardiac rate. There are changes in the kidneys and the liver that influence the way different medications are handled by the body. The main findings of the Australian, EWPHE, Coope & Warrender, SHEP, STOP-HYP and MRC studies of hypertension in the elderly have been summarized. The intervention studies have proven that the treatment of hypertension in the elderly patient is efficacious and decreases the mortality and morbidity due to coronary and cerebrovascular events. The pharmacologic agents available for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly are the diuretics, beta blockers, vasodilators, calcium-channel blockers, adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The morbidity and mortality benefits derived from antihypertensive trials are greater for the older than for the younger patients. The pharmacologic antihypertensive agents to be used in older patients will also depend upon the presence or not of associated illnesses in which some agents might be harmful or contraindicated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Diastolic function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Diamond, J A

    2001-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension may present as asymptomatic findings on noninvasive testing, or as fulminant pulmonary edema, despite normal left ventricular systolic function. Up to 40% of hypertensive patients presenting with clinical signs of congestive heart failure have normal systolic left ventricular function. In this article we review the pathophysiologic factors affecting diastolic function in individuals with diastolic function, current and emerging tools for measuring diastolic function, and current concepts regarding the treatment of patients with diastolic congestive heart failure.

  15. Hypertension and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deak, Teresa M; Moskovitz, Joshua B

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is increasing in prevalence and incidence and its treatment becoming more commonplace. Associated complications of pregnancy, including end-organ damage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia, are leading sources of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, requiring an emergency physician to become proficient with their identification and treatment. This article reviews hypertension in pregnancy as it relates to outcomes, with special emphasis on preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia.

  16. Hypertension: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio

    2012-11-01

    High blood pressure (BP) along with smoking habit and lipid disorders are the most important and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prevalence of high BP has grown progressively over time with a progressive increase not only in the absolute number of patients but in the proportion of those showing BP values out of control. The increasing world-wide prevalence of hypertension and the related increase in burden of the disease due to diagnosis, treatment and management of the complications mandates both Health Authorities and research institutions to find out new strategies to improve the BP control. So, one of the main questions is which are the possible perspectives for the future of high BP management, and in particular how can we face the problem of hypertension in the near future? Four main points will be shortly discussed: the genetic contribution to hypertension development and control, the availability of effective preventive strategies, the improvement of disease management, and the role of extensive control of concomitant risk factors. It is relatively easy to suppose that the integration of the best available knowledge with the more recent diagnostic and therapeutic achievements will improve the management of hypertension through a more effective detection of subjects at risk who will undergo an earlier diagnosis leading to a more tailored, tolerated and effective treatment of the hypertensive disease. This means that the future direction of the hypertension management is the simpler: the patient instead of the disease.

  17. Patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amar, Jacques

    2007-06-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in the majority of treated patients, especially those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This was demonstrated by a French study that showed that 70% of treated hypertensive patients are not controlled to the target level of 140/90 mmHg. This proportion reached 84% in hypertensive patients with diabetes (target level 130/85 mmHg). What are the reasons for this disappointing situation? Observational studies have shown that only a minority of patients with uncontrolled hypertension receive triple therapy including a diuretic. In this respect, self-measurement of blood pressure should improve the situation by allowing clinicians to base their decision to intensify hypertension treatment on more solid evidence than consultation blood pressure measurements alone. Patient-related factors may also contribute to this situation. Treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension often have multiple risk factors. This is associated with or is a source of poor treatment observance linked to patient psychological factors or a result of the increased consumption of medication. Finally, risk factors themselves may be responsible for problems with blood pressure control as a result of their detrimental effects on large arteries as well as the microvascular network. The early correction of such vascular anomalies is vital for medium and long-term blood pressure control.

  18. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures.

  19. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  20. Three-Dimensional Segmented Poincaré Plot Analyses SPPA3 Investigates Cardiovascular and Cardiorespiratory Couplings in Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Claudia; Voss, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect 6-8% of gestations representing the most common complication of pregnancy for both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to introduce a new three-dimensional coupling analysis methods - the three-dimensional segmented Poincaré plot analyses (SPPA3) - to establish an effective approach for the detection of hypertensive pregnancy disorders and especially pre-eclampsia (PE). A cubic box model representing the three-dimensional phase space is subdivided into 12 × 12 × 12 equal predefined cubelets according to the range of the SD of each investigated signal. Additionally, we investigated the influence of rotating the cloud of points and the size of the cubelets (adapted or predefined). All single probabilities of occurring points in a specific cubelet related to the total number of points are calculated. In this study, 10 healthy non-pregnant women, 66 healthy pregnant women, and 56 hypertensive pregnant women (chronic hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and PE) were investigated. From all subjects, 30 min of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiration (RESP), non-invasive systolic (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were continuously recorded and analyzed. Non-rotated adapted SPPA3 discriminated best between hypertensive pregnancy disorders and PE concerning coupling analysis of two or three different systems (BBI, DBP, RESP and BBI, SBP, DBP) reaching an accuracy of up to 82.9%. This could be increased to an accuracy of up to 91.2% applying multivariate analysis differentiating between all pregnant women and PE. In conclusion, SPPA3 could be a useful method for enhanced risk stratification in pregnant women.

  1. [Hypertension in children and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas, Martín; Mendoza-González, Celso; Méndez, Arturo; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Buendía, Alfonso; Férez-Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus.

  2. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  3. Prevention of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: a Novel Application of the Polypill Concept.

    PubMed

    Browne, J L; Klipstein-Grobusch, K; Franx, A; Grobbee, D E

    2016-06-01

    Nearly all of the annual 287,000 global maternal deaths are preventable. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are among the major causes. A novel fixed-dose combination pill or polypill to prevent cardiovascular disease is a promising strategy for prevention of HDP. The aim of this study was to identify eligible candidates for a polypill for the prevention of HDP. A comprehensive review of systematic reviews on drug and dietary interventions to prevent HDP was conducted. Interventions were evaluated based on efficacy, dose, route of administration, and side effects. Fourteen interventions were assessed. Low-dose aspirin and calcium were identified as candidates for a polypill, with risk reduction estimations for pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia ranging between 10 and 62 %, depending on patient population characteristics including a priori risk, and gestation age at start of intervention. Their effect may be augmented through the addition of vitamin D, vitamin B12, and folic acid. The effect and optimal composition needs to be evaluated in future trials. Given the persistent burden of maternal and perinatal mortality associated with HDP, prevention of these disorders is key-especially in low-resource settings. The polypill approach with a combination of aspirin, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and folic acid is a promising strategy to improve maternal and perinatal health outcomes.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle, endothelial regulation and effects of aspirin in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M A

    1998-04-27

    Dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is at the center of occlusive disorders of the cardiovascular system such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and hypoxia. In addition to circulating biogenic amines and various neurotransmitters originating from the central nervous system and endocrine system, various autocoids of arachidonic acid metabolism in the blood as well as in the endothelium play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the tone and the contractile function of VSM. A monolayer of endothelial cells lining the heart and large blood vessels is responsible for producing and releasing both endocrine and paracrine substances such as endothelins, nitric oxide, prostaglandins and prostacyclins. Aspirin, (acetylsalicylic acid/ASA) an ancient remedy against fever and pain, is emerging as an effective drug not only against occlusive disorders but also against various cancers and the AIDs virus. During pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and in occlusive disorders, aspirin provides relief through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme required for the metabolism of arachidonic acid to produce prostaglandins and prostacyclins in platelets and in endothelial cells. Because of its unique molecular constitution, synergistic ability and solubility in the lipidic environment, various mechanisms of aspirin's actions are being currently investigated. In this review, the effect of aspirin on the regulation of VSM in the presence and absence of endothelium are discussed.

  5. Screening for renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, N R; Sfakianakis, G N

    1991-05-01

    The most common curable cause of high blood pressure is renovascular hypertension. Although hypertension is common in the United States, only a minority, approximately 1%, of patients have a renovascular cause. Using clinical criteria, a subgroup of these patients can be selected in which the prevalence of renovascular hypertension will be approximately 15%. In these selected patients, it is appropriate to proceed to a radiographic screening modality to look for a significant renal artery stenosis. The choice of modality should reflect the strengths and expertise of each specific institution. Hypertensive urography is no longer recommended for screening. Excellent results have been reported with intravenous DSRA in institutions where a strong interest in this procedure exists. Furthermore, intravenous DSRA is easily coupled with the collection of renal vein samples for renin assay. Intravenous DSRA, however, has not maintained widespread use. Although the radionuclide renogram is no longer adequate as a radiographic screening tool, stimulation with an ACE inhibitor, such as captopril or enalaprilat, may produce excellent results. In many institutions, this is the most appropriate examination. Furthermore, it is relatively noninvasive. Merely detecting a significant renal artery stenosis does not, however, mean the patient has renovascular hypertension. Both hypertension and a renal artery stenosis may be present and not be causally related. Because renovascular hypertension is, at least initially, renin mediated, the demonstration of increased renin production by the ipsilateral kidney should confirm renovascular hypertension. Prospective application of these results to patients undergoing revascularization techniques, however, has been disappointing. This may be related to problems in patient preparation, sample collection, renin assay, or even the physiology of chronic hypertension, which is incompletely renin mediated. Thus, offering revascularization only to

  6. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    PubMed

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  7. Sleep and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory BP studies indicate that even small increases in BP, particularly nighttime BP levels, are associated with significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, sleep-related diseases that induce increases in BP would be anticipated to substantially affect cardiovascular risk. Both sleep deprivation and insomnia have been linked to increases in incidence and prevalence of hypertension. Likewise, sleep disruption attributable to restless legs syndrome increases the likelihood of having hypertension. Observational studies demonstrate a strong correlation between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the risk and severity of hypertension, whereas prospective studies of patients with OSA demonstrate a positive relationship between OSA and risk of incident hypertension. Intervention trials with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) indicate a modest, but inconsistent effect on BP in patients with severe OSA and a greater likelihood of benefit in patients with most CPAP adherence. Additional prospective studies are needed to reconcile observational studies suggesting that OSA is a strong risk factor for hypertension with the modest antihypertensive effects of CPAP observed in intervention studies. PMID:20682533

  8. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  9. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Lawrence; Dresang, Lee T; Fontaine, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Elevated blood pressure in pregnancy may represent chronic hypertension (occurring before 20 weeks' gestation or persisting longer than 12 weeks after delivery), gestational hypertension (occurring after 20 weeks' gestation), preeclampsia, or preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. Preeclampsia is defined as hypertension and either proteinuria or thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, impaired liver function, pulmonary edema, or cerebral or visual symptoms. Proteinuria is not essential for the diagnosis and does not correlate with outcomes. Severe features of preeclampsia include a systolic blood pressure of at least 160 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure of at least 110 mm Hg, platelet count less than 100 × 103 per µL, liver transaminase levels two times the upper limit of normal, a doubling of the serum creatinine level or level greater than 1.1 mg per dL, severe persistent right upper-quadrant pain, pulmonary edema, or new-onset cerebral or visual disturbances. Preeclampsia without severe features can be managed with twice-weekly blood pressure monitoring, antenatal testing for fetal well-being and disease progression, and delivery by 37 weeks' gestation. Preeclampsia with any severe feature requires immediate stabilization and inpatient treatment with magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive drugs, corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity if less than 34 weeks' gestation, and delivery plans. Preeclampsia can worsen or initially present after delivery. Women with hypertensive disorders should be monitored as inpatients or closely at home for 72 hours postpartum.

  10. Knowledge and awareness of hypertension among patients with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Familoni, B Oluranti; Ogun, S Abayomi; Aina, A Olutoyin

    2004-05-01

    In Nigeria, systemic hypertension is the commonest noncommunicable disease, and public awareness about hypertension and its determinants is poor. This study aims to assess the knowledge and level of awareness of the disease among hypertensive patients attending the medical outpatient clinic of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH). Hypertensive patients who attended the medical outpatient clinic during the one-year study period and gave their consent were recruited into the study. Response to a questionnaire on various aspects of hypertension was analyzed using the STATA for Windows software. There were 254 hypertensive patients, of which 111 were males and 143 were females, giving a male: female ratio of 1:1.3. The mean age (SD) of the patients was 51 years +/- 12.2; 52.4% of the participants were aware that hypertension was the commonest noncommunicable disease in Nigeria. About one in 10 patients (11.4%) was aware that "nil symptom" is the commonest symptom of hypertension, while 37% were not aware that hypertension could cause renal failure. Only about one-third (35.4%) of the patients knew that hypertension should ideally be treated for life, while 58.3% believed that antihypertensive drugs should be used only when there are symptoms. The remaining 6.3% believed that the treatment of hypertension should be for periods ranging from two weeks to five years but not for life. This study has demonstrated inadequate knowledge of hypertension in patients with hypertension in our study population. Conscious efforts should be made and time set aside to health educate hypertensive patients. Organization of "hypertensive club or society" could be encouraged. These will reduce dissemination of false or inaccurate information by hypertensive patients to the public and its attendant dangers.

  11. Influence of random urine albumin-creatinine ratio of pregnant women with hypertension during the gestation period on perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qian; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Ronghui; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Jingying; Wang, Lijuan; Guo, Yuanying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the random urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) of pregnant women with hypertension during the gestation period on perinatal outcome. A total of 6,758 pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension and proteinuria were randomly selected between September, 2009 and June, 2015 for the study. Kidney function, blood pressure, history of gravidity and parity, embryo number and the birth weight of the participants was determined. Logistic regression and paired data correlation analyses were carried out with kidney function, blood pressure, history of gravidity and parity, embryo number, birth weight, maternal age, labor presentation and other risk factors as the independent variables and the newborn APGAR score as the dependent variable. The results showed that random urine ACR was increased and negatively correlated with the APGAR score (OR=−0.095, P=0.017). In conclusion, the increased random urine ACR can influence the postpartum outcome. Early intervention of women of childbearing age in early pregnancy or before pregnancy can minimize the adverse complications of infants and mothers such as pregnancy hypertension syndrome, and improve the outcome of the pregnancy. PMID:27703509

  12. Influence of random urine albumin-creatinine ratio of pregnant women with hypertension during the gestation period on perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qian; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Ronghui; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Jingying; Wang, Lijuan; Guo, Yuanying

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the random urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) of pregnant women with hypertension during the gestation period on perinatal outcome. A total of 6,758 pregnant women with pregnancy-induced hypertension and proteinuria were randomly selected between September, 2009 and June, 2015 for the study. Kidney function, blood pressure, history of gravidity and parity, embryo number and the birth weight of the participants was determined. Logistic regression and paired data correlation analyses were carried out with kidney function, blood pressure, history of gravidity and parity, embryo number, birth weight, maternal age, labor presentation and other risk factors as the independent variables and the newborn APGAR score as the dependent variable. The results showed that random urine ACR was increased and negatively correlated with the APGAR score (OR=-0.095, P=0.017). In conclusion, the increased random urine ACR can influence the postpartum outcome. Early intervention of women of childbearing age in early pregnancy or before pregnancy can minimize the adverse complications of infants and mothers such as pregnancy hypertension syndrome, and improve the outcome of the pregnancy.

  13. [Portopulmonar hypertension: Updated review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Almendros, Nielzer; Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz N; Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; Espinola Zavaleta, Nilda; Muñoz-Martínez, Sergio G; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-12-13

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare global entity, although epidemiological data are unknown in Mexico. However, chronic liver diseases are very prevalent in Mexico. The PPH is the 4th subtype in frequency in the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its diagnosis is within 2 groups: patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension and candidates for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Both echocardiogram and a right cardiac catheterization are crucial for diagnosis in both scenarios. The PPH is a challenge for OLT since it can increase perioperative mortality significantly. The use of specific therapy is the cornerstone of this disease, as a measure to improve the outcome of those who become candidates for OLT with moderate to severe PPH. It is important to recognize that PPH can be a contraindication to OLT. So far the role of lung-liver transplantation or heart-lung-liver transplantation as a measure to heal pulmonary vascular disease in patients with PPH is uncertain.

  14. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  15. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-03

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  16. [Hypertension and heart].

    PubMed

    Hennersdorf, Marcus G; Strauer, Bodo E

    2006-03-22

    The term hypertensive heart disease covers the entities left ventricular hypertrophy, microangiopathy, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, und increased risk of arrhythmias. From the pathophysiological point of view this is caused by hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes, interstitial fibrosis and media hypertrophy of the arterioles. As an earliest sign of hypertensive heart disease a microangiopathy can be diagnosed. Also a diastolic dysfunction can be found as an early change. In further persisting arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy develops (often asymmetric), and later a systolic dysfunction. Clinically, the patients suffer from angina pectoris, dyspnea and rhythm disorders. Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of ventricular malignant arrhythmias. Thus, the main therapeutic principle should be antihypertensive therapy with the goal of regression of hypertrophy and, as a consequence, a decreased mortality risk.

  17. Oral contraceptives and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G D

    1977-01-01

    A variety of studies have noted that the use of oral contraceptives generally leads to mild increases in blood pressure which are usually reversible when the medication is discontinued. Representative data from the Walnut Creek Contraceptive Drug Study and the Royal College of General Practitioners Study concerning the magnitude of excess risk and relation to duration of use and pull content are shown. Preliminary data from women, aged 25-34 years, taking multiphasic health checkups in Oakland and San Francisco, suggest that black as well as white women are susceptible to this side effect of oral contraceptives. A method is given for estimating the proportion of hypertensives among a population of young women that is attributable to oral contraceptive use. Although the risk of pull-induced hypertension is small for the average user, oral contraceptives appear to be an important identifiable cause of hypertension in samples of women studied.

  18. Snakes and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition of Angiotensin Conversion in Experimental Renovascular Hypertension. By Miller ED Jr, Samuels A, Haber E, and Barger AC. Science 1972; 177:1108-9. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.Constriction of the renal artery and controlled reduction of renal perfusion pressure is followed by a prompt increase in systemic renin activity and a concomitant rise in blood pressure in trained, unanesthetized dogs. The elevated blood pressure induced by the renal artery stenosis can be prevented by prior treatment with the nonapeptide Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro, which blocks conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Further, the nonapeptide can restore systemic pressure to normal in the early phase of renovascular hypertension. These results offer strong evidence that the renin- angiotensin system is responsible for the initiation of hypertension in the unilaterally nephrectomized dog with renal artery constriction.

  19. [Hypertension and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    The number of patients with high blood pressure and osteoporosis are increased year by year in our society. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidism to increase serum calcium level by calcium release from bone, which may accelerate osteoporosis. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. Recently, it has been reported that angiotensin receptor blockade clinically decreased the incidence of bone fracture. Renin-angiotensin system might be common molecule to regulate both hypertension and osteoporosis.

  20. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, P.

    1990-01-01

    In susceptible persons emotional stress results in immediate sympathetic stimulation, with a vasomotor response that results in a high-output state and elevated blood pressure; the vasopressor response seems to be transient. There seems to be no longitudinal epidemiologic validation of the attractive hypothesis that transiently elevated blood pressures are the prelude to fixed hypertension, however. The acquisition of hypertension by populations abandoning their traditional mode of living has been attributed to the sociocultural stress inherent in westernization, but these studies usually have not taken into account concomitants of this type of acculturation, such as dietary changes and increased body weight. The inverse relationship of blood pressure levels to education could explain the development of hypertension when aspiration to upward mobility is thwarted. The severity of perceived occupational stress relates inversely to blood pressure, suggesting that familiarity with a job renders the demands made by the work environment more predictable and less threatening in terms of vasopressor response. PMID:2219875

  1. Assessment of renal insufficiency in gestational proteinuric hypertension in third trimester pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Khatun, A; Latifa, S; Shahla, K; Anowara, B; Suhrab, A; Rashid, H U; Ullah, Sakhawat

    2003-12-01

    This prospective study on assessment of renal insufficiency in pregnancy induced proteinuric hypertension was carried out on 104 cases, in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (former IPGM&R), Dhaka during period of August 1997 to September 1998. The objective of this study, to find out the impairment of renal function in mild (<110 mmHg) and severe (>110 mmHg) hypertension. The frequency of mild hypertension was 96.29% and severe hypertension was 3.71% in third trimester of pregnancy. In this study mean age of the patient was 26.53+/-3.9 years, mean gestional age was 36.46+/-1.93 weeks and mean diastolic BP was 99.07 mmHg. The prevalence of hypertension was more in primigravida which was (72.23%) than multigravida (27.77%). Proteinuria was diagnosed as quantitative measurement of 24 hour urinary protein in photometric colorometer. The mean value of total urinary protein was 335+/-74.14 mg/24 hour (range 280-800 mg/24) hour). 1+Oedema was present in 48.14%, 2+ was 12.96% and 3+ was 14.81% of cases. There is a correlation of proteinuric hypertension with renal function which was done on the basis of laboratory investigations. Findings of parameters of renal function found to declined: Serum creatinine mean value 1.0+/-0.14 (P<0.001) (normal range 0.6-0.8 mg/dl.), Urinary creatinine mean 57.69+/-12 mg/dl., Creatinine clearance mean 53.72+/-11.63 ml/min, Total urinary protein mean 335.52+/-74.14 mg/24 hour. Total urinary volume mean 2985+/-49 ml/24 hr. All the patients and their babies were followed up till discharge from hospital. Cesarean section was done in 76% of cases and vaginal delivery was done in 24% cases. Mean hospital stay was prolonged in proteinuric hypertension 7+/-1 days than non proteinuric normotensive goup 3+/-1 days. All of those were average socio-economic status. Extreme low birth weight was 14.81% in 50% of IUGR cases.

  2. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  3. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  4. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  5. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  6. Immune mechanisms in hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Porteri, Enzo; Petroboni, Beatrice; Gavazzi, Alice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Low grade inflammation may have a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Several studies showed that both innate and adaptive immune systems may be involved, being T cells the most important players. Particularly, the balance between Th1 effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes may be crucial for blood pressure elevation and related organ damage development. In the presence of a mild elevation of blood pressure, neo-antigens are produced. Activated Th1 cells may then contribute to the persistent elevation of blood pressure by affecting vasculature, kidney and perivascular fat. On the other hand, Tregs represent a lymphocyte subpopulation with an anti-inflammatory role, being their activity crucial for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, Tregs were demonstrated to be able to protect from blood pressure elevation and from the development of organ damage, including micro and macrovascular alterations, in different animal models of genetic or experimental hypertension. In the vasculature, inflammation leads to vascular remodeling through cytokine activity, smooth muscle cell proliferation and oxidative stress. It is also known that a consistent part of ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is mediated by inflammatory infiltration and that Treg cell infusion have a protective role. Also the central nervous system has an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. In conclusion, hypertension development involves chronic inflammatory process. Knowledge of cellular and molecular players in the progression of hypertension has dramatically improved in the last decade, by assessing the central role of innate and adaptive immunity cells and proinflammatory cytokines driving the development of target organ damage. The new concept of role of immunity, especially implicating T lymphocytes, will eventually allow discovery of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and

  7. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, J; Egger, K; Harloff, A

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the clinical findings as well as thes diagnostic and therapeutic options for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri). Furthermore, the pathophysiological concepts are discussed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with no established pathogenesis. Common symptoms include headaches, visual loss and pulsatile tinnitus. Treatment has two major goals: the alleviation of headaches and the preservation of vision. Weight loss and acetazolamide are the cornerstones in the treatment of the disorder. Drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve sheath fenestration and stent angioplasty of a sinus stenosis can be employed in severe cases.

  8. Hypertension in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2012-06-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men, but cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women.

  9. Neurological theory of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eggers, A E

    2003-06-01

    Review of the older literature on the relationship between migraine and hypertension, written in the era before either condition could be treated, discloses a high rate of co-morbidity. A neurological theory of essential hypertension is proposed in which the two diseases are brought together into one entity. It is hypothesized that abnormally functioning serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus, as part of a chronic stress response, inappropriately activate and inhibit parts of the central and autonomic nervous systems, so as to cause the two conditions. This theory builds on a previously published neural theory of migraine.

  10. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension.

  11. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    PubMed

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  12. Risk of Preterm Delivery and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Relation to Maternal Comorbid Mood and Migraine Disorders during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O.; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We evaluated risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders. We used data from a cohort study of 3,432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-gestational or early pregnancy (before 20 weeks gestational) mood disorder and pre-gestational migraine diagnoses were ascertained from in-person interview and medical record review. We fitted generalized linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine, and comorbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RRs were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with comorbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with comorbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05–3.34) compared with the referent group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of preeclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83–6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00–2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with comorbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from depression screening during prenatal care, and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with comorbid mood-migraine disorders. PMID:21281324

  13. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  14. Gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among young adults.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bethany; Zajacova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health.

  15. Gender Differences in Hypertension and Hypertension Awareness Among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    EVERETT, BETHANY; ZAJACOVA, ANNA

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health. PMID:25879259

  16. Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension among adolescents.

    PubMed

    McNiece, Karen L; Poffenbarger, Timothy S; Turner, Jennifer L; Franco, Kathy D; Sorof, Jonathan M; Portman, Ronald J

    2007-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension on the basis of the 2004 National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group guidelines in an adolescent school-screening population. Cross-sectional assessment of blood pressure (BP) in 6790 adolescents (11-17 years) in Houston schools was conducted from 2003 to 2005. Initial measurements included height, weight, and 4 oscillometric BP readings. Repeat measurements were obtained on 2 subsequent occasions in students with persistently elevated BP. Final prevalence was adjusted for loss to follow-up and logistic regression used to assess risk factors. BP distribution at initial screen was 81.1% normal, 9.5% pre-hypertension, and 9.4% hypertension (8.4% Stage 1; 1% Stage 2). Prevalence after 3 screenings was 81.1% normal, 15.7% pre-hypertension, and 3.2% hypertension (2.6% Stage 1; 0.6% Stage 2). Hypertension and pre-hypertension increased with increasing body mass index. Sex, race, and classification as either at-risk for overweight or overweight were independently associated with pre-hypertension. Only classification as overweight was associated with hypertension. Application of new classification guidelines for adolescents with elevated BP reveals approximately 20% are at risk for hypertension. Further research determining the significance of each BP category and refining definitions to account for BP variability is warranted.

  17. CD34 and CD49f Double-Positive and Lineage Marker-Negative Cells Isolated from Human Myometrium Exhibit Stem Cell-Like Properties Involved in Pregnancy-Induced Uterine Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masanori; Kajitani, Takashi; Uchida, Hiroshi; Arase, Toru; Oda, Hideyuki; Uchida, Sayaka; Ota, Kuniaki; Nagashima, Takashi; Masuda, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Asada, Hironori; Hida, Naoko; Mabuchi, Yo; Morikawa, Satoru; Ito, Mamoru; Bulun, Serdar E; Okano, Hideyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Maruyama, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    Repeated and dramatic pregnancy-induced uterine enlargement and remodeling throughout reproductive life suggests the existence of uterine smooth muscle stem/progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize stem/progenitor-like cells from human myometrium through identification of specific surface markers. We here identify CD49f and CD34 as markers to permit selection of the stem/progenitor cell-like population from human myometrium and show that human CD45(-) CD31(-) glycophorin A(-) and CD49f(+) CD34(+) myometrial cells exhibit stem cell-like properties. These include side population phenotypes, an undifferentiated status, high colony-forming ability, multilineage differentiation into smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, and in vivo myometrial tissue reconstitution following xenotransplantation. Furthermore, CD45(-) CD31(-) glycophorin A(-) and CD49f(+) CD34(+) myometrial cells proliferate under hypoxic conditions in vitro and, compared with the untreated nonpregnant myometrium, show greater expansion in the estrogen-treated nonpregnant myometrium and further in the pregnant myometrium in mice upon xenotransplantation. These results suggest that the newly identified myometrial stem/progenitor-like cells influenced by hypoxia and sex steroids may participate in pregnancy-induced uterine enlargement and remodeling, providing novel insights into human myometrial physiology. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  18. [Hypertension and sports activity].

    PubMed

    Mos, Lucio; Driussi, Caterina; Mihaleje, Martina

    2010-10-01

    The importance of physical activity in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated in many studies. In particular, the effect of exercise, especially aerobioc exercise, is to reduce blood pressure and heart rate by reducing sympathetic tone, and to correct many factors of the metabolic syndrome. Exercise prescription should be based on knowledge of the changes induced by training, but also on risk assessment, both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular, of hypertensive subjects. It is generally accepted that for prevention and treatment of hypertension is useful to perform 3-4 weekly sessions of aerobic exercise for 30-45 min, at 50-70% of maximum working capacity. The recommended activities are walking, running, cycling and programs of mixed aerobic exercise. People with hypertension may follow their own personal inclinations, by choosing a sport and doing it at a competitive level. In hypertensive athletes the eligibility for competitive sports activities implies a careful medical evaluation, according to the recently published Italian COCIS cardiac guidelines.

  19. Treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Czarina Acelajado, M; Calhoun, D A

    2009-12-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is a common clinical problem. Patients with RH have increased cardiovascular risk. These patients also have high risk for having reversible causes of hypertension and may potentially benefit from special diagnostic or therapeutic considerations. The purpose of this review was to discuss RH, its definition, recognition, evaluation and treatment. Authors define RH and the implications of this definition. They present latest data on its prevalence, prognostic implications, genetics, and patient characteristics. Elements of pseudoresistance and possible etiologies of treatment resistance are also identified. Lastly, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to RH are discussed, focusing on antihypertensive medication classes that have proven benefit in patients with RH, and also on novel therapeutic approaches in these patients. RH is a common clinical problem and carries an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as well as target organ damage. Patients with RH are aat high risk for reversible causes of hypertension and may benefit from special diagnostic or therapeutic considerations. Elements of pseudoresistance, intake of interfering substances and secondary causes of hypertension should be searched for and corrected, if possible. Therapeutic lifestyle modifications should be emphasized. Medical therapy includes optimizing diuretic use and considering the use of mineralocorticoid antagonists as add on antihypertensive agents. Novel approaches include surgical and transcatheter techniques, chronotherapy, and new classes of antihypertensive agents.

  20. Hypertension in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aglony, Marlene; Acevedo, Monica; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In adults, hypertension has long been perceived as a public health problem. By contrast, its impact in childhood is far less appreciated. In fact, quite often, high blood pressure in children is not even diagnosed. Blood pressure is a vital sign that is routinely obtained during a physical examination of adults, but only very seldom in children. The diagnosis of hypertension in children is complicated because 'normal' blood pressure values vary with age, sex and height. As a consequence, almost 75% of the cases of arterial hypertension and 90% of the cases of prehypertension in children and adolescents are currently undiagnosed. Furthermore, adolescence hypertension is increasing in prevalence as the prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful method for risk evaluation in adolescents. In addition to being viewed as an important cardiovascular risk factor in adolescents, elevated blood pressure should prompt a thorough search for other modifiable risk factors that, if treated, might reduce teenagers' risk of developing cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Thus, assessing blood pressure values in children represents one of the most important measurable markers of cardiovascular risk later in life and a major step in preventive medicine.

  1. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  3. Children and Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  4. Project "Hypertension Alert."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Emma Lou

    1983-01-01

    "Hypertension Alert," a 1979-80 blood pressure screening-awareness project of the Yonkers, New York Public Schools, is described. Data is analyzed in tables for ethnic composition, and range of blood pressure readings for the high school, junior high school, and elementary school students tested. (Author/JMK)

  5. Children and Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  6. Decoding white coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-03-16

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the "white coat" condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure.

  7. Decoding white coat hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-01-01

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the “white coat” condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure. PMID:28352632

  8. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment.

  9. Evaluation of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Gaurav; Baracco, Rossana

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is an important public health problem, and increasingly children are being diagnosed with primary hypertension. As the list of secondary causes of hypertension is extensive, pediatric practitioners increasingly need to decide on investigations needed for evaluating children presenting with high blood pressure. The differentiation between primary and secondary hypertension is paramount to understanding this important health issue, since many forms of secondary hypertension require specific treatment. The review evaluates the current available guidelines and practice patterns for evaluating children with elevated blood pressure. The review also aims to provide a framework for cost-effective evaluation strategies for children with elevated blood pressure based on current recommendations and evidence.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  11. Resistant hypertension: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Dell' Omo, Giulia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Cameli, Matteo; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Coiro, Stefano; Emdin, Michele; Liga, Riccardo; Marcucci, Rossella; Morrone, Doralisa; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Padeletti, Luigi; Savino, Ketty

    2017-09-05

    Despite the availability of anti-hypertensive medications with proven efficacy and good tolerability, many hypertensive patients have blood pressure levels(BP) not at the goals set by international societies. Some of these patients are either non-adherent to the prescribed drugs or not optimally treated. However, a proportion, despite adequate treatment, has resistant hypertension(RH) defined as office BP above goal despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses (one ideally being a diuretic). Diagnosis of RH based upon office measurements, however, needs confirmation through 24-h BP monitoring to exclude "white coat" RH since cardiovascular events and mortality rates follow mean ambulatory BPs. Although several studies have approached the issue of the prevalence of RH in the hypertensive population, its prevalence is by and large based upon reasonable but approximate estimates for reasons detailed in the text. Standardized combination therapy based upon angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, amlodipine or other dihydropiridine calcium channel blockers and a diuretic (thiazide and thiazide-like compounds as cholrthalidone or indapamide) has been advocated to treat RH with spironolactone as fourth add-on drug. Interventional procedures such as renal denervation have been devised to treat RH and implemented in some patients with RH not responding to medical treatment. However, the results of this interventional procedure have insofar not been positive. It is unclear whether RH constitutes a specific phenotype of EH or should rather be considered a more serious form of uncontrolled hypertension. Whatever the case, its presence associates with and increased cardio- and cerebrovascular risk and deserves, therefore, particular care.

  12. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  13. Pharmacologic Management of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Misurac, Jason; Nichols, Kristen R; Wilson, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in children is common, and the prevalence of primary hypertension is increasing with the obesity epidemic and changing dietary choices. Careful measurement of blood pressure is important to correctly diagnose hypertension, as many factors can lead to inaccurate blood pressure measurement. Hypertension is diagnosed based on comparison of age-, sex-, and height-based norms with the average systolic and diastolic blood pressures on three separate occasions. In the absence of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD), stage I hypertension is managed first by diet and exercise, with the addition of drug therapy if this fails. First-line treatment of stage I hypertension with TOD and stage II hypertension includes both lifestyle changes and medications. First-line agents include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and calcium-channel blockers. Hypertensive emergency with end-organ effects requires immediate modest blood pressure reduction to alleviate symptoms. This is usually accomplished with IV medications. Long-term reduction in blood pressure to normal levels is accomplished gradually. Specific medication choice for outpatient hypertension management is determined by the underlying cause of hypertension and the comparative adverse effect profiles, along with practical considerations such as cost and frequency of administration. Antihypertensive medication is initiated at a starting dose and can be gradually increased to effect. If ineffective at the recommended maximum dose, an additional medication with a complementary mechanism of action can be added.

  14. Hypertension in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hanna, N N; Kenady, D E

    1999-12-01

    Adrenal-dependent hypertension syndromes are uncommon forms of hypertension. They include primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, Cushing"s syndrome, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Pheochromocytomas are the cause of hypertension in 0.1% to 0.2% of hypertensive patients. Excess catecholamine release and other neural and humoral mechanisms contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension. Patients with pheochromocytomas have a potentially curable cause of endocrine hypertension and, if undetected, pheochromocytomas confer a high risk for morbidity and mortality, especially during surgical procedures and pregnancy. All patients with incidental adrenal tumors, regardless of tumor size, should be biochemically screened for pheochromocytoma (especially before resection or needle biopsy) to avoid precipitation of a lethal hypertensive crisis.

  15. [Pathophysiology of hypertension: what's new?].

    PubMed

    Büchner, Nikolaus; Vonend, Oliver; Rump, Lars Christian

    2006-06-01

    The pathophysiology of primary hypertension is still unresolved and appears more complex than ever. It is beyond the scope of this article to review all new scientific developments in this field. On clinical grounds, hypertension is divided into primary and secondary forms. Here, the authors discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension associated with three common disease entities showing a large overlap with primary hypertension: chronic kidney disease (CKD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and hyperaldosteronism. Especially in CKD and OSA, the activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays a crucial role. It is the authors' belief that hypertension due to these three diseases is more common than previously appreciated and may account for about 20% of the hypertensive population. The knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology allows early diagnosis and guides optimal treatment of these hypertensive patients.

  16. The evolving definition of systemic arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S; Giles, Thomas D

    2010-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease. Hypertension also contributes to excessive morbidity and mortality. Whereas excellent therapeutic options are available to treat hypertension, there is an unsettled issue about the very definition of hypertension. At what level of blood pressure should we treat hypertension? Does the definition of hypertension change in the presence of co-morbid conditions? This article covers in detail the evolving concepts in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  17. Hypertension, preeclampsia and eclampsia among HIV-infected pregnant women from Latin America and Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz; Krauss, Margot R; Megazzini, Karen; Coutinho, Conrado Milani; Kreitchmann, Regis; Melo, Victor Hugo; Pilotto, José Henrique; Ceriotto, Mariana; Hofer, Cristina B; Siberry, George K; Watts, D Heather

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for hypertensive disorders in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women. Hypertensive disorders (HD) including preeclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E) and pregnancy induced hypertension, and risk factors were evaluated in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women from Latin America and the Caribbean enrolled between 2002 and 2009. Only pregnant women enrolled for the first time in the study and delivered at ≥20 weeks gestation were analyzed. HD were diagnosed in 73 (4.8%, 95% CI: 3.8%-6.0%) of 1513 patients; 35 (47.9%) had PE/E. HD was significantly increased among women with a gestational age-adjusted body mass index (gBMI) ≥25 kg/m(2) (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9-5.0), hemoglobin (Hg) ≥11 g/dL at delivery (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.2-3.6) and age ≥35 years (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1-3.2). PE/E was increased among women with a gBMI ≥25 kg/m(2) (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.5-6.0) and Hg ≥11 g/dL at delivery (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.2-6.5). A previous history of PE/E increased the risk of PE/E 6.7 fold (95% CI: 1.8-25.5). HAART before conception was associated with PE/E (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.9). HIV-infected women, with a previous history of PE/E, a gBMI ≥25 kg/m(2), Hg at delivery ≥11 g/dL and in use of HAART before conception are at an increased risk of developing PE/E during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. All rights reserved.

  18. HYPERTENSION, PREECLAMPSIA AND ECLAMPSIA AMONG HIV-INFECTED PREGNANT WOMEN FROM LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN COUNTRIES

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz; Krauss, Margot R; Megazzini, Karen; Coutinho, Conrado Milani; Kreitchmann, Regis; Melo, Victor Hugo; Pilotto, José Henrique; Ceriotto, Mariana; Hofer, Cristina B.; Siberry, George K.; Watts, D. Heather

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for hypertensive disorders in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women. Methods Hypertensive disorders (HD) including preeclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E) and pregnancy-induced hypertension, and risk factors were evaluated in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women from Latin America and the Caribbean enrolled between 2002-2009. Only pregnant women enrolled for the first time in the study and delivered at ≥ 20 weeks gestation were analyzed. Results HD were diagnosed in 73 (4.8%, 95%CI: 3.8%-6.0%) of 1513 patients; 35(47.9%) had PE/E. HD was significantly increased among women with a gestational age-adjusted body mass index (gBMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 (OR=3.1; 95%CI: 1.9-5.0), hemoglobin (Hg) ≥11 g/dL at delivery (OR=2.1; 95%CI: 1.2-3.6) and age ≥35 years (OR=1.8; 95%CI: 1.1-3.2). PE/E was increased among women with a gBMI ≥25 kg/m2 (OR=3.0; 95%CI: 1.5-6.0) and Hg ≥11 g/dL at delivery (OR=2.8; 95%CI: 1.2-6.5). A previous history of PE/E increased the risk of PE/E 6.7 fold (95%CI: 1.8-25.5). HAART before conception was associated with PE/E (OR=2.3; 95%CI: 1.1-4.9) Conclusions HIV-infected women, with a previous history of PE/E, a gBMI ≥25 kg/m2, Hg at delivery ≥11 g/dL and in use of HAART before conception are at an increased risk of developing PE/E during pregnancy. PMID:24462561

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension in Hemolytic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  20. Hypertension and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Seux, Marie Laure; Lenoir, Hermine; Rigaud, Anne Sophie; Forette, Françoise

    2003-11-01

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases. Several epidemiologic studies have also indicated a positive correlation between cognitive decline or dementia and blood pressure level. Indeed, the results of most longitudinal studies show that cognitive functioning is often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Cerebral infarcts, lacunae, and white matter changes are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia, but may also favor the development of Alzheimer's disease. Microcirculation disorders and endothelial dysfunctions are also advanced to explain the deterioration in cognitive functions in hypertensive subjects. Data from recent therapeutic trials open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments and must be confirmed by other studies.

  1. Hypertension in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women. PMID:22427070

  2. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  3. [Dietary modification in hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Kloock, B; König, D

    2006-11-23

    Successful treatment of hypertension requires a holistic approach. In this connection, focusing on a healthy lifestyle, eating, drinking and consumption behavior and, finally, the quality of foodstuffs and the exercise habits of the patient represents an essential supplement to the classical forms of pharmaceutical treatment. The major dietary-physiological factors have been shown to be weight reduction, the monitoring of salt consumption, appropriate intake of fiber, a preference for vegetables, and a reduction of immoderate alcohol consumption.

  4. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  5. Genetics of experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, A F; Clark, J S; Jeffs, B; Anderson, N H; Negrin, C D; Lee, W K; Brosnan, M J

    1998-12-01

    Experimental models of genetic hypertension are used to develop paradigms to study human essential hypertension while removing some of the complexity inherent in the study of human subjects. Since 1991 several quantitative trait loci responsible for blood pressure regulation have been identified in various rat crosses. More recently, a series of interesting quantitative trait loci influencing cardiac hypertrophy, stroke, metabolic syndrome and renal damage has also been described. It is recognized that the identification of large chromosomal regions containing a quantitative trait locus is only a first step towards gene identification. The next step is the production of congenic strains and substrains to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus and to narrow down the chromosomal region of interest. Several congenic strains have already been produced, with further refinement of the methodology currently in progress. The ultimate goal is to achieve positional cloning of the causal gene, a task which has so far been elusive. There are several areas of cross-fertilization between experimental and human genetics of hypertension, with a successful transfer of two loci directly from rats to humans and with new pharmacogenetic approaches which may be utilized in both experimental and clinical settings.

  6. Severe paroxysmal hypertension (pseudopheochromocytoma).

    PubMed

    Mann, Samuel J

    2008-02-01

    Paroxysmal hypertension always engenders a search for a catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma. Yet 98% of people with paroxysmal hypertension do not have this tumor. The cause and management of paroxysmal hypertension remain a mystery, and the subject of remarkably few papers. This review presents an approach to understanding and successfully treating this disorder. Patients experience symptomatic blood pressure surges likely linked to sympathetic nervous system stimulation. A specific personality profile associated with this disorder suggests a psychological basis, attributable to repressed emotion related to prior emotional trauma or a repressive (nonemotional) coping style. Based on this understanding, three forms of intervention, alone or in combination, appear successful: antihypertensive therapy with agents directed at the sympathetically mediated blood pressure elevation (eg, combined alpha- and beta-blockade or central alpha-agonists such as clonidine); psychopharmacologic interventions including anxiolytic and/or antidepressant agents; and psychological intervention, particularly reassurance and increased psychological awareness. An appropriately selected intervention can reduce or eliminate attacks in most patients.

  7. [Arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1993-07-01

    It is considered hypertension in children, the persistent increase of the blood pressure values above percentile 95 for age and sex, in no less than three determinations, with adequate register techniques. Blood pressure is maintained mainly by the regulation of metabolism of sodium and water in the intravascular space, through the adequate balance of intake, filtration, reabsorption and renal throughout. It is also regulated by hormonal factors. Weight gain control in teen-agers could be useful to prevent high blood pressure in adults. In children, it is generally secondary to renal, reno-vascular, endocrinological or tumoral diseases. Clinical manifestations and the recommended diagnostic procedures are analysed to detect the most frequent causes of hypertension at different ages. Most cases response with antihypertensive drugs in combination with hyposodic diet. For the hypertensive crisis, asa diuretics and powerful antihypertensive drugs may be employed. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency could also need dialytic treatments. Renovascular diseases require almost always invasive treatments. Better prognosis in children with severe high blood pressure is related with recent diagnostic procedures, surgical techniques and antihypertensive drugs improvements.

  8. Beta blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thadani, U

    1983-11-10

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective in the management of patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Noncardioselective agents, cardioselective agents and beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are equally effective, provided they are used in equipotent doses. Beta blockers can be used as first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and can be safely combined with diuretics, vasodilators, or both, for a better control of blood pressure. The exact mechanism by which beta blockers decrease blood pressure remains speculative, but they all reduce cardiac output during long-term therapy; drugs with ISA lower cardiac output and heart rate less than do drugs without ISA. Pharmacokinetic properties of beta blockers differ widely; drugs metabolized by the liver have shorter plasma half-lives than drugs primarily excreted by the kidneys. Although many of the side effects of various beta blockers are similar, differences in water and lipid solubility account for a higher incidence of central nervous system side effects with lipid-soluble drugs (such as propranolol and metoprolol) than with hydrophilic drugs (such as atenolol and timolol). The incidence of cold extremities has been reported to be less with drugs with ISA, and the incidence of bronchospasm less with cardioselective drugs. In the management of uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension, all beta blockers are equally effective and produce less troublesome side effects than alternative antihypertensive agents. For effective therapy beta blockers can be used in 2 divided daily doses or even once daily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  10. Hypertension: management perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2012-10-01

    The increasing worldwide prevalence of hypertension and the related increase in cost due to diagnosis, management and negative outcomes forces public health institutions and clinical researchers to find new strategies to improve blood pressure (BP) control. So what are the possible future perspectives for high BP management? Three main points are briefly discussed in this article: individualized therapy, the known genetic contribution to hypertension development and control, and the improvement of disease management, including perspectives on new antihypertensive drug development. It is likely that the integration of the best available current knowledge with recent diagnostic and therapeutic achievements for the management of hypertension prevention and treatment will lead to the early detection of at-risk conditions, early diagnosis, and individualized and efficacious treatment. The most promising antihypertensive drugs currently in development are innovative renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulators. Further drugs have potentially interesting mechanisms of action, but renalase analogs are in the very early phases of development, and available endothelin antagonists have a poor safety profile.

  11. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  12. Treprostinil for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Lang, Irene; Naeije, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Treprostinil is a stable, long-acting prostacyclin analogue which can be administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a portable miniature delivery system. Subcutaneous treprostinil has been shown in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to improve exercise capacity, clinical state, functional class, pulmonary hemodynamics, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, an uncommon disease of poor prognosis. Side effects include facial flush, headache, jaw pain, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea, all typical of prostacyclin, and manageable by symptom-directed dose adjustments, and infusion site pain which may make further treatment impossible in 7%–10% of the patients. Long-term survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with subcutaneous treprostinil is similar to that reported with intravenous epoprostenol. There are uncontrolled data suggesting efficacy of subcutaneous treprostinil in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treprostinil can also be administered intravenously, although increased doses, up to 2–3 times those given subcutaneously, appear to be needed to obtain the same efficacy. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial of inhaled treprostinil on top of bosentan and sildenafil therapies have shown significance on the primary endpoint, which was exercise capacity as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes. Trials of oral formulations of treprostinil have been initiated. PMID:18827901

  13. Hypertension: issues in control and resistance.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Minor, Deborah S

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in more than 50% of treated patients. Barriers to hypertension control include those that are patient-related, physician-related, and related to the health system. Identification of uncontrolled hypertension, pseudoresistant hyper-tension, and resistant hypertension require thoughtful attention to accurate blood pressure measurement, lifestyle factors, evaluation for secondary causes of hypertension, and proper treatment. Recent guidelines emphasize the importance of aggressive treatment and referral to hypertension specialists for patients with resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure that remains above goal despite the use of three appropriate anti-hypertensive agents.

  14. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage in Ghanaian Civil Servants with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Addo, Juliet; Smeeth, Liam; Leon, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low levels of detection, treatment and control of hypertension have repeatedly been reported from sub Saharan Africa, potentially increasing the likelihood of target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1015 urban civil servants aged≥25 years from seven central government ministries in Accra, Ghana. Participants diagnosed to have hypertension were examined for target organ involvement. Hypertensive target organ damage was defined as the detection of any of the following: left ventricular hypertrophy diagnosed by electrocardiogram, reduction in glomerular filtration rate, the presence of hypertensive retinopathy or a history of a stroke. Results Of the 219 hypertensive participants examined, 104 (47.5%) had evidence of target organ damage. The presence of target organ damage was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The odds of developing hypertensive target organ damage was five to six times higher in participants with blood pressure (BP)≥180/110 mmHg compared to those with BP<140/90 mmHg, and there was a trend to higher odds of target organ damage with increasing BP (p = 0.001). Women had about lower odds of developing target organ damage compared to men. Conclusions The high prevalence of target organ damage in this working population associated with increasing blood pressure, emphasises the need for hypertension control programs aimed at improving the detection of hypertension, and importantly addressing the issues inhibiting the effective treatment and control of people with hypertension in the population. PMID:19701488

  15. Imaging in hypertensive heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Kramer, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive heart disease is the target organ response to arterial hypertension. Left ventricular hypertrophy represents an important predictor for cardiovascular events. Myocardial fibrosis, a common end point in hypertensive heart disease, has been linked to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Echocardiography is clinically useful in the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy and the assessment of diastolic function. Although echocardiography is more widely available, cardiac magnetic resonance has been demonstrated to be more reproducible for the estimation of left ventricular mass. Future developments in cardiac magnetic resonance techniques may facilitate the quantification of diffuse fibrosis that occurs in hypertensive heart disease. Thus, advances in cardiac imaging provide comprehensive, noninvasive tools for imaging left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, myocardial fibrosis and ischemia observed in hypertensive heart disease. The objective of this article is to summarize the state-of-the-art and the future of multimodality imaging of hypertensive heart disease. PMID:21453216

  16. Calcium channel antagonists in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    1989-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of calcium entry-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure is related to their capacity to act upon the primary hemodynamic derangement in hypertension: the increased peripheral vascular resistance. They can be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of various forms of hypertensive disease. The calcium entry-blockers appear to be the most useful agents for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly and for the treatment of hypertension associated with ischemic heart disease, pulmonary obstructive disease, peripheral vascular disease, and supraventricular arrhythmias. They are effective in reducing blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertension and must be considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertensive crisis.

  17. Paradoxical hypertension with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Herzog, Eyal; Halpern, Dan G; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Subacute (medical) tamponade develops over a period of days or even weeks. Previous studies have shown that subacute tamponade is uncommonly associated with hypotension. On the contrary, many of those patients are indeed hypertensive at initial presentation. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertensive cardiac tamponade and hemodynamic response to pericardial effusion drainage. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent pericardial effusion drainage for subacute pericardial tamponade. Diagnosis of pericardial tamponade was established by the treating physician based on clinical data and supportive echocardiographic findings. Patients were defined as hypertensive if initial systolic blood pressure (BP) was ≥140 mm Hg. Thirty patients with subacute tamponade who underwent pericardial effusion drainage were included in the analysis. Eight patients (27%) were hypertensive with a mean systolic BP of 167 compared to 116 mm Hg in 22 nonhypertensive patients. Hypertensive patients with tamponade were more likely to have advanced renal disease (63% vs 14%, p <0.05) and pre-existing hypertension (88% vs 46, p <0.05) and less likely to have systemic malignancy (0 vs 41%, p <0.05). Systolic BP decreased significantly in patients with hypertensive tamponade after pericardial effusion drainage. Those results are consistent with previous studies with an estimated prevalence of hypertensive tamponade from 27% to 43%. In conclusion, a hypertensive response was observed in approximately 1/3 of patients with subacute pericardial tamponade. Relief of cardiac tamponade commonly resulted in a decrease in BP.

  18. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  20. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between placenta previa and risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: a meta-analysis based on 7 cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Yin, X-A; Liu, Y-S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the association between placenta previa and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). A computerized literature search was carried out on PubMed to collect relevant articles on the association between placenta previa and HDP before November 2013. Pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 7 cohort studies were identified according to the inclusion criteria. Overall, a significantly inverse correlation between placenta previa and HDP was found when all study results were pooled into the meta-analysis (RR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.97). For subgroup analyses, the same results were found in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) group (RR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.23-0.57) but not in other HDPs group (RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.44-2.00). This meta-analysis suggested a reduced risk for PIH in women with placenta previa.

  2. Liquorice: a root cause of secondary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Calum N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a patient presenting with hypertension and hypokalaemia who was ultimately diagnosed with liquorice- induced pseudohyperaldosteronism. This rare cause of secondary hypertension illustrates the importance of a methodical approach to the assessment of hypertension. PMID:28210494

  3. Drug induced hypertension--An unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Messerli, Franz H; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-09-15

    Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension or well-known forms of secondary hypertension, such as renal disease, renal artery stenosis, or common endocrine diseases (hyperaldosteronism or pheochromocytoma). Physicians are less aware of drug induced hypertension. A variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances may increase blood pressure. When a patient with well controlled hypertension is presented with acute blood pressure elevation, use of drug or chemical substance which increases blood pressure should be suspected. Drug-induced blood pressure increases are usually minor and short-lived, although rare hypertensive emergencies associated with use of certain drugs have been reported. Careful evaluation of prescription and non-prescription medications is crucial in the evaluation of the hypertensive individual and may obviate the need for expensive and unnecessary evaluations. Discontinuation of the offending agent will usually achieve adequate blood pressure control. When use of a chemical agent which increases blood pressure is mandatory, anti-hypertensive therapy may facilitate continued use of this agent. We summarize the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action.

  4. Malignant hypertension with reversible brainstem hypertensive encephalopathy and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ichiro; Uchino, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tanahashi, Norio

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with headache and nausea. Severe hypertension, renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and anemia were present. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of her head revealed widespread hyperintense lesions located in the brainstem and cerebellum on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging. Hypertensive encephalopathy was suspected, and antihypertensive therapy was started. A second MRI of the patient's head on day 12 of hospitalization revealed that the hyperintensities in the brainstem and cerebellum had almost disappeared, and that thrombocytopenia, anemia, and renal dysfunction had also gradually improved. Test results led to a diagnosis of malignant hypertension. This patient was regarded as suffering from malignant hypertension with reversible brainstem hypertensive encephalopathy (RBHE) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). RBHE and TMA are known to occur as complications of malignant hypertension, but there has been no previous report of them occurring simultaneously. RBHE and TMA related to malignant hypertension are both conditions that can be improved by the rapid institution of antihypertensive therapy, and as such, early diagnosis and treatment are important. When treating patients with malignant hypertension, the possibility that it may be complicated by both RBHE and TMA must be kept in mind. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  6. Fermented milk for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-04-18

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle interventions, such as fermented milk, would be of great importance. To investigate whether fermented milk or similar products produced by lactobacilli fermentation of milk proteins has any blood pressure lowering effect in humans when compared to no treatment or placebo. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), English language databases, including MEDLINE (1966-2011), EMBASE (1974-2011), Cochrane Complementary Medicine Trials Register, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED) (1985-2011), Food science and technology abstracts (1969-2011). Randomised controlled trials; cross over and parallel studies evaluating the effect on blood pressure of fermented milk in humans with an intervention period of 4 weeks or longer. Data was extracted individually by two authors, afterwards agreement had to be obtained before imputation in the review. A modest overall effect of fermented milk on SBP was found (MD -2.45; 95% CI -4.30 to -0.60), no effect was evident on DBP (MD -0.67; 95% CI -1.48, 0.14). The review does not support an effect of fermented milk on blood pressure. Despite the positive effect on SBP the authors conclude, for several reasons, that fermented milk has no effect on blood pressure. The effect found was very modest and only on SBP, the included studies were very heterogeneous and several with weak methodology. Finally, sensitivity and subgroup analyses could not reproduce the antihypertensive effect. The results do not give notion to the use of fermented milk as treatment for hypertension or as a lifestyle intervention for pre-hypertension nor would it influence population blood pressure.

  7. [Arterial hypertension and prediabetes].

    PubMed

    Boned Ombuena, Patricia; Rodilla Sala, Enrique; Costa Muñoz, José Antonio; Pascual Izuel, José María

    2016-11-04

    The aim of this study was to assess the factors related to new diabetes in hypertensive. This prospective follow-up study involved 2588 non-diabetic, hypertensive patients. The total follow-up was 15053 patient-years with a median of 3.4 years (interquartile interval 1.4-6.8). During the follow-up 333 (13%) patients had new diabetes, with a conversion rate of 2.21 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-2.46) 100/patients/year. In a Cox proportional hazard model including baseline characteristics and modifications during the follow up the three components of metabolic syndrome (excluding blood pressure and glucose values) HR 1.69 (95% CI, 1.36-2.09), family history of diabetes HR 1,49 (95% CI, 1,20-1,85) and baseline blood glucose ≥110 mg/dl HR 7.84 (95% CI, 5.99-10.29) were the most important factors related to new diabetes. Weight variation during the follow up, and statins, beta-bloquers or diuretic treatment did not increase the risk of new diabetes, blood pressure control at the end of study reduce the risk HR 0,74 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91). In hypertensive non-diabetic patients in primary prevention the factors related to new diabetes can easily identified at the beginning of follow up. Being obese, with family history of diabetes, and glucose values ≥110 mg/dl dramatically increase the risk of developing new diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Chronotherapy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bendersky, M

    2015-01-01

    The blood pressure profile in most normo- and hypertensive subjects are currently known, as well as the impact their changes induced on the cardio- and cerebrovascular risk. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has contributed greatly to the knowledge of this parameter. It to correct the schedule of drug administration (chronotherapy) with changes in any component of the BP profile that have better correlation with risk. These include the nocturnal decrease and the morning BP surge. Investigations in this direction are still scarce, and multicenter studies need to be conducted that can answer the true preventive impact of such modifications.

  9. Management of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Essop, M R; Galie, N; Badesch, D B; Lalloo, U; Mahomed, A G; Naidoo, D P; Ntsekhe, M; Williams, P G

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a potentially lethal disease mainly affecting young females. Although the precise mechanism of PAH is unknown, the past decade has seen the advent of many new classes of drugs with improvement in the overall prognosis of the disease. Unfortunately the therapeutic options for PAH in South Africa are severely limited. The Working Group on PAH is a joint effort by the South African Heart Association and the South African Thoracic Society tasked with improving the recognition and management of patients with PAH. This article provides a brief summary of the disease and the recommendations of the first meeting of the Working Group.

  10. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti

  11. Endocrine hypertension – Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashpal; Kotwal, Narendra; Menon, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing's syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease. PMID:22145133

  12. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  13. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  14. Hypertensive retinopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, Sherry A.

    2003-01-01

    A 12-year-old cat presented for sudden blindness was diagnosed with hypertensive retinopathy on the basis of ophthalmologic and ultrasonic examination. Renal failure due to a large intranephric cyst obstructing the right ureter and renal artery was the suggested cause of the systemic hypertension. The cat died 8 hours after unilateral nephrectomy. PMID:12650046

  15. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  16. Low incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in women treated with spiramycin for toxoplasma infection

    PubMed Central

    Todros, T; Verdiglione, P; Oggè, G; Paladini, D; Vergani, P; Cardaropoli, S

    2006-01-01

    Aims Toxoplasma infection in pregnancy is usually treated with long-term administration of the macrolide spiramycin to prevent fetal malformations. We had empirically observed that treated patients seldom developed pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), a common and severe disorder of pregnancy whose aetiology and pathogenesis are still debated. Some clinical and experimental data suggest that infection could play a role in its development. Methods To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort of 417 pregnant women treated with spiramycin because of seroconversion for Toxoplasma gondii and 353 low-risk women who did not take any antibiotic during pregnancy. PIH was defined as blood pressure >140/90 mmHg on two or more occasions, occurring after 20 weeks of gestational age. Results Seventeen (5.2%) women in the control group developed PIH compared with two (0.5%) in the case group. The odds of developing the disease were significantly lower in the treated subjects (odds ratio =0.092, 95% confidence interval 0.021, 0.399; P < 0.001). Conclusions Our results suggest that antibiotic treatment during pregnancy can reduce the incidence of PIH, thus opening new perspectives in its prevention and therapy. PMID:16487228

  17. Low incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in women treated with spiramycin for toxoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Todros, T; Verdiglione, P; Oggè, G; Paladini, D; Vergani, P; Cardaropoli, S

    2006-03-01

    Toxoplasma infection in pregnancy is usually treated with long-term administration of the macrolide spiramycin to prevent fetal malformations. We had empirically observed that treated patients seldom developed pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), a common and severe disorder of pregnancy whose aetiology and pathogenesis are still debated. Some clinical and experimental data suggest that infection could play a role in its development. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort of 417 pregnant women treated with spiramycin because of seroconversion for Toxoplasma gondii and 353 low-risk women who did not take any antibiotic during pregnancy. PIH was defined as blood pressure>140/90 mmHg on two or more occasions, occurring after 20 weeks of gestational age. Seventeen (5.2%) women in the control group developed PIH compared with two (0.5%) in the case group. The odds of developing the disease were significantly lower in the treated subjects (odds ratio=0.092, 95% confidence interval 0.021, 0.399; P<0.001). Our results suggest that antibiotic treatment during pregnancy can reduce the incidence of PIH, thus opening new perspectives in its prevention and therapy.

  18. Hypertensive emergencies. Etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Meryem; Ram, Venkata C S

    2003-01-01

    Although systemic hypertension is a common clinical disorder, hypertensive emergencies are unusual in clinical practice. Situations that qualify as hypertensive emergencies include accelerated or malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute left ventricular failure, acute aortic dissection, pheochromocytoma crisis, interaction between tyramine-containing foods or drugs and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, eclampsia, drug-induced hypertension and possibly intracranial hemorrhage. It is important to recognize these conditions since immediate lowering of systemic blood pressure is indicated. The diagnosis of hypertensive emergencies depends on the clinical manifestations rather than on the absolute level of the blood pressure. Depending on the target organ that is affected, the manifestations of hypertensive emergencies can be quite expressive, yet variable. Thus, the physician has to make the clinical diagnosis urgently in order to render appropriate therapy. Several parenteral drugs can quickly and effectively lower the blood pressure in hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous fenoldopam, a selective dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, offers the advantage of improving renal blood flow and causing natriuresis. Intravenous nicardipine may be beneficial in reserving tissue perfusion in patients with ischemic disorders. Whereas trimethaphan camsilate is the drug of choice for managing acute aortic dissection, hydralazine remains the drug of choice for the treatment of eclampsia. The alpha-adrenoceptor, phentolamine, is useful in patients with pheochromocytoma crisis. Enalaprilat is the only ACE inhibitor available for parenteral use and may be particularly useful in treating hypertensive emergencies in patients with heart failure. However, ACE inhibitors may cause a precipitous fall in blood pressure in patients who are hypovolemic. Although useful as adjunctive therapy in hypertensive crises, diuretics should be used with caution in these patients because prior

  19. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Reem, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Primary (idiopathic) intracranial hypertension has been considered to be a rare entity, but with no precise estimates of the pediatric incidence in the United States. There have been attempts to revise the criteria over the years and adapt the adult criteria for use in pediatrics. The clinical presentation varies with age, and symptoms tending to be less obvious in younger individuals. In the prepubertal population, incidentally discovered optic disc edema is relatively common. By far the most consistent symptom is headache; other symptoms include nausea, vomiting tinnitus, and diplopia. Treatment mainstays include weight loss when appropriate and acetazolamide. Furosemide may exhibit a synergistic benefit when used in conjunction with acetazolamide. Surgical interventions are required relatively infrequently, but include optic nerve sheath fenestration and cerebrospinal fluid shunting. Pain and permanent vision loss are the two major complications of this disorder and these manifestations justify aggressive treatment. Once intracranial hypertension has resolved, up to two thirds of patients develop a new or chronic headache type that is different from their initial presenting headache.

  20. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Charlotte U.; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens E.; Simonsen, U.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin and the G-protein coupled apelin receptor (APLNR) are expressed in several tissues throughout the organism. Apelin is localized in vascular endothelial cells while the APLNR is localized in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vessels and in the heart. Apelin is regulated by hypoxia inducible factor -1α and bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2. Patients with PAH have lower levels of plasma-apelin, and decreased apelin expression in pulmonary endothelial cells. Apelin has therefore been proposed as a potential biomarker for PAH. Furthermore, apelin plays a role in angiogenesis and regulates endothelial and smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation complementary and opposite to vascular endothelial growth factor. In the systemic circulation, apelin modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, induces eNOS-dependent vasodilatation, counteracts angiotensin-II mediated vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting potential new therapeutic target for PH. PMID:22140623

  1. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Liu, Tao; Cai, Ying-ying; Luo, Lian; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mengmeng; Cai, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively common in connective tissue diseases. However, few studies have focused on the pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with polymyositis (PM). Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of PH and determine the associated factors for PH in patients with PM. Multicenter study of 61 patients with PM underwent evaluation including general information, physical examination, laboratory indictors, thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) imaging, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). TTE was performed to estimate the pulmonary arterial pressure. PH was defined as resting systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) ≥40 mmHg. PH was identified in ten patients (16.39 %) who had few cardiopulmonary symptoms. PM patients with PH had higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pericardial effusion (PE) compared with patients without PH (18 vs. 11.5 %, p = 0.005; 11.5 vs. 9.8 %, p = 0.004; respectively). After controlling for age, gender, and potential factors, ILD and PE were independently associated with PH in patients with PM in multivariate analysis (OR = 8.193, 95 % CI 1.241-54.084, p = 0.029; OR = 8.265, 95 % CI 1.298-52.084, p = 0.025; respectively). Depending on TTE, the possible prevalence of PH was 16.39 % in patients with PM. Both ILD and PE may contribute to the development of PH in PM.

  3. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  4. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  5. Pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Armaganidis, Apostolos

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with haemolytic disorders and is a frequent finding in echocardiographic screening of patients with β thalassaemia. Substantial progress has been made in understanding of the multifactorial pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia. Haemolysis, reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, iron overload, and hypercoagulopathy are among the main pathogenetic mechanisms. Various disease-directed therapeutic methods, such as transfusion, chelation, and splenectomy, have important roles in the development of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia. Studies investigating the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia are mostly based on echocardiographic findings, and are thus limited by the scarcity of information derived from right heart catheterisation. Invasive pulmonary haemodynamic data are needed to clarify the true prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in β thalassaemia, to better understand the underlying pathophysiology and risk factors, and to define the optimum therapy for this devastating complication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients.

  7. [Comparison of hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts].

    PubMed

    Suárez, P; Castillo, J; Pardellas, H; Vadillo, J; Lema, M; Noya, M

    1998-05-01

    Arterial hypertension and hypohyalinosis of the arterias perforantes are said to be the commonest cause of lacunar infarcts, although other etiological factors and anatomo-pathological lesions are described more and more frequently. We designed a study to compare the clinical topographic and prognostic characteristics of patients with hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. We selected 51 patients with lacunar infarcts: in 23 (45%) arterial hypertension was the only etiological factor recognized. In 28 (55%) other risk factors (16 diabetes mellitus, 17 cardiopathy, 8 hyperlipemia, 13 cigarette smoking and 11 alcoholism) were seen. We evaluated the form of presentation, the type of infarct and whether this was associated with headache. The degree of defect was determined on admission using the Canadian scale. The size of the infarct was measured on CT or RM, using whichever measurement was greater. The evolution of the condition was determined on the Canadian scale and the index of Barthel after three months. Age and sex distribution was similar to both groups. Motor hemiparesia was the commonest lacunar syndrome and the distribution was similar. There was no difference in form of onset, association with headache or neurological defect between the hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. The topographical distribution, the presentation of single or multiple lesions, the size of the infarcts and the prognosis were similar in both groups. Lacunar infarcts, whether hypertensive or not, show no differences regarding clinical, neuro-radiological or evolutionary characteristics.

  8. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period.

  9. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%–5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period. PMID:27147865

  10. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (<20 weeks gestation) mood disorder and pre-pregnancy migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders.

  11. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  12. Weight control in the management of hypertension. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This article, which includes a brief description of the mechanisms and some epidemiological findings in obesity and high blood pressure, sums up present knowledge on a complex subject and provides guidance to medical practitioners on the management of obese hypertensive patients. Weight reduction, together with drug therapy in severe and moderate hypertension, and other non-pharmacological methods and continuing observation in mild hypertension are the essential measures to be applied. In addition to the lowering of blood pressure, weight loss offers several other metabolic and haemodynamic benefits. PMID:2670295

  13. Dermatoglyphics in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Agampodi, Thilini C; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2015-08-12

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and mortality. A major medical advancement would be a better means to ascertain which persons are at higher risk for becoming hypertensive beforehand. To that end, there have been a number of studies showing that certain dermatoglyphic markers are associated with hypertension. This association could be explained if the risk toward developing hypertension later on in life is somehow connected with fetal development of dermatoglyphics. It would be highly valuable from a clinical standpoint if this conjecture could be substantiated since dermatoglyphic markers could then be used for screening out individuals who might be at an elevated risk of becoming hypertensive. The aim of this review was to search for and appraise available studies that pertain to the association between hypertension and dermatoglyphics.A systematic literature search conducted using articles from MEDLINE (PubMed), Trip, Cochran, Google scholar, and gray literature until December 2014. Of the 37 relevant publications, 17 were included in the review. The review performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement.This review showed a fairly consistent finding of an increased frequency of whorl patterns along with a higher mean total ridge count in digital dermatoglyphic results in hypertensive samples compared to controls. However, it was imperative to discuss several limitations found in the studies that could make this association as yet unsettled.

  14. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  15. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  16. WNK kinases and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chou-Long; Kuo, Elizabeth; Toto, Robert D

    2008-03-01

    The present review summarizes recent literature and discusses the potential roles of WNKs in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. WNKs (with-no-lysine [K]) are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine protein kinases with unusual protein kinase domains. The role of WNK kinases in the control of blood pressure was first revealed by the findings that mutations of two members, WNK1 and WNK4, cause Gordon's syndrome. Laboratory studies have revealed that WNK kinases play important roles in the regulation of sodium and potassium transport. Animal models have been created to unravel the pathophysiology of sodium transport disorders caused by mutations of the WNK4 gene. Potassium deficiency causes sodium retention and increases hypertension prevalence. The expression of WNK1 is upregulated by potassium deficiency, raising the possibility that WNK1 may contribute to salt-sensitive essential hypertension associated with potassium deficiency. Associations of polymorphisms of WNK genes with essential hypertension in the general population have been reported. Mutations of WNK1 and WNK4 cause hypertension at least partly by increasing renal sodium retention. The role of WNK kinases in salt-sensitive hypertension within general hypertension is suggested, but future work is required to firmly establish the connection.

  17. Qigong for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of qigong for hypertension. A systematic literature search was performed in 7 databases from their respective inceptions until April 2014, including the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang database, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials of qigong as either monotherapy or adjunctive therapy with antihypertensive drugs versus no intervention, exercise, or antihypertensive drugs for hypertension were identified. The risk of bias was assessed using the tool described in Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0. Twenty trials containing 2349 hypertensive patients were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was generally high. Compared with no intervention, qigong significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −17.40 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [CI] −21.06 to −13.74, P < 0.00001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (WMD = −10.15 mm Hg, 95% CI −13.99 to −6.30, P < 0.00001). Qigong was inferior to exercise in decreasing SBP (WMD = 6.51 mm Hg, 95% CI 2.81 to 10.21, P = 0.0006), but no significant difference between the effects of qigong and exercise on DBP (WMD = 0.67 mm Hg, 95% CI −1.39 to 2.73, P = 0.52) was identified. Compared with antihypertensive drugs, qigong produced a clinically meaningful but not statistically significant reduction in SBP (WMD = −7.91 mm Hg, 95% CI −16.81 to 1.00, P = 0.08), but appeared to be more effective in lowering DBP (WMD = −6.08 mm Hg, 95% CI −9.58 to −2.58, P = 0.0007). Qigong plus antihypertensive drugs significantly lowered both SBP (WMD = −11.99 mm Hg, 95% CI −15.59 to −8.39, P < 0.00001) and DBP (WMD = −5.28 mm Hg, 95% CI, −8.13 to −2.42, P = 0

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  19. Pulmonary hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2011-01-01

    Female predominance in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been known for several decades and recent interest in the effects of sex hormones on the development of disease has substantially increased our understanding of this epidemiologic observation. Basic science data suggest a beneficial effect of estrogens in the pulmonary vasculature both acutely and chronically, which seems to contradict the known predilection in women. Recent human and rodent data have suggested that altered levels of estrogen, differential signaling and altered metabolism of estrogens in PAH may underlie the gender difference in this disease. Studies of the effects of sex hormones on the right ventricle in animal and human disease will further aid in understanding gender differences in PAH. This article focuses on the effects of sex hormones on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle on both a basic science and translational level. PMID:21090930

  20. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, H.J.; Kloek, J.J.; Bresser, P.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rapidly progressive and deadly disease, resulting from incomplete resolution of acute pulmonary embolism. Historically, the incidence of CTEPH was significantly underestimated but it may be as high as 3.8% following acute pulmonary embolism. Although the medical management of CTEPH may be supportive, the only curative treatment is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA). However, a careful screening programme is mandatory to select CTEPH patients who are likely to benefit from PEA. In this review we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic pitfalls, surgical treatment, outcome after surgery, and the potential benefit of medical treatment in inoperable CTEPH patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696637

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  2. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kendall, M J

    1998-01-01

    In those aged 65-85 years, the major causes of death and disability are cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction, sudden death and stroke). Clinical trials in elderly patients have demonstrated unequivocally that effective blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients up to the age of 85 years significantly reduces this mortality and morbidity. The larger trials are referred to as the SHEP trial (chlorthalidone), the STOP trial (beta-blockers and/or diuretics), the MRC Elderly Trial (atenolol or diuretic) and the SYST-EUR trial (nitrendipine). Patients entered into clinical trials are a selected population; those with serious coexisting diseases and with a poor prognosis are usually excluded. For this reason one has to carefully consider whether the results of these trials would provide the best treatment for the next patient the doctor sees who would probably not meet the entry criteria. Elderly hypertensives may fall into one of three categories. The sick elderly with serious disorders such as cancer or dementia have a poor quality of life and a bad prognosis. They should not be given antihypertensive drugs. The medically complicated elderly have serious disorders, which usually require drug therapy and the medical condition and the drugs used in treatment may complicate the choice of antihypertensive drugs. The potential adverse effects of adding another form of drug treatment may outweigh the potential benefits. The fit elderly do derive considerable benefit from adequate blood pressure control and need an effective, well-tolerated antihypertensive drug. The choice of drug to control blood pressure in the elderly is difficult. An effective, well-tolerated antihypertensive with little potential to interact with coexisting disorders and other drugs is needed.

  3. Hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kurukulasuriya, L Romayne; Stas, Sameer; Lastra, Guido; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2011-09-01

    Obesity and HTN are on the rise in the world. HTN seems to be the most common obesity-related health problem and visceral obesity seems to be the major culprit. Unfortunately, only 31% of hypertensives are treated to goal. This translates into an increased incidence of CVD and related morbidity and mortality. Several mechanisms have been postulated as the causes of obesity-related HTN. Activation of the RAAS, SNS, insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin, dysfunctional fat, FFA, resistin, 11 Beta dehydrogenase, renal structural and hemodynamic changes, and OSA are some of the abnormalities in obesity-related HTN. Many of these factors are interrelated. Treatment of obesity should begin with weight loss via lifestyle modifications, medications, or bariatric surgery. According to the mechanisms of obesity-related HTN, it seems that drugs that blockade the RAAS and target the SNS should be ideal for treatment. There is not much evidence in the literature that one drug is better than another in controlling obesity-related HTN. There have only been a few studies specifically targeting the obese hypertensive patient, but recent trials that emphasize the importance of BP control have enrolled both overweight and obese subjects. Until we have further studies with more in-depth information about the mechanisms of obesity-related HTN and what the targeted treatment should be, the most important factor necessary to control the obesity-related HTN pandemic and its CVD and CKD consequences is to prevent and treat obesity and to treat HTN to goal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Hemorheological alterations in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Foresto, Patricia; D'Arrigo, Mabel; Filippini, Fernando; Gallo, Roberto; Barberena, Liliana; Racca, Liliana; Valverde, Juana; Rasia, Rodolfo J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the blood viscosity profile and to evaluate the influence of plasmatic (fibrinogen) and cellular (erythrocyte aggregation) factors in a group of hypertensive patients, compared with a normotensive group. We worked with anticoagulated blood of both non diabetic hypertensive patients (n=31), and healthy individuals (n=40). The plasmatic viscosity and whole blood determination were obtained with a cone-plate viscometer. Erythrocyte aggregation was studied by microscopical observation and quantified by an Aggregate Shape Parameter (ASP), defined as the relation projected area/perimeter. Fibrinogen was determined by the Clauss method with a coagulometer. A comparison between these groups led us to assert that whole blood viscosity was significantly higher in hypertensive patients than in the controls at all shear rates. Plasma viscosity values only showed significant differences between both groups at low shear rate (1.15 a 11.56 seg(-1)). The hypertensive patients showed irregular and amorphous aggregates so that ASP appeared significantly higher (p< 0.001) in patients with hypertension (0.69 +/- 0.11) than in healthy subjects (0.25 +/- 0.12). Fibrinogen appeared slightly higher (p<0.01) in the hypertensive group than in the normal group. Several hemorheological parameters play important roles in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Among these factors, several hemorheological parameters could be altered in hypertension (hematocrit, plasma fibrinogen level, erythrocyte deformability and aggregability, plasma and whole blood viscosity). An increased RBC aggregation has been identified as an important factor responsible for disturbing blood rheological behavior in the microcirculation. The present study demonstrates an abnormal erythrocyte aggregation, which was detected by increased ASP values that could be responsible for vascular complications in hypertension.

  5. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Harrison, David G

    2014-03-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We and others have shown that mice lacking adaptive immune cells, including recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice and rats and mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension to stimuli such as ANG II, high salt, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Agonistic antibodies to the ANG II receptor, produced by B cells, contribute to hypertension in experimental models of preeclampsia. The central nervous system seems important in immune cell activation, because lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle block hypertension and T cell activation in response to ANG II. Likewise, genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and immune cell activation. Current evidence indicates that the production of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-6, contribute to hypertension, likely via effects on both the kidney and vasculature. In addition, the innate immune system also appears to contribute to hypertension. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, production of cytokines, and, ultimately, vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to the augmentation of hypertension. Studies of immune cell activation will clearly be useful in understanding this common yet complex disease.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  7. [The magnetotherapy of hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S G; Smirnov, V V; Solov'eva, F V; Liashevskaia, S P; Selezneva, L Iu

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of the constant MKM2-1 magnets on patients suffering from essential hypertension. Continuous action of the magnetic field, created by such magnets, on the patients with stage II essential hypertension was noted to result in a decrease of arterial pressure without the occurrence of any side effects and in a simultaneous reduction of the scope of drug administration. Apart from that fact, magnetotherapy was discovered to produce a beneficial effect on the central hemodynamics and microcirculation. The use of the MKM2-1 magnets may be regarded as a feasible method of the treatment of essential hypertension patients at any medical institution.

  8. Reduced endothelial NO-cGMP vascular relaxation pathway during TNF-alpha-induced hypertension in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Justin R; Giardina, Jena B; Green, Gachavis M; Alexander, Barbara T; Granger, Joey P; Khalil, Raouf A

    2002-02-01

    Placental ischemia during pregnancy is thought to release cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension. We have reported that a chronic twofold elevation in plasma TNF-alpha increases blood pressure in pregnant but not in virgin rats; however, the vascular mechanisms are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that increasing plasma TNF-alpha during pregnancy impairs endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and enhances vascular reactivity. Active stress was measured in aortic strips of virgin and late-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats untreated or infused with TNF-alpha (200 ng x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 5 days) to increase plasma level twofold. Phenylephrine (Phe) increased active stress to a maximum of 4.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(3) and 9.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(3) N/m2 in control pregnant and TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats, respectively. Removal of the endothelium enhanced Phe-induced stress in control but not in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. In endothelium-intact strips, ACh caused greater relaxation of Phe contraction in control than in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. Basal and ACh-induced nitrite/nitrate production was less in TNF-alpha-infused than in control pregnant rats. Pretreatment of vascular strips with 100 microM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthase, or 1 microM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-]quinoxalin-1-one, to inhibit cGMP production in smooth muscle, inhibited ACh-induced relaxation and enhanced Phe-induced stress in control but not in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. Phe contraction and ACh relaxation were not significantly different between control and TNF-alpha-infused virgin rats. Thus an endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP-mediated vascular relaxation pathway is inhibited in late-pregnant rats infused with TNF-alpha. The results support a role for TNF-alpha as one possible mediator of the increased vascular resistance

  9. Management of hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Falkner, B

    1986-11-01

    Secondary causes of hypertension are more frequent in children than in adults; however, essential hypertension does occur in the young. The decision to search for secondary causes rests on the age of the child, the severity of hypertension, the presence of clues in the history or physical examination, and the family history. If nonpharmacologic measures fail to control hypertension and if acute hypertension is not present, a stepped-care approach is suggested.

  10. Intussusception Presenting with Malignant Hypertension and Lethargy

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Andra; Ashtiani, Nilou; Ahmadi, Nazanin; Bakx, Roel; de Vaate, Annelies Walrave-bij; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2013-01-01

    The most common cause of malignant hypertension in children is renal or renovascular pathology. The combination with lethargy suggests a diagnosis of hypertensive crisis with hypertensive encephalopathy. Here, we present a case of severe hypertension with lethargy as the sole presenting symptoms of ileocecal intussusception. Both normalized following surgical repositioning. We conclude that malignant hypertension and lethargy can be presenting symptoms of intussusception. PMID:23914204

  11. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  12. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with their PH specialist prior to starting any exercise program. Current members: first time on our new PHPN/PHCR or Support Group ... Pulmonary Hypertension Association 801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, ...

  13. Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Stanford in 1981 for a patient with primary pulmonary hypertension, and over the next decade, single ... While some testing is performed by the patient’s primary care physician (routine cancer screening and vaccinations, for ...

  14. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  15. [Hypertension in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M

    2001-05-01

    Normal blood pressure and hypertension were defined according to age and sex based on the data on Japanese children. When high blood pressure is found, both white-coat and secondary hypertension should be excluded. Subsequently lifestyle modifications should be initiated in children and adolescents with essential hypertension. These modifications include: weight reduction, reduction of dietary salt intake, high dietary potassium intake and increased physical activity. When nonpharmacologic treatment is not effective after 3 to 6 months, or when there is an evidence of target organ injury, antihypertensive drugs such as ACE inhibitors and Ca antagonists will be started to control blood pressure. Lifestyle modifications are also important for primary prevention of hypertension in normotensive children.

  16. A case of hypertensive urgency.

    PubMed

    Baum, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    A 41-year-old male Nepalese soldier presented to the primary care medical centre with a 1-week history of fatigue and muscle aches following a trip to Nepal. His BP was 164/98 but was otherwise normal. Four days later he presented with new symptoms of sweating and palpitations and a BP of 200/127 whereupon he was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of hypertensive crisis. Appropriate investigation and initial management were undertaken, and he was discharged after 12 h on antihypertensive treatment. This case highlights the risk of hypertensive crisis in both diagnosed and silent hypertensive disease, and the review highlights the presentations, initial investigation and different management of hypertensive crisis.

  17. Hypertension, hypertrophy, and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasquale; Penna, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The heart of patients with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy is more vulnerable to ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Here we discuss the main mechanisms of IRI and possible targets for cardioprotection. In particular, we consider the viewpoint that hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy may act synergistically in increasing the predisposition to cardiovascular accidents and in worsening IRI. There is no doubt that hypertrophic hearts may be redirected to be less vulnerable to IRI. Some experimental evidences suggest that antihypertensive drugs may have beneficial effects, some of which are not directly related to hypertension-lowering effect. However, more thorough experimental and clinical studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms and to maximize the beneficial effects of reperfusion after a heart attack in the presence of comorbidities, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

  18. Novel approaches for treating hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Andrew J.; Vinh, Antony; Widdop, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a prevalent yet modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While there are many effective treatments available to combat hypertension, patients often require at least two to three medications to control blood pressure, although there are patients who are resistant to such therapies. This short review will briefly update on recent clinical advances and potential emerging therapies and is intended for a cross-disciplinary readership. PMID:28184289

  19. Pediatric hypertension: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Debra; Dixon, Emily

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents, once thought to be rare, has been estimated at a current prevalence of between 1% and 5% in the United States. The prevalence of primary hypertension continues to increase with the increasing body mass index of the pediatric population. Who is at risk? If and when to screen? When and how to treat? These controversial questions are important to the physician in primary care practice.

  20. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is generally attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, the kidney, and the central nervous system. During the past several years, it has become apparent that cells of the innate and adaptive immune system also contribute to this disease. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension, and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We have shown that mice lacking lymphocytes, such as recombinase-activating gene-deficient (RAG-1(-/-)) mice, have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II, increased salt levels, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Others have shown that mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II. Deletion of the RAG gene in Dahl salt-sensitive rats reduces the hypertensive response to salt feeding. The central nervous system seems to orchestrate immune cell activation. We produced lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle and showed that these block T cell activation in response to angiotensin II. Likewise, we showed that genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and T cell activation. Current evidence indicates that production of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 17, and interleukin 6 contribute to hypertension, likely by promoting vasoconstriction, production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, the production of cytokines, and ultimately vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to augmentation of hypertension.

  1. Pulmonary hypertension management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Kartikey A; Puligandla, Pramod S

    2015-02-01

    The management of pulmonary hypertension is multi-faceted, with therapies directed at supporting cardiovascular and pulmonary function, treating the underlying cause (if feasible), and preventing irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Recently, manipulation of signaling pathways and mediators contained within the pulmonary vascular endothelial cell has become a new target. This article will review the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and the broad principles involved in its management, with specific emphasis on pharmacological therapies directed at the pulmonary vascular endothelium.

  2. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B

    1997-01-01

    Progress in treatment of pulmonary hypertension has been impaired by the lack of formal clinical trials. This is now beginning to change, and the impact on our approach to treating patients with pulmonary hypertension in substantial. As with other relatively uncommon medical disorders, randomized, controlled, multi-center trials are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of potential therapeutic modalities. Treatments showing promise at the level of small pilot studies within a single center should be studied more rigorously.

  3. Radiological imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baruah, Manash P.; Baruah, Upasana M.

    2011-01-01

    While different generations of assays have played important role in elucidating causes of different endocrine disorders, radiological techniques are instrumental in localizing the pathology. This statement cannot be truer in any disease entity other than endocrine hypertension. This review makes an effort to highlight the role of different radiological modalities, especially ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the evaluation of different causes of endocrine hypertension. PMID:22145144

  4. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  5. [Hypertension during pregnancy: Epidemiology, definition].

    PubMed

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy has several forms that differ by their mechanisms and their consequences for mothers and fetus. Chronic hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg before pregnancy or before the 20th week of amenorrhea. Gestational hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg during or after the 20th week of amenorrhea. Preeclampsia is the occurrence of hypertension and proteinuria after 20weeks of amenorrhea. Severe preeclampsia is accompanied by clinical signs and symptoms indicating visceral pain. The HELLP syndrome is a severe preeclampsia accompanied by intravascular hemolysis and hepatic cytolysis. Eclampsia is characterized by seizures of the tonic-clonic type. A chronic hypertension is observed in 1-5% of pregnancies. Gestational hypertension without proteinuria appears in 5-6% of pregnancies. A preeclampsia develops in 1-2% of pregnancies, but much more frequently (up 34%) in the presence of risk factors. High blood pressure during pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality.

  6. The hidden epidemic of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Robert; Lee, Rebecca; Stavreski, Bill; Page, Karen

    2014-04-01

    The majority of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is caused by risk factors that can be controlled, treated or modified. In terms of attributable deaths, the leading cardiovascular disease risk factor is hypertension. The Australian Health Survey results showed some startling figures-4.6 million adult Australians are hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg). Further, a fifth of the adult population experience hypertension, with more than two out of three not attaining blood pressure target levels. This is despite an estimated cost of $1 billion per annum spent on managing hypertension. It is now well recognised that the level of risk for coronary heart disease is linked to an individual's risk profile. Results indicate that many Australians have multiple risk factors, including hypertension. It could be considered that these numbers provide a proxy indicator of secondary prevention failure. Considerable attention needs to be given to the assessment of the combined risk of those with hypertension enabling effective management of identified, modifiable risk factors. We look forward to presenting the absolute risk profiles when the Australian Health Survey biometric results are released. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypertension and exercise.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K

    1993-11-01

    A sedentary lifestyle may be a risk for hypertension, according to the results of both cross sectional and longitudinal studies. However, exercise may reverse the adverse effects of lack of activity. Many controlled studies have shown that exercise lowers systolic/diastolic blood pressure by at least 10/5 mmHg. Exercise not only improves blood pressure, but also attenuates other risk factors for cardiovascular complications. Dynamic isotonic exercise (e.g., weight lifting). Milder (e.g., brisk walking for 30-60 minutes/day) rather than moderate to severe exercise (e.g., running) is also recommended because of similar effectiveness and better compliance. The underlying mechanism of action of exercise on blood pressure seems to be multifactorial involving a decrease in pressor factors such as plasma norepinephrine, the serum Na/K ratio, endogenous ouabain-like substance and erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume, as well as an increase in depressor factors such as plasma prostaglandin E, serum taurine and urinary dopamine excretion.

  8. [Hypertension and dementia].

    PubMed

    Hanon, O

    2014-06-01

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Several epidemiological studies have indicated a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the onset of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) several years later. Cognitive disorder may be related to focal cerebral lesions of vascular origin (infarctus, lacunae) and/or chronic ischemia of the white matter (white matter lesions) related to arteriosclerosis and/or lipohyalinosis of small perforating arteries high blood pressure in mid-life to later cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, disorders of cerebral microcirculation and endothelial dysfunction may be associated to blood brain barrier dysfunction and amyloid plaques formation leading to Alzheimer's process. Few randomized clinical trials have included a cognitive assessment and dementia as outcome in their design. They all raise some major criticisms: cognitive assessment was never the main outcome, too short follow-up to study dementia; incomplete assessment of cognition, lost of follow-up and a small proportion of subjects at risk for dementia at inclusion. However, the results of therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) or cognitive decline by antihypertensive treatments. A meta-analysis including randomized controlled studies, suggests a significant decrease in the risk of dementia with antihypertensive treatment compared to placebo.

  9. Intracranial Hypertension Is Painless!

    PubMed

    Manet, R; Fabre, N; Moyse, E; Laurent, B; Schmidt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Headache is usually considered a key symptom of intracranial hypertension (ICHT). However, there are no published experimental data to support the concept that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is painful in humans. This prospective study was performed in 16 patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, necessitating a lumbar infusion test with measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. During the test, ICP was increased from baseline to a plateau. Headache was scored on a visual analog scale (VAS) (0 = no pain, 10 = very severe pain) at baseline ICP and when ICP plateaued. At baseline, mean ICP was 11 ± 3.6 mmHg and VAS was 0. At plateau, mean ICP was 28 ± 9.5 mmHg and VAS was 0. There was a significant increase in ICP (p <0.001), but no increase in headache intensity (VAS). An acute (20-min) moderate increase in ICP was not accompanied by a headache. We demonstrate that an acute, isolated increase in CSF pressure does not produce a headache. To occur, a headache needs activation of the pain-sensitive structures (dura and venous sinuses) or central activation of the cerebral nociceptive structures. This peripheral or central activation does not occur with an isolated increase in CSF pressure.

  10. Developmental programming and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nuyt, Anne Monique; Alexander, Barbara T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review There is a growing body of evidence linking adverse events or exposures during early life and adult-onset diseases. After important epidemiological studies from many parts of the world, research now focuses on mechanisms of organ dysfunction and on refining the understanding of the interaction between common elements of adverse perinatal conditions, such as nutrition, oxidants, and toxins exposures. This review will focus on advances in our comprehension of developmental programming of hypertension. Recent findings Recent studies have unraveled important mechanisms of oligonephronia and impaired renal function, altered vascular function and structure as well as sympathetic regulation of the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, interactions between prenatal insults and postnatal conditions are the subject of intensive research. Prematurity vs. intrauterine growth restriction modulate differently programming of high blood pressure. Along with antenatal exposure to glucocorticoids and imbalanced nutrition, a critical role for perinatal oxidative stress is emerging. Summary While the complexity of the interactions between antenatal and postnatal influences on adult blood pressure is increasingly recognized, the importance of postnatal life in (positively) modulating developmental programming offers the hope of a critical window of opportunity to reverse programming and prevent or reduce related adult-onset diseases. PMID:19434052

  11. Sodium intake and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karppanen, Heikki; Mervaala, Eero

    2006-01-01

    In current diets, the level of sodium is very high, whereas that of potassium, calcium, and magnesium is low compared with the level in diets composed of unprocessed, natural foods. We present the biologic rationale and scientific evidence that show that the current salt intake levels largely explain the high prevalence of hypertension. Comprehensive reduction of salt intake, both alone and particularly in combination with increases in intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium, is able to lower average blood pressure levels substantially. During the past 30 years, the one-third decrease in the average salt intake has been accompanied by a more than 10-mm Hg fall in the population average of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and a 75% to 80% decrease in both stroke and coronary heart disease mortality in Finland. There is no evidence of any harmful effects of salt reduction. Salt-reduction recommendations alone have a very small, if any, population impact. In the United States, for example, the per capita use of salt increased by approximately 55% from the mid-1980s to the late 1990s. We deal with factors that contribute toward increasing salt intakes and present examples of the methods that have contributed to the successful salt reduction in Finland.

  12. [Hypertension in women].

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas, Martín; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Pastelín, Gustavo; Méndez, Arturo; Ferez, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease is a crucial cause of morbidity and mortality in the woman mainly when they arrive at menopause. The pathophysiology and neurohormonal mechanisms widely vary with respect to the man. This finding has given the support to think that the estrogens may be playing a protector role in cardiovascular disease. However, the associated risk factors like obesity, diabetes, dislipidemia, smoking and sedentary life are increasing in an exponential form. In Mexico the population age distribution establishes that 60% of the women with hypertension are aged < 54 years old. This is reason why as factor of independent cardiovascular risk is commonest. Nevertheless, after the menopause cardiovascular mortality is greater in the woman than in the man. In this review, the importance of the new pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical-therapeutic approach are analyzed, making emphasis in the importance of the change in the life style and also in the nutritional aspects. In Mexico the woman still have a unique role in the nutritional culture.

  13. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  14. Hypertension and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda; Parto, Parham; Krim, Selim R

    2016-07-01

    Despite its continued increase in prevalence in minorities, data regarding hypertension (HTN) control among such ethnic groups remains limited. This review highlights the most recent literature on the epidemiology, prevalence, and treatment strategies of HTN among four racial groups (non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians). Overall awareness and treatment of HTN were found to be higher in blacks when compared with NHWs. Access to health insurance is associated with successful HTN control, particularly among the Hispanic populations. Recent data from SBP Intervention Trial suggests the blood pressure control and adherence rates in blacks were highest among men, with a higher number of comorbidities, and on diuretic therapy. Additionally, the initiation of thiazide-type diuretics and calcium channel blocker was superior to β-adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers in blood pressure lowering among blacks. However, no specific treatment recommendations exist for Hispanics or Asians. Finally, recent guidelines from the Joint National Commission recommend initial treatment with a thiazide-type diuretic regardless of race. Despite recent progress, racial disparities in awareness and treatment of HTN continue to exist. To reduce this important gap, future research should focus on epidemiologic, genetic, and sociologic factors as well as specific therapies to achieve maximum medical benefit in these subgroups.

  15. Salt and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Joossens, J V; Geboers, J

    1983-01-01

    The salt hypothesis states that salt is a necessary condition for the genesis of essential hypertension; however, it is not a sufficient condition. Other factors---primarily genetics--are necessary for the expression of the disease. The arguments in favor of this still controversial subject originate from pathophysiology, evolution, history, pharmacology, experimental and clinical medicine, and epidemiology. Epidemiologic observations favoring the hypothesis mostly relate to comparisons between populations, and much less to comparisons within populations. The arguments against this hypothesis are related mostly to the well known difficulties of proving a within-population relationship of a relatively homogeneously distributed variable to an age-related variable (blood pressure). Mortality data derived from stomach cancer and stroke, compared within and between populations, provide only circumstantial, but nevertheless important, evidence in favor of the salt hypothesis. The strong, consistent, and independent association between stomach cancer and stroke mortality is best explained by the level of salt intake in the population. The observations made in Belgium over the last years are consistent with the salt hypothesis. A decrease in salt intake at the population level correlated with a marked decrease in stroke and stomach cancer mortality, larger than in any other European country, except Finland.

  16. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  17. Central Systolic Hypertension in Patients with Well-Controlled Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Potočárová, Mária; Murín, Ján; Kozlíková, Katarína; Luha, Ján; Čaprnda, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background. Central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) has prognostic significance and simplified devices for its estimation have been introduced recently. The aim of this study was to assess the achievement of the target CSBP in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods. One hundred patients with well-controlled hypertension were analysed. For CSBP estimation, we used the Arteriograph (TensioMed Ltd.), which uses one cuff for all measurements, the “single-point measurement” approach. Results. We found that 62% of patients had CSBP ≥ 130 mmHg, the suggested cut-off value for hypertension. When sex-specific classification was employed (CSBP ≥ 137 mmHg for female and CSBP ≥ 133 mmHg for male), only 13% of patients (mainly women) remained in the hypertensive range. We also found that 55% of patients had a CSBP higher than brachial pressure. Multiple analyses showed that CSBP was significantly associated with sex, height, and return time. Conclusions. A high proportion of treated hypertensive patients had CSBP levels that exceeded their brachial BP. CSBP positively correlated with lower height and shorter return time of the reflected pressure wave and was significantly higher in females compared to males. These findings suggest that, for CSBP classification, it is important to take height and sex-specific differences into account. PMID:28127560

  18. Drug-induced hypertension: an unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-01-01

    A myriad variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce either a transient or persistent increase in blood pressure, or interfere with the blood pressure-lowering effects of antihypertensive drugs. Some agents cause either sodium retention or extracellular volume expansion, or activate directly or indirectly the sympathetic nervous system. Other substances act directly on arteriolar smooth muscle or do not have a defined mechanism of action. Some medications that usually lower blood pressure may paradoxically increase blood pressure, or an increase in pressure may be encountered after their discontinuation. In general, drug-induced pressure increases are small and transient: however, severe hypertension involving encephalopathy, stroke, and irreversible renal failure have been reported. The deleterious effect of therapeutic agents is more pronounced in patients with preexisting hypertension, in those with renal failure, and in the elderly. Careful evaluation of a patient's drug regimen may identify chemically induced hypertension and obviate unnecessary evaluation and facilitate antihypertensive therapy. Once chemical-induced hypertension has been identified, discontinuation of the causative agent is recommended, although hypertension can often be managed by specific therapy and dose adjustment if continued use of the offending agent is mandatory. The present review summarizes the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New therapies for arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Rubattu, Speranza; Volpe, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is the most common chronic disease in developed countries and it is the leading risk factor for stroke, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and peripheral artery disease. Its prevalence appears to be about 30-45% of the general population. Recent European guidelines estimate that up to 15-20% of the hypertensive patients are not controlled on a dual antihypertensive combination and they require three or more different antihypertensive drug classes to achieve adequate blood pressure control. The guidelines confirmed that diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are suitable for the initiation and maintenance of antihypertensive treatment, either as monotherapy or in combination therapy. Very few antihypertensive agents have reached the market over the last few years, but no new therapeutic class has really emerged. The long-term adherence to cardiovascular drugs is still low in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the issue of compliance is persistently high in hypertension, despite the fixed-dose combination therapy. As a consequence, a cohort of high-risk hypertensive population, represented by patients affected by refractory and resistant hypertension, can be identified. Therefore, the need of controlling BP in high-risk patients may be addressed, in part, by the development of new drugs, devices and procedures that are designed to treat hypertension and comorbidities. In this review we will comprehensively discuss the current literature on recent therapeutic advances in hypertension, including both medical therapy and interventional procedures.

  20. Effect of nebivolol treatment during pregnancy on the intrauterine fetal growth, mortality and pup postnatal development in the l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altoama, Kassem; Mallem, Mohamed Yassine; Thorin, Chantal; Betti, Eric; Desfontis, Jean-Claude

    2016-11-15

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of nebivolol vs. bisoprolol treatment on the intrauterine fetal growth, mortality and postnatal development in N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in normotensive pregnant Wistar rats by daily administration of l-NAME (100mg/kg/day, in the drinking water) for the period of pregnancy. After 9 days of l-NAME treatment, rats with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) more than 140/90mmHg were considered hypertensive. Then, some of them were treated from day 11 to day 18 of pregnancy with nebivolol (8mg/kg/day) or bisoprolol (10mg/kg/day) via oral gavage. SBP, DBP and heart rate (HR) were re-evaluated by tail cuff method on day 19 of pregnancy and morphometrical or histological studies were performed on day 20. In addition, the mortality and postnatal development of newborn pups were assessed in all groups. The l-NAME administration during pregnancy induced an increase in SBP and DBP while HR did not change. Nebivolol or bisoprolol treatment completely prevented the elevation of SBP and DBP induced by l-NAME with a reduction in HR in pregnant and non-pregnant rats. The intra-uterine fetal growth and the postnatal development of newborn rats in nebivolol-treated hypertensive group were significantly lower vs. control and higher vs. bisoprolol-treated group with a higher mortality in the both types of treatments vs. control rats. The nebivolol and bisoprolol administration produce adverse effects on fetal growth and postnatal development, that limits their therapeutic use in females during pregnancy.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Álvarez, Julio; Redon, Josep

    2010-12-01

    Hypertension is a global problem, affecting both developed and developing nations. In children and adolescents, hypertension has gained ground in cardiovascular medicine, thanks to the progress made in several areas of pathophysiologic and clinical research. Childhood hypertension is often asymptomatic and is easily missed, even by health professionals. Target organ damage is detectable in children and adolescents. Management of hypertension includes lifestyle changes and pharmacologic treatment. In the case of secondary hypertension, pharmacologic treatment usually is required. In essential hypertension, assessment of early organ damage provides a useful tool for treatment decisions.

  2. Etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sanjad, Sami A

    2010-01-01

    While most hypertension in children has been previously considered secondary to renal, cardiovascular or endocrine etiology, a substantial number of children aged 6 to 20 years are now diagnosed with primary or essential hypertension. Hypertension in children and adolescents seems to be increasing over the past two decades. This is attributed at least in part to an increased prevalence of overweight in this population. Essential hypertension in childhood is a diagnosis arrived at by excluding the known causes of secondary hypertension. This paper will discuss the etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents.

  3. Hypertension and counter-hypertension mechanisms in giraffes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong Gus

    2006-03-01

    The giraffe is unique as its head is 2500-3000 millimeters above its heart, thus the giraffe's heart must pump hard enough to overcome the huge hydrostatic pressure generated by the tall column of blood in its neck in order to provide its head with sufficient nutrients and oxygen. Giraffes therefore have exceptionally high blood pressure (hypertension) by human standards. Interestingly, the "unnaturally" high blood pressure in giraffes does not culminate in severe vascular lesions, nor does it lead to heart and kidney failure, whereas in humans, the same blood pressure is exceedingly dangerous and will cause severe vascular damage. Intrinsically, natural selection likely has provided an important protective mechanism, because hypertension develops as soon as the giraffe stands up and erects its neck immediately after birth. Therefore, those individual giraffes who did not tolerate the burden of hypertension presumably developed acute heart failure and renal failure, not surviving to reproductive age. The genes and genotypes of animals that did not survive are thus predicted to have been gradually eliminated from the gene pool by natural selection. By the same process, genes that protect against hypertensive damage would be preserved and inherited from generation to generation. Some unique ingredients of the giraffe's diet may also provide an extrinsic mechanism for the prevention of hypertension and the prevention of fatal end-stage organ damage. The fascinating nature of the protective mechanisms in giraffes may provide a conceptual framework for further experimental investigations into mechanisms as well as prevention and treatment of human hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  4. Hypertensive encephalopathy and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy is one cause of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertensive encephalopathy and cerebral infarction have only been reported in a few individual case reports. A 51-year-old woman presented with hypertensive encephalopathy. T2-weighted images from magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions in both occipital and parietal lobes. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed that this represented cytotoxic oedema and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging revealed reduced blood volume and flow. The magnetic resonance imaging was repeated 5 months later and subtotal regression of theT2-hyperintensity had occurred. However, small bilateral infarcts were seen on T1-weighted images. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging presented reduced blood volume and flow on the right side. The patient in this report had posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome caused by hypertensive encephalopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed bilateral cytotoxic oedema that partially resolved and resulted in small infarcts. The imaging findings are compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with subtotal resolution and infarct evolution. The case report suggests that the presence of hypertensive encephalopathy and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should alert clinicians and lead to prompt treatment in order to prevent cerebral damage.

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Savale, Laurent; Sattler, Caroline; Sitbon, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is defined by the combination of portal hypertension and precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP < 15 mmHg and PVR > 3 Wood units). PoPH is characterised by pathobiological mechanisms that are similar to other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prevalence of PoPH is estimated at 0.5-5% among patients with portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis. Treatment strategies most commonly employed for PoPH patients are based on recommendations for idiopathic PAH management. Indeed, the choice of specific PAH treatment must take account the severity of the underlying liver disease. Prognosis of PoPH patients is dependent on both the severity of PAH and of the underlying liver disease. PoPH may be a contraindication for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) if mean pulmonary arterial pressure is > 35 mmHg associated with severe right ventricular dysfunction or high level of pulmonary vascular resistance (> 3-4 Wood units). Bridge therapy with specific PAH therapies should be considered in those patients in an attempt to improve pulmonary hemodynamic and thereby allow OLT with acceptable risk. Recent data suggest that stabilize, improve or cure PoPH seems to be possible by combining specific PAH therapies and liver transplantation in selected patients. Clinical and experimental evidences suggest that IFN therapy may be a possible risk factor for PAH.

  6. Hypertension in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2008-09-01

    Hypertension in a nursing home patient is a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher and 130 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency, or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher and 80 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Numerous prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that antihypertensive drug therapy reduces the development of new coronary events, stroke, and congestive heart failure in older persons. The goal of treatment of hypertension in elderly persons is to lower the blood pressure to less than 140/90 mm Hg and to less than 130/80 mm Hg in older persons with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Elderly persons with diastolic hypertension should have their diastolic blood pressure reduced to 80 to 85 mm Hg. Diuretics should be used as initial drugs in the treatment of older persons with hypertension and no associated medical conditions. The selection of antihypertensive drug therapy in persons with associated medical conditions depends on their associated medical conditions. If the blood pressure is more than 20/10 mm Hg above the goal blood pressure, drug therapy should be initiated with 2 antihypertensive drugs, one of which should be a thiazide-type diuretic. Other coronary risk factors must be treated in patients with hypertension.

  7. SOCIAL NETWORKS HELP CONTROL HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Chirikov, Viktor V.; Mullins, C. Daniel; Shematek, Jon; Howard, DeLeonardo; Foster, Clyde; Saunders, Elijah

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular health disparities continue to pose a major public health problem. We evaluated the effect of education administered within social networks on the improvement of hypertension in 248 African Americans compared to historical controls. Patients formed clusters with peers and attended monthly hypertension education sessions. We assessed the likelihood of reaching goal below predefined SBP and DBP thresholds as well as the absolute reduction in SBP and DBP, controlling for diabetes, smoking, baseline hypertension, and demographics. The intervention group was more likely to have ever reached treatment goal at 12 months follow-up (OR=1.72, P=0.11). At 18 months of follow-up, the MVP group had a statistically significant larger drop in SBP (−4.82 mmHg, P<0.0001) and DBP (−3.37 mmHg, P=0.01) than the control. The clustering of patients in social networks around hypertension education has a positive impact on the management of hypertension in minority populations and may help address cardiovascular health disparities. PMID:23282122

  8. Hypertension prevention beliefs of Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Aroian, Karen J; Peters, Rosalind M; Rudner, Nancy; Waser, Lynn

    2012-04-01

    This qualitative study used focus group methodology to explore attitudes and beliefs of Hispanics regarding hypertension prevention behaviors. The sample was composed of 17 participants from varied Hispanic backgrounds. The theory of planned behavior guided interview questions. Analysis indicated that participants were knowledgeable about and had a positive attitude toward preventing hypertension. However, they identified numerous barriers to preventive behaviors. Two key themes, limited resources (e.g., no time to prepare healthy meals or exercise) and cultural expectations and values (e.g., traditional food as a marker of ethnicity, hospitality, and affection; valuing social interaction over solitary exercise) summarized significant barriers to engaging in recommended preventive behaviors. Findings suggest that literature about lack of knowledge about hypertension prevention in Hispanics may be outdated or not applicable to many Hispanics. Select resource and cultural barriers to engaging in hypertension prevention behaviors are important areas to target. Exercise, stress reduction, and diet modification strategies for hypertension prevention among Hispanics should be consistent with the cultural norms regarding the importance of social interactions and leisure.

  9. Nonpharmacologic strategies for managing hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randy; Aukerman, Glen

    2006-06-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends lifestyle modification for all patients with hypertension or prehypertension. Modifications include reducing dietary sodium to less than 2.4 g per day; increasing exercise to at least 30 minutes per day, four days per week; limiting alcohol consumption to two drinks or less per day for men and one drink or less per day for women; following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (high in fruits, vegetables, potassium, calcium, and magnesium; low in fat and salt); and achieving a weight loss goal of 10 lb (4.5 kg) or more. Alternative treatments such as vitamin C, coenzyme Q10, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids have been suggested for managing hypertension, but evidence for their effectiveness is lacking.

  10. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance.

  11. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  12. Management of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mudjari, Nurike S; Samsu, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnancy should be managed appropriately to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rate, i.e. by preventing women from getting the risks of increased blood pressure, preventing disease progression and preventing the development of seizure and considering termination of pregnancy in life-threatening situation for maternal and fetal health.

  13. Epigenetic Modifications in Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wise, Ingrid A; Charchar, Fadi J

    2016-03-25

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a complex, polygenic condition with no single causative agent. Despite advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of EH, hypertension remains one of the world's leading public health problems. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that epigenetic modifications are as important as genetic predisposition in the development of EH. Indeed, a complex and interactive genetic and environmental system exists to determine an individual's risk of EH. Epigenetics refers to all heritable changes to the regulation of gene expression as well as chromatin remodelling, without involvement of nucleotide sequence changes. Epigenetic modification is recognized as an essential process in biology, but is now being investigated for its role in the development of specific pathologic conditions, including EH. Epigenetic research will provide insights into the pathogenesis of blood pressure regulation that cannot be explained by classic Mendelian inheritance. This review concentrates on epigenetic modifications to DNA structure, including the influence of non-coding RNAs on hypertension development.

  14. [Hypertension in the elderly population].

    PubMed

    Sierra, Cristina; López-Soto, Alfonso; Coca, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    The prevalence of essential hypertension in the Spanish population aged more than 60 years old is greater than 65%, mainly due to the high prevalence of elevated systolic pressure. Essential hypertension is known to be the most important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, which continues to be the leading cause of death among adults in the developed world. Several randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in hypertensive elderly people. However, the management of high blood pressure in the elderly population can be difficult due to a series of factors in this group such as altered pharmacokinetics, comorbidity, and polypharmacy. In addition, although there is recent evidence of the benefit of antihypertensive treatment in the oldest old (> 85 years), comprehensive geriatric assessment and individualized treatment should be applied in daily clinical practice.

  15. Hypertension: The Demographics of Management and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Natalie

    1985-01-01

    The ultimate goal of any hypertension control program is reduction of excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. Factors affecting detection of hypertension and compliance with educational intervention are discussed and implications drawn. (MT)

  16. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases.

  17. Hypertension: The Demographics of Management and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Natalie

    1985-01-01

    The ultimate goal of any hypertension control program is reduction of excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. Factors affecting detection of hypertension and compliance with educational intervention are discussed and implications drawn. (MT)

  18. The immune system and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  19. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O. )

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac {beta}-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of {beta}-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension: diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Krowka, M J

    2000-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may develop because of a spectrum of insults to the lungs; in some patients, there seems to be no cause. Noninvasive tests, such as standard chest radiography, electrocardiography, and transthoracic Doppler echocardiography, provide effective screening if PH is suspected. This synopsis focuses on these screening studies and the more common clinical problems, including primary cardiac abnormalities, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pulmonary embolism, pulmonary parenchymal problems, connective tissue disorders, cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and use of appetite suppressants, that should be considered when PH exists. Treatment options for PH, including intravenous prostacyclin (epoprostenol), and investigational agents such as subcutaneous or oral prostacyclin analogues and oral endothelin receptor antagonists are described.

  1. [Mechanisms of hypertension in obesity].

    PubMed

    López de Fez, C M; Gaztelu, M T; Rubio, T; Castaño, A

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, considered to be an important risk factor in the development of coronary disease, hypertension, renal insufficiency and failure. Obesity contributes to hypertension by mechanisms such as: insulinic resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, increase of adrenergic activity and of concentrations of aldosterone, retention of sodium and water and increase of cardiac wear, alteration of the endothelial function, through molecules such as leptin and adiponectin and genetic factors. Many paths of research remain open. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and/or the angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II) are first choice medicines because of their beneficial effect on insulinic resistance and sympathetic activity.

  2. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  3. Is Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension A Reproducible Phenotype?

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Jeff; Muntner, Paul; Diaz, Keith M.; Reynolds, Kristi; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH), defined as nocturnal without daytime hypertension on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM), has been observed to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the short-term reproducibility of INH. METHODS The Improving the Detection of Hypertension Study enrolled a community-based sample of adults (N = 282) in upper Manhattan without CVD, renal failure, or treated hypertension. Each participant completed two 24-hour ABPM recordings (ABPM1: first recording and ABPM2: second recording) with a mean ± SD time interval of 33±17 days between recordings. Daytime hypertension was defined as mean awake systolic/diastolic BP ≥ 135/85mm Hg; nocturnal hypertension as mean sleep systolic/diastolic BP ≥ 120/70mm Hg; INH as nocturnal without daytime hypertension; isolated daytime hypertension (IDH) as daytime without nocturnal hypertension; day and night hypertension (DNH) as daytime and nocturnal hypertension, and any ambulatory hypertension as having daytime and/or nocturnal hypertension. RESULTS On ABPM1, 26 (9.2%), 21 (7.4%), and 50 (17.7%) participants had INH, IDH, and DNH, respectively. On ABPM2, 24 (8.5%), 19 (6.7%), and 54 (19.1%) had INH, IDH, and DNH, respectively. The kappa statistics were 0.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04–0.38), 0.25 (95% CI 0.06–0.44), and 0.65 (95% CI 0.53–0.77) for INH, IDH, and DNH respectively; and 0.72 (95% CI 0.63–0.81) for having any ambulatory hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that INH and IDH are poorly reproducible phenotypes, and that ABPM should be primarily used to identify individuals with daytime hypertension and/or nocturnal hypertension. PMID:25904648

  4. Underdiagnosis of hypertension using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, D.; Chung, S.; Wong, E. C.; Wang, E. J.; Stafford, R. S.; Palaniappan, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is highly prevalent and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Appropriate identification of hypertension is fundamental for its management. The rates of appropriate hypertension diagnosis in outpatient settings using an electronic health record (EHR) have not been well studied. We sought to identify prevalent and incident hypertension cases in a large outpatient healthcare system, examine the diagnosis rates of prevalent and incident hypertension, and identify clinical and demographic factors associated with appropriate hypertension diagnosis. METHODS We analyzed a three-year, cross-sectional sample of 251,590 patients aged ≥18 years using patient EHRs. Underlying hypertension was defined as two or more abnormal blood pressure (ABP) readings ≥140/90 mmHg and/or pharmaceutical treatment. Appropriate hypertension diagnosis was defined by the reporting of ICD-9 codes (401.0 – 401.9). Factors associated with hypertension diagnosis were assessed through multivariate analyses of patient clinical and demographic characteristics. RESULTS The prevalence of hypertension was 28.7%, and the diagnosis rate was 62.9%. The incidence of hypertension was 13.3%, with a diagnosis rate of 19.9%. Predictors of diagnosis for prevalent hypertension included older age, Asian, African American, higher BMI, and increased number of ABP readings. Predictors for incident hypertension diagnosis were similar. Patients with underlying hypertension were more likely to be treated when they had a hypertension diagnosis in the EHR (92.6%) than if they did not (15.8%, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Outpatient EHR diagnosis rates are suboptimal, yet EHR diagnosis of hypertension is strongly associated with treatment. Targeted efforts to improve diagnosis should be a priority. PMID:22031453

  5. Anatomical and functional imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    In endocrine hypertension, hormonal excess results in clinically significant hypertension. The functional imaging (such as radionuclide imaging) complements anatomy-based imaging (such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) to facilitate diagnostic localization of a lesion causing endocrine hypertension. The aim of this review article is to familiarize general radiologists, endocrinologists, and clinicians with various anatomical and functional imaging techniques used in patients with endocrine hypertension. PMID:23087854

  6. Dangerous versus useful hypertension (a holistic view of hypertension).

    PubMed

    Hulin, I; Duris, I; Paulis, L; Sapakova, E; Mravec, B

    2009-03-01

    The authors aim to offer a holistic view on hypertension and its treatment. Their approach is fairly confrontational, particularly by suggesting that hypertension may play a role in optimizing the blood flow and enhancing oxygen delivery. An increase in blood pressure brings about a threat of catastrophes. Therefore hypertension might be considered as either a subsequent complication, or an inevitable adaptation. When changes of many complicated and complex mechanisms result in retention of sodium and water, then the treatment of this condition is so far the most logical conclusion, and possibly beneficial to the patient. This can be done by influencing the peripheral resistance or the load of vascular bed. However, in some cases a moderate overfilling of the system with no increase in heart rate could be interpreted as an optimal solution for organism that does not necessarily need to be medically treated. This may apply especially to young hypertensive patients, and in cases when no catastrophe is assumed to take place. Lowering the blood pressure to average population levels in each case, especially by means of aggressive therapy may not necessarily lead to improved tissue perfusion. A decrease in blood pressure reduces the risk of catastrophes. However, on the other hand, it can deteriorate the tissue perfusion and cause unfavorable long-term consequences.

  7. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting with hypertensive emergency.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Samrat; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Nilay Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl presenting with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) along with hypertensive emergency. Hypertension persisted for few weeks following recovery and subsided with oral clonidine. Although autonomic instability in ADEM has been reported before, hypertensive emergency was not previously documented as presenting feature of ADEM.

  8. Renovascular hypertension: Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Glorioso, N.; Laragh, J.H.; Rappelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 42 selections. Some of the titles are: Clinical Pharmacology of Two Synthetic Atrial Natriuretics Peptides; Reflex Control of Renin Release in Normotensive and Hypertensive Humans; Renal Blood flow in Renovascular Hypertension; and Radioisotopic Studies in Renovascular Hypertension Before and After Surgery or Percutaneous Transluminal Renal Angioplasty.

  9. Increasing trend in admissions for malignant hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Polgreen, Linnea A; Suneja, Manish; Tang, Fan; Carter, Barry L; Polgreen, Philip M

    2015-05-01

    Malignant hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy are life-threating manifestations of hypertension. These syndromes primarily occur in patients with a history of poorly controlled hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate national trends in hospital admissions for malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, and essential hypertension. This was a retrospective cohort study that used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. We identified all hospitalizations between 2000 and 2011, during which a primary diagnosis of malignant hypertension (ICD 9 code: 401.0), hypertensive encephalopathy (ICD 9 code: 437.2), or essential hypertension (ICD 9 code: 401.9) was recorded. Time series models were estimated for malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, essential hypertension and also for the combined series. A piecewise linear regression analyses was performed to investigate whether there were changes in the trends of these series. In addition, we also compared the characteristics of patients with these diagnoses. The estimated number of admissions for both malignant hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy increased dramatically after 2007, whereas discharges for essential hypertension fell, and there was no change in trend for the combined series. Costs rose substantially for patients with these diagnoses after 2007, but mortality significantly fell for malignant hypertension and mortality for hypertensive encephalopathy did not change. The dramatic increase in the number of hospital admissions for hypertensive encephalopathy and malignant hypertension should have resulted in dramatic increases in morbidity, but it did not. The change is most likely related to changes in coding related to diagnostic-related groups that occurred in 2007. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. [Knowledge level of hypertensive patients about hypertension. Relationship between knowledge level and hypertension control].

    PubMed

    Benítez Camps, M; Egocheaga Cabello, M Isabel; Dalfó Baqué, A; Bajo García, J; Vara González, L; Sanchis Doménech, C; Martín Rioboo, E; Ureña Fernández, T; Domínguez Sardiña, M; Bonet Pla, A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of the hypertensive patients about their hypertension and their relation to its control. Cross-sectional study among 400 hypertensive patients, all over 18 years, selected from 50 primary-care centres, who responded to an hypertension-related survey. Included variables were survey items, age, gender, educational level, professional occupation, blood pressure data and antihypertensive treatment. The obtained differences were analyzed using the chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, Anova and Bonferroni methods. There were 323 valid surveys. 52.9% of respondents were women, the average age: 65.4 years (SD: 11.2), 54.8% of them had primary education. 39.6% were aware of the objectives of systolic BP control. Only 19.6% having knowledge of those for diastolic BP control, with no differences between controlled and uncontrolled (systolic BP: 39% vs 38.1%, P=.887; diastolic BP: 19.2% vs 21%, P=.721). Over 70% knew about lifestyle changes, without significant differences between controlled and uncontrolled respondents. 82% of controlled respondents, and 79% of those uncontrolled, recognized the chronical nature of the treatment (P=.548), but 15.1% of the controlled respondents and 12.4% of uncontrolled respondents did not see the relation between the treatment and hypertension control (P=.525). 31.1% believed to be well-controlled, but in fact was not. Our patients doesn't know blood pressure targets of control. There isn't relationship between this knowledge and control of hypertension. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypertension control in brazilian publications

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Natália de Alencar; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence and cardiovascular complications. Its treatment is aimed at reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, its goal being to maintain blood pressure levels below 140/90 mm Hg. Hypertension control in Brazil is low, and nationwide rates are unknown. The objective of this review was to provide an overview on hypertension control in Brazil from publications in a database. We identified 45 publications. In population-based studies, the highest control rate (57.6%) was reported in a multicenter study in 100 municipalities and the city of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state (52.4%), while the lowest rates (around 10%) were identified in microregions of the Rio Grande do Sul state and in the city of Tubarão, Santa Catarina state. In conclusion, the studies assessed showed a wide variation in hypertension control rates. It is worth noting that the comparison between studies was a major limiting factor, because of the different methods used. PMID:24061761

  12. Pulmonary hypertension in congenital shunts.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2010-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension frequently arises in patients with congenital heart disease. The vast majority present with congenital cardiac shunts. Initially these may manifest as left-to-right (i.e. systemic-to-pulmonary) shunts. The natural history of disease progression involves vascular remodeling and dysfunction that lead to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and, finally, to the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, which is the most advanced form. The anatomical, pathological and structural abnormalities occurring in the pulmonary circulation of these patients are, to some extent, similar to those observed in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This understanding has recently led to significant changes in the management of Eisenmenger's syndrome, with the introduction of treatment specifically targeting pulmonary vascular disease. Early closure of the cardiac shunt remains the best way of preventing pulmonary vascular lesions. However, it is still not clear which preoperative parameters predict safe and successful repair, though hemodynamic evaluation is still routinely used for assessment. Postoperative pulmonary hypertension, both in the immediate period after surgical repair and during long-term follow-up, remains a real therapeutic challenge. The clinical situation of a single ventricle with Fontan circulation also presents difficulties when pulmonary vascular lesions are present. This article reviews pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital shunts and discusses a number of the specific problems encountered.

  13. [Hypertension, CKD and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-05-01

    The patients with "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are accompanied with an osteoporosis. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidsim to increase serum calcium (Ca) level, which may lead to Ca release from bone. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. As for CKD, excess phosphorus (P) due to renal dysfunction induces secondary parathyroidism to decrease serum P level, which similarly leads to osteoporosis. Moreover, excess P can increase FGF23 expression and decrease activated vitamin D, which also resulted in progression of osteoporosis. Both "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are inducible factor to osteoporosis.

  14. [Management of severe arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Leeman, M

    2015-09-01

    Severe arterial hypertension is defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥180 mmHg and/or a diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Initial assessment is to identify acute, ongoing, target-organ damage such as pulmonary edema, aortic dissection, ... (hypertensive emergency). If so, the patient requires urgent and specific management in a hospital setting. More commonly, however, BP in the severe range is relatively asymptomatic and not associated with end-organ damage (hypertensive urgency). Management can usually be carried out in the ambulatory setting. Severe hypertension should first be confirmed after a period of rest in a quiet room. If BP remains in the severe range, an antihypertensive drug can be initiated. Otherwise, the patient should be referred for further evaluation within a few days ; however, an antihypertensive treatment could be started immediately if there is concern that urgent outpatient follow-up cannot be ensured or if the patient is at high cardiovascular risk. The choice of the first drug should be tailored according to associated conditions and possible contraindications. Some guidelines recommend starting therapy with an antihypertensive combination of two drugs. In all cases, rapid and excessive reduction in BP, which could compromise organ perfusion, must be avoided, especially in elderly patients. In the short-term (days), BP should be progressively lowered to < 160/100 mmHg. In the long term, a BP < 140/90 mmHg should be obtained.

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    McGoon, Michael D.; Kane, Garvan C.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive, symptomatic, and ultimately fatal disorder for which substantial advances in treatment have been made during the past decade. Effective management requires timely recognition and accurate diagnosis of the disorder and appropriate selection among therapeutic alternatives. Despite progress in treatment, obstacles remain that impede the achievement of optimal outcomes. The current article provides an overview of the pathobiologic mechanisms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, including genetic substrates and molecular and cellular mechanisms, and describes the clinical manifestations and classification of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The article also reviews established approaches to evaluation and treatment, with emphasis on the appropriate application of calcium channel blockers, prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. In addition, the authors discuss unresolved issues that may complicate patient management, such as the clinical importance of mild or exercise-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, and they identify avenues by which treatment may advance in the future through the use of combination treatment, outcomes assessment, and exploration of alternative pharmacologic strategies. PMID:19181654

  16. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic limitations].

    PubMed

    Dias, Bruno Arantes; Jardim, Carlos; Hovnanian, André; Fernandes, Caio Júlio César; Souza, Rogério

    2008-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is the only potentially curable form of pulmonary hypertension, assuming that surgical treatment is possible. However, there are hindrances to making a definitive, noninvasive diagnosis. We present the case of a 40-year-old female patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, confirmed in 1994. This patient developed thrombi in pulmonary vessels (as an overlap syndrome) mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The identification of these conditions, which present high intraoperative mortality and unsatisfactory surgical resolution, is quite difficult in clinical practice. We discuss the current approach to candidate selection for surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the possible repercussions of inappropriate selection.

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  18. Misconceptions and facts about treating hypertension.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is a powerful risk factor strongly linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Because of its high prevalence, health care providers at many levels are involved in treating hypertension. Distinct progress has been made in improving the rates of hypertension awareness and treatment over years, but the overall control of hypertension remains inadequate. Several recent guidelines from different sources have been put forward in an attempt to bridge the gap between existing evidence and clinical practice. Despite this effort, several misconceptions about treating hypertensive cardiovascular disease continue to persist among clinicians. This review highlights some of the misconceptions regarding antihypertensive therapy.

  19. Paroxysmal Hypertension Induced by an Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ko; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Hasegawa, Kou; Iwamuro, Masaya; Hagiya, Hideharu; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Insulinoma is a rare, usually benign, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. The clinical features of an insulinoma are fasting hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenic symptoms including confusion and unusual behavior, while hypertension is usually not associated with the disease. We herein report a patient with insulinoma who manifested paroxysmal hypertension and neuroglycopenic symptoms. The possible etiology of hypertension induced by an insulinoma is catecholamine release in response to hypoglycemia, which may cause acute hypertension through activation of the sympatho-adrenal system. This case implies that sustained hyperinsulinemia due to insulinoma can be functionally linked to the induction of paroxysmal hypertension. PMID:28202863

  20. Carbamazepine-induced hypertension: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, Preeti; Mittal, Niti; Gupta, Mahesh C.

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with trigeminal neuralgia developed hypertension after the initiation of carbamazepine therapy. The time sequence of start of the suspected drug and onset of hypertension are consistent with the diagnosis. The hypertension did not resolve with antihypertensive therapy or dose reduction of carbamazepine. Patient recovered after the carbamazepine therapy was discontinued. The positive rechallenge and positive dechallenge showed association of carbamazepine therapy with hypertension as its adverse effect. This is a rare case that we report of carbamazepine-induced hypertension and this report may act as alerting mechanism to the health care professionals especially neurologists. PMID:26816475

  1. HYPERTENSION TELEMANAGEMENT IN AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Cha, Eunme

    2009-01-01

    Background We propose evaluation of a multi-component home automated telemanagement (HAT) system providing integrated support to both clinicians and patients in implementing hypertension treatment guidelines. Methods In a randomized clinical study 550 African Americans with hypertension are followed for 18 months. The major components of the intervention and control groups are identical and are based on the current standard of care. For the purpose of this study, we define “standard of care” as the expected evidence-based care provided according to the current hypertension treatment guidelines. While intervention and control groups are similar in terms of their care components, they differ in the mode of care delivery. For the control group the best attempt is made to deliver all components of a guideline-concordant care in a routine clinical environment whereas for the intervention group the routine clinical environment is enhanced with Health Information Technology (IT) that assists clinicians and patients in working together in implementing treatment guidelines. The HAT system guides patients in following their individualized treatment plans and helps care coordination team in monitoring the patient progress. The study design is aimed at addressing the main question of this trial: whether the addition of the IT-enhanced care coordination in the routine primary care setting can improve delivery of evidence-based hypertension care in African Americans. The outcome parameters include quality of life, medical care utilization, treatment compliance, psychosocial variables and improvement in blood pressure control rates. Conclusions The trial will provide insight on the potential impact of IT-enhanced care coordination in African Americans with poorly controlled hypertension. PMID:20031848

  2. HNF1 AND HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Renata I.; Hinojos, Cruz A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braun, Michael C.; Fornage, Myriam; Doris, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension in SHR is associated with renal redox stress and we hypothesized that nephropathy arises in SHR-A3 from altered capacity to mitigate redox stress compared with nephropathy-resistant SHR lines. We measured renal expression of redox genes in distinct lines of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-A3, SHR-B2, SHR-C) and the normotensive WKY strain. The SHR lines differ in either resisting (SHR-B2, SHR-C) or experiencing hypertensive nephropathy (SHR-A3). Immediately prior to the emergence of hypertensive renal injury expression of redox genes in SHR-A3 was profoundly altered compared with the injury-resistant SHR lines and WKY. This change appeared to arise in anti-oxidant genes where 16 of 28 were expressed at 34.3% of the level in the reference strain (WKY). No such change was observed in the injury-resistant SHR lines. We analyzed occurrence of transcription factor matrices (TFM) in the promoters of the down-regulated antioxidant genes. In these genes, the HNF1 TFM was found to be nearly twice as likely to be present and the overall frequency of HNF1 sites was nearly 5 times higher, compared with HNF1 TFMs in anti-oxidant genes that were not down-regulated. We identified 35 other (non-redox) renal genes regulated by HNF1. These were also significantly down-regulated in SHR-A3, but not in SHR-B2 or SHR-C. Finally, expression of genes that comprise HNF1 (Tcf1, Tcf2 and Dcoh) was also down-regulated in SHR-A3. The present experiments uncover a major change in transcriptional control by HNF1 that affects redox and other genes and precedes emergence of hypertensive renal injury. PMID:18443232

  3. Pressure-volume regulation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Brands, M W

    1996-06-01

    In all forms of hypertension, including human essential hypertension, pressure natriuresis is abnormal because sodium excretion is the same as in normotension despite increased arterial pressure. Considerable evidence indicates that this resetting of pressure natriuresis plays a key role in causing hypertension, rather than merely occurring as an adaptation to increased blood pressure. Because human essential hypertension is a heterogeneous disease, it is likely that multiple neurohumoral and intrarenal defects contribute to abnormal pressure natriuresis and increased blood pressure. Physiological studies have shown that renal abnormalities that cause increased distal and collecting tubule reabsorption, decreased glomerular filtration coefficient or loss of nephrons also cause decreased slope of pressure natriuresis (salt-sensitive hypertension), whereas increased preglomerular resistance causes a parallel shift of pressure natriuresis (salt-insensitive hypertension). Comparison of the characteristics of pressure natriuresis (such as salt-sensitivity of blood pressure) in hypertensive subjects with those forms of experimental hypertension of known origin can provide insight into the etiology of human hypertension. With long-standing hypertension, pathological changes in the glomeruli and renal arterioles may further shift pressure natriuresis and exacerbate hypertension.

  4. Characterization and Treatment of Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pisoni, Roberto; Ahmed, Mustafa I.; Calhoun, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a common medical problem and carries a significantly increased risk of end organ damage and cardiovascular events as compared with more easily controlled hypertension. Resistant hypertension is most often related to isolated systolic hypertension and is characterized by aldosterone excess and increased intravascular volume. Its diagnosis requires the exclusion of pseudoresistance. The etiology of resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial and common reversible contributing factors need to be identified and addressed. Secondary causes of hypertension such as primary aldosteronism, parenchymal and vascular kidney disease, and obstructive sleep apnea require investigation and effective treatment if present. Therapy for resistant hypertension should be based on use of rational drug class combinations at optimal doses with particular attention to adequate diuretic use. The addition of an aldosterone antagonist may further improve blood pressure control. PMID:19863864

  5. Social Network Resources and Management of Hypertension*

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Erin York; Waite, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases among older adults, but rates of blood pressure control are low. In this paper, we explore the role of social network ties and network-based resources (e.g., information and support) in hypertension diagnosis and management. We use data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) to identify older adults with undiagnosed or uncontrolled hypertension. We find that network characteristics and emotional support are associated with hypertension diagnosis and control. Importantly, the risks of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension are lower among those with larger social networks -- if they discuss health issues with their network members. When these lines of communication are closed, network size is associated with greater risk of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension. Health care utilization partially mediates associations with diagnosis, but the benefits of network resources for hypertension control do not seem to stem from health-related behaviors. PMID:22660826

  6. Characteristics of Systemic Hypertension in Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankur B.; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Sahulee, Raj; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of essential hypertension (EH) among the preterm children is unknown. We evaluated consecutive children with the diagnosis of hypertension and prematurity (gestational age <37 weeks) in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic and identified 36 preterm hypertensive children. Among these preterm children, 23 were diagnosed in NICU (infantile) and 13 were diagnosed at an older age (childhood). When compared to childhood diagnosis, those with infantile diagnosis had a significantly lower gestational age, longer duration of hospitalization in the NICU, a higher incidence of perinatal risk factors for hypertension. None with infantile diagnosis had EH, whereas 46% with childhood diagnosis had EH. In conclusion among premature children, systemic hypertension was either diagnosed in infancy or in childhood, each age at diagnosis with unique risk factors and clinical course. Although 83% of preterm children had secondary hypertension, EH was diagnosed in 17% and was only seen in those diagnosed beyond infancy. PMID:25775924

  7. The treatment of hypertension in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Smith, Grant; Minor, Deborah S

    2008-04-01

    Hypertension causes a significant disease burden in all racial and ethnic groups and is directly attributable to excess weight in most cases. The relationship between increasing body mass index and hypertension prevalence has been recognized for decades. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate the correlation between body weight and blood pressure in obese and lean populations. Most patients with hypertension are overweight or obese, and loss of excess weight lowers blood pressure. Although the epidemiologic relationship is clear, the understanding of mechanisms linking hypertension and weight gain is still evolving. Lifestyle modifications and specific pharmacologic agents address many of the known mechanisms; however, blood pressure remains difficult to control in obese hypertensive patients. This review highlights the association of obesity and hypertension, identifies potential mechanisms for this association, and describes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies that offer potential benefits for the obese patient with hypertension.

  8. Associations of Early Pregnancy Sleep Duration with Trimester-Specific Blood Pressures and Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michelle A.; Miller, Raymond S.; Qiu, Chunfang; Cripe, Swee May; Gelaye, Bizu; Enquobahrie, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: We evaluated the influence of maternal self-reported habitual sleep duration during early pregnancy on blood pressure (BP) levels and risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Clinic-based study. Participants: A cohort of 1,272 healthy, pregnant women. Measurements and Results: We abstracted maternal antenatal BP values from medical records and estimated mean BP differences across hours of sleep categories in regression models, using generalized estimating equations. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and preeclampsia (PE) in relation to long and short sleep duration were estimated. Mean 1st and 2nd trimester systolic (S) and diastolic (D) BP values were similar among women reporting to be short sleepers (≤ 6 h) vs. women reporting to sleep 9 hours. However, both short and long sleep duration in early pregnancy were associated with increased mean 3rd trimester SBP and DBP. For example, mean 3rd trimester SBP was 3.72, and 2.43 mm Hg higher for women reporting ≤ 6 h and 7-8 h sleep, respectively, compared with women reporting 9 h of sleep. Mean 3rd trimester SBP was 4.21 mm Hg higher for women reporting long sleep (≥ 10 h) vs. the reference group. Short and long sleep durations were associated with increased risks of PIH and PE. The ORs for very short (< 5 h) and long (≥ 10 h) sleepers were 9.52 (95% CI 1.83 to 49.40) and 2.45 (95% CI 0.74 to 8.15) for PE. Conclusions: Our findings are consistent with a larger literature that documents elevated blood pressure and increased risks of hypertension with short and long sleep duration. Citation: Williams MA; Miller RS; Qiu C; Cripe SM; Gelaye B; Enquobahrie D. Associations of early pregnancy sleep duration with trimester-specific blood pressures and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. SLEEP 2010;33(10):1363-1371. PMID:21061859

  9. The hypoxic moderation of systemic hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Deng, X; Zhou, X; Zheng, Y; Wang, X; Liang, B; Cai, Q; Yang, Y

    1993-09-01

    The mechanism of hypoxic moderation of systemic systolic blood pressure was investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Male SHR rats were divided into hypoxic (H, 5000 m for 15 d) and normoxic (N) groups. The systemic blood pressure of SHR-H (24.9 +/- 1.2 kPa) was found to be 3 kPa lower than that in SHR-N (27.0 +/- 1.3 kPa) (P < 0.05). This protective effect may have been related to the adaptive changes in vascular reactivity which manifested as an increase in the relaxation response of the aorta to ACh (P < 0.01) and a drop in its contraction in response to 5-HT (P < 0.05) following hypoxic exposure. The hypoxic moderating effect against the development of systemic hypertension may have also been related to the increased plasma levels of ANP observed.

  10. Impedance Cardiographic (ICG) Assessment of Pregnant Women With Severe Hypertension to Assess Impact of Standard Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-11

    Pregnancy; Proteinuria, With Hypertension (Severe Pre-eclampsia); Delivery; Proteinuria, With Gestational Hypertension (Pre-eclampsia, Severe); Pregnancy; Hypertension, Gestational Hypertension, With Albuminuria (Severe Pre-eclampsia)

  11. Unintended Pregnancy, Induced Abortion, and Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Sarah; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2017-09-14

    The early medical literature on mental health outcomes following abortion is fraught with methodological flaws that can improperly influence clinical practice. Our goal is to review the current medical literature on depression and other mental health outcomes for women obtaining abortions. The Turnaway Study prospectively enrolled 956 women seeking abortion in the USA and followed their mental health outcomes for 5 years. The control group was comprised of women denied abortions based on gestational age limits, thereby circumventing the major methodological flaw that had plagued earlier studies on the topic. Rates of depression are not significantly different between women obtaining abortion and those denied abortion. Rates of anxiety are initially higher in women denied abortion care. Counseling on decision-making for women with unintended pregnancies should reflect these findings.

  12. Planned early delivery versus expectant management for hypertensive disorders from 34 weeks gestation to term.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Catherine; Novikova, Natalia; Koopmans, Corine M; West, Helen M

    2017-01-15

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are significant contributors to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. These disorders include well-controlled chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension (pregnancy-induced hypertension) and mild pre-eclampsia. The definitive treatment for these disorders is planned early delivery and the alternative is to manage the pregnancy expectantly if severe uncontrolled hypertension is not present, with close maternal and fetal monitoring. There are benefits and risks associated with both, so it is important to establish the safest option. To assess the benefits and risks of a policy of planned early delivery versus a policy of expectant management in pregnant women with hypertensive disorders, at or near term (from 34 weeks onwards). We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register (12 January 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials of a policy of planned early delivery (by induction of labour or by caesarean section) compared with a policy of delayed delivery ("expectant management") for women with hypertensive disorders from 34 weeks' gestation. Cluster-randomised trials would have been eligible for inclusion in this review, but we found none.Studies using a quasi-randomised design are not eligible for inclusion in this review. Similarly, studies using a cross-over design are not eligible for inclusion, because they are not a suitable study design for investigating hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and risks of bias. Two review authors independently extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. We included five studies (involving 1819 women) in this review.There was a lower risk of composite maternal mortality and severe morbidity for women randomised to receive planned early delivery (risk ratio (RR) 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 0.83, two studies, 1459 women (evidence graded high)). There were no clear

  13. Hypertension in children: approach to management.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension in children is an important often under diagnosed condition. There are no absolute values of normal blood pressure in children as it varies with age, gender and height. Normative blood pressure data is available for different ages, sexes and heights, the diagnosis of hypertension should be based on these values. It is recommended that all children over the age of 3 years should have blood pressure measured whenever seen by a doctor. Essential hypertension can occur in children, but hypertension secondary to an underlying cause (most often renal) is more likely. Secondary hypertension tends to be more severe, sustained and at times uncontrolled. Evaluation includes a thorough history and physical examination and certain basic laboratory tests. All attempts should be made to look for the etiology in cases where secondary hypertension is suspected. Management of hypertension in children must incorporate non pharamacological measures including weight reduction, exercise and dietary modifications. Pharamacological treatment is indicated for; a) symptomatic hypertension, b) if there is evidence of end organ damage and c) for those unresponsive to nonpharmacological treatment. A number of drugs are available for children with hypertension; commonly used ones are calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics. Choice of a drug depends on the underlying cause of hypertension and presence of comorbidity, if any.

  14. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated.

  15. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  16. Hypertension and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Cristina; Doménech, Mónica; Camafort, Miguel; Coca, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The brain is an early target for organ damage due to high blood pressure. Hypertension is the major modifiable risk factor for stroke and small vessel disease. It has been suggested that cerebral microvascular disease contributes to vascular cognitive impairment. The mechanisms underlying hypertension-related cognitive changes are complex and not yet fully understood. Both high and, especially in the elderly, low blood pressure (BP) have been linked to cognitive decline and dementia. There is some evidence that antihypertensive drug treatment could play a role in the prevention of cognitive impairment through BP control. The BP levels that should be targeted to achieve optimal perfusion while preventing cognitive decline are still under debate.

  17. [Psychological approaches in hypertension management].

    PubMed

    Abgrall-Barbry, Gaëlle; Consoli, Silla M

    2006-06-01

    Stress factors, especially high levels of occupational stress, are associated with hypertension. Several so-called psychological techniques have been applied to hypertension: biofeedback, relaxation techniques (Schultz' autogenic training, Jacobson's progressive relaxation), transcendental meditation, and cognitive behavioral techniques for stress management. Randomized studies show that the best results come from cognitive behavioral methods, whether or not they include relaxation techniques. Other forms of psychotherapy (such as psychoanalysis) may be useful, although their benefits for blood pressure have not been tested in controlled trials. Patients should be informed about the personal benefits they may obtain from psychological treatment. Indications are hyperreactivity to stress, high levels of occupational stress, and difficulty in tolerating or complying with antihypertensive drugs.

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension: Types and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Jones, Lisa J; Mclaughlin, Vallerie V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a panvasculopathy that affects the distal pulmonary arteries and leads to restricted blood flow. This increased afterload leads to adaptive mechanisms of the right ventricle, with eventual failure once it can no longer compensate. Pulmonary hypertension from associated conditions, most importantly left heart disease, i.e. heart failure, can also lead to the same sequela. Patients often experience early vague symptoms of dyspnea and exercise intolerance, and thus PH can elude clinicians until right heart failure symptoms predominate. Evidence-based treatment options with pulmo-nary vasodilators are available for those with PAH and should be employed early. It is essential that patients be accurately categorized by their etiology of PH, as treatment strategies differ, and can potentially be dangerous if employed in the wrong clinical scenario. PMID:24251459

  19. Lung function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Low, A T; Medford, A R L; Millar, A B; Tulloh, R M R

    2015-10-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and an important cause of morbidity. Though this has been attributed to the well described pulmonary vascular abnormalities and subsequent cardiac remodelling, changes in the airways of these patients have also been reported and may contribute to symptoms. Our understanding of these airway abnormalities is poor with conflicting findings in many studies. The present review evaluates these studies for the major PH groups. In addition we describe the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by evaluating cardiopulmonary interaction during exercise. As yet, the reasons for the abnormalities in lung function are unclear, but potential causes and the possible role of inflammation are discussed. Future research is required to provide a better understanding of this to help improve the management of these patients.

  20. Role of prostaglandins in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Colina-Chourio, J A; Godoy-Godoy, N; Avila-Hernández, R M

    2000-04-01

    The role of prostaglandins (PGs) in hypertension (HT) is reviewed, emphasising their biochemical characteristics, physiological effects and functions, especially in the cardiovascular area, and the current evidence of their participation in the antihypertensive activity of a balanced mechanism to maintain normal blood pressure. Also, the clinical use of PGs and the future of such autacoids in the treatment of HT and other diseases or conditions is mentioned.

  1. Beta-blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2010-12-15

    Beta blockers have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular conditions for decades. Despite a long history and status as a guideline-recommended treatment option for hypertension, recent meta-analyses have brought into question whether β blockers are still an appropriate therapy given outcomes data from other antihypertensive drug classes. However, β blockers are a heterogenous class of agents with diverse pharmacologic and physiologic properties. Much of the unfavorable data revealed in the recent meta-analyses were gleaned from studies involving nonvasodilating, traditional β blockers, such as atenolol. However, findings with traditional β blockers may not be extrapolated to other members of the class, particularly those agents with vasodilatory activity. Vasodilatory β blockers (i.e., carvedilol and nebivolol) reduce blood pressure in large part through reducing systemic vascular resistance rather than by decreasing cardiac output, as is observed with traditional β blockers. Vasodilating ability may also ameliorate some of the concerns associated with traditional β blockade, such as the adverse effects on metabolic and lipid parameters, including an increased risk for new-onset diabetes. Furthermore, vasodilating ability is physiologically relevant and important in treating a condition with common co-morbidities involving metabolic and lipid abnormalities such as hypertension. In patients with hypertension and diabetes or coronary artery disease, vasodilating β blockers provide effective blood pressure control with neutral or beneficial effects on important parameters for the co-morbid disease. In conclusion, it is time for a reexamination of the clinical evidence for the use of β blockers in hypertension, recognizing that there are patients for whom β blockers, particularly those with vasodilatory actions, are an appropriate treatment option.

  2. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies.

  3. Blood pressure change and risk of hypertension associated with parental hypertension: the Johns Hopkins Precursors Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nae-Yuh; Young, J Hunter; Meoni, Lucy A; Ford, Daniel E; Erlinger, Thomas P; Klag, Michael J

    2008-03-24

    Parental hypertension is used to classify hypertension risk in young adults, but the long-term association of parental hypertension with blood pressure (BP) change and risk of hypertension over the adult life span has not been well studied. We examined the association of parental hypertension with BP change and hypertension risk from young adulthood through the ninth decade of life in a longitudinal cohort of 1160 male former medical students with 54 years of follow-up. In mixed-effects models using 29 867 BP measurements, mean systolic and diastolic BP readings were significantly higher at baseline among participants with parental hypertension. The rate of annual increase was slightly higher for systolic (0.03 mm Hg, P= .04), but not diastolic, BP in those with parental hypertension. After adjustment for baseline systolic and diastolic BP and time-dependent covariates--body mass index, alcohol consumption, coffee drinking, physical activity, and cigarette smoking--the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) of hypertension development was 1.5 (1.2-2.0) for men with maternal hypertension only, 1.8 (1.4-2.4) for men with paternal hypertension only, and 2.4 (1.8-3.2) for men with hypertension in both parents compared with men whose parents never developed hypertension. Early-onset (at age hypertension in both parents imparted a 6.2-fold higher adjusted risk (95% CI, 3.6-10.7) for the development of hypertension throughout adult life and a 20.0-fold higher adjusted risk (95% CI, 8.4-47.9) at the age of 35 years. Hypertension in both mothers and fathers has a strong independent association with elevated BP levels and incident hypertension over the course of adult life.

  4. [Nephrotoxicity--proteinuria and hypertension--].

    PubMed

    Ando, Minoru

    2008-10-01

    Targeted and biological therapies have been investigated as methods of improving anticancer therapy. One approach to targeted therapy is to inhibit tumor angiogenesis, which has a critical role in the development of cancer. However, the potential for further improvement in outcomes is likely to be limited by its nephrotoxic side effects such as urinary protein and hypertension. Among the anti-angiogenesis inhibitors, the humanized monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, directed against VEGF(vascular endothelial growth factor), is the first anti-angiogenic agent to be approved for cancer therapy, but it has a high frequency of these side effects. Hypertension could be due to a reduction of eNOS activity and rarefaction of microvessels in various tissues and organs induced by VEGF inhibition. Bevacizumab also induces proteinuria, glomerular endothelial cell detachment and suppression of nephrin, an important protein for the maintenance of the glomerular slit diaphragm, sometimes leading to nephritic syndrome and/or thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli. Periodic monitoring of blood pressure and urinary protein should be necessary in patients on anti- VEGF agents. Patients showing nephrotoxicities need special referral to nephrologists and to be treated using proper anti-hypertension drugs.

  5. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-10-08

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment can deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs have significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls, and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before. We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers the preceding day. This case describes an unusual pattern of arterial hypertensive crisis due to capsaicin.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  7. White coat hypertension in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Jurko, Alexander; Minarik, Milan; Jurko, Tomas; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2016-01-15

    The article summarizes current information on blood pressure changes in children during clinic visit. White coat as a general dressing of physicians and health care personnel has been widely accepted at the end of the 19th century. Two problems can be associated with the use of white coat: white coat phenomenon and white coat hypertension. Children often attribute pain and other unpleasant experience to the white coat and refuse afterwards cooperation with examinations. Definition of white coat hypertension in the literature is not uniform. It has been defined as elevated blood pressure in the hospital or clinic with normal blood pressure at home measured during the day by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring system. White coat effect is defined as temporary increase in blood pressure before and during visit in the clinic, regardless what the average daily ambulatory blood pressure values are. Clinical importance of white coat hypertension is mainly because of higher risk for cardiovascular accidents that are dependent on end organ damage (heart, vessels, kidney). Current data do not allow any clear recommendations for the treatment. Pharmacological therapy is usually started in the presence of hypertrophic left ventricle, changes in intimal/medial wall thickness of carotic arteries, microalbuminuria and other cardiovascular risk factors. Nonpharmacological therapy is less controversial and certainly more appropriate. Patients have to change their life style, need to eliminate as much cardiovascular risk factors as possible and sustain a regular blood pressure monitoring.

  8. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  9. The relationship between hypertensive pregnant women's hypertension self-care knowledge and hypertension control at a reference in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mahaka, H T

    2006-01-01

    To determine hypertensive self-care knowledge possessed by outpatient pregnant hypertensive women and to establish the relationship between their knowledge and their hypertension control. Descriptive correlational study. A Harare antenatal clinic, a national reference centre, Harare, Zimbabwe. Mild hypertensive pregnant women, not on antihypertensive drugs, attending the antenatal clinic on repeat visits as outpatients, (n = 75). Interviewer-administered structured interview schedule on indicators of hypertension self-care knowledge and blood pressure measurement using a syphygmanometer and astethoscope. Selected indicators of hypertension self-care knowledge and diastolic blood pressure readings. Pearson's correlational analysis and simple regression analysis used for the relationship. The total possible score for hypertension self-care knowledge was 40 (100%) Scores ranged from 11 (27.5%) to 38 (95%). The mean total knowledge score was 32.7 and the standard deviation was 4.24. The score range was from 11 to 38. Of blood pressure readings, 85.3% of the outpatients had a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg and below. Only 14.7% had a diastolic blood pressure reading above 90 mmHg. The range was from 60 mmHg to 110 mmHg and the mean was 89.7 mm Hg. Pearson's correlational analysis revealed a relationship between hypertension self-care knowledge and diastolic blood pressure which was significant (r = -0.25, p < 0.001). Simple linear regression analysis revealed a negative relationship (p < 0.001) suggesting that hypertension self-care knowledge has a negative effect on hypertension. Hypertension self-care knowledge seems to assist in the control of hypertension in pregnancy.

  10. [Seven core principles for treatment of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun-song; Gao, Run-lin; Liu, Li-sheng

    2006-04-01

    The seven core principles (SeCP) for treatment of hypertension were (1) early identification, early diagnosis, early and life-long treatment; (2) application of long-acting and slow-released anti-hypertension drugs to control blood pressure smoothly; (3) use low dosage and combined therapy; (4) individual and racial therapy; (5) integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine; (6) life style improvement; (7) enhancing compliance. Being more comprehensive and detailed than the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee (JNC-7), the 2003' European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology (ESH/ESC2003), the report of the fourth working party of the British Hypertension Society (2004-BHS IV), and the 2004' Chinese Guideline of Hypertension (CGH2004), the programmatic SeCP should be promoted in clinical practice for hypertension patients and doctors to follow and apply.

  11. The problem of hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hedner, T

    2000-01-01

    Since most developed countries have an ageing population, the prevalence of hypertension is increasing. This age-driven increase in cardiovascular risk is an important factor contributing to the increasing burden of mortality and morbidity associated with cardiovascular disease. Today, there is a strong rationale for an aggressive approach to hypertension since antihypertensive treatment has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in the elderly. It is likely that increasing emphasis will be placed on control of isolated and borderline systolic hypertension, which are the predominant forms of hypertension in elderly patients. The recent second Swedish Trial in Old Patients with Hypertension (STOP-Hypertension-2) represents an important contribution to the literature since it shows that newer antihypertensive agents, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and calcium antagonists, are as effective as older agents in reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in elderly patients.

  12. Hypertension as an autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Afsar, Baris; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Aslan, Gamze; Yalcin, Can Ege; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension that is considered idiopathic is called essential hypertension and accordingly has no clear culprit for its cause. However, basic research and clinical studies in recent years have expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of essential hypertension. Of these, increased oxidative stress, both in the kidney and arterial wall, closely coupled with inflammatory infiltration now appear to have a prominent role. Discovery of regulatory and interleukin-17-producing T cells has enabled us to better understand the mechanism by which inflammation and autoimmunity, or autoinflammation, lead to the development of hypertension. Despite achieving considerable progress, the intricate interactions between oxidative stress, the immune system and the development of hypertension remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the pathophysiology of hypertension with a focus on the oxidant stress-autoimmunity-inflammation interaction.

  13. [Does essential hypertension exist in childhood?].

    PubMed

    Stickler, G B

    1983-12-01

    Essential hypertension in children is difficult to define and is probably very rare. Of 44 children and adolescents diagnosed between 1966 and 1980 to have essential hypertension, we found that only 8 patients continued to be hypertensive, 3 patients turned out to have secondary hypertension and only 5 patients continued to have elevated blood pressures. The incidence of obesity was high in our patients initially diagnosed to have hypertension, but had normalized their weight at the time of reevaluation. The patients with sustained hypertension had initial diastolic blood pressures over 90 mm of mercury at an age of under 12 years and over 100 mm of mercury when older than 12 years of age.

  14. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Bensman, A

    1988-01-01

    Hypertension in children is divided in 2 groups: primary hypertension and the secondary forms which are more severe and mostly due to kidney diseases. The medical management of hypertension includes non pharmacological intervention (diet, exercise, life-style) and pharmacological agents. The children with primary and mild hypertension may need only non pharmacological strategies. The main pharmacological agents used are: diuretics, vasodilators, sympathetic blockers, centrally acting agents, converting enzyme inhibitors. Except for hypertensive emergencies, the management of children with hypertension is facilitated by a stepped-care titration approach. Step 1: beta adrenergic blockers or vaso-dilators; step 2: combine beta adrenergic blockers with vaso-dilators or with diuretics or converting enzyme inhibitors alone; step 3: combine converting enzyme inhibitors with vaso-dilators and/or diuretics and/or beta adrenergic blockers; step 4: drugs include minoxidil, prazosin, labetalol.

  15. Clinical assessment of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisarg; Walker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The use of blood pressure measurements have become a routine part of physical exam for the evacuation of cardiovascular health adults and, more recently, children. The most widely used definition of hypertension is delineate as greater than 90 % BP according to age, sex, and height by the National High Blood Pressure Education Program. Current research suggests that pediatric hypertension is influenced by multitude of factors including birth weight, maturity during birth, heredity, and diet leading to primary hypertension. Factors influencing secondary hypertension include renal abnormalities, coarctation of the aorta, medications, neoplasm, etc. The treatment for pediatric hypertension is carried out with diet and exercise as the first line of defense. Only under non-compliance with diet and exercise is pharmaceutical intervention appropriate. This paper outlines a concise summary of the current understanding and research for scientists, clinicians, as well as for the general population to better understand pediatric hypertension.

  16. Tinnitus and arterial hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ricardo Rodrigues; de Azevedo, Andréia Aparecida; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Tinnitus is considered a multi-factorial symptom. Arterial hypertension has been cited as a tinnitus etiological factor. To assess the scientific evidence on the associations between arterial hypertension and tinnitus. A systematic review was performed using PubMed, ISI Web, Lilacs and SciELO scientific databases. This review included articles published in Portuguese, Spanish, French and English correlating tinnitus with hypertension. Letters to editors and case reports were excluded. A total of 424 articles were identified, of which only 20 met the inclusion criteria. Studies that analyzed the incidence of hypertension in tinnitus patients tended to show an association, while those that evaluated the incidence of tinnitus in hypertensive patients did not. There is evidence of an association between tinnitus and hypertension, although a cause and effect relationship is uncertain. Changes in the cochlear microcirculation, resulting in hearing loss, may be an adjuvant factor in tinnitus pathophysiology.

  17. The kidney and hypertension: causes and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence of hypertension. Extracellular volume expansion is an important, if not the most important, contributing factor to hypertension seen in chronic kidney disease. Beyond volume expansion, chronic kidney disease-related hypertension is without truly defining characteristics. Consequently, the sequencing of antihypertensive medications for the patient with chronic kidney disease and hypertension becomes arbitrary. Prescription practice in such patients should be mindful of the need for multiple drug classes with at least one of them being a diuretic. Blood pressure goals in the patient with chronic kidney disease and hypertension are set at lower levels than those for patients with essential hypertension alone. It remains to be determined to what level blood pressure should be lowered in the patient with chronic kidney disease, however.

  18. Small artery remodeling in hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2006-04-01

    The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small artery smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen, and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, whereas in some secondary forms of hypertension and in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a hypertrophic remodeling may be detected. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive patients. Various antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effects on vascular structure. A complete normalization of small resistance artery structure was demonstrated in hypertensive patients, after prolonged and effective therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II-receptor blockers, and calcium antagonists. Few data are available in diabetic hypertensive patients; however, blockade of the renin-angiotensin system seems to be effective in this regard.

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  20. Renin in differential diagnosis of hypertension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    Renin is a proteolytic enzyme secreted by the kidney. Techniques for the direct measurement of renin content of human blood are not available at the present time. Two of the best known causes of remediable hypertension can be diagnosed from abnormalities in renin activity and aldosterone production. In renovascular hypertension, renin secretion is increased because of impaired glomerular perfusion. The renin activity assay, when applied in a carefully controlled fashion, is a useful screening test for treatable causes of hypertension.

  1. [Pulmonary hypertension caused by left heart disease].

    PubMed

    Erer, Betül; Eren, Mehmet

    2010-09-01

    Increased resistance to pulmonary venous drainage is the main mechanism in pulmonary hypertension (PH) developing due to left heart disease. This condition may occur as a result of various diseases affecting left ventricle, left atrium, mitral or aortic valves. Pulmonary hypertension is the common and well-recognized complication of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension accompanying chronic heart failure is related to increased mortality. Treatment should be tailored according to the underlying disease.

  2. [Evolutionary and Genetic Roots of Hypertensive Disease].

    PubMed

    Markel, A L

    2015-06-01

    This review concerns issues related to the evolutionary and genetic origins of hypertensive disease. An evolutionary approach is used to account for the predisposition of modern people to the development of a pathology such as hypertensive disease. Many studies indicate the importance of "ancestral" alleles, which provided perfect adaptation to the environment and lifestyle of our distant relatives, with respect to the increase in hypertensive disease development among modern individuals.

  3. Renin in differential diagnosis of hypertension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    Renin is a proteolytic enzyme secreted by the kidney. Techniques for the direct measurement of renin content of human blood are not available at the present time. Two of the best known causes of remediable hypertension can be diagnosed from abnormalities in renin activity and aldosterone production. In renovascular hypertension, renin secretion is increased because of impaired glomerular perfusion. The renin activity assay, when applied in a carefully controlled fashion, is a useful screening test for treatable causes of hypertension.

  4. Prevalence of Hypertension Among Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-13

    coronary heart disease , and renal disease , which account for a large proportion of adult deaths in the United States. The purpose of this study was to...cardiovascular diseases --stroke, rheumatic heart disease , coronary heart disease , and hypertension--hypertension is the most prevalent, afflicting approximately 30...factor, in conjunction with the fact that hypertension is one of the most modifiable risk factors for heart disease and stroke (Alderman,

  5. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  6. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness reduces the risk of incident hypertension associated with a parental history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shook, Robin P; Lee, Duck-chul; Sui, Xuemei; Prasad, Vivek; Hooker, Steven P; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2012-06-01

    Family history of hypertension increases the risk of an individual to develop hypertension, whereas moderate-to-high cardiorespiratory fitness has the opposite effect. However, the joint association of each on the development of hypertension is not well understood. We studied fitness and incident hypertension in 6278 participants who were given a preventative medical examination. Thirty-three percent reported a parent with hypertension, and there were 1545 cases of incident hypertension after a mean of 4.7 years. The presence of parental hypertension was associated with a 28% higher risk of developing hypertension after adjustments for age, sex, and examination year. After further adjustments for smoking, alcohol intake, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures, hypercholesterolemia, body mass index, physical inactivity, and fitness, there was a 20% higher risk associated with parental hypertension. After adjusting for age, sex, and examination year, both moderate and high levels of fitness were associated with lower risk for developing hypertension by 26% and 42%, respectively. In the joint analysis, individuals with both a low level of fitness and a parent with hypertension exhibited a 70% higher risk for developing hypertension compared with high fit individuals with no parental history (P = 0.004). However, individuals with a high level of fitness and a parent with hypertension only experienced a 16% higher risk of developing hypertension compared with fit individuals with no parental history (P = 0.03). The significantly lower risk of developing hypertension when progressing from low- to high-fit groups among those with a parental history of hypertension has important clinical implications.

  8. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive's. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor's clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics.

  9. [Prevalence of masked hypertension in a cohort of controlled hypertensive patients in Spain].

    PubMed

    Sobrino, Javier; Domenech, Mónica; Camafort, Miguel; Vinyoles, Ernest; Coca, Antonio

    2011-05-21

    In recent years the evidence that masked hypertension is associated with a highest cardiovascular risk is well established. Knowing the prevalence of masked hypertension in our country will allow a better cardiovascular risk stratification and management of hypertensive patients, although the information is scant and heterogeneous. For this reason, the working group for the study of masked hypertension (ESTHEN) in Spain developed the present study with the objective to know the prevalence of masked hypertension in a cohort of hypertensive patients follows in several Hypertension Units in Spain. Prospective study of a cohort of hypertensive patients followed in 75 Hypertension Units in Spain. Eligible patients were hypertensive cases aged ≥ 18 years receiving antihypertensive drug treatment and showing an adequate BP control at the clinic (BP < 140/90 mmHg). Masked hypertension was defined when mean daytime BP ≥ 135/85 mmHg. We analyzed data from 302 patients. Mean age was 56.2 years and 56% were male. Prevalence of masked hypertension was 48% (95%CI 42-53). The most prevalent accompanying risk factors were abdominal obesity (39.7%), smoking (24.2%), family with premature cardiovascular disease (22.5%), and diabetes (11.6%). Prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was 23.8%, and 22.2% of patients had established cardiovascular disease, and 6.3% had renal disease. Masked hypertension was related to the absence of established cardiovascular disease (OR 0.306, 95%CI 0.139-0.676) and to the proximity of the clinic BP levels to the control thresholds (0.901, 95%CI 0.842-0.963). The OR of masked hypertension diminished 10% for each mmHg below the threshold of control. The prevalence of masked hypertension was approximately 50% in treated hypertensive patients. ABPM constitutes a basic tool for detection of this abnormality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Studies of the effect of mode of delivery: obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia on maternal Plasma Renin Concentration (PRC) and Plasma Renin Activity (PRA) in the normotensive and hypertensive primigravidae.

    PubMed

    Odum, C U

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated, the influence of mode of delivery, obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia on the maternal plasma renin angiotension system (RAS) in the normotensive primigravidae (n-10) and those with Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) (n-18). A total of 56 plasma samples from these subjects were assayed for Plasma Renin Concentration (PRC) and Plasma Renin Activity (PRA), using the radio-immunoassay technique. The normotensive subjects had normal delivery, while their hypertensive counterparts were delivered vaginally under lumbar epidural analgesia (n = 10) and with Caesarean Section (n = 8). The blood sample for the study were taken pre-labour, and immediately after delivery. The mean pre-labour PRC and PRA levels for the normotensive subjects were 5.73 +/- 0.25, and 3.56 +/- 0.13 ngml.1hr-1; and the post-delivery PRC and PRA values were 4.43 +/- 0.18 and 2.1 +/- 0.05ngml-1hr-1 respectively. The mean pre-labour PRC and PRA levels for the hypertensive subjects, who were delivered under epidural analgesia were 6.38 +/- 0.52 and 3.64 +/- 0.09 ngml-1hr-1 and the post-delivery values for this group were 5.04 +/- 0.21 and 2.34 +/- 0.07 ngml-1hr-1 respectively. The mean pre-labour PRC and PRA levels for the hypertensive subjects who were delivered by Caesarean Section were 5.87 +/- 0.36 and 3.83 +/- 0.36 ngml-1hr-1 and their post-delivery PRC and PRA values were 4.55 +/- 0.30 and 2.30 +/- 0.09 respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Rodrigo Vanerson Passos; Souza, Michel Kendy; Passos, Clévia Santos; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Simoes, Herbert Gustavo; Prestes, Jonato; Boim, Mirian Aparecida; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Franco, Maria do Carmo Pinho; Moraes, Milton Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH). Objective This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing), performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC), on blood pressure (BP) and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with SH. Methods Fifteen male SHR [206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBP)] and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP) were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY) and SHR (SED-SHR); RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC); and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC). Systolic BP and heart rate (HR) were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05), whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in HR only for the RT1 group (p < 0.05). There was a higher increase in strength in the RT2 (140%; p < 0.05) group as compared with RT1 (11%; p > 0.05). Conclusions Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength. PMID:26840054

  12. Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM). Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go. PMID:23861720

  13. Association between Hypertension and Periodontitis: Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Badiah, Baharin

    2014-01-01

    This review is to examine the current literatures on the relationship between periodontitis and hypertension as well as to explore the possible biological pathways underlying the linkage between these health conditions. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are among the critical components in the development of hypertension. Inflammation has received much attention recently and may contribute to a pivotal role in hypertension. Periodontitis, a chronic low-grade inflammation of gingival tissue, has been linked to endothelial dysfunction, with blood pressure elevation and increased mortality risk in hypertensive patients. Inflammatory biomarkers are increased in hypertensive patients with periodontitis. Over the years, various researches have been performed to evaluate the involvement of periodontitis in the initiation and progression of hypertension. Many cross-sectional studies documented an association between hypertension and periodontitis. However, more well-designed prospective population trials need to be carried out to ascertain the role of periodontitis in hypertension. PMID:24526921

  14. Physical Activity and the Prevention of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Keith M.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2013-01-01

    As the worldwide prevalence of hypertension continues to increase, the primary prevention of hypertension has become an important global public health initiative. Physical activity is commonly recommended as an important lifestyle modification that may aid in the prevention of hypertension. Recent epidemiologic evidence has demonstrated a consistent, temporal, and dose-dependent relationship between physical activity and the development of hypertension. Experimental evidence from interventional studies have further confirmed a relationship between physical activity and hypertension as the favorable effects of exercise on blood pressure reduction have been well characterized in recent years. Despite the available evidence strongly supporting a role for physical activity in the prevention of hypertension, many unanswered questions regarding the protective benefits of physical activity in high-risk individuals, the factors that may moderate the relationship between physical activity and hypertension, and the optimal prescription for hypertension prevention remain. We review the most recent evidence for the role of physical activity in the prevention of hypertension and discuss recent studies that have sought to address these unanswered questions. PMID:24052212

  15. The Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kattah, Andrea G.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders complicate 6–8% of pregnancies and cause significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The goal of treatment is to prevent significant cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the mother, without compromising fetal well-being. Current guidelines differentiate between the treatment of women with acute hypertensive syndromes of pregnancy and women with preexisting chronic hypertension in pregnancy. This review will address the management of hypertension in pregnancy, review the various pharmacologic therapies, and discuss the future directions in this field. PMID:23928387

  16. Pulmonary hypertension associated with use of phentermine.

    PubMed

    Bang, Woo-Dae; Kim, Ji-Ye; Yu, Hee-Tae; Cho, Sung-Soo; Jang, Ji-Yong; Oh, Chang-Myung; Joung, Boyoung; Chang, Hyuk-Jae

    2010-11-01

    Weight-control drugs (known as anorexigens) such as fenfluramine have been linked with pulmonary hypertension in previous reports. In our case, a 29 year old woman was admitted for shortness of breath and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension. Three months ago, she had been taking phentermine for five weeks. Other factors that might have contributed to the development of pulmonary hypertension were excluded. With treatment, her symptoms improved. This is the first case that can suggest a possible connection between phenermine single medication with pulmonary hypertension. Phentermine has been considered a relatively safe drug to treat obesity, and further investigation is needed to decide the safety and dosage of phentermine.

  17. Portal Hypertension Secondary to Isolated Liver Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Otoukesh, Salman; Shahsafi, Mohammad R.; Tahbaz, Mohammad O.; Rahvari, Seyed K.; Poorabdollah, Mihan; Sajadi, Mohammad M.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of isolated liver tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension leading to bleeding esophageal varices. Although TB has been known to cause portal hypertension in a variety of ways, this case was notable for the presence of periportal inflammation and granulomas, also seen in hepatic schistosomiasis. Herein, we discuss isolated liver TB and the differential diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. In endemic areas, TB should be considered in the differential diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. PMID:22764308

  18. [Dental care for the pregnant hypertensive patient].

    PubMed

    Díaz Romero, R M; Mandujano Valdez, L

    1989-10-01

    Different odontology publications have stressed how important it is for every D.D.S. to be familiar with the fundamentals of detection and treatment to be considered in all cases of patients who suffer from hypertension. This condition has of late been occurring at increasingly early ages, and it is now known that children of hypertensive parents have higher blood pressures than those of parents with normal readings, all ages considered. The state of stress in which individuals currently live, conditions young persons with labile hypertension to develop essential hypertension, which becomes fixed within briefer periods.

  19. Mechanisms and Treatment of Intradialytic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter Noel; Inrig, Jula K

    2016-01-01

    Background Intradialytic hypertension is an increase in blood pressure from pre to post hemodialysis that has recently been identified as an independent mortality risk in hypertensive hemodialysis patients. The mechanisms and management of intradialytic hypertension have been explored in numerous research studies over the past few years. Summary Patients with intradialytic hypertension have been found to be more chronically volume overloaded compared to other hemodialysis patients, although no causal role has been established. Patients with intradialytic hypertension have intradialytic vascular resistance surges that likely explain the blood pressure increase during dialysis. Acute intradialytic changes in endothelial cell function have been proposed as etiologies for the increase in vascular resistance, although it is unclear if endothelin-1 or some other vasoconstrictive peptide is responsible. There is an association between dialysate to serum sodium gradients and blood pressure increase during dialysis in patients with intradialytic hypertension, although it is unclear if this is related to endothelial cell activity or acute osmolar changes. In addition to probing the dry weight of patients with intradialytic hypertension, other management strategies include lowering dialysate sodium and changing antihypertensives to include carvedilol or other poorly dialyzed antihypertensives. Key Messages Hemodialysis patients with intradialytic hypertension have an increased mortality risk compared to patients with modest decreases in blood pressure during dialysis. Intradialytic hypertension is associated with extracellular volume overload in addition to acute increases in vascular resistance during dialysis. Management strategies should include reevaluation of dry weight and modification of both the dialysate prescription and medication prescription. PMID:26765312

  20. Preeclampsia and Pregnancy-Related Hypertensive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hypertension during pregnancy and in particular, preeclampsia has changed dramatically over the last decade. During the last year (2014–15), several articles published in Hypertension have provided important insights into the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and its related complications1–38. In addition, Hypertension also published some key research communications that translated important basic science observations into the clinic. Some of these articles are briefly discussed, highlighting their significance to our understanding of the mechanism of the disease, to predict the disease and treat or prevent hypertension during pregnancy and other preeclampsia related complications. PMID:26693822

  1. Evidence-based chinese medicine for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM). Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go.

  2. Management of severe hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leslie A; Simpson, Lynn L; Rochelson, Burton

    2016-03-01

    While hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death in most of the world, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are the leading cause of maternal mortality in the United States. The opportunity to improve outcomes lies in timely and appropriate response to severe hypertension. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnostic criteria for severe hypertension, choice of antihypertensive agents, and recommended algorithms for evaluation and management of acute changes in clinical status. Adhering to standard practices ensures that care teams can timely and appropriate care to these high risk patients. With heightened surveillance and prompt evaluation of signs and symptoms of worsening hypertension, maternal morbidity and mortality can be decreased.

  3. The management of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-05-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders complicate 6% to 8% of pregnancies and cause significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The goal of treatment is to prevent significant cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the mother without compromising fetal well-being. Current guidelines differentiate between the treatment of women with acute hypertensive syndromes of pregnancy and women with preexisting chronic hypertension in pregnancy. This review will address the management of hypertension in pregnancy, review the various pharmacologic therapies, and discuss the future directions in this field.

  4. Mechanisms of obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lamounier-Zepter, V; Bornstein, S R; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M

    2004-06-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic problem in western societies, contributing to metabolic diseases, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Although the importance of obesity as a cause of hypertension is well established, the molecular basis of the relationship between obesity and increased blood pressure remains poorly understood. This brief review examines the association between obesity and hypertension along with the mechanisms proposed to explain this association, while presenting evidence of a direct causal effect of adipose tissue in the development of hypertension through the involvement of the adrenal cortex.

  5. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  6. Management of hypertension in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-09-01

    The treatment of hypertension on an outpatient basis should be approached in a systematic manner. The diagnosis of hypertension should always be verified first before treatment is initiated and, where indicated, a workup should be done. Lifestyle modifications should be considered in all patients with hypertension. Blood pressure can be brought to goal in the majority of patients if antihypertensive medications are correctly dosed or combined. As blood pressure is brought to goal in the patient with hypertension, ongoing attention should be directed to long-term adherence to therapy.

  7. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Venous Hypertension: Epidemiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Craig B; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common form of PH, defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≥15 mm Hg. PH-LHD development is associated with more severe left-sided disease and its presence portends a poor prognosis, particularly once right ventricular failure develops. Treatment remains focused on the underlying LHD and despite initial enthusiasm for PH-specific therapies, most studies have been disappointing and their routine clinical use cannot be recommended. More work is urgently needed to better understand the pathophysiology underlying this disease and to develop effective therapeutic strategies.

  8. Maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy regulates hydrogen sulfide-generating pathway and renal transcriptome to prevent prenatal N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced fetal programming of hypertension in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Chien-Te; Chan, Julie Y H; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-11-01

    Pregnancy is a critical time for fetal programming of hypertension. Nitric oxide deficiency during pregnancy causes hypertension in adult offspring. We examined whether maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy can prevent N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced fetal programming of hypertension in adult offspring. Next, we aimed to identify potential gatekeeper pathways that contribute to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester -induced programmed hypertension using the next generation RNA sequencing technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 4 groups: control, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester +melatonin, and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester+N-acetylcysteine. Pregnant rats received N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester administration at 60 mg/kg/d subcutaneously during pregnancy alone, with additional 0.01% melatonin in drinking water, or with additional 1% N-acetylcysteine in drinking water during the entire pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring (n=8/group) were killed at 12 weeks of age. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester exposure during pregnancy induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring, which was prevented by maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy. Protective effects of melatonin and N-acetylcysteine against N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced programmed hypertension were associated with an increase in hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes and hydrogen sulfide synthesis in the kidneys. Nitric oxide inhibition by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester in pregnancy caused >2000 renal transcripts to be modified during nephrogenesis stage in 1-day-old offspring kidney. Among them, genes belong to the renin-angiotensin system, and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways were potentially involved in the N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced programmed hypertension. However, melatonin and N-acetylcysteine reprogrammed the renin-angiotensin system and arachidonic acid pathway

  9. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, and Assessment of Risk of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kevin C; Benoit, Geneviève; Dionne, Janis; Feber, Janusz; Cloutier, Lyne; Zarnke, Kelly B; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M; Fournier, Anne

    2016-05-01

    We present the inaugural evidence-based Canadian recommendations for the measurement of blood pressure in children and the diagnosis and evaluation of pediatric hypertension. Rates of pediatric hypertension are increasing concomitant with increased rates of childhood obesity. With this, there is growing awareness of the need to measure blood pressure in children. Consequently, the present recommendations have been developed to address an important gap and improve the clinical care of children. For 2016, a total of 15 recommendations are presented. These are categorized in a fashion similar to that of the existing adult recommendations. Specifically, we present recommendations on (1) accurate measurement of blood pressure in children, (2) criteria for diagnosis of hypertension in children, (3) assessment of overall cardiovascular risk in hypertensive children, (4) routine laboratory tests for the investigation of children with hypertension, (5) ambulatory blood pressure measurement in children, and (6) the role of echocardiography. We discuss the rationale for the recommendations and present additional supporting material for the clinician, including tables with standardized techniques for blood pressure measurement and determination of normative blood pressure values for children. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will update the recommendations annually and develop future evidence-based recommendations to guide prevention and treatment of pediatric hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pre-hypertension and hypertension in college students in Kuwait: a neglected issue.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Hana T; Sadek, Ali A

    2012-05-01

    To determine the proportion of pre-hypertension and hypertension in college students in Kuwait and their related risk factors. A total of 803, randomly selected students aged 17 to 23 years (346 male, 457 female) from different colleges in Kuwait, were included in the study between 2009 and 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements were taken by trained personnel. Pre-hypertension was defined as systolic pressure between 120 and 139 mm Hg or diastolic pressure between 80 and 89 mm Hg. Risk factor measurements that were determined, included smoking, body mass index (BMI), and family history of hypertension. Blood samples were collected and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and lipid profile levels were determined. There were no hypotensive students. Normotensives constituted 53.5% (n = 430), pre-hypertensives formed 39.5% (n = 317), and hypertensive students comprised of 7% (n = 56). The overall proportions of hypertension and pre-hypertension were higher among male students (85.7 and 64.4%) than female students (14.3 and 35.6%), respectively. Hypertensive and pre-hypertensive students versus normotensive students had significantly higher levels of BMI-based obesity, smoking, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and IGT. Also, hypertensive and pre-hypertensive, compared to normotensive students, had significantly higher proportions (21.4, 18.3, and 4.0%, respectively) of risky high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level (< 1 mg / dL), cholesterol (7.1, 3.8, and 1.4%, respectively), and triglycerides (TG) (17.9, 9.1, and 7.9%, respectively) where p was< 0.001, 0.016, and 0.051, respectively. Hypertensive and pre-hypertensive students showed elevated levels of lipids and BMI-based obesity more than normotensive students. TG, HDL, HbA1c, and cholesterol appeared to influence pre-hypertension.

  11. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  12. Clinical Outcome of Hypertensive Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Lewkowicz, Deborah; Willermain, François; Relvas, Lia Judice; Makhoul, Dorine; Janssens, Sarah; Janssens, Xavier; Caspers, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To review the clinical outcome of patients with hypertensive uveitis. Methods. Retrospective review of uveitis patients with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) > 25 mmHg and >1-year follow-up. Data are uveitis type, etiology, viral (VU) and nonviral uveitis (NVU), IOP, and medical and/or surgical treatment. Results. In 61 patients, IOP values are first 32.9 mmHg (SD: 9.0), highest 36.6 mmHg (SD: 9.9), 3 months after the first episode 19.54 mmHg (SD: 9.16), and end of follow-up 15.5 mmHg (SD: 6.24). Patients with VU (n = 25) were older (50.6 y/35.7 y, p = 0.014) and had more unilateral disease (100%/72.22%  p = 0.004) than those with NVU (n = 36). Thirty patients (49.2%) had an elevated IOP before topical corticosteroid treatment. Patients with viral uveitis might have higher first elevated IOP (36.0/27.5 mmHg, p = 0,008) and maximal IOP (40.28/34.06 mmHg, p = 0.0148) but this was not significant when limited to the measurements before the use of topical corticosteroids (p = 0.260 and 0.160). Glaucoma occurred in 15 patients (24.59%) and was suspected in 11 (18.03%) without difference in viral and nonviral groups (p = 0.774). Conclusion. Patients with VU were older and had more unilateral hypertensive uveitis. Glaucoma frequently complicates hypertensive uveitis. Half of the patients had an elevated IOP before topical corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26504598

  13. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  14. Diuretics in primary hypertension - Reloaded.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sundeep

    Diuretics have long been cherished as drugs of choice for uncomplicated primary hypertension. Robust mortality and morbidity data is available for diuretics to back this strategy. Off-late the interest for diuretics has waned off perhaps due to availability of more effective drugs but more likely due to perceived lack of tolerance and side-effect profile of high-dose of diuretics required for mortality benefit. Low-dose diuretics particularly thiazide diuretics are safer but lack the mortality benefit shown by high-dose. However, indapamide and low dose chlorthalidone have fewer side-effects but continue to provide mortality benefit. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Hypertension and happiness across nations.

    PubMed

    Blanchflower, David G; Oswald, Andrew J

    2008-03-01

    In surveys of well-being, countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands emerge as particularly happy while nations like Germany and Italy report lower levels of happiness. But are these kinds of findings credible? This paper provides some evidence that the answer is yes. Using data on 16 countries, it shows that happier nations report systematically lower levels of hypertension. As well as potentially validating the differences in measured happiness across nations, this suggests that blood-pressure readings might be valuable as part of a national well-being index. A new ranking of European nations' GHQ-N6 mental health scores is also given.

  16. Genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, C Gregory

    2013-12-01

    Painstaking research led to the discovery of gene mutations responsible for heritable forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mutations in the gene BMPR2, which codes for a cell surface receptor (BMPRII), cause the approximately 80% of heritable cases of PAH. Less commonly mutations in ALK1, CAV1, ENG, and SMAD9, and newly discovered mutations in KCNK3, may cause heritable PAH. Other family members of many patients diagnosed with idiopathic PAH may be diagnosed with PAH. Genetic counseling and testing should be offered to patients diagnosed with heritable or idiopathic PAH.

  17. Capsule endoscopy in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Dell' Era, Alessandra; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; de Franchis, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Since the introduction of small bowel capsule endoscopy, and more recently of esophageal capsule endoscopy, these diagnostic tools have become available for the evaluation of the consequences of portal hypertension in the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. The main advantage of the esophageal and the small bowel capsule is the relatively less invasiveness that could potentially increase patients' adherence to endoscopic screening/surveillance programs. When esophageal capsule endoscopy was compared with traditional gastroscopy, it showed good sensitivity and specificity in recognizing the presence and the size of esophageal varices. However, the results are not consistent among studies, and more data are needed.

  18. Anti-oxidants show an anti-hypertensive effect in diabetic and hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Lefebvre, P J

    1991-12-01

    1. In this study an acute anti-hypertensive effect of three anti-oxidant agents (vitamin C, thiopronine and glutathione) in hypertensive subjects and in both hypertensive and non-hypertensive diabetic patients is reported. 2. The anti-oxidants had no effect on blood pressure in healthy normal subjects at a dose of 6 mmol, but thiopronine and glutathione produced a significant hypotensive effect at a dose of 12 mmol. 3. These data suggest that anti-oxidants might have a dilatatory effect and that an imbalance of the nitric oxide-free radical interaction might facilitate the development of hypertension in humans.

  19. Effectiveness and safety of 1 vs 4 h blood pressure profile with clinical and laboratory assessment for the exclusion of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a retrospective study in a university affiliated maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Carins, Thomas A; Hannigan, Yolanda; Bardien, Nadia; Shub, Alexis; Walker, Susan P

    2015-11-18

    We asked whether 60 compared with 240 min observation is sufficiently informative and safe for pregnancy day assessment (PDAC) of suspected pre-eclampsia (PE). A retrospective study of 209 pregnant women (475 PDAC assessments, 6 months) with routinely collected blood pressure (BP), symptom and laboratory information. We proposed a 60 min screening algorithm comprising: absence of symptoms, normal laboratory parameters and ≤1high-BP reading (systolic blood pressure, SBP 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure, DBP 90 mm Hg or higher). We also evaluated two less inclusive screening algorithms. We determined short-term outcomes (within 4 h): severe hypertension, proteinuric hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension, as well as long-term outcome: PE-related diagnoses up to the early puerperium. We assessed performance of alternate screening algorithms performance using 2×2 tables. 1 in 3 women met all screen negative criteria at 1 h. Their risk of hypertension requiring treatment in the next 3 h was 1.8% and of failing to diagnose proteinuric hypertensive PE at 4 h was 5.1%. If BP triggers were 5 mm Hg lower, 1 in 6 women would be screen-negative of whom 1.1% subsequently develops treatment-requiring hypertension and 4.5% demonstrate short-term proteinuric hypertension. We present sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratios for alternate screening algorithms. We endorse further research into the safest screening test where women are considered for discharge after 60 min. Safety, patient and staff satisfaction should be assessed prospectively. Any screening test should be used in conjunction with good clinical care to minimise maternal and perinatal hazards of PE. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Diagnostic status of hypertension on the adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Andrade, Flavia C D

    2016-12-01

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is a widely recommended diet for individuals with hypertension. Adherence to the DASH diet has been shown to be effective for controlling hypertension, but it is unclear whether a hypertension diagnosis has an impact on adherence to the diet and nutrient intake. This study examined the association between hypertension diagnosis and the DASH nutrient intake using the multivariate linear regression method. The sample was composed of individuals with hypertension in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2007 to 2012. The outcome was the DASH accordance score (0 to 9 points), which measures the intake of nine nutrients compared to target amounts. Study findings indicate that a diagnostic status of hypertension was associated with increased consumption of sodium, saturated fat, total fat, and protein. Adherence to the DASH diet was more likely to be associated with health conditions such as obesity and heart diseases and lifestyle behaviors such as current smoking status and physical activity. Individuals diagnosed with hypertension showed less adherence to the DASH diet than those not diagnosed with hypertension, so a diagnosis of hypertension did not seem to provide an incentive to engage in healthy dietary behavior. Overall, regardless of diagnostic status, individuals with hypertension did not seem to follow the DASH guidelines.

  1. Comparative epidemiology of resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease and the general hypertensive population.

    PubMed

    Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Georgianos, Panagiotis I; Zebekakis, Pantelis E

    2014-01-01

    Until a few years ago, information regarding the epidemiology of resistant hypertension was obtained from indirect sources, such as cross-sectional studies on hypertension control in large cohorts from tertiary hypertension centers and outcome trials in hypertension. During the past 3 years, however, large population-based studies have provided direct epidemiologic data on resistant hypertension and estimated its prevalence at 8% to 12% of adult patients with hypertension. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), in particular, has been long considered a frequent underlying cause of resistant hypertension, however, recently, direct epidemiologic data for this entity in patients with CKD were brought to light again, suggesting an even higher prevalence of resistant hypertension (approximately 20%-35%) among such individuals. Furthermore, recent prospective cohort studies have suggested incident resistant hypertension to be associated with increased cardiovascular and renal risk in both the general hypertensive population and patients with CKD. This article discusses currently available data on epidemiology of resistant hypertension, providing a comparative overview of its prevalence, incidence, and prognosis in these two populations.

  2. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  4. Value of retinal examination in hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, F; van Montfrans, G A; van den Born, B J H

    2010-04-01

    The presence of grade III or IV hypertensive retinopathy (HRP) is considered to distinguish hypertensive urgencies from emergencies. However, case-reports suggest that these retinal changes may be lacking in patients with hypertensive encephalopathy. To assess the frequency of grade III and IV retinopathy in this hypertensive emergency, we conducted a retrospective cohort study. We retrieved 162 patients with malignant hypertension and 34 patients (17%) fulfilled the predefined criteria for hypertensive encephalopathy. Data on retinal examination were incomplete for 6 patients (18%), thus leaving 28 patients who were analysed for the presence or absence of grade III and IV HRP. In 9 (32%) patients with hypertensive encephalopathy, grade III or IV HRP was absent, 11 (39%) patients presented with grade III and 8 (29%) patients with grade IV retinopathy. Patients without retinal abnormalities were on average 13 years younger (P=0.05), more often black (P=0.02) and displayed lower blood pressure (BP) values (P=0.04 for systolic and diastolic BP). A substantial proportion of patients with hypertensive encephalopathy lack grade III or IV HRP. This suggests that the decision to admit these patients should not only rely on the presence of grade III and IV retinopathy alone, but should also include a careful neurological examination.

  5. Hypertensive encephalopathy complicating transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, R. J.; Bewick, M.; Trafford, J. A.; Parsons, V.

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old female diabetic patient developed hypertensive encephalopathy with gross neurological abnormalities complicating renal artery stenosis of her transplant kidney. The elevated blood pressure was unresponsive to medical treatment. Surgical correction of the stenoses in the renal artery cured the hypertension and renal failure and led to the patient's complete recovery. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6377286

  6. Secondary hypertension: the ways of management.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gian P; Seccia, Teresa M; Pessina, Achille C

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of secondary hypertension is lower than that of primary (essential) hypertension, but it is likely that it has been underestimated because appropriate tests were not generally performed. Hence, before embarking on a search for secondary hypertension physicians are generally advised to select populations of patients with a high pre-test probability of secondary forms of hypertension in order to maximize the positive predictive value and the gain in "ruling in" of the diagnostic tests. Based on updated information on prevalence and pathophysiology we herein critically review the general diagnostic strategy and the management of the main forms of secondary hypertension. In particular, strategies for identifying primary aldosteronism, the most frequent form of endocrine secondary hypertension, and for determining its unilateral or bilateral causes are discussed in details, because of the differences of treatment that requires adrenalectomy in the unilateral forms and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade in the bilateral forms. The tests available for the diagnosing pheochromocytoma (pheo), which is much rarer but extremely important to identify, as it can be fatal if unrecognized are also discussed, with emphasis on the recent developments in genetic testing. Renovascular hypertension is also a common curable form of hypertension, which should be identified as early as possible to avoid the onset of cardiovascular target organ damage and events, is also discussed.

  7. Inflammation in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Pende, Aldo; Quercioli, Alessandra; Mach, François

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the huge amount of research recently performed in this area, the pathogenesis of human hypertension remains elusive. Thus, hypertension has to be defined as "essential" for the majority of patients with high blood pressure. Given the lack of animal models useful to investigate essential hypertension, we analyze and discuss both clinical and basic research studies indicating that essential hypertension should be considered as a potential multifactorial inflammatory disease. The pathophysiology of essential hypertension might result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Morphological abnormalities in the renal parenchyma and arteries have also been shown to determine hypertension. Inflammatory processes might induce renal vasoconstriction, ischemia and injury that can sustain systemic hypertension. Arterial and tubulointerstitial infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to renal damage might further increase renal and vascular alterations through the production of oxidants and other soluble inflammatory mediators. The present review gives an update regarding the latest research on the possible direct role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension.

  8. [Severe hypertension: definition and patients profiles].

    PubMed

    Mourad, Jean-Jacques

    2013-05-01

    Severe arterial hypertension gathers relatively different clinical situations explained by the heterogeneity of the definitions of this clinical setting. From a medical point of view, severe hypertension is a short course situation defined by very high values of blood pressure corresponding to grade 3 hypertension. In France, until 2011, the social security also included in the definition of severe HTA chronic situations characterized by moderate blood pressure values requiring at least triple anthihypertensive therapies associated with a clinical or infraclinical target organ damages. These clinical profiles, much more frequent than grade 3 hypertension, allowed the full reimbursement of care costs for these patients. In France, it is estimated that 10% of hypertensive patients present a severe form with an annual incidence of 50,000 patients. The patients with severe hypertension have an increased cardiovascular morbidity justifying a closer clinical monitoring. From an economic point of view, these severe forms of hypertension have a higher cost of care, explained primarily by a more frequent need of specialized referrals, radiological exams and hospitalizations. This excess cost justified the existence of a full coverage of induced costs by the social security, since the incidence of severe hypertension is more frequent in the low social categories, and in patients with economic fragility.

  9. Thallium-201 stress imaging in hypertensive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, D.S.; Francis, C.K.; Black, H.R.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-07-01

    To assess the potential effect of hypertension on the results of thallium-201 stress imaging in patients with chest pain, 272 thallium-201 stress tests performed in 133 hypertensive patients and 139 normotensive patients over a 1-year period were reviewed. Normotensive and hypertensive patients were similar in age, gender distribution, prevalence of cardiac risk factors (tobacco smoking, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus), medications, and clinical symptoms of coronary disease. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy were present in 16 hypertensive patients. Stepwise probability analysis was used to determine the likelihood of coronary artery disease for each patient. In patients with mid to high likelihood of coronary disease (greater than 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 54 of 60 (90%) hypertensive patients compared with 51 of 64 (80%) normotensive patients. However, in 73 patients with a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 21 patients (29%) of the hypertensive group compared with only 5 of 75 (7%) of the normotensive patients (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in patients with a mid to high likelihood of coronary artery disease, coexistent hypertension does not affect the results of thallium-201 exercise stress testing. However, in patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, abnormal thallium-201 stress images are obtained more frequently in hypertensive patients than in normotensive patients.

  10. Hypertension. Part 1: How Exercise Helps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews possible mechanisms by which exercise lowers blood pressure and discusses research which indicates exercise is an effective therapy for hypertension. The article presents information to help physicians counsel hypertensive patients wanting to start an exercise program and examines the use of exercise testing to predict the onset of…

  11. Minority Barbers Screen Customers for Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Margaret V.

    1989-01-01

    Offering hypertension screening within the Black community in a convenient, nonthreatening environment can aid in reduction of morbidity and mortality attributable to high blood pressure in Black men. This article describes a successful pilot program which used volunteer barbers to perform on-site hypertension screening for their customers. (IAH)

  12. Pulmonary hypertension associated with thalassemia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Machado, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hemolytic anemia has increasingly been identified as an important risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Within the thalassemia syndromes, there are multiple mechanisms, both distinct and overlapping, by which pulmonary hypertension develops and that differ among β-thalassemia major or intermedia patients. Pulmonary hypertension in β-thalassemia major correlates with the severity of hemolysis, yet in patients whose disease is well treated with chronic transfusion therapy, the development of pulmonary hypertension can be related to cardiac dysfunction and the subsequent toxic effects of iron overload rather than hemolysis. β-thalassemia intermedia, on the other hand, has a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension owing to the low level of hemolysis that exists over years without the requirement for frequent transfusions, while splenectomy is shown to play an important role in both types. Standard therapies such as chronic transfusion have been shown to mitigate pulmonary hypertension, and appropriate chelation therapy can avoid the toxic effects of iron overload, yet is not indicated in many patients. Limited evidence exists for the use of pulmonary vasodilators or other therapies, such as l-carnitine, to treat pulmonary hypertension associated with thalassemia. Here we review the most recent findings regarding the pathogenic mechanisms, epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in thalassemia syndromes. PMID:27008311

  13. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  14. Hypertension management: the primary care nursing role.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2005-03-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic illness that is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Practice nurses and the district nursing team have a major role to play in its management. In this article, current British Hypertension Society guidelines are presented and discussed with regards to their evidence base. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.

  15. Benign intracranial hypertension: diagnosis and conservative management.

    PubMed

    Theisler, C W

    1986-03-01

    The clinical features of benign intracranial hypertension are described. Pathological components are discussed and are contrasted against the current theoretical model of pain production in benign intracranial hypertension. Diagnosis and associated conditions are discussed from a review of the literature, and conservative management is outlined.

  16. Hypertension. Part 1: How Exercise Helps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews possible mechanisms by which exercise lowers blood pressure and discusses research which indicates exercise is an effective therapy for hypertension. The article presents information to help physicians counsel hypertensive patients wanting to start an exercise program and examines the use of exercise testing to predict the onset of…

  17. Minority Barbers Screen Customers for Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Margaret V.

    1989-01-01

    Offering hypertension screening within the Black community in a convenient, nonthreatening environment can aid in reduction of morbidity and mortality attributable to high blood pressure in Black men. This article describes a successful pilot program which used volunteer barbers to perform on-site hypertension screening for their customers. (IAH)

  18. Comment on autogenic training and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sakai, M; Sato, T; Takeichi, M; Fakunishi, I

    1997-06-01

    We comment on a report by Watanabe, et al. regarding the effects of autogenic training on hypertension. Using previous reports in the United States, we mention methodological problems on how to evaluate the effects of autogenic training and express our hope that they would provide further research to clarify the effects of autogenic training on hypertension.

  19. [Pertussis infection and fatal pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Menif, K; Bouziri, A; Khaldi, A; Hamdi, A; Belhadj, S; Benjaballah, N

    2010-11-01

    Pertussis is ranked among the leading causes of childhood mortality. The most catastrophic clinical complication of pertussis in infants, intractable pulmonary hypertension with shock, is not very well known. We describe the clinical course of a fatal case of severe pertussis complicated by refractory pulmonary hypertension and shock in a 2-month-old infant. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Prevention and treatment of postpartum hypertension.

    PubMed

    Magee, L; Sadeghi, S

    2005-01-25

    Postpartum blood pressure (BP) is highest three to six days after birth when most women have been discharged home. A significant rise in BP may be dangerous (e.g., lead to stroke), but there is little information about how to prevent or treat postpartum hypertension. To assess the relative benefits and risks of interventions to: (1) prevent postpartum hypertension, by assessing whether 'routine' postpartum administration of oral antihypertensive therapy is better than placebo/no treatment; and(2) treat postpartum hypertension, by assessing whether (i) oral antihypertensive therapy is better than placebo/no therapy for mild-moderate postpartum hypertension; and (ii) one antihypertensive agent offers advantages over another for mild-moderate or severe postpartum hypertension. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (March 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2003), EMBASE (1980 to January 2003), bibliographies of retrieved papers and personal files. For women with antenatal hypertension, trials comparing a medical intervention with placebo/no therapy. For women with postpartum hypertension, trials comparing one antihypertensive with either another or placebo/no therapy. We extracted the data independently and were not blinded to trial characteristics or outcomes. We contacted authors for missing data when possible. Six trials are included. Three trials (315 women; six comparisons) compared furosemide or nifedipine capsules with placebo/no therapy. There are insufficient data for conclusions about possible benefits and risks of these management strategies. Most outcomes included data from only one trial. No trial reported severe maternal hypertension or breastfeeding. In two trials (106 women; three comparisons), oral timolol or hydralazine were compared with oral methyldopa for treatment of mild to moderate postpartum hypertension. In one trial (38 women; one comparison), oral hydralazine plus sublingual nifedipine were compared with sublingual